BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Nov 6, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0345015.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0345015.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0345015-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0345015-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0345015-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0345015-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0345015-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0345015-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0345015-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0345015.ris

Full Text

Array THE
W9
/.-x
'INDUSTRIAL UNITY:  STKBNGTH.
OFFICIAL PAPBB:
COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
?BB:  VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FBDBRATION OF LABOR.. ^^. POLITICAL UNITT: TIOTttlf I
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 187.
VANCOUVER, B. C., pHDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1914.
CcRCST)   IliW PER YEAB
PRESEN^lAST
M
/DeL W. R. Trotter Reviews
Proceedings of St John
Convention
{[Report Well Received and
Good Work of Congress
Appreciated *
At last night's meeting ef the
(Trades and Labor council W. B. Trot-
'Iter presented'his report aB delegato to
I the St. John's eonvention of the Trades
(and Labor congress of Canada.  Though
I somewhat  belated, owing to the
[forced  absence   of  Mr. Trotter, The
Federationist feels justified in repro
II during it in full, as a matter of record
I for the unionists of British Columbia,
I Who arc especially interested in the
f work 'of the congress owing to the'fact
: that its 1915 convention is to be held
J'.in Vancouver.   The report reads:
The thirtieth annual convention of
Lithe Trades and Labor congress of Can-
It ada began its deliberations on Septem-
■ ber 21st in the city of St. John, New
| Brunswick, and adjourned on September 26th, to meet next year in the city
I of Vancouver.
The industrial conditions throughout
lithe dominion had caused some anxiety
las to how the various unions would re-
lepond to the call, and there is consid-
I arable satisfaction in recording that
1.147 credentials were forwarded and
■that 135 delegates were actually in at
lltendance. The fact that the western
[section of the country has probably
■ been the hardest hit by the untoward
{conditions together with the distance
Ito be travelled, was responsible for the
■very much reduced western delegation,
[there being only thirteen from the
west including Winnipeg.
Of the 147 credentials received, two
Were from fraternal delegates—one
Krom a provincial federation of labor,
[seventeen from international representatives, twenty-three from trades councils and 104 from local unions. While
she total number of delogates was be-
ow the figures of recent years, the delegation was thoroughly representative
'rom a geographical standpoint and
packed nothing but numbers compared
"*i any standard of previous years.
Resolutions
The advantage gained by the resolution paaaed laat year at Montreal which
ailed for resolutions to-be in the
•ids of the secretary ten days prior
i the eonvention, was early apparent,
he resolutions committee was enabled
i meet one day before the regular seems and was ready to report at the
truing session on Tuesdny—two days
ead of previous custom. Tho fact
hat a two-thirds vote of tho convention
l/as necessary to introduce any additional resolutions deterred the working
■fi tbe. incubator on minor resolutions,
lad gave time for a fuller and freer
llscussion of major issues which has
■sen deplorably lacking at many pre-
' is assemblies. Tho resolutions this
r numbered 70 as compared with 120
i Montreal last year.
[ There was a smaller crop than usual
: resolutions pertaining to particular
tBdea. Among those adopted were two
Resented by the Vancouver locnl of
lailway carmen, one calling for leglaln
■ion making it compulsory for two men
lo be sent to certain defined classes of
work where at present it is the allegedly dangerouB custom to employ one.
{.nd the other callt'g f.>r the certified
Inspection of air-brakes on railway
ara.
Street railwaymen secured Buppor
ior a proposition to extend the slx-dav
aw for Ontario to other provinces;
lompulsory thirty dnys training of mo-
lormen and conductors-one week of this
■ime to be spent in the- motor shop
lind, as a measure of public safety, the
lirohibition of running street cars wi.
pnly one attendant.
I Bakers sought the prohibition nf Sunday wirk in the province of (Juehw
Inachinists   and   boilermakers desired
no further assistanoe be federal!'
riven to the 0. T. P. until that com
made a satisfactory   settlement
[with   its   shopmen; and moulders in
Ontario wanted the appointment of a
moulders foundry inspector, nnd quoted
the good results from such an appointment in the province of Quebec.
J Longshoremen drew attention   to   n
federal bill introduced at last session
J parliament dealing   with   merchant
Shipping, and the executive committee
pas instructed to seek the addition of
1 olause providing for afflclont inspection of loading and unlonding mnchln-
Iry the provision of rails upon and nets
fnder gangways, etc., also to havo all
nbsldlzed shipping   companios   come
Hthin the operation of tho dominion
Ur wages regulations.
! Letter-carriers urged the need for a
half-holiday   during  summer
 _ and secured the congress' en-
lorsatlon of this and also that superlactation be granted to letter-carriers
Fter twenty-five yeara service.
.Note was taken of the abolition In
janada of the ubo of white phosphor-
i in the manufacture of matches, and
fetter inspection of white   lead   and
[it-product factories will be urged. In
"is connection a resolution was adopt-
requesting that the dominion conization commission   include   occupa-
nal diseases among its subjects of
warch and suggest relief and reme-
i for same.
Lemleux Aet.
-he Lemieux act received its quota
' attention in resolutions, this time
[the hands of the   commercial   tele-
Shers.   As certain amendments are
ing and the executive is already
rooted in regard to same the atti-
i of the congress remains unaltered
jet is, that tha act   be   suitably
jeaded or repealed.
Five or six resolutions dealing with
[unsatisfactory administration of the
ll fair wages regulations were de-
,„ in the presence of the minister
Mor, who tfrjved on tht TmtAJ
and spent two days in attendance at
the convention.   '
From three different sources came resolutions denouncing the operation, of
private detective agencies, the employees of which were described as being
chiefly of criminal' and undesirable
classes, and the executive is instructed,
together with provincial executives, to
seek for government control of all detective agencies, which would mean the
abolition of the private agency.
Two resolutions; by the carpenters
and the cigarmakers, sought legal protection for union labels and the executive is instructed to make another attempt along those lines.
The principle of compulsory voting at
public elections waa endorsed aa was
also the extension of the franchise to
women on equal terms
Several corporations having adopted
the system of deducting insurance premiums from workmen's wages, legal
protection against this will be sought.
Considerable discussion waa evoked
by what was held to be unfair discrimination by musicians' unions against
other unions at Labor day parades, and
a somewhat bitter resolution waa substituted by a recommendation that the
executive committee confer with the
officers of the American Federation of
Musicians in regard to the whole question
Constitutional Amendments
*A number of constitutional amend-
CONTRACTOR OBT8
AWAY AND PAHS TO
PAT BIS VICTIMS
Mail advices from members of
th* Minen' union at Stewart, B. 0.,
Indicate that tha Industrial crista
haa alio reached that far north.
Moit of tha members of Portland
Miners'union are Idle and th» prospects for tha winter ar* vary
punk. To add to thtlr troubles a
number of wage-workers ther* w*r*
recently swindled ont of thilr
wages, after working for a contractor who built a wharf for the provincial government, dr*w down Ml
money ud toft for Mexico, leaving
ttae victims who did tta* work to
shift for themielvei aa b*M ttoy
could. Ths only consolation for the
victims seems to b* that • f*w mu-
chants war* alio pinched In tta*
flimflam, ud thli may remit ln u
Inquiry as to why tba government
lets contract! to irresponsible men
and makes no provision for thi protection of thon who actually famish the supplies ud do ttae work.
EXECUTIVES OT I
LC.OFC.TOMEET
Will Hold Important Conference in Philadelphia on
Saturday Next
ments, all presumably emanating from
the New Brunswick Federation of Labor, were almost unanimously defeated.
One sought the permanent provision of
a lobbyist at the New Brunswick legislature; anotbeOr to increase the executive committee by adding a vice-president from eaoh province; ahd still another which sought to make the office of
secretary-treasurer a permanent full-
time office. A proposition that provincial vice-presidents be brought to the
convention at congress expense was also
defeated.
A resolution in favor of daily printed proceedings was defeated on the
ground that officers' reports and all resolutions were now printed previous to
the convention for distribution, and it
was agreed that amended or additional
resolutions and also organisers' reports
should be printed in future for distribu
tion to delegates the following day.
President's Report
Tho various officers' reporte were
one of tho features of the convention.
Thnt of President Watters, as parliamentary representative) occupied ten
closely printed pages and related to
matters effecting tl)e workers which
were dealt with at last session. The
eight-hour bill, use of armed men by
private corporations, semi-monthly payment of wages on railways, amendments
to the Lemieux aet, revision of elections act, amendments to railway act,
old age pensions, and federal labor bureaus or exchanges are among the subjects dealt with and in connection with
which legislation is pending or sought
and to whioh the president has devoted
considerable time. As to old age and
mothers' pensions, two statements by
the chairman of the select committee which has amassed evidence on this
subject are worth repeating as showing
how that committee has been affected
by the testimony submitted. Speaking
to the house of commons, Mr. Burnham
stated: "The testimony obtained by
the committee iB absolutely unblemished, and that testimony, taken from all
over tbe country, is overwhelmingly in
favor of an old age peneion system for
Canada. I have no hesitation in saying
that if the matter comes to an argument, any objection to an old age pension system would not have a ghost of
n show." In another place he stated
that "experience has shown that no
matter what else we may do, at all haz'
nrds and with the least possible delay-
railways or no railways—we ought to'
provide some means for assisting mothers who are left widows with very small
children."
Vice-president's Report.
An individual report was this year
submitted by Vice-president Bancroft,
giving in detail, over eighteen pages,
his experiences as representative at the
Ontario legislature, dealing more specifically with the new workmen's compensation act of that province. This re
port will prove a valuable handbook in
other provinces where up-to-date workmen's compensation legislation Is to be
sought. Besides this act, legislation was
also obtained which makes Ontario the
third province in Canada to prohibit
the employment of white girls by Chin-
Tho hours of children in the canning Industry were by law reduced from
ten to eight; an aot passed giving municipalities power to acquire land within
five miles of any city for the erection
of workmen's dwellings and a bill promoted by retailers to enable them to
garnishee wages to the extent of fifty
per cent, of same, was defeated. The
present law only allows a garnishee on
wages in excess of 425 per week.
[To be concluded next week.]
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE
Encouraging Progreu Being Made ud
All Ward Bub-committees Buiy.
The parliamentary committee of the
Trades and Labor council held another
encouraging meeting on Wednesday
evoning. The ward sub-committees reported progress in almost every Instance. In ward v. the committee were
reluctantly compelled to report the de-
clinntion of Fred. Hoover as an alder-
manic candidate, because of unforeseen
difficulties which have arisen since last
meeting, which will necessitate the
choice of another, and this the commit-
too hope to do by next Wednesday
night's meeting. In ward vll. the committee submitted the name of A. V.
Lofting, 2601 Trinity atreet, recording
secretary of the Street Railway Employees ' union, which was endorsed and
the subcommittee instructed to proceed
with a nomination meeting in the ward
at the earliest possible date. Ex-presi-
dent Walker was named as chairman of
ward ii. and requested to arrange for
placing a candidate in that ward if investigation warranted auch action.
Good progress was reported from South
Vancouver, where it Is expected that a
full labor ticket, from the reeve down,
will be placed in the contest. For park
commissioner a couple of names were
suggested and the ward it. subcommittee reported that as yet they had
been unable to find a suitable candidate, who possessed the property quali
ficatlons. The committee decided to
meet hereafter every Wednesday evening.
Ouelph,   Ont.,   Trades   and   Labor
Council is considering a proposal to buy
BTREET RAILWAY EMPLOYEES
Reduction of Service ud Forces Presents Difficult Problems
Local officers of the Street Railway
Employees' union are kept busy looking
after the interests of their membership
these days. The reduction of operating
fores has caused a number of complaints in the matter of seniority, which
are being adjusted as rapidly as possible. Traffic seems to be steadily decreasing, a reflex of local conditions,
and the prospects for the winter are
not particularly bright. The boys are
holding together well and doing everything possible to assist the junior employees, by "dividing up" the work.
Discrimination Against Whites
Complaints are reaclUng officers of
the Trades and Labor council that the
timber for the new federal government
wharf is being largely supplied by a
sawmill which employs Orientals almost
exclusively, while other mills, manned
with local white residents, are working
short time. The matter will be looked
into and the eentral labor body asked
to take action.
