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The British Columbia Federationist May 7, 1915

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OFFICIAL    PAPER    VABOODVBB
TBADBS   AM)   UBOR   OOTOOIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
SEVENTH YEAR.    No. 19.
VANCOUVER, B.0., FRIDAY^ MAY 7,1915.
SIX PAGES.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
SPENCER'S FOR MENS
SUMMER  UNDERWER
AT 50c. we have a superior two-thread balbriggan in all the
normal sises up to 44 shirts and 42 drawers; also in short
stout sizes up to 50.
A great favorite with some men is the white mesh. It is here
in all sires at 50e.   Also the porous kind of underwear at
50c. in all sizes to 44.
All tho above are made with both knee and ankle length
drawers, with and without sleeves.
BALBRIGGAN    COMBINATIONS, in three qualities, at
41.00, tl.S.5 and 41.60 a suit.
MESH COMBINATIONS—Short and long sleeves, in ankle
length styles, at $1.00 a suit.
POBOUS COMBINATIONS in same style, in natural and
white, at #1.00 a suit.
WHITE MADBAS COMBINATIONS, athletic style, with
open leg, knee length and sleeveless, in sizes to 46, at
41.00 suit.
BABBIOOAN COMBINATIONS, in three qualities, at 41.00
well made and neatly finished.   This is underwear that
gives a surprising amount of wear for a small outlay.
—Main Floor, East Wing.
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Be sure and place your TEA order to-day with
your Grocer for
TETLEY'S
=TEAS=
40, 50, 60 cents per pound
Ask for
"NABOB    Products
TEA SPICES
COFFEE ICINGS
JELLY POWDER PUDDINGS
FLAVORING EXTRACTS BAKING POWDER
AT YOUR GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
HOTEL ST. REGIS
H. TOLFORD FITZSIMMONS, Manager
Greater Vancouver's
'   Newest Hotel
European Plan
RATES:
$1.00 per Day and Up
Seymour & Dunsmuir Sts. Vancouver
One Block from Labor Temple
No More Tooth Trouble
WHEN 700 bring roar tooth troublei to me, yoa n*ed worry no more (or it
lent ten rein.
UT GUARANTEED HALLDINE piinleii method hu butihed ill pila ind
■hook—no dlieomfort winterer.
NATURE TEETH
WHEN I hive fitted yoa with my NATURE TEETH—after thoroughly preparing your mouth, earing my pouible gum trouble (Pyorrhea or Rlggt Disease)
and rendering the onl cavity abaolutely healthy—you may trust In my ten-year
guarantee ot perfect aervlce.
MT OBABOBS ire no higher thin tboae of other dentlata, Although every
eaie receive* INDIVIDUAL STUDY ind treatment, ind only the greateit care ind
the highest gride of material! ire uied.
FREE
Make in appointment for FBBS tuuniutton.   Phoni or ciU.
Dr. HALL
THE MODEHN DBHIMI
STANDARD BANK BUILDING
 ROOM 212	
PHONE SEY. 4679
OPEN EVEOTHOS, 7 to 8
SOUTH AUSTRALIA
PUIS IK
TO ROUT
Food Hogs Favored; Public
Works Reduced and
Electorates Faked
Labor Vote Supported the
Reduction of Liquor
Sale Hours
Superior
=====        1
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right aiid we
deliver when wanted.
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNKY, N. S. W, April 20.—When
I saw the huge bread line at Adelaide,
the capital city ot the atate of South
Australia, a full week before the state
elections, I waa fully convinced that
Tory domination of that state was at
an end and that Labor would sweep the
state in the then pending elections.
Well, the elections held,on March 27th
last resulted in a victory for Labor.
The Tory government which went to
the country with a good majority haa
been utterly routed, its leadors have
been defeated, and Labor comes into its
own with a majority of 6. The Tory
premier and two other cabinet ministers
have lost their seats in parliament.
Pandered to Food Hogs.