Internationa) Presidentsand
Canadian delegates WlU
Also Participate
OTTAWA, Bi C, Nov. 5.-(Spe-
dial to The FederaUoiiirt)—On
tuggeition bf Preiident Oomperi,
a conf««noowiti be held on Saturday, November 14th, of the executive council* of the American Fed
eration of Labor, Tradei and labor congreu of Canada, international preiidenta, and Canadian
delegate! to the Philadelphia convention. Amendment! to the Lemieux aot and other Canadian labor legislation will be discuued.
All the executive of Tradei; and
Labor congreu will be preient
An Ontario By-election
In the by-election in West Hamilton,
the fight will be waged probably between labor and conservative candidates only. Mayor Allan is the present
choice of the conservatives, but it is
rumored that another conservative may
be nominated. The independent labor
people have not decided on their repre:
sentative. W. R. Hollo, Sam Landers
and Aid. Walters are mentioned.—Toronto Lance.
Will Cry the Sword.
.'. Oarland Foster, for the past six
yeara managing editor of the Nelson
Daily News, has decided to drop the
pen and try the Bword. He will be
among the second contingent to take
part in the European rumpus.
SASKATOON WILL
BID POR CONORISS
1916 OONVBNTION
Saskatoon Tradee ■' ind Ubor
councU, some time ago expwusj
itself u of tto opinion thit tto
1916 convention of ttae Tradee lad
Labor congress of Canada wu
about do* In that quarter, tt* congreaa never having held a convention ln tto province of Saskatche- .
wu. According to advlcoi received
by tto ctaalrmu of tto local con-
gnu committee ttl agitation la
now assuming definite form. A
•pedal boosting commltte* U being
arranged for ud u iffort will to
made to md a fall guota of delegates to tt* Vancouver convention
nut September for the purpose of
landing the big labor meet. Naturally enough ttae Saskatoon central
labor tody expects to'to genuinely
supported ln lti bid for the convention by all ths otter prairie labor organisations.    ,
'SAFETY rntBT!'
Bend-off to Marsden 0. Scott.
The friends, especially those in the
printing trades, bf Marsden 0. Scott,
former president of Typographical union; No. 6, who was elected president of
the International Typographical union
to succeed .Tamos M. Lynch, now Btate
labor commissioner, tendered him a reception and dinner ae a send-off before
he left for headquartera of the I. T. U.
at Indianapolics. '.Scott has been president of No. 0 for. three terms altogether, filling this position in 1001 and 1002,
as well as last year. Be has made a
good record for executive ability as
president of No. 6, and in spite of the
business depression of last year succeeded In building up the membership
of the union. Among those who were
present at the reception and dinner
were: President Gompers of the American Federation of Labor; Labor Commissioner Lynch, Samuol B.. Donnelly,
former president of No. 6, later public
printer and now secretary of the
Building Trades Employers' association; John W. Hays, secretary of the I.
T. IT.; Don 0. Belts, manager of the
New York World, and many others, including the officers and many members
of No. 6.—Ne* Yorf Dally Call.
Any mother can tell you that her boy
learns to swear from the Other Children in the neighborhood.
Cautious Policy of Vancouvtr Labor
Temple Oompuy Justified
If some of the local unionists who
eould not see their way clear to invest
their savings in Vaneouvar Labor Temple Company, limited, shares, but who
were enamored with the opportunities
presented by various trust, brokerage
and oil companies, had. to make their
choice anew they would trust themselves and their own concerns. The
walla of a number of the victims of
local collapses are not pleasant, but
the object lesson is one that might be
borne in mind by those who seem to
think the labor temple company ahould
pay dividends, with money whieh sound
business policy demands should be used
for the liquidation of capital account
in the shape of building fund mortgage.
The policy of the Vancouver Labor
Temple Co., Ltd., directors has been
"safety first," where the flnanclal interests of their shareholders have been
concerned. The wisdom of this policy
and the advisability of its continuance
should be apparent to any one with
enough intelligence to read, of the daily
bankruptcy of many business concerns
whioh have been looked upon aa being
"as good aa the bank."
To Honor A. F. of la.
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 31.—Mayor
Blankonburg has signed an ordinance
appropriating 125,000 for defraying expenses to honor the thirty-fourth annual
convention of the American Federation
of Labor. A large delegation of local
trades unionists were present when the
mayor's signature made the act law.—
A. F. of L. News-letter.
Say Libor Saved Honey
A saving of more than 110,000 waa
estimated to have been effected by the
use of day labor on the China Crank
and Canoe Creek trunk sewers by the
joint sewerage commission, according to
a report placed before the board yesterday morning by Chairman Frank
Bowser.
•i»!»ef?rf'l»fe»rtfii>J'lei
Give the Children a Chance
Parents who have children attending the Vancouver city schools, and who do not wish
to see them grow up tainted with the poison of race hatred, will be well advised to cautiously
question them as to what they are being told about the war. Also what they are not being
told about it. The necessity for this has been made plain by a news item which appeared in
the Daily Province of October 28th. It contains an account of some of the children in one
of the schools refusing to sing a song whioh thoy were being taught, because it was by a German composer. In another school a selection used, was sung to music by Beethoven, and the
boys refused to sing it when they discovered! the nationality of the composer.
If men behaved in that way, it would be said that they were childish, and narrow-
minded. And that a genius whose work had endeared him'to music-lovers the world over,
had long since been lifted far above and beyond the narrow limits of nationalism, by the surpassing quality of his art. That is the place which Beethoven occupies in the minds of all
men of breadth and tolerance. They could no more think of the Moonlight Sonata being the
exclusive property of one nation, than they could of Home Sweet Home, or Shakespeare's
plays, or Grimm's fairy tales. Such things have an universal appeal to the artistic instinct of
all men and women, no matter where they were born. That is to say, all men and women with
minds bigger than those of mice, and who do not belong to that detestable typo which thinks
that the world only revolves as the result of resolutions passed at a meeting held round the
Only to men and women who aro big enough to rise above such pitiful parochialism
should the education of children be entrusted. It depends upon them, in a large measure, to
offset the pcrnicibus effect of that teaching which imbues the coming men and women of tM
race with the idea that their kind in other countries are to be looked upon with more or lest
scorn, just according to the frame of mind in whieh international diplomats may happen*
be in. But reading the account of the incidents to which attention is here drawn, it is apparent that at least one of our local educators is sadly in need of a little real education himself.
In the article referred to he is credited thus:
Mr. Qeorge P. Hicks, supervisor of singing in the city schools, has during the past
few days been muoh impressed with the spirit of loyalty of Vancouver's school-children. On two occasions he has seen the children go on strike against the singing of
German songs.
Having thus shewed his weakness before the children, who knew no better because they
had not been taught, he completely surrendered himself and came down to the level of their
immature intelligence, for: IMLWIIJMjIH*1 »
Again Mr. Hicks did not press the matter and later acknowledged that it gave him
a good deal of satisfaction to see how deep-rooted was the sentiment of loyalty
on the part of the children. IMMM>H'-r4*. r
What Mr. Hicks chooses to call loyalty in this case, is nothing more than the seeds of
what in future years becomes the racial animosity which makes such a war as is now going
on, possible. The British press is persistently assuring its own people, and the world in
general, that there is no quarrel with the common people of Germany, but that the flght is
solely against the Kaiser and his military bureaucracy. If that is true—and, presumably Mr.
Hicks believes it is—then he had a real man's chance to point that out to those boys and girls.
Instead of that he allowed their youthful mistake to pass by, and to become embedded in
their plastic minds, from whence it may some day come forth again, making them the unwitting and hayless tools of the war-mongers of the future.
In the children, one can understand the mistake. But the deliberate cnoouragement
of such things by a teacher, should serve as a warning to all intelligent parents who hope
better things for their children than to have them end their days killing workmen like
themselves, because they were not taught those truths which will save the world in the future
from such horrors as are now going on in Europe. One of the oldest, strongest, and moat
subtly organized institution the world has ever seen, has for one of its maxims this: "Give
us the ohild, and we shall not fear for the man." There is a wealth of wisdom in it, distilled
from ages of experience, and those who would have an end to war, its cauiet, and subsequent
misery, will do well to ponder upon its meaning. J. W. W.
CENTRAL LABOR BODY
Held Buy ieaHon Latt Evening aad
Heard Muy Oommlttee Reports
Laat night's meeting of Vanoouver
Trades and Labor council waa fairly
well attended, with President MeVety
in the chair and all executive membera
present. Routine buslneas and the hearing of committee reporte took np the
greater part of the evening's session,
rhe question of unemployment figured
largely in moat of tto reports.
Four aew delegatee were seated from
the Btreet Railway Employees', Tailora'
and Molders' unlona.
A letter from the secretary of Victoria Trades and Labor couneil, in re
the Oillings sedition cue, waa read. Inasmuch aa Oillings had since enlisted,
the letter wu flled.
A circular-letter from tke Civic Reform association, in re the municipal
elections, wu read md referred to the
parliamentary commltte*.
Delegate J. B. Wilton, secretary of
the parliamentary committee, reported
progress in the plan to plwe aldermanlc candidate! in .the field nt the
forthcoming municipal elections. He
urged the delegatee, in their respective
unions, to assist the committeo by
bringing to their attention worthy material for candldatea, who alio possess
property qualifications.
Delegate W. R. Trotter presented his
report, as the council'a representative
at the St. John convention of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada.
It was received and the thanks of the
council unanimously tendered for the
splendid work done, including the securing of the 1815 eonvention.
Delegate Miss Outterldge reported
upon the work being accomplished by
the recently ■ organised Women's Employment league. A large number of
women were atlll unprovided for, bnt
the league wu doing lta beat to cope
with the situation—along lines already
reported in The Federationist.
Vlce-prealdent Estinghausen took the
chair while President MeVety reported,
covering his activities on the elvie war
relief fund committee. Over 500 eases
had been dealt with no to yesterday'a
session. The personnel of the seeond
contingent went to prove that many
married men were enlisting for no other reaaon than that they and their families were in want and the men were
willin? to sacrifice their lives ln order
to provide for their wives and kiddies.
Delegate Walker of tKe Cooks, Waiters and Waitresses' union, reported that
they were endeavoring to institute a
six-day week for their membership.
ITpon motion of Delegates Pettipiece
and Kilpatriek, a speelal committee waa
appointed to arrange for a fitting commemoration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Trades and Labor council,
on December ' 5th. The committee
named were: Delegates Brooks, Mala-
cord. -Tunes, Bartley and Burkhart.
T.. H. Burnham, who was oresent u a
visitor, was invited to tho platform and
briefly addressed the couneil.
MORE WATCHMEN NEEDED.
Coroner's Jnry Makes Itadlag ln Case
0. P. B. Employou' Death.
Before Coroner Jaffa and a jury on
Wedneaday, an Inquest was held upon
the bodies ef Engineer J. H. Shrapnel and Fireman Harry Morter who
were killed in the collision between a
C. P. R. freight train and a landslide
near Hope, B, C, on Monday morning
last. The verdict returned by the .iury
was as follows: "That the deceased
came to their death through their train
running into a landslide, and that no
blame can be attaohed to the company
or emplovees, bnt would add aa a rider
that In future the patrol system should
be increased, esoecially during the winter months, and that the double hearing svstem carried on by tbe C. P B.
•hould be done away with entirely
through mountainous country, thus
nvoldine further dlsaaters to employees,
nubile and rolling stock.
SI. RAIL VOTER
UNION LEADS
America) Declared to Have
Strongest   Street Car
Men's Union in World
Conclusions Based Upon
Observations and Investigation
TO COME TO VANCOUVER
Big Beattle Brewing Oompuy Hit Hard
by the "Drya."
As the result of the eleetion in the
State of Washington last Tuesday, in
which the voters decided to declare tue
state "dry," it is stated that the Seattle Brewing A Malting Oompany, one
of the largest concerns of its kind In
the west, and which operates a union
plant, will remove its brewery to this
city. The company haa a payroll running into the hundreds of thousands of
dollars annually. A site has already
been arranged for from the Great
Northern Railway in False Creek, it is
said. Other Seattle and State of
Washington concerns are also contemplating moving to Vancouver.
Ottawa Theatre Houses Struck
The I. A. of T. S. E. and Musicians,
employed in the Dominion theatre, Ottawa, are on strike. General President
Shay of the Stage Employees and Gon-
cral Presldont Carruthers of the Musicians, both visited Ottawa, and also
Montreal, where two houses are also
struck. They addressed a joint meeting of the unions involved at Ottawa,
nt which President Watters of the
Trades ond Labor congress of CanndB
ivns present, along with Organisers
Brunet and Foster of Montreal, who
nre assisting in the conduct of the
strike.