Tho Tory government faced the people in South Australia with a record of
treachery such as would have turned
Beelzebub green with envy. This government, unlike New South Wales when
the war broke out, refused to fix the
price of wheat or foodstuffs, with tho
result that the food brigands had full
play and made tho most of their opportunities. While wheat waB $1.20 in
New South Wales, through the government interfering and ordering the
wheat fitters to stund off, the same
wheat in the' adjoining state of South
Australia was $1.02 per bushel.
Curtailed Public Work.s
Far from assisting the peoplo in their
hour of need, as was the case in New
South Wales, tho government of South-
Australia sot about a wholesale curtailment of public works. While hundreds
of meu were awaiting work in the government workshops, the government
gave huge tenders outside the state for
railway materials. In one case $2,000,*
000 for locomotives, and thus kept their
own people idle. Then again while
cross country railways could have eased
the tension of unemployment and found
work and food for thousands of out-of-
work men, the government refused to
do anything.
Carved tha Constituencies.
The electors rightly judged that if
the largest state in Australia (New
South Wales) could do without a bread
line and have its food prices fixed by
government, so eould the state of South
Australia. Seeing that defeat stared
them in the face on account of their
maladministration, t!he Torjr government set about a wholesale rigging of
the electorate in order to secure a return to power. It so cut up the electorates that in tho industrial centres 14
Labor men represented over 90,000 electors, while in tho country, where Toryism was strongest, 04,000 electors were
represented by 24 members. But the
peoplo were not to be fooled thus, and
decided that a government that did
this waB no good for the state. It is
snid that so incensed wero the people
that the highest percentage of votes
ever cast in tho elections of tho state
were cast at this election.
Labor Favors Temperance.
Simultaneous with the elections Q
referendum of tho people was taken 09
the control of the liquor trade. Tht
people wore asked to decide the hour-*
from 0 p. m. to 11 p. m. inclusive—at
which hotels should close. A large majority was cast for 6 o'clock. Up to
the timo of writing tho voting shows a
majority in favor of 6 p. m. of over
40,000 ahead of the 11 p. m. vote. This
cannot be altered now as most of the
votes are counted. Tne workers them*
selves voted on this question of reduction, and in only one division in the
whole' state did the people voto in favor
of 11 p. m. The Labor party plumped
for the 0 p. m. vote.
PBINTEBS AT LOS ANQELES.
International Convention May Pose Before Movie Camera.
John W. Hays, secretary-treasurer of
the International Typographical union
recently visited Los Angeles to make
arrangements for the annual convention
of the prlntors which will bo hold there
this yonr. He chose tho spacious auditorium in tho Labor Temple for tho convention hall. Whilo in Lob Angeles ho
visited by invitationoneoftholnrgeBtof
tho many moving picture camps, whoro
1600 peoplo divided into 18 companies
were to bo seen nt work. A tcntntivo
olfor was mado to and accepted by Mr.
Hays that on tho occasion of tho printers' visit arrangements Bhnll be made
for them to take part In tho production
of a feature drama.*' Ihe average convention of the typos contains qulto a
number of very good performors.
This Rummy World
The longer I linger tho more I discern that this' world of ours is a darn
queer concern. It's a crime t*o pick
pockets, but it's perfectly right to pick
a man's wages on Saturday night; for
the laws are constructed, wherever I ve
been, that the workers aro mado for the
grafters of skin. If you try to bo honest you don't stand a chance; you are
sure to be known by me patch on your
pantB. If you steal a few millions you
are a person of note; if you steal 11 ham
bono the police get your goat. If you
run around naked, you're sent, to tho
nen; If you swipe some old clothing
Sou go there again. If you mmjwta
war, then your valor is sung; if y°»
privately murder you're doomed to be
tang* If a girt-sells her virtue she's
Sded a. vTle, but the rooster that
bought it is met with a smilo. lit
man8 tells the truth, then tho pjml. get
tired- if he tolls them a myth, why
hoyiayhe',inspired ItHatow»*$
world wherever you turaj It's I MW
Saw," St. Louis.