South Vucouver ud Point Orey
While In South Vancouver the voto of
Reeve Kerr hns prevented a cut in the
municipal #3 wage for an eight-hour
dny, lt is reported that In Point Grey
the wages have beon reduced to #2.40,
which will cost the reeve his reelection
in January.
Loyalty ud Loyalty.
Some time ago a cortain Vancouver
Arm appealed to tho loyalty of Vancouver citizens, asking them to support
homo industry. The loyalty of that firm
is indicated, In this hour of trial, by
the rapidly increasing price of sugar.
Special Typo. Meeting Sunday.
A special meeting of Vancouvor Typographical union, No. 228, will be held
in tho Labor Temple on Sunday next,
nt 2 p. m. sharp, to deal with the question of unemployment among its members.
No country in the world has i
stronger and more effective organisation of atreet car men thu the Amalgamated Association of Street aad.
Electric Employeee of America, declares Editor L. D. Bland, ol the Union Leader, official journal of .tke electric employeea of Chicago, in a leadtag
article in that paper.
Editor Bland, together with Pre*,
dent Mahon, of tb atreet car mea,
were appointed a commission by th*
A. F. of L, convention, ud have recently returned from their trip abroad.
The commission, naturally, declines to make publlo their viewi on
municipal ownership, until same u*
submitted through the American Federation of Labor, bat the trip hu
made Bdltor Blind enthusiastic over
the work'being accomplished by Ua
union, and he writea u followi:
"The Amalgamated Association
leads them all.
"In no country in the world hu
the organisation of electric railway
employees developed to the extent
that it hu in this country.
"In no other country in the world
ean the unions of electric railway
employees be compared with the various local divisions of tke Amalgamated association. -
"These are strong statements, but
true in every respect.
"They are based upon personal observation in the leading cities ot continental Europe and Orut Britain.
"In no city in continental Europe
or Great Britain among the electric
railway employees is there i near approach to the thoroughness of organization that is manifested in our Amalgamated locals in American and Canadian cities.
"In no country in the world hu
the electric railway employee the freedom that ia enjoyed by the men of oar
craft on the American continent wherever the Amalgamated membership exists.
"The Amalgamated association u t
force for freedom—of thought of expression, of action—towers so far
above the organisations of electric
railway employees of Continental En-
rope and Great Britain that no comparison is possible.
"Whether it be a municipally owned and operated aystem, a municipally
owned and privately operated system,
or a privately owned and operated system across the water, there is none
thot can present the advanced conditions for employees on the wholo that
are everywhere in evidence in thla
country wherever the Amalgamated
as&rcintlon has planted its banner.
"These conclusions are based upon
observation and investigation in Europe during a normal period, prior to
the inception ot the terrible conflict
that is now raging where autocracy
maddens and misery results to mil-'
lions.
"Nowhere on the civilized globe
lias there been an organic* t'n'.i of electric railway employees established
that has achieved so mueh, or brought
the genuine comforts of the individual
worker, flnd for the improvement of
tbo homo surroundings, as tbe Amalgamated association has on the continent of America"
Strut Railwayman'! Union.
The Street Railwaymen'a International union is making splendid progress according to the report of the
auditors. The balance on hand on
January 31, 1914, wu #280,13071, and
the receipts from February 1st to July
1st were #220,353.03, or a total of
(480,484.00. Disbursements from February 1st to July 1st, 1914, were #196,-
162.2.3. Tbe total funds at the headquarters of tho association on July 31st,
1914, were #290,322.43. The increase
was #30,191.72, during the six months.
During the six months #97,550 wns paid
out upon 210 doaths. The averngo
death claim paid was for #404.52. In
six months there was paid out in strikes
and lockouts, #13,735. The strikes covered a period of 2,747 weoks.
Dunn—Walsh.
A pretty wedding took place in St.
Patrick's church, Mount Plensant, on
Tuesday morning last, when Miss M. A.
Walsh becamo the life helpmeet of
Wm. F. Dunn, of the Electrical Workers' union. Tho FederntloniBt joins
with the mony friends of tho popular
young couple in Vancouver in wishing
Mr. and Mrs. Dunn an enjoyable honeymoon in the south, a safe return, and all
the good things in Ufe ever after.
"Jack" Hough Dead at Nanalmo.
Jack Place, socialist M. L. A. for
Nanaimo, writes under date of November 4th: "... It is with the deepest
rogret that I inform you that pur old
friend "Jack'' Hough passed''away
tl|l| mpfping.       ,
Crawfish Progress.
The day of the "boot-legger" is at
hnnd in the state of Washington, joining B. C. to the south. Last Tuesday
the electors turned down tho eight-hour
day and voted for a permit system of
securing beer and liquor that was discarded, because of its pernlciousness, in
the Canadian northwest territories more
than twenty years ago. Some progressives, those Washington people.
Casualties Among Industrial Army.
According to the record of industrial
accidents maintained by the department of labor, 55 workpeople were
killed and 232 injured during the month
of September 1914. The record for
August was 77 killed and 269 injured,
and that for September, 1913,123 killed
and 627 injured.
Washington Btate F. of la.
The Washington State Federation of
Labor will hold its annual convention
at Olympia, Wash., beginning January
ib. %m PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY., .. ...NOVEMBER 6, 1914
L
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reeerve, - $8,800,000
il branches ln Canada
A (tneral baaaklm business transacted.
Savings Department
Interut allowed at hlgbeet
current rat*
Eaat End Branch
1(0 HABTINOB BTREET IABT
A. W. Jarvia, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1MI
Paid-up Capital
Reurve	
Total Auete • •
♦ 11
12>l
Wl ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will open
the account, and your
bullion Will bi wil-
urn* be It large er
email
FOURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
MCOItrOltATED
1155
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve 111,178,871
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your uvlnge In th* Bank
ef Toronto, and watoh your de-
poeita and Interest added by the
blink jrow to a moit desirable
bink balance. Th* flnanolal
strength of thl* long-utib-
llehed, well-conducted Inititutlon I oniuru ufety for your
money, and you will receive
•v*ry courteey, md year account careful attention.
AeeeU ..
Depeelto      ..     ..   141,000,000
Main Ofllce—
400 HASTINOS ST. WEST
(Nur Rloharde)
Branchee—
Car. Hutlngi ind Carrall Sta
N*w Wutmlnster
Victoria
Merritt
THE 6. C. fEDERATIONIST
Pubtlihtd every Friday morning by tht
B. C. Fedsratlonlst, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Managing Editor
J. W.  Wilkinson Aaaociate Editor
Directors:   Ju.    Campbell,    preildent;
Hi MeVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Gibb; 0. J. Kelly; R. P. Pettlpieee
Office: Room 817. Labor Tomple
Tal. Exehtnoa Soy. 7418.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Bhrader
Subscription: fl.GO per year; in Vancouver
City. 92.00; to unions subscribing
in a body, 11.00
REPBE8ENTATVES
New Westminster..  .W. E. Holden, Box 531
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box S31
Victoria..  .. .--.--      - —
n. Ti. trmnntng, on dpi
.A. 8. Well., Box 1538
Afflliated with th. Western Ltbor Press
Association.
"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 6, 1914
CRADLE,
ALTAR
AND   ORAVE
r
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities In Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
Poultry. Brltiab Columbia
Grants Pre-emptions of 160 acres
to Actual Settlers—
Free
TERMS—Residence on tbe land
for at leut tbree years; improvements to tbe extent of (S per
ure; bringing under cultivation
at leut Ave acres.
For furtnor Information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LANDS VICTORIA, B.O.
SEORETABY, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
FUSSY OLD LADIES of both
sexes in Britain—including his
Right Reverence, the bachelor
bishop of London—are malting the welkin ring with their wails, because tbe
reeently published
report of the
registrar - general
shows that tbe
birth-rate ia falling
off. Thia has grown
to be a sort of perennial malady
with them. His Majesty the Baby is
not doing the square thing in their
opinion, for the birth-rate is the low
est ever yet recorded. Moreover, adults
of marriageable age are not seeking
admission to the'mystic shrine of Hymen in sucb numbers u to cause any
crush at the ticket office. This applies
especially to women, wbo are elnding
matrimony until the flood tide of fertility is on the ebb. It would take the
wisdom of a hundred Solomons to trace
every one of tbe probable causes of this
state of things ta their real foundation.
Bnt among the influences that have
played their part is the entrance of women into competition with men in tbe
economic Ufe of tbe world. To a certain extent that is the result of a demand fer cheaper labor. It is also partly due to women, with brain and initiative, realising that matrimony, as a
method of earning a living, ia not essentially different—In Its ethical aapect
—from something more varied perhaps
in practice, but unpleasantly similar in
theory.
• *      •      *
Moreover, the woman of to-day, with
mental horlion a good deal wider
than her grandmother, is quietly enforcing her desire to be something more
than a mere breeding animal. The
"upper classes" have long since ridiculed the large family ont of their
scheme of life, although they have not
approved or encouraged such a course
among the "lower orders." Race suicide—as blatant humbugs like Roosevelt call it—has, up to within recent
years, been the exclusive privilege of
the rich. As long as it remained so,
it was seldom heard of, but now that
it ia establishing Itself in the social
life of the intelligent part of the proletariat, it becomes quite a different
matter. Of course it Is not a subject
that "nice" people care to handle, but,
being confronted with the choice of
handling it, or being bandied by it,
tbey become human just long enough
to chooee the flrst of those two courses.
It appears also, from the report
ferred to, that married women
gaged in the textile trades have the
smallest families. How painfully pro-
sale the announcement sounds, just as
a plain piece of newsl The registrar
ia only a recorder of facts and It is not
his business to go into pathological detail!.
• »      a      •
In order to make tbat part of his
report really intelligible, it would be
necessary to say that married women
who work in those textile factories,
for the most part do their work
standing. In order to hold tbelr jobs,
they stay at tbeir machines up to the
laat possible moment previous to their
conflnement, and make every effort to
be baek at their work the flrst day
after tbe four week's absence prescribed by law. This Is perhaps not
the place to enter into a detailed discussion of the effect whieh standing all
day haa upon the genitals of a woman
who haa just risen from child-bed. Bnt
any honest physician knows that it occupies one of tbe top places on tbe list
of those causes which are responsible
for a reduced birth rate, not to mention the part which it plays in tbat
long category of concentrated agony,
which is part of the price women pay
for tbe privilege of being women. If
the registrar were also the recorder of
natural abortions, his report would be
immensely more human and dam*
ning document than it is. Ono very
thought-provoking matter which he
mentions is, that coal    miners    have
bigger families that other members of
the general population. In view of the
number of miners who are killed, the
assertion seems true on the'face of it,
otherwise there would be no miners, or
at least a dearth of them.
.      «      *,     .
Probably one of the causes of it is
the appalling promiscuity of the condi
tions under which so many thousands
of coal miners have to live in Britain.
They are housed in long dreary rows of
"brick boxes with slate lids," and containing the minimum amount of privacy
and sanitary equipment. A bath room
is not considered by the landlord u a
necessary part of such houses, despite
the fact that a miner above all others,
must have a bath daily after his return
from work. The make-shift methods
which have to be adoptod are well well-
known, and calculated in every way to
reduce the miners limited opportunity
for preserving domestic decency to
minimum. It would tax the ingenuity
of a Munchausen, to describe the dwell*
ing place of a miner, in a typical British mining village, as a house. From
all of which, nnd more, -it is plain that
when the registrar makes his report on
births, marriages and deaths, it is not
so much the mere figures whieh are interesting, as the facts which lie at the
back of them. Our worthy bishop be-
Ing a "nice" man, does not care to outrage bis olfactory apparatus by delving
Into such social garbage. He has a palace all to himself at Lambeth, and the
malordorous emanations of the national
muck-heap; do not violate its aesthetic
sanctity sufficient to Cause discomfort.
YESTERDAY
TODAY AND
TO-MORROW
B. C. MUNICIPAL BONDS
FOR SAFETY, STABILITY
AND ATTRACTIVE INCOME.
Municipal Bonds are exposed to the criticism of every flnanclal
journal, yet it Is noticeable that B. 0. Municipal Bonds, although
they yield large returns, have never been adversely criticised.