/  la Vaanu»r\
_________
$1.50 PER YEAR
JOHN W. BETOE.
General organiser for the Plumbers'
international -union in Canada, is
en route west again and hopes to
reach Vancouver during the next
month or two. . "Jack" will be
remembered by many Vancouver
unionists, especially those who took
part in the exciting building tradeB
strike times of the summer of 1911.
LIBERALS AND JOE MARTIN.
Make Him The Party and All WlU Be
Well.
Whilo compelled to suffer along without the "Evening Journal," there is
consolation in the continued presence
among us of the Hon. Joseph Martin.
To tho political onlooker, the task ho
undertook, besides being more or less
necessary, presented elements of the
picturesque. Of course, whether the
Liberal party needs reorganizing or not,
is largly a matter of view-point.
The Conservative party may be expected to tako the view that reorganization is not necessary because an organized Liberal party is a danger to the
general welfare of the province. The
official Liberal will agree with the Conservative on a different basis. He will
admit that reorganization is not necessary, but for the reason thnt there is
no disorganization. It is the unofficial
Liberal—unofficial either on account of
his own or the party'b dosire—who is
convinced that the Liberal party is in
urgent need or reconstruction.
More interesting than any other viewpoint, however, are Mr.'Martin's methods. His plan seems to consist of first
organizing himself into a wrecking
crew. He evidently feels it incumbent
upon himself to first reduce the party to
a collection of dazed units, and then
out of the debris to construct according to his own ideals.
It is a simple task. It should be
easy for Mr. Martin to produce wreckage. After that it is only necessary
for everybody to agree with Mr. Martin and the organization is perfect. It
is highly probable that he would immediately then find means to disagree with
everybody, but tho problems of the
present cannot be solved by those of tho
future'.' Let us all hope that discour-
ngement will not deprive us of the edification afforded by tho operations of
Sir Wilfrid's interesting ambassador.
R. I. M.
Employees Should Have a
100 Per Cent. Union to
Protect Interests
Management Should Be Investigated and Put
Right
THE BOND OF BABIES.
Eve Formed the First International Before Marx was Born.
Eve, not Karl Marx, founded the
first "International." The interests of
women, from her day to our own, have
continually split across national lines
and defied language and tradition.
Motherhood is tho first and last great
order of freemasonry. It is a more
majestic institution than kingdoms and
courts, armies and navies, or other trivial playthings with which mankind beguiles tho hourB between getting-up
and time to go to bed.
When the mothers of the world get
together there will bo no more- wars,
for it is thoir little babies who grow
up and fight wars. German mothers
cannot hate English mothers. Thoy
must know thnt the hearts of English
mothers break just as theirs do, when
their boys' lives are taken away.
Therefore, there iB something more than
sentimentality behind the -international
women's peace congress In session at
the Hague. There is power. If these
women will lenrn how to use their power they can wipo war out of tho world
as they would wipo dirty finger-marks
from a nursery window-pane.—San
Frnnscisco Bulletin.
As an outstanding need of organization among wage workera probably
the government telegraph lines from
here to the Yukon furnish a notable
example. Without a union the telegraphers are subjected to the whims of
political partisans and used pretty muoh
the same as Eskimo dogs. It ia time
these men were organized, and once organized it is up to the rest of organized labor throughout the Dominion to
see that they are not discriminated
against by the government for doing
so. In this connection a correspondent
writes:
'Some three months has now elapsed
since the Telegraphers' Journal and
tho press of Vancouver drew attention
to the unsatisfactory culpable mismanagement from whioh the B. O. and
Yukon telegraphs have long suffered.
"The verdict of the coroner's jury
on the deplorable death of E. Elphin-
stone, one would naturally suppose to
bo of sufficient gravity to focus the
attention of the public works department on tho crying necessity of cleansing the telegraph department from a
mismanagement which has become atrophied, diseased and unhealthy under
a baneful influence which could be removed by a stroke of the pen.