Buy from a mponaihle Company that hss carefully acrutlniied
the investment,
We offer selected Bonds ln amounts from gloo up to yield
<!%•% to 7% that aro unquestioned and the prlcee right.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST.W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Mftnafcr
TALK ABOUT CONSCRIPTION in
Britain, to meet the war requirements of  the  military  authorities, is quite a topical topic   in   the
newspapers over there just now.   Some
journals   only   hint
at    its   possibility,
while others take the
bolder stand that it
will have to eome.
All   of  them, however, seem to think that the only ob-
ection to such a proposal   would  come
from the maBBes, who would not relish
the coercive flavor of such a step.   It
occurs to us that there may possibly be
another side to the question.   Conscription, or the compulsory training in military skill of the entire male population,
opens up the possibility of it    being
rather an embarrassment than   an   ad*
Vantage, after it had served the immediate' purposes of the war.   No one
with   properly   balanced     judgment,
thinks that when the war is over and
national life resumes Its normal course,
the essential position of the working
class will bo any different from what it
was before, or that strikes will be a
thing of the past
• * # •
On the other hand, if the aftermath
is unemployment, poverty and Indus-'
trial unrest,—as has been the case -subsequent to previous wars—the workers
will be forced into action which will
call forth the same measures of repression which have been expressed by -the
use of military force, twelve times in
seven years, against organized labor, by
the present Liberal government. If, in
suck- a contingency, the majority of
those workmen had a practical knowledge of military tactics and weapons,
the outcome might not be quite so de
void of actual conflict as similar episodes of a previous kind have been. Or
it may be, that the more astute minds
feel that general compulsory service
might create a fraternity of Interest
among the masses which would not entirely die down as the result of a portion of them returning to civil life.
These considerations, and others like
them, undoubtedly exercise a potent Influence with the authorities when they
think the matter over. They tolerate
the bluff directness of men like Lord
Roberts, who by reason of their specialized training only see one side of the
matter. His one Idea is to produce men
who can flght. But the politicians have
a double object in view. They want
men who can flght when war is on, and
who, at the same time, can be ruled
when war is over. Hence their wariness in approaching the conscription
plan. If they made up their minds that
they wanted it, they could get It, especially at a time like thia. But they
are not aure they want it. There is another dtj» to-morrow.
fashion the land situation here—they
would most probably exercise an influence in politics whieh would cause no
regret from a working-class standpoint.
Anyhow, they eould not make it any
worse than it ia now.
A FEW MEN' CONTROL the industries of the   world   A   few
men manage the affairs of every
fraternal body.   A few men direct the
business     of     labor     organizations.
Whether or not it is
MILITANT desirable it does not
»*•»««»«..        a-tflr    tae    'act,
MINORITIES        Ffom m prMeedB
AND MACHINES tT0  ideas-the
liberate building of
a machine, and the natural formation of
a militant minority which gathers itself
together   by   the    mutual    attraction
which each part haa for the other. The
capitalist machine rules   for   its   own
benefit without any real regard for the
wishes of the whole body sooial, but
justifies its actions by wordy pretence
that it is actuated by motives directly
opposite to those which govern it. That
is the essential function of a machine
as such.
e        •        #        • ""
But the militant minority is quite
another matter. It is composed of the
more active, alert, and aggressive spirits, who possess the mentality to divine,
and the stamina to carry out, the imperfectly expressed desires and hazy aspirations of the whole body. Its keynote is action toward the ends to which
the whole body aspires, and none who
are willing and able to do their part in
that work, can be prevented by any
scheming or artificial attempts from
getting into that group. The militant
minority is the visualizing of the hopes
held by the mass, and it can no more
escape the limitations of the body within whieh it operates than a social order
can rise above the average level of intelligence of its membera Where the
machine tries to retain knowledge so as
to be more secure in its hold upon the
main body, the militant minority seeks
to spread knowledge so as to add to
Its numbers.
i.
R. I. P.
THE
I. W. W.
SAID THE
SPIDER TO
THE PLY
HE HEART OF THE C. P. R.,
through its land settlement department, is just aching for the
poor peasants of Belgium, who have
been driven from house and home by a
ruthless enemy.
Just aching for the
poor peaaants, not
for their woes. Per-
fete clarity of understanding is necessary regarding that point, in order
that the inward quality of some of the
charity which is being hatched for
these Belgians may be appreciated to
the limit of its worth. For the C. P. R.
to bring those folk to Canada, and settle them on farm lands which people
with money have nosed over aad cast
aside a hundred times, would be a very
good investment for tho railway company. It would also mean a life-long
mortgage upon the diligence and industry of the new settlers. However,
If a systematic effort is made to bring
them, they will moat likely come; for
doubtless any kind of a proposition will
look good to them just now. Moreover,
if the political history of Belgium during the past ten years is any guide to
the average of intelligence to be found
among Belgians, then from that staid-
point they should be immensly superior
to the average aew arrival from
owme." And after living here long
enough to be naturalised—by which
time they( would re»l|j$  )n   pr»«tteal
W. W. CONVENTIONS in the
past, have been among the
livlleat of the labor gatherings
of this continent. Unkind critics have
described them aa donnybrooks and
bear gardens. Others more friendly,
have looked upon
their proceedings aa
the natural result of
so much intellectual
power congregating on one spot at one
time. Be that as it may, it would seem
that the glory whieh was, is so more.
It is admitted by themselves, that their
recent convention in Chicago waa a disappointment to the I. W. W. Delegates
were sadly reduced in numbers; none
were there from the Pacific coaat, and
the convention only lasted four days,
instead of at leaat'two weeks, as it has
done previous yeara.
.     .      .      .
In its place and time, the I. W. W.
has fulfilled a function which none but
body of that kind could do. And
just so long as there are large bodies
and districts of unfranchised workers,
ao long will some organisation like the
I. W. W. remain. But as an instrument
for the attainment of real freedom and
liberty it was largely a joke; Freedom
to the I. W. W. only meant freedom for
the I. W.'W. It waa self hypnotised
with language, and failure-to use the
mumbo-jumbo jargon correctly, aa laid
down by the autocracy of this super-
democracy, was to be branded aa one
of the 57 different varieties of fools or
knaves who constitute the entire population of the world outside the Bum-
raery.
B'
DOCKERS'
CONDITIONS
RITI8H DOCKERS HAVE FELT
.the blow of unemployment caused
by the war, as much ae any.  Ia
a survey of  their   position,   reeently
made, lt is shewn that work at London docks is falling
off  apace, and  the
same is true of Bristol.   At Cardiff and
Barry, an improvement ia shewn, but
taking conditions in all ports, the average is SO per cent, more ont of work
than usually at thia time of the year,
§      •      .      .
At a few of the porta, where e
barkatlon of troops and stores is going
on, wagea have actually been raised.
For instance, Plymouth, where the rate
for loading coal haa remained fixed for
twenty yeara, an advance of 26 per
cent, in wages has been obtained. The
dockers were officially thanked by the
government for their work in facilitating the embarkation of the first troops
for France. After their experience of
the same government three years ago,
they will know how te take the blarney
with a full sense of what it is really
worth. But it is not likely to make
them change Ben Tlliet for Lord Dev-
onport. This is a good place-for the
dockers to keep their memories alive.
When a man comes here, he had much
better bring a paid up oard of the
Orange Order than a character, if he
wants to go ahead.
"Be good.   If you can't be good,
keep your mouth shut about it."
Most people get their thoughts
thought for them — ready-made like
"reach me down" clothing—or predi-
gested like patent breakfast food.
Words and phrases are used more than
ideas. This applies particularly to pulpits and politics. When ideaa are uaed
they are generally clothed in the whiskers of an age of current usage. If it
were possible to compute, it would be
Interesting to know just how muoh real
original thinking is done by the average man. To judge by the world to-day,
not very much.
As choice an aggregation aa can be
seen anywhere outside a vaudeville
show, is the motley hunch of mixed politicians known as the Civic Reform
League. Mountebank parsons, discredited politicians, and a sprinkling of sycophants who profess to the ability to
administer the affairs of the city, in
spite of the fact that their personal
appearance proclaims that they cannot
control their own weaknesses, even at
present distance from the public treasury. They are full to the brim with
platform, platitudes, and prunes.
Archdeacon Forneret of Toronto
saya:
"Able-bodied young men of Canada who fail to join the militia and
undergo the light burdens of military training which enlistment involves should be deprived of the
right to vote and other privileges
of citizenship."
The gentleman suggests that, they
should be put on tho same footing as
the majority of workmen in Oreat Britain, who have no vote or anything else,
except the carcases they live in.
.The fact of the age is that co-operation betweefl both individuals and nations is more profitable than war.
When a twentieth century nation goes
out to kill and conquer it injures itself—meaning thereby its people—
as much as it injures its enemies. In
trade, science and literature the world
Is bound together by ties of self-interest. Internationalism will come because it Is more profitable than nationalism. Fraternity among men will not
come because some maudlin jelly-back
has written a book to say it ought to,
but because men will discover that the
world's affairs can beat be carried on
from that basis. When that comes
about, the thinking of the world may be
reasonably said to have caught np with
its material interest.
Bev. Dr. Fraser one of the more enterprising and spectacular of the spiritual pastors of our fair city, announces
a programme of sermons, to be delivered by him during the present mouth.
The list Is as follows:
November 1st, "Ought We to
Slug Ood Hove the King!" November 8th, "Why Oreat Britain
Is at War"; November 15th,"Canada's Duty in the Present Crisis";
November 29th, "Problem of the
Unemployed."
The order in which tho subjects are
arranged—which, we presume, is according to their importance in the opinion of Dr. Fraser—suggests an additional one, such as say, "An Inquiry
into the Probable Causes "of the Reduced Numbers of Working-class
Church-goers."
Judge Orant is mneh perturbed, because he feels that very few out of the
1,100 foreigners who have appeared before him for naturalization during the
last three months, are anxious to go to
the front. He says: "We want men of
character for citizens of thia country of
ours." It's too bad not to be able to
take that kind of thing seriously, but
really after all the gush and: hyperbole,
it is not men of character—if "character" means the ability to think for
themselves—who are wanted here. The
kind the judge and hie claas like, are
mea who think ti they are told, believe aa they are told and vote ta they
are told. " Men of character,'' indeedl
Why, there are thouiandi of them, citizens bred and born, actually starving in
one part- op ss?,hef of th\s ppyjupe.
Vancouver Dally Province sometimes hits the mark, if only by accident.
On the question of soldiers and alcohol it saya:
The Russian problem of vodka
is altogether different. The government has abolished its monopoly and haa forbidden its sale for
the present. The trouble in Russia
has been the conditions under
which the peasant lives, and the
vileness of the liquor with which
the government haa supplied him.
The Russian government haa hitherto considered vodka less dangerous and more profitable than education.
Education In thia respect, teaches
the utilitarian value of moderation-
something whieh mere preaohing and
threats of fnture perdition have not
been able to accomplish.
MINARD'S LINIMINT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
We are now prepared to accept
orders for delivery of onr
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
Thla coal, because of its price,
is by no means a small sin, inferior nnt coal, but high grade,
large sized WASHED NUT
COAL fer kitchen use
We know what this coal will
do, having sold It in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to stand behind it and guarantee that it will
give you aa good a kitchen fire as
any high-priced eoal you are now
using. If you use wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire thaa either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for it,
but try it on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
929 MAW STREET
"He Tears Is Victoria."
Seymour 1441
SS!5-5SSS=SB!S==5=SS=BB*?=SS|<
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prloea and terms to salt
your pocket-book.
Oar Stock of
FURNITURE
muit   he   «een  to   be   appreciated.
OiU in aal look it ont.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
City Auction and Commission Co,
G*ih paid for houaea tnd lultea
of furniture or' Auction arranged.
Satisfaction naaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ABTHUB B. BETCHLBT
Bmythe tnd Granville Streeta
Auctioneer Phons Bay, 9079
Take thnt Watoh to Appleby, 800
Vwdn Wart, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nigh-class watoh,
clock and Jewellery repaira. All
cleaning and mainsprings jobi
guaranteed for 12 months.
AROUt!
acoo.
In ihe hurl of ihe retail districL. Al
irepraol and modem in eveiy raped.    	
unexcelled.   European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AlIO BUS MEETS ALL IHAINS.  Wai
epteud h|T   Tne Provincial  Holela  Company,  limited.
HO*ARD I SHEEHAU, fmlm
STOVES and
RANGES
Everything; For the Kitchen
Mount Pleasant headquarters for
Carpenters' Tools and all .kinds
of   Builders'   and   Contractors'
Supplies
W. R. OWEN
& MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447.    23S7 Main St
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
hi ONE -SO-EASY
OBOANIEED   LABOB   EVEBYWHEBB
Thla It Oar New UNION LABEL
If yoa believe In and atand for Working Claaa Solidarity and really want to
asaist  the  Clothing   Workera   organiie,
{ou will reeognlae this label and demand
t from your tailor, merchant and deal-
era.
Aak for It—unlit on It
Phone:   Fairmont 810/
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave, and Main St.
Branoh Offloe: 40th ft Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SYNOPSIS OP OOAL MINING RIQU-
LATIONS
Coal mining rights of tbe Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
tha Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and ln a portion of tha Provinoe
of Britlah Columbia, may bo loaned for
a term ef twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of fl an aore, Net more than
MM acres will be teased to ono applicant.
Applications for lease muat bo made by
tho applicant in penon to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of tho district ln whloh the
rlghta applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land muat bo
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of Motions, and In unsurveyed territory tho tract applied for shall bo
staked by tha applicant himself.
Eaoh application must be accompanied
by a faa of IB. whloh will be refunded If
tha rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall bo
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at tha rate of five cents per ton.
Tho person operating the mine shall
furnish tha Agent with sworn returns
accounting for tho full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon, tf the coat mining rights
aro not being operated, such returns
should bo furnished at least once a year.
Tho lease will include the ooal mining
rlghta only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aero.
For full Information application should
bo made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa.
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thla
Mtortlwma^ w|» mt \f pajd fnp-JMtf.
MINERS' UNIONS
UNION, NO. 100,
"      a-lfeett
KIMBEBLET MINERS'      .
Weatorn  Federation  of  Mlnen	
Snnday evening! in Union hall. President
Alex, Wilson: seoretary-treeaurer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. 6.
SANDON MINERS' UNION. NO. 81,
Weitern Federation of Minera—Meats,
every Saturday In the Miners' Unloa kail.
Addreaa all commnnicationa to the'Saentary,
Drawer "K.," Sandon, B, C.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual eonvention ln January. Executive officers, 1914-16: PreslH
dent, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
?' £"?."• i*f- "i; McVety, G. H. Fraaer,
3. W. Ore*, H. Knudson, 3. 3. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, A. "*
Wells, Boa lilt. Victoria. B.C
N1W WI1TWIW1H, I.e.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES Ajrb tt-
BOR Council—Heeta .very seoond sad
■fourth Wednesday et 8 p. ra. In 'Labor hall:
President, H. Knadaon; flnanolal sMretarr.
?.• A- BU,S.'U ajaeral secretary, W. I,
Maiden.   P. 0. Box 884.   Tk. publlo la tat
vltad to attend.
-4
PLUMBERS AMD STEAMPITTEBS' LOCH
Ho. MS—Meata mry aacond aad fourth
Friday of month In Lauor hall, 7:10 p. a.
Pr.ald.nt,  D.  Webater:  secretary,  A.  Me^
Larra.   t. 0. Boi Me, New tfitm'
VICTORIA, B. C.
VlOTpBIA TBADES AND LABOB OOTJN-
, . OIL—Meete (rat ud third Wednesday.!
Labor hall, 781 Johnaton stmt, at I p. in
Preaident A. S. Walla; aaeretary' Tho. »
Mathlaon, Bu 103, VictoraaTBrO.
__
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
.....Meeta Srat and third Thursdays. hx,.
cutlve board: Jaa. H. McVety. Seeld.nf
Frank Eetlnahsuatr. vice-president: Oeo
Bartley, general seoretary, 111 Ubor
Temple: flies H. Gutteridge, treasiVr?
Fred A. Hoover, statistician: sergeant
et-arms, John Sulyj o. CurnookrF
Knowles, w, B, Trofter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.-
«.,P!™°,.0I'»: FS"d' A- Hoover, J, H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian.
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson? r.p
Pettlplece, John McMillan, MurdochTilS
Kensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. rise
Managing Director, J. H. McVety, Room
ALLIED   PRINTING   TRADES    COUNCIL.—Meets second  Monday in  the
raonthi, J*^""!'' °*°- Mowat: ieore'
tary, F. R Fleming, P.O. Box li.
BAKEBS' AND CONFECTIONERS' LOOAL
8_["_i _ H'-J*—*—} "»nd and
,___f_ 'o°«» ..Saturday, at 7:10
_f_*mSl P ■■ Preeldent. B. O. Ue
worthy; corresponding aee-
rotary, B. J. Adam.; bsal-
neaa aient, J. Bla
280 Labor Tempi.,
BARBERS'   LOCAL   No.    110.—MEETS
.■ "V,  President, J. Bruce; reeoorder, C,
J.. Herrltt: seoretary-business agent. C.1
Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. I7I.-OF-
flge. Room 101 Labor Temple. Meet,
flret Sunday of eaoh month. President
F. F. Lavlgne; financial aeoretary, Oeo
W. Curnock, Room 101, Labor Templt
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. d
—Meets every 1st and Jrd Tueaday,
8 p.m.. Room 807. Preeldent, Jams,
Haslett: corresponding secretnry, W. R
Dagnall, Box EX; nnanclal aeoretary, F
R. "Brown; business agent, W. B. Dag.
nail. Rnnm 21B » ^*M
BROTHERHOOD   OF   BOILEB    MAKERS
and Iron Ship   Builders   and   H.lp.ral
of America, Vancouver   Lodge   Ne.   IM—,1
Meeta  flrat and   third  Mondaya,   I  p. m?F
Preeldent, F. Barclay,   SS8   Cordova   But'
aeoretary, A. Fraaer, 1161 Row. atreet. '
COOKS. WAITERS AND WAITRESSES!
Union—Meete flrat Friday In eaoh month J
8:80 p. m.. Labor Temple. W. E. Walker!
bualneaa rppreaentative. Office: Room 901,1
Labor Temple. Hours: 0 a. m. to 10:30; if
to 2:80 and 5 p. m. to 0:00 p. m.    Ooml
Content   help   furnlahed   on   abort    notice.!
hone Sey. 8414.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTER!
meete in room 200, Labor Temple, aeel
ond and fourth Thursday of eaeh month, S
P. m. Preaident, 0. It Hardy: aeeretary!
F. L. Barrett; treaaurer, W. T. Taylor. Lo'l
cal No. 217 meete flret and third Men
day of each month, and Local 2647 meet*,
flret and third Tueaday of each month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. aid
' —Meeta room 801, Labor Temple, even!
Monday, 8 p. m. Preaident, Dave Flnki
viceprea Ident, M. Sander; recording aeol
rotary, Roy Blger, Labor Temple; financier
eecretary and bualneaa agent, E. H. Morriaon,
room 207, Labor Temple.
ELF.CTRJCAL WORKERS, LOCAL No!
...■ 51!. ''"•"•.Men)—Meeta flret anl
third Mondays nf each month. Room Mil
8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; re-1
cording secretary, J. M. Campbell: bualJ
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 107]
HODOARRIERS, BDILDINO AND COMMON]
.v JltbKm, !"*", He. IS—Meete flrat andl
third Friday of each month, Labor Templ.,1
Preeldent, Oeorte Olbaon; aeoretary, Oeoriel
Harrlaon, room 220, Labor Temple. All lab* I
orara Invited to meeting. ■
MACHINISTS, NO.  182—MEETS SEOONdJ
and fourth Frldya at 8 p. m.   President,,!
A.   R.    Tpwlcr;    recording    aeoretary.   3.1
Brookea; flnanclal aeoretary. J. H. MoVety. 1
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-\
Ml 848 I. A. T. B. E.—Meeta flrat Ban-
day of each month, Labor Temple, 8 ui, Preaident H. C. Roddan; seo-
retary-treaaunar, L B. Goodman; recording eeorettry, A. O. Hanaen: bus! ,
ness agent, 0. R. Hamilton. OIBci
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Bey. 8045
MUSICIANS'   MUTUAL    PROTECTIVE!
llnlen, Ideal No. 146, A. F. of AT-l
Meete seoond Sunday   of   each month I
rooms 18.18, WlRaSa Bull«iScJliaSS* I
__?*?}• ?• Baalish; secretary, H. 3.
Brasfleld: treasurer, w. Fowler
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNA- I
• TIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 88 —
Meet; every diet ud third Wedneaday j
In the month In room 801, Labor Temple. I
Preeldent, A. Harry; ooimpoadlag aeeretary, I
F. Sumpter, 1880 Twenty-third anna, east
flnanclal aeoretary, D. Scott, 577 Richard. I
atreet; treaaurer,   L.  Tyeoa,
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANOERS'. AND i
Decorators', Local 188—MeeU every I
Thuraday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Orand; I
flnanolal eecretary, J. Freckleton, Ull]
rSSSf ,trSSj! '1<""rdlng aeeretary, R1
Dowding, III Howe street. Business]
agent, James Train,  Room 808,  Labor I
agent.
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .OFl
, NORTH AMERICA.-Vancouver andl
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and Ird Frl-I
days at Labor Temple,, room lei, Robert I
C. Sampson, Free., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;]
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanolal seoretary, 17111
Grant street; J. Campbell, according eeo-1
retary, 4818 Argyle street.
8TBREOTYP1R8' AND BLECTROTTP-I
' ere' Union, No. 18, of Vaneouvar and I
Victoria—Meets second Wedneaday of I
eaoh month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. Presi-I
dent, Chaa. Bayley; recording aeoretary,!
A. Birnle, co, ''News Advertiser."   :_"■
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY1.
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101J
—Meeta Labor Temple eecond and fourth!
Wednesdaya at 2 p.m., and flrat and!
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President,!
W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary^
Albert V. Lofting, 8881 Trinity street!
flnanclal seoretary and business agent,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2408 Clark Drive,
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-I
al Local 817—Meete every WedneedajT
8 p. m„ room 104, Labor Temple. FlnanJ
clal aeeretary, B. Prendergaat, room 111. T
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAI. UNION (INl
ternatlonal). Local No. 171—Meetings!
hell flrst Tuesday In eaoh month, 8 p. mj
President, Miss H. Outterldge: recording
secretary, C. MoDonald, Box MS; loaal
clal sec, K. Peterson, p. O. Box 501.
THEATRICAL   STAGE   EMPLOYEES. LO|
CAL No. 118—MeMa aecond Sunday ol
eaoh month at room 804,    Labor Temple
Preaident, H, flpeara;   recording   	
Oeo. W. Allln, P. 0. Box 711, Vai
TYPOGRAPHICAL    ONION,    RO.    lll-i
Meats laat Sunday «f seek meata at I
p. ra.   Pree'dut, B. P. PMtlplHel vlH-pm' [TODAY. NOVEMBES 6, 1914
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PAGE THRU
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
i
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Army Grey and Khaki Shirts
This store Ib headquarters for this class of shirts. We'
supplied hundreds to the .Vancouver war contingent) and
every mail brings country orders for them, because they undoubtedly are-the best shirts for a campuign that involves
hardships.
Any store can take pride in handling shirts like these:
.EIGHT SHIBTS TO CHOOSE PBOM AT 11.50-Four different weights of melton, flannels and tweeds, in greys and
browns, khaki and navy.   All with collar attached and
pooket; double .attached, yoke shoulder and gusseted.
Price ..;.'  ......14.50
THE BEST BLUE FLANNEL SHIRT EVEB SOLD FOB
$2.00—Cut on extra roomy UneB, with two pleated and flap
breast pockets.     Also in heavy khaki tweed with clasp
button fasteners for $3.26
HEAVY KHAKI TWILL SHIBTS—Plush lined, warm and
wear like iron.    Price ,' 93.60
FINE BOTANY FLANNEL SHIBTS—Dyed pure Indigo in
two stylus with collar attached and. with loose double
collar.   Price ..'  ,...$8.75
DOUBLE BREASTED ALL WOOL FLANNEL SHIBTS—
In navy.   Price's I3-50
THE BEST MACKINAW SHIBT WE KNOW Made
of pure Shetland wool; weight four pounds; khaki color.
Price  55.00
SPENCEB'S "CHALLENGE" SATEEN SHIRTS—The
very best of its kind. Two shirts are guaranteed to givo
a year's wear.   Price 52.60
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD,
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Auction Sale* are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
Private sales are held daily when you can
purchase in any quantity.