"Evidences and symptoms of rotten
nnd unjust mismanagement have, alas,
been too frequent. Surely it is'the
bounden duty of those representatives
of the peoplo immediately concerned,
to insist thnt when officials are permitted to retain public positions ad libitum, they should at least be compelled
to give somo slight imitation of an appearance of endeavoring to do right.
"To permit any person to arrogato
the privileges of a Czar, without let or
hindrance, check or control of any kind,
is, to sny tho least, undemocratic in
principle and unjust and heartless in
practice.
"The time is fast approaching when
tho many victims of a callous, unscrupulous mismanagement will insist on
the guilty parties being brought to book
From truth and publioity no party or
individual should have -cause for fear.
"Let us hope that the abuses which
have become rampant, under tho present mismanagement, may bo rectified
before it becomes necessary to print in
detail, week by week, the various flagrant misdemeanors of which the mismanagement has for several years been
guilty.
"All that telegraphers ask is justice
and fair piny. They care nothing for
party politics, but only ask that their
parliamentary representative see to it
that thoy be not exploitod and their interests sacrificed to the shibboleth of
Greed and Injustice."
Ontario to Insert Fair Wage Clause
After considerable painstaking effort
on the-part of President J. C. Watters
and his colleagues on the executive of
the TradeB and Lnbor congress of Can-
adn, tho public works department of
Ontario hns at last agreed to Insert a
fair wage clause in all contrncts given
out by the provincial government.
Information to this effect has beon
sent to the representatives of various
labor organizations throughout tho province, in a letter from Mr. Bobert Edgars, secretary to the Ontario government labor bureau, in which it is asked
thnt all local labor bodies connected
with the central organization bo requested to fill in the schedules which
will bo supplied them by tho bureau of
labor, so that information may bo
readily given when required.
More Miners' Bodies Found. N
During the past week, tho bodies of
David Nellist, Olaf Llngren, William
Irving, William Gilson, John Stewart
and V. Finn were recovered from the
South Wellington mine, making in all
nine bodies bo far recovered from the
disaster which on February 9 last exacted a toll of nineteen lives. Tho
bodies have all been recovered from
tbo section known aB No. 3 North and
as the water is being pumped out rapidly, it is expected that the bodies in
tho othor sections of tho mine will soon
be recovered.
Worth Knowing and Remembering.
If the railway companlefl in Canada
fail to refund tho prlco of an unused
ticket within thirty days from demand
on one class ticket or sixty days on
another they are liable to a fine of $25.
Tho Railway Commission has so ruled
in an order juat issued by Chief Commissioner Drayton and concurred in by
his brother commissioners.
WORKLESS IN MELBOURNE
Trades Council Estimates 10,000 Are
Unemployed There
It is estimated by tho secretary of
tho Victorian Trades and Lnbor council
that there are 10,000 workless in tho
city of Melbourne and suburbs, whioh is
in the tory state of Victoria. The government there is trying its hardest to
get the men to go to tho war, but they
do not see why they should go to the
war and leavo tho idle class at home
doing nothing, but livo on their misfortune. On top of this bod state of affairs there are thousands who are only
working half time. The position showed
no signs of improvement and every day
from 2,000 to 3,000 worxless called at
the Trades hall endeavoring to get
work.
Different in New South Wales.
The position in tho labor state of
New South Wales Ib, nowover, much
brighter. There is less unemployment
nnd lesa distress in this state than in
nny other pnrt of Australio. Tho reason
for this is that the state government is
spending $4,000,000 monthly in work
to keep the unemployed going till work
becomes normal in other directions.
Arrangements havo beon just mado by
tho Now South WaloB Btate to spend
this amount every month for at least
the noxt twelve months.
NEED OF A LABOR PRESS
Pres. Oompers of A. F. of L. Believes
in Value of Publicity.