OCR SALESMEN ABE ALWAYS AT
YOUR SERVIOE. OOOP DELIVERY
AT    LOWEST    POSSIBLE    BATES
Saturday Is Our Speolal Day for Snaps.
1 See the Producers' Stalls in Front of the Market as Well as the
Inside Displays.
Everything sold in the Market is produced
in British Columbia.
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES.
John McMillan, Manager.
Best
Coffee
,-,. W**" HH All) rt <•" ..
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
AI
Many Legislative Measures
Discussed and Presented
to Government
New Officers Elected and
Headquarters Removed
to the Capital City
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Nest to tha Market
By L. T. ENGLISH.
Tho second annual convention of the
Alberta Federation of Labor was held
in the Labor Temple, Calgary, on Nov.
12th, 13th and 14th. All sections and
trades in the province were well represented, especially the minerB from district No. IS, but there were no delegates present from the United Farmers
of Alberta, whioh organization 'seems
bent upon playing a lone hand, al*
though some of its locals are still affiliated with the provincial federation.
President John Pearson, of Calgary
Typographical union, filling the position bf chairman of the local entertain*
ment committee, called the initial meeting to order at 10 a. m., and after a
brief address of welcome, introduced
Mayor Sinnott, who extended a cordial
civic welcome to the delegates and declared himself in sympathy with the
aims and ideals of organized labor, and
thought the time had come when a degree of state socialism was both desirable and necessary.
Mr. T. M. Tweedie, M. L. A. for Calgary, gave those present the benefit of
his criticism and advice which was
neither unwelcome or far from the
point. He said that when labor unions
were led to take an ill-considered and
unreasonable attitude on any -question,
which he knew they sometimes did, that
I it was bound to react to the discredit* of
the labor movement und weaken their
position before the public whose opinion
generally ruled in such matters, but he
felt that organized labor had a great
work to do and a great cause to advance and that in advancing that cause,
if organized labor followed the leadership of its most experienced and dependable men, and presented its case
reasonably but firmly, tnere was no element in any community which .could
stop them achieving their objects, bo
long as those objects were sane and
practical and made for the general betterment of the workers' conditions. Mr, Tweedio wns followed
by tho president of Calgary Trades and
Labor council, who made an apologetic
speech as to why Calgary council was
not afflliated with the Alberta Federation of Labor. This subject, which related to internal affairs, was not in good
taste, but was listened to patiently but
awakened no enthusiasm.
President John 0. Jones, of Leth-
bridge, then took tho gavel and called
the convention to order for- tho transaction of serious business. On recommendation of the president the proceedings woro thrown open to the press
and public.
The reports of officers were read and
submitted to committee on officers reports. Alt officers reported excopt the
board member for District 18, U. M.
W. A.
Tlie executive committee submitted a
lengthy ngenda of proposed legislation winch had been previously dealt
with in committee. This included a
recommendation as to a now compensation act on the lines of Washington
state and Ontario; a new act governing
outside electrical construction; amendments to the provincial legislation governing moving picture theatres and
operators; factory and workshop inspection, ventilation and sanitation.
When the report of the committee on
constitution  was  taken up the griev-
!l ance of Calgary Trades    ond    Labor
B Council received full vontilation. There
is a clause in the constitution which
provides that delegates to convention
-DEALER IM-
NeW and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves.  Furniture moving and shipping.   Telephone us when you have furniture for
'sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
NEW ENGLAND HOTEL     ■» •">-<" «'»'■
Rooms elegantly furnished, classed wltb the best.   Low rates.
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
68 Cordova Street WeBt Vancouver, B. 0.
[More Light and Better Light for
the Home
| USE TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
Thl* It advised at tht Tungtttn Lamp glvtt thru timet tht
amount of light of a oarbon lamp on the aame consumption of
ourrent.
|USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thlt type It the only clatt of Tungtttn Lamp you thould utt. Don't
fall to atk for It when you buy Tungtttnt.   It btart tht umt relation to othtr typet of Tungtttnt at dott tht but grada of ttte) to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOMS A PULL LINE OF THE
■best TYPE OF TUNGSTEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
■PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIGH STAND-
|arD OF OUR LAMPS IS CONSIDERED.
.     Atk our eltrk to demonstrate for you the difference between a
[rungtten and Carbon Lamp utlng tht tamt amount of current.
|C.mll and
• Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
1138 Creatine St.
Nsai Dsvis
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS
FRED PERRY
le Labor Temple
TAILOR
says:
I give you my word
that the suits I am now producing at $30.00, $32.50
and $35.00 are not inferior
to the suits I have supplied
my customers with for $40.
Thin U the explanation: I have
neciireil a largo contract to make
HtiitN for the B. 0. E. railway staff,
which han necessitated changes In
the method of production, and
which changes are not detrimental
In any way to tho product, bat on
the contrary enhance Us efficiency.
I utilise* the same high grade
Brit in h woollens, tho same flrst
quality linings and Interllnlngs.
Every detail in the production Ib
the work of union workmen and
compiles with every union specification. If you wear a PEBBT
SUIT your conscience will be easy
and you have the satisfaction of
knowing you have bought a fair article at a fair price, and that you
-will receive all the satisfaction that
style, fit ind quality In clothes can
give.
Koto  the  Address:
LABOR TEMPLE
DUNSMUIR STEEET
WW^^^EaF^^
"•S-fi^F^RF
from central bodies must be members
of local unions which are affiliated.
This clause has been law aince the ini*
tial convention when Calgary Trades
and Labor Council1 was represented in
its d/afting, and same was assented to
by them. Afterwards Calgary Trades
and Labor Council was led to object to
this clause by certain of its members who would lifce to sit in judgment on the affairs of t'ue Federation,
but who don't care enough for its welfare to secure tne* affiliation of their
local union to the provincial federation.
The move to alter -this clause was em-
phatically sat upon by the convention,
as delegates whose unions had been
paying the great fart of the Federation's expense felt'the claune to be a
necessary safeguard to head off just
such types of union men aB objected to
li The miners from District 18 secured an amendment to the constitution which gives them two members on
the executive board. This move was'
felt by many, even miners themselves,
to be a bit one-aided, as the miners are
the only trade itl the province which
have a seat on the* executive accorded
them, and to increase this to two
means more expense in conducting the
work. It seems uncalled for, too, because district No. 18 has not made full
use of the one seat they already possess.
The report' of the resolutions committee embraced some 25 subjects of a
legislative and progressive character,
the main one being that dealing with
the present industrial depression and
unemployment.
Fair-wage Officer McNiven was present and'took part, ini the debate on this,
which was acknowledged to be by far
the most important | matter for consideration.
The debate brought out the faot that
Alberta is blessed with as great a diversion of cults and opinions as most
other places. The labor-party man was
there to bemoan the poor success of
past efforts to secure working-class representation in parliaments and governments. The labor-socialist was there
to urge not only what the labor-party
man proposed but that all the united
power of organized lanor should be exerted to force the provincial and federal governments to assume responsibility for the carrying on of industry
which had entirely broken down under
capitalist management. The anarchist
was there to urge the "organization of
the unemployed" into a force to be
used for insurrection to break into the
storehouses and appropriate goods and
wealth wherever found.
These three opinions represent almost
distinct groups in the labor movement
hero; the two first bid fair to eventually merge together and form the advanced guard of labor. The latter opinion, while pure anarchy, is advocated
by a group who style themselves socialists. More will be heard of these contentions later. Meantime the federation will probably follow along the middle course of Inducing the governments
to recognize their responsibility for
economic conditions, and provide work
and wages for the unemployed. The
road to political action in elections is
not clear yet, and the propaganda of
such alleged socialists is not the least
stumbling block in the way. The action taken by the federation's executive in this matter will be published
later.
The miners submitted a resolution
condemning the Alberta government in
its dealing with the Hillcrest mine disaster refief fund. A substitute motion
to forego condemnation until tho executive committee had tried to adjust the
difficulty was opposed'by them and defeated. The result was that the federation was put on record aB condemning the government's action, merely because district No. 18 had condemned it.
The unfairness of this position- never
seemed to strike the movers. The resolution itself has since been acknowledged to contain a glaring misstatement of fact and the movers have since
asked for its withdrawal and suppression. This Bhould be a warning to all
against hasty and ill-considered actions
of nny kind.
A resolution which will probably occasion widespread discussion, was introduced by vVice-prosident English and
concurred in. ThiB resolution calls for
an entire readjustment of the legislative bodies of organized labor in Canada in their inter-relations and seeks
the aid of other provincial bodies to
work this out. The proposal is, roughly, that the Canadian Trades and Labor congress work for the establishing
of provincial federations in all those
provinces thnt are now without them.
After these are established, the dominion legislative body is aBkod to be
made to consist of the provincial executives in convention. Local trades and
labor councils are to hold their charters
from their respective federations. This
will do away with local unions paying
per capita to two organizations and will
serve to make the positions and functions of these various bodies clear to
all union men. It would also secure
equal representation in dominion affairs
from all sections of the country, and cut
down the present henvy expense of dominion congress conventions.
The brewery-workers secured the
passage of a resolution instructing the
executive committeo to do what they
could to protect their trade as threatened by proposed prohibitory legislation. More will be heard of this later
as a plebiscite is to be taken of the
province.
It was an open secret that this convention was in a way a test of the past
policy of tho Alberta Federation of Labor. The nnarchist-Bocinlist group who
secured the retirement of Clem Stubbs
as president of district No. 18, because ho approved of tho candidature
of John O. Jones in Lethbrldge in the
late provincial elections as a labor representative, were present in full force.
Very early in the convention they were
forced to forsake their main position,
that is opposition to the federation's
innin function—the securing of remedial legislation. The fight then-assumed
the form of a raid on the funds for
charitable purposes. This was not carried through to the extent originally
proposed, but the federation has established n fund and will seek to add to
it for to supplement the public funds
for the relief of Hillcrest victims. Then
this group scored a point by adding another vice-president for distcrict No.
18, which will add to the expense of
executive committee meetings without
serving any necessary purpose. This
smoldering fight, which ran all through
tho convention, became more open in
the contest for the office of president.
John 0. .Tones had announced his intention of retiring, as he had been president now for two years and he could
point with pride that the federation
had steadily progressed while he was at
its head, until it was.now the most
powerful labor body in the province.
Joseph Knight of Edmonton, whose
candidature in Lethbrldge was largely
responsible for tho defeat of Jones, was
nominated for president. Knight was
present at the last convention and
moved that the federation be dissolved,
declaring that the union men of Edmonton would jjo$ support it,   Eyepts ha?e
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Laborf
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house. * 	
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street
LEO. T. ENGLISH
A vice-president of the Alberta Federation of Labor, who deals with the
recent Calgary eonvention In this
issue of The Federationist.
proved him wrong in that particular,
Alex. Boas of Calgary, a well-known
advocate of political action by organized labor waa placed in nomination as
was also Byron Vickrage, vice-president for Medicine Hat. On the first
ballot Knight had a lead of fonr over
Ross. This eliminated Vickrage, and
on the second ballot Boss was eleoted
president by a substantial majority.
The nominees for the office of secre'
tary-treasurer were Byron W. Bellamy
of Medicine Hat, and A. Farmilo of
Edmonton, resulting in a victory for
the latter, and on motion of Brother
Bellamy the election of Farmilo waa
made unanimous. Edmonton being
unanimously conceded the place of next
convention, coupled with the fact that
Edmonton union men, under the able
guidance of Brother Farmilo have advanced far along the path of political
action, were powerful factors in securing his election.
According to constitution, the other
vice-presidents and members are appointed by the labor bodies in their respective localities and remained aa before, namely: L. T. English, Calgary;
W. Graham, district No. 18; A. Farmilo,
Edmonton; W. Alfred, Lethbrldge, and
Byron Vickrage, Medicine Hat. 0.
Bees, district No. 18, waa later added
pro tem. to committee by the district
board. He did not, however, accompany the delegation to Edmonton. Ex-
president Jones, who is also a member
of district No. 18, accompanied, the delegation in an advisory capacity, at the
unanimous invitation of the executive
board, there being some legislative
matters affecting the miners still pending for adjustment, and It was felt that
his familiarity with those subjects
would be of great value to the miners
and to the federation itself.
Brother John Pearson of Calgary
Typographical union and the local entertainment committee were able-to entertain the delegates and their friends
right nobly. The convention was treated to an entertainment at the Pantages
theatre, and afterwards a banquet was
spread in the Empire hotel eafe. Abundance of good things to eat and drink
put the familiar devil (hard times) to
rout, and a pleasant evening was passed in song, speeches and stories, and
that spirit of good-fellowship asserted
itself to a degree which showed that at
bottom all labor men stand first for
solidarity, and our differences of cult
and creed are not bo deep or abiding
after all.
A Message from J. J. Taylor.
Editor B, C. Federationist: Dear
friend and brother,—I have just ja-jj
ceived a letter from the minister of \W]
bor, iii reply to my letter asking for
his influence in obtaining my pardon.
He replied and told me thnt you had
been speaking to him about it, while at
Ottawa recently, and that he would do
all that lay in hia power to do so. I
wish to thank you for what you have
done.
I think organized labor is moving in
the right direction, when they are devoting more of their time on the political field. Labor must have the men in
that "rock pile" at Victoria, and it
matters not under what name they get
there, as long as tho right men get
there.
I am sorry to inform you that Bro.
Robt. WalkenBhaw will have passed over
the Great Divide ere you receive this
letter. Mortification has set in, and he
is deaf and blind. He was the victim
of the shooting affair that took place
in the union hall some few weeks ago—
shot by an officer.
Few of the old hands are getting
back to work at Ladysmith or Nanaimo. They are starting new men, however. There are about 300 Austrians
and Germans working in Nanaimo—
all of whom were imported during the
lato strike. J. J. TATLOB.
Ladysmith, B. C, Nov. 3, 1914.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
DISTEMPER
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Serrice
1041 GEORGIA STRUT
One   Blook   wont  of  Court  House.
Use  of  Modern  Chapel  tnd
Funeral   Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
Mee. Sey. 231 Da, er Ni,.t
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Rlcbsrde «.      . Vu;otter, t. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3486.
North Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. West. Phono
131.
DarftNlsktCdb
Phaaa.Bar.S4S
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vansourer British Columbia
HEALTH li mete to He dotted end Is of men Tttel iaporteaeo te tie
' well-being end hepplneu ef the IndMdul thia free* itches. Hot
teeth nonen or liter mesa poor health. Te he healthy msnit hsvs
the power to assimilate en food. Before lt can be assimilated, lt moot
be thoroughly digoetod, before lt ess be digested lt mut he thonmghlr
maitlgated, snd before lt ess be msitlgsted pet mut have good teeth
with which to msitlgsti.
Offing to the stringency of the money market I em offering to do dental
work at very moderate prices
Silver filling....       $100
Platinitefilling..     2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    SOO
Bridge-work, per tooth      ..    S 00
Plates .'.    10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour S3S1 Offlee:  101 Bsnk of Ottawa 1
Lira-pool
WHITE STAR SMICHARGfSI
Portland, Me. . Halifax Ltrapool
Dee. lit SS. "Arable" Dee. M
Dee. 5th SS. "Mefontle" Dee. ltt
Dee. 19th SS. "Zeeland" Dec Utt
SB. "Arabic" (11,000 ton.; eoo (eet loni) tarries eat eUss (HI eabia sol
third   else,  puaeuere.    88. "VsderUnd" snd   SS. "Zeelaad"  (11,000  teas)
- carry, flrst, second and third clue,
WHITE STAB LINK
New York Qneenrtown Urn-pool
Not. tlth—New 88. "Lapland" (11,000 leas)
Not. 18th—88. "Baltic".     Nor. 35th—88. "Adriatic"
Dec. 2nd—88. "Oedrie"   '    flSHa^a^an
New York AMERICAN LINE
T7NDEB THB AMEE10AM PLAO
TAST EXPRESS. ONE CLASS  (HI OABDI ISIT101 A» '.	
Nor. Uth—88. "Bt. Fail.     Nor. 91st—Sa "New Tork"
Dee. 5th—B8. "St. LooU"
for rsssrtatlens and Mchsts apply any lecsl tanned or steamship atom
Keep the Children Healthy
by sending them out ln the frssh air these One days. There's nothing bet-
tar (or keeping them exercised than wheeled goods.
Our stook ot WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWINO WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES.
SIDEWALK SULKIES, la easily the finest and meet eemprehenorfe la the
olty and ths prices are right.,
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
UB HASTINOS STRICT WIIT
BIST IN THI WIST
VANCOUVM, B.O.
IITAILISHID MM
Lrl. L Milk Proprietor EUROPEAN PLAN       Prederlek A- * still. Msaanr
HOTEL EMPRESS SSEP
BSriS3cB°" 235 Histbp St. L, Vntoror, B. C. »!,*#&■»!
PENDER HOTEL a^a&__&___->-
... Trnanan »»<.«« «.. nSW?!!! **¥"* H"l
Kate. 11.50 per Day aad Up
Hi FENDER STREET WEST
HOTEL REGENT ^'on'eU^PtlrE^«revPT^mr1<r■.•?.*l ^»f-I>letanc."
tMm_-*i:*-»Arm$E™«*'■nSi^BSSaM^w-w*
the Popular priced, European plan
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUI
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
manufacturers
We manufacture erery Uld ef
work shoe, end specieliie m lines
'or miners, railroad coestructioa,
"Mini • etc
VANCOUVER   .   -   B.C.
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
—ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIB LABEL ON. PINTS, UX
FOB FITTY CENTS. ™"
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ud. PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT NOVEMBER 6, If
THE BLANKET AND COMFORTER SALE
OFFERS  MANY WONDERFUL
OPPORTUNITIES OF SAVING
—and the saving is on just the quality of goods
which one is needing. Good blankets and good comforters, all of British manufacture, and priced fairly
in the first instance, now at prices never equalled for
lowness before. Take a look at these descriptions
and prices—they tell the story—a story of money
saving opportunities:
DOWN COMFORTERS with selected down fllling and good, strong
quality cambric covering. A variety of fancy floral effects to choose
from in colors of green, pink and blue.
Size 60x72.   Begular $4.50 for ;    W.B5
Sire 66x72.   Begular »5.50 for    W.60
Slse 72x72.   Begular $6.00 for    W.96
DOWN COMFOBTEBS with Bpecial quality fine art sateen covering
and double panel of plain sateen to match, in a large variety of beautiful designs and coverings. These aro particularly well filled with high
grade down, and ventilated.
Size 72x72 at these reductions!
Begular t 7.50 value for    15.65
Beguhr (8.00 value for    >6.29
Begular $10.00 value for    »7.f»
Begular $12.00 value for    $8.64
Begular $15.00 value for    $9.20
JMMWHITE BLANKETS SEDUCED TO $4.49—A limited quantity_of
them only, so that early shopping is necessary to avoid disappointment.
They are unshrinkable quality, soft lleecy llnish, and with pink or blue
borders.
Size 68x86, regular $6.50 for    $5.39
Size 64x84, regular $6.00 for    $4.49
GENUINE WITNEY BLANKETS—Direct to us from the famous mills
in Witney, England. They nre pure wool, with a soft fleecy finish and
made in singles with blue borders. Just the warmest and best value on
the market at these prices:
Siso 61*84, regular   $7.50 for, per pair i  $6.65
Site 68x86, regular   $8.50 for, per pair  $7.10
Site 72x90, regular   $9.50 for, per pair  .. $7.95
Size 76x94, regular $11.00 for, per pair  $8.49
V[.|V| ___\___   __     __**. j •«■"«? wwii aamtttaaata _     ,V_***"**^J
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
Futb« thi Bens lnduitry Mo-nmmt by hiving
thli Lsbtl appear on yonr printed matter.. ft itendi
for good workmanship, good dtlnnshlp, docont
wmoi and tho up-building of tho city.
ALLIED PBXNTXVa TRADES
Oompoood of Typographical Union, Wob Pmimon'a Union, Printing Press-
mon'i Union, Preu Assistants' Union, Sterootypon' and Elocirotypori' Union,
BeokMndon' Union, Photo-engrawa' Union.
n
Wo hive just placed In stock a aew line of..
WINTER UNDERWEAR
OVERCOATS SUITS and HIGH
TOP BOOTS
. AT OLD RICES
TWHrrr-nvB m out. disooumt to all dhioh
IDW OB THBIB MCHVIBS
I Do Not Practice "Huny-op" Dentistry
The Month
•Value Teeth"
Tbe Vow
Standard. Bank
Bldg.. Blehards
Seeond Floor
Boom 218
Phono ley.
4.6.7.9
OPEN
EVENINGS
"Tb* Lut Word
In Dentistry"
"HURBY-UP," "out-rate," and slipshod dentistry li
distasteful, to say the lent, to people of refinement. In inch
an Important matter ai letting the month ln proper condition
to prepare tho food for tho stomach, omy the highest eklll,
tho moot ImproTed methodi and tho belt material! ihonld .be
eonildered.
ONLY the moit eonielontloni oare and tho most lelentlfio
methodi are employed ln my ottee. My "Nature Teeth" are
worthy ineoeiiori to Nature1! own. Hy guarantee Ii plain
and ilneere. I charge nothing for examination and advice. Before I eatabllihed tat own offloe I waa in demand at tho high-
eit lalary as a ikllled operator.
"TOU SUPPBB BO PAIB" OUABAVTBBD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work
performed br me will bo absolutely palnlen. If the
•lightest twinge of pain is experienced by the patient no money need be paid to me, or if any has
been paid It will be Instantly refunded by me.
I furter guarantee that all erown or bridge work
or filling will remain in flnt-elesi condition for a
period of TEN TEARS. If any of my work becomes
defective during tbat time I will replace It Absolutely
FREE OP OHARGE
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
W.B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
^^^~^~~~~m~~i^~~^^^tW^imi~~^vv.
A Voice from Sydney
Editor B. O. Federatlonist: I bave
ceived a copy of report of proceedings of the
St. John convention of the Trades Congress of
Canada. With regard to the pronouncement
of the executive of congresB and the war
there seems to be a strango inconsistency
Homewhere. For instance the report of the
executive says: "We also feel that In this
unfortunate struggle is Involved a principle
which should bave our undivided mpport."
Will the executive kindly tell us what la the
principle involved and the reaion why it
should receive our individual support) Perhaps the answer is contained In the following statement found In the same paragraph
of the executive's report from which the previous question was taken: "The German
people have labored for years under a despotism which should have no place in twentieth century civilization;" and, "the workers are not for a moment willing to change
our present institutions for German despot-
[.un and desire that the German people ihould
have the way made clearer towards their
froedom." Is the principle involved freedom
for the German people and resistance against
German despotism being imposed upon ml
If so. it may be asked since when nave the
ruling class or war lords of Great Britain
Flood for or fought for democracy and freedom against autocracy and repression and
would thny not, If they could, place the same
restraint to freedom on, and exact the same
military service from, the people of Britain
ax thnt from which the German people suffer!
But the executive soys In the first paragraph
of this section of the .rport, "More than
nncn has the congress in convention expressed
Itself ax of the opinion that those who make
the quarrels among the ruling class of the
world should be allowed to do the fighting."
Is ft not a contradiction then to say that the
orkers should give thli war iti undivided
ipport when, according to the executive, it
Is "a quarrot among the ruling clan," and
"they should he allowed to do tbe fighting"!
is it not also a contradiction of this other
statement in tho report: "Yonr executive
council recommend that the convention ie-
affirm its utter abhorrence of war as a
means of settling disputes"!
The executive says further: "Grent Britain and France are fighting together as they
must alwayB stand together for the forces of
democracy agnlnst autocracy." Tho truth
of that statement Is demonstrated, of course,
hy the faot of Franco being :n ftlllonce with
(in-rii-i—laud of freedom, lloirty nf thought
and notion and sweetly pure democracy and
because of her alliance with democrat!-! Ret-
sia. France was dragged into the confli-'L.
So then we have the spectacle of d-ynocuHc
Russia engaged in a war to bring the lileis-
Ings of democracy and freedom to tbe oppressed and autocratically-governed people of
Germany. France was unwillingly dragged
into the noble fight for wemocracy and freedom bv reason of her alliance with Russia.
And Great Britain! The executive says:
'Thli is evidently not a war of Great Britain's choosing." So then Great Britain did
not choose to flght for democracy and freedom against autocracy. Was she alio compelled to declare war against Germany as a
means of protecting us from German despotism! But since when has Germany tried to
force her despotism on us or given ■ the
slightest indication of iuch a desire! She
Is beating us in the race for Industrial supremacy and that is the kind of despotism
that hurts our ruling class, hence the German
menace and the action of our ruling class and
war lords In allying Britain with democratic
Russia In crushing out German despotism,
When President Watters of the congress
was In Sydney I heard him make a strenuous protest against Oreat Britain declaring
war against Germany. Because of his outspoken ntterancoi threats were made against
him, and it required fine courage to stand
out against the flood of strong feeling that
menaced him. I heard him claim tbat our
war lords, led by Sir Edward Grey, had tied
the hands of Great Britain, and she was powerless to do otherwise tban join forces with
France and Russia, but an excuse muit be
found and an Ideal placed before the people to win their approval, and the violation
of Belgian neutrality by Germany was the
excuse, and the destruction of German militarism and autooracy was the ideal. Yet the
name of President Watters Is attached to the
report which Is a flat contradiction of his
attitude before and after Great Britain became involved In this present "quarrel of
the ruling class,"
Subsequent events and the appearance of
the now famous "white paper" has proved
that the attitude of President Watters to
the war was correct. A careful perusal of
the said "paper" reveals the fact that since
1906 the naval and military forces of Oreat
Britain and France have been co-npuratlnv
to meet the preient "quarrel": that each
country knew that Germany must violate Belgian neutrality or remain cooped up while
the triple entente leisurely proceeded to cripple and crash her; that the navy and military
nlans of Britain and France was Iild on the
basis of Germany reaching France through
Belgium; that Germany knew of the
plans'of Britain, France and Russia:
that Britain knew Germany's plans of
campaign; that Germany promised to observe
Belgian neutrality and Independence If Great
Britain would give assurance of remaining
upatral; that Germany could afford to olv
serve Belgian neutrality if Great Britain remained neutral by having the sea open to
transport her troops to France as well as
battering down tbe French forts near the
German border; that Germany pledged, In
the event of France being defeated and Britain remaining neutral, the integrity of
France and her colonies; that Sir Edward
Grey in the house of commons' made It appear that Germany was trying to buy or
bribe Britain's neutrality; that Germany
asked Great Britain to formulate the terms
on which she would remain neutral; that Sir
Edward Grey refused to state the terms on
which Great Britain could be saved from the
horrors of war) that Sir Edward Grey and
Mr. Asquith when asking for endorsatlon of
declaring war on Germany deliberately misled the house by falling to state that Germany had requested Britain to Btate terms
on which sin* would remain neutral and Sir
Edward Grey's refusal to do so; that Great
Britain's neutrality meant Belgium's neutrality; that had Great Britain promised not
to become involved In tho war she would
have saved an' invasion of Belgium, Instead
of which she said no, and made It next to
Impossible for Germany to do other thin try
to reach France through Belgium; that a
dosen- men called ambassadors and diplomats
led Europe np to the brink of the chasm of
war nnd that the war lords pushed It over:
that International diplomacy as set forth
In the "paper" ii another name for sham
and hypocrisy; that sham and hypocrisy la
the breeding ground of distrust; that die*
trust characterised every move made by the
hypocrites—pardon, ambassadors; that Sir
Edward Gray said repeatedly Britain's
hands were free to participate or otherwise
In tbe war, yet be admitted her honor waa
pledged (her handa free, yet ber honor
pledged), .think of that for hypocrisy; that
a heavy burden of responsibility rests on
Servta, Russia and Frauw on the one hand,
and Austria, Hungary and Germany on Uie
other, for the human butchery now In pro<
gross; that Great Britain, through Sir fid-
ward Grey, deliberately chose to participate
In'the auarrel, and the whole harden of responsibility rests on her shoulders for the
inhuman butchery and suffering of onr peo-
fie at the front, and the desolate firesides at
'■tn.1: that Sir Edward Grey having failed
to maintain the peace of Europe used every
effort to embroil Oreat Britain In the war
nft*-r it tmit broken nut in order to keep faith
with France In the understanding entered
into: that the British cnblnot had no knowledge of, or gave consent to, the "conversations" between Sir Edward Grey and the
French nnd British naval and army experts
■wring n period of over six, years, providing for joint operations of the armies and
navies of the two countries; that the rnnkest
deception hns been practised on the peoples
of the nations Involved In the preient con-
flirt by the masters nf hypocrisy known as
diplomats, and the time Is overdue for their
unmasking by the wnm*n« people seising
th" relgm nf government In their reipectlvo
countries nnd guiding humanity away from
tho wilderness nf revolting bloodshed, agony
and heastialislng surroundings Into smiling
flpMs nf -t.'ceii, comfort and happiness.
Sydney, N. 8., Oct. 31, 1014; SYJ).
Vancouver the One Back Number.
Observes tho Winnipeg Voico: The
Vnnrouver Tnuloa nnd Lnbor council
hiiH decided to enter enndidtites in the
forthcoming municipal elections, nnd
hns instructed its pnrlinmentnry committee to invite* ropresentntivea from
nil tha organization*! in the city to
come together nnd mnke arrangements for the campaign. This is a new
move in Vancouver, for in the past sec-
fionnlism has been too rampant, which
probably accounts for the fnct that thnt
is now the only city in the dominion
which hnn not a single labor man in
the municipal council.
'Let's dig coal because the people
need coal and not because somebody
wants to make a proflt out of it.
Let's produce food becauso the people
need food and not because somebody
wants a proflt out of the production thereof. Let's collectively own
tho world and run it forthe benefit o*
thpw whf) ty fa FpTkt'f
A HORRIBLE RETRIBUTION
Feu Expressed that B. O. Promoters
May Have to Go to Work
The Dominion Trust, one of the largest realty-dealing concerns on the
coast and the National Finance, another
of the same kind, have closed their
doors and the examiners are looking
into the Back which the public is left
holding, saya the Edmonton Daily Capital. These two concerns, in a sense,
are typical of British Columbia and
what has happened to it. There are
approximately four hundred and fifty
thousand people in B. C. Of these not
less than three hundred thousand live
in the towns and cities, where production is very limited and the main occupation of the populace has been exploiting the future. Timber limits, mines,
real estate and farm lands In the raw
state have been given en anticipatory
valuation and the province has declared
itself rich out of the profits shown by
this anticipation of the development of
the country's natural resources. But so
busy were the people of B. C. promoting
thnt they forgot to develop. Particularly was thia true of the farming business. Farmers were very scarce, and
notwithstanding that British Columbia
hns millions of acres of beautiful agricultural area, those who had. an ambition to farm discovered that the land
had been taken up long ahead of the
railway and that the prices asked for
wild Innd were such as to practically
close the country against settlement
and development. Now the war comes,
and, with the changed conditions whioh
call upon Western Canada for production, B. C. suddenly discovers that it haa
no production worthy of the name and
has no training or business machinery
for anything except promotion and exploitation. The thing that will happen
in B. C. is that quite a lot of the promoters will have to go to work.
BIG UNION DEMONSTRATION
Monster Night Parade Planned for Opening of A. F. of L. Convention.
The local committee of unionists arranging for the A. F. of L. convention,
to be held at Philadelphia next month,
announce that a monster night parade,
in honor of the event, will be held Friday, Nov. 13th. It is believed that 60,-
000 working men and women will be in
line, as over 16,000 have already signified their intention to take part. _ Another feature of the convention will be
a label exhibit which will cover more
than 25,000 square feet of floor space
in the large convention hall.
"Parm's" Successor.
Kid" Pettipiece and Bill Bacon
fought over a four rounds route in the
108-pound class, Bacon getting the decision by a shade. This was also an
attractive bout, aa both boys mixed
things freely.—News-Advertiser, Nov.
4th.
About all most arguments are fit for
la to promote unnecessary conversation.
MINARD'S   LINIMENT  CURES
COLDS, ETC.
Phone Sey more
*
*^S%?
FIRE
INSURANCE?
Consult Us
PROPERTY MANAGED^
AGREEMENTS^
BOUGHT «e>S
COL
Short.
Loan
Dow FraserTpustG"
SAFETY 0CP .
BOXES FOR RENTl
•AT IT MERE SINCE 1900"
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vsncouvsr, end McKsy Station,
Bupn.by,  B.C.
Cloe. st 1 o'clock Soturdsy.
MADE
Deer,    __
Of America et&tr
M-niw ___ ______>__
COLUMBIA
OPTICAL PARLORS
Lorne Pi Mcintosh
Eyesight Specialist
639 GRANVILLE STREET
 8-aywout 7078
Labor Papsr as an Advertising
Medium
Printer'! Ink, • recognised an-
thorlty nn advertising, after a thorough investigation on this subject
says:
"A labor paper ti a far better advertising medium tban an ordiiary
ntwsnapwr In comparison wtth dr-
cnUtton.. A Ubor paper, for -mm-
plo, having 2,000 subscribers, U ef
mon nine to tM business man who
advertised in It, than an ordinary
paper with 18,000 wbscrlbtn.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CO., LIMITED.
Gentlemen,—I have used MINARD'S
LINIMENT from time to time for the put
twenty years. It was recommended to me
by a prominent physician of Montreal, who
called it the "great Nova Scotia Liniment."
It does the doctor's work; It is particularly
good in cases of Rheumatism and Sprains. *
Yohrs truly,
G. G. DUSTAN,
Chartered Accountant.
Halifax, N. S., Sept. 21, 1905.
Semi-ready
Tailoring
To buy or not to buy-
that 's not the question.
Have you seen our new
Semi-ready Suits and Overcoats? Much more to the
point.
Welcome you are to just
oome and post yourself on
"what's new."
New oolour schemes.
New fabrics.
New models.
New ideas.
Clothes never were so
smart and beautiful — so
plentiful in desirability.
After you see them, go and
compare the values with any
first-class tailor as to style,
fit, fabric and p r i c e — the
four essentials.
, You'll come back here.
THOMAS & McBAIN
65S Granville Street
BERRY BROS.
Agents for
Cleveland Cycles
Th. Bicycle wltb  the Reputation.
Toll Uu of  Accuurl...
Bepalri promptly mealed.
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Fbon. Highland 895
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THB LABOR TEMPLE FREE
READING ROOM.
TO READERS OF THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
I have under formation a Oompany for the purpose of
breeding Silver Black Foxes in captivity in British Columbia.
This industry, after careful investigation in Eastern Canada
and the world's Fur-buying centres, impresses me with its
almost unlimited possibilities. We already have our Ranch
in going order and have a very flne stock of Foxes, obtained
under most favorable conditions. '
Our company will not be widely advertised as but a few
shares will be available to the General Public  '
If you are interested drop me a line to Revelstoke, and
I will see that you get a Prospectus when ready.
Very small sums oan be invested.
W. W. LEFEAUX,
(Late of Labor Temple Building.) Revelstoke, B. 0.
Named Shoes are frequently made ia Nob- '
Union Factories-Do Not Buy Aay Shoe \
no msttor whtt Its name, unioss It bears t j
plain and readable Impression or this sump
AU shoes without Uu Unloa Stamp are I
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
244 Bummer Street, Boston, Mus.
J. P. Tobln, Pres.    C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Tre»»
Phone Yonr Printing Order
 to	
SEYMOUR 4490
PANTAGES
Unequalled  Vaudeville   Moans
PANTA0E8  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
.2.46, 7.20, 9.1B    Season's   Prleesi
Matinee, 1Bc.|  Evenings,  1So„ 290.
IDEAL
AMUSEMENT
these long winter evenings right
at your own fireside. Tou can nifty
snd hear the music you like nest
with the
NEW TONE
EDISON
PHONOGRAPH
This new tone Is different. You'll
gay so the minute you hear a record.
There Is no scratch, and no steel
needles to change, as all Genuine
"Edison*" have permanent diamond points.
We have special Xmas outfits (including 12 records) at $46-80,
$66.80, $03.00, and $115.00, on
exceptional terms. Call ln and iee
, those specials.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
T.B. CUTHBERTSON Ado.
Men '8 Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
FALL HATS
THB LATEST STYLES AND
NOVELTIES IN
HEN'S HATS ln BORSALINO,
HAWES, STETSON
and other high-grade makes
PRICES:
$2.50 to $5.
Clubb& Stewart
LIMITED
309-315 Hastings Street Wert.
Tel. Hey. 702
COAL
WELLINGTON    NUT
is the best obtainable.
fuel for kitchen use!
Mined on Vancouver
Island
Telephone Sey. 210
MacDonald Maipole Co.
MU
It makes Tiie Mountain Smile.
'«'•*>■••-        saaafi &
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent
137 WATER STREET
enesisssiasssa

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0345015/manifest

Comment

Related Items