President Oompers of tho American
Fcdcrntion of Labor knows something
nbout labor's struggles. Ho knows tho
need of n lnbor prcsB. This is what ho
Baid in a speech flo'mo timo ngo:
"Publicity is a mighty force in pro*
pngnting nny cnuso. No matter how
worthy or how noblo the purpoBO of the
movement if they can not be correctly
interested and brought to the attention
-of the peoplo tho movement loses in
effectiveness and forco.
"Labor papers have done much to
clarify public thought and to impart
correct impressions of the purposes
and policies of the workers.
"Tbo mon giving tbeir time to theso
labor papers are performing work vory
necessary to tho success of tho organized labor movement.
"Regular and budensome is the duty
whoso greatest reward is tho sntisfnet-
of promoting tho woll boing of tho
workers. Many aro the temptations to
turn aBido for tho handful of silver, tho
offico, or the honor offered. But, true
to their conscience and humanity's best
intorcsts, this group of labor editors
stay faithfully by thoir chosen work
nnd help mold a public opinion and conscience that Bhnll bo aware of tendencies and thoir moaning.
"All the workingmon owo theso labor
editors both moral and financial support,
and honor and grntitudo for the services rendered dny after day.
"They aro doing a work of formn-
tive power that will hnvo _ a telling
effect upon hiBtory, but thoir services
should bo recognlzod by tho men of today na well as in tho pages of history."
Hotel Irving Grill Room
101 Hastings Street Eaat
ARE YOU ONE OF THE PLEASED PATRONS
OF THE FINEST GRILL IN VANCOUVER?
FRENCH CHEF. MUSIC 5 TO 12 P. Bt
The Finest of Wines, liquors and Cigars aold' at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologist* to serve
you.
JOHN L SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour 8380.
UNION ■**■ OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAK SOFFIT TOU WITH TBI ALLI1D PJUMTCMO TBADBI TOIOB LAML
BARLEY * BONS. 151 Baitlan Stmt. Seymour IM-
BLOOHBEHOER, F. B., 810 Broadway KmI Faineant I0»
BRAND a PERRT. t.» F.nd.r Su.,1. Wmi   Deyneor 1171
BURRARD   PUBLISHING   CO..   711   Seymour   SlrMl    Seymour   8580
CHINOOK PRINTING CO., 4801 Mala Stmt  Fairmont 1174
CLARKE * STUART, 110 Somonr Stmt   Seyaoar I
COMMERCIAL PRINTING » PUBLISHING CO.  ..World Bolldlor. 8.7. 488887
COWAN * BROOKHOUSE, Ubor Tnnpl. Balldinf  Seymonr ttOO
DUNSMUIR PRINTING OO, 4ST Dumnralr Strtrt. Snmr 1108
EVANS * HASTINGS. Arts and Cr.lt. Bide., Seymour St Seymoar 5610
GRANDVIIW PRINTERS. 1441 Comm.rtlel. HlfUaad 741L
JEWELL, M. L., 841 Feeder St TSymour 144*
KERSHAW. J. A., 589 Howe St Seymour 8874
LATTA. R P., 833 Gore At Seymoar 1088
MAIN PRINTING OO, 8851 Mala St Fairmont 1MI
MoLEAN * SHOEMAKER, North Vancouver N. Tan. 58
MOORE PRINTING OO, Oor. Oranvllle aad Robion BU Seymour 484S
NEWS-ADVERTISER, 801 Fender St Seymour 1018-41
NORTH SHORE PRESS, North Vancouver N Van. SO
PACIFIC PRINTERS. World Balldinf Seymour 0503
PEARCE * HODGSON, 518 Hamilton Street Seymour 18H8
ROEDDE, G. A, 616 Homer Street Seymour 864
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING OO, 817 Cambie St Seymour 8608
TERMINAL OITT PRESS, 8408 Weitmlmter Bud Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY, 825 Haitian W Seymour 9510
TIMMS, A. H, 280 Fourteenth Ave. E Fllmoat 621R
WESTERN PRESS, 828 Cordova W. Seymour 7666
WESTERN SPECIALTY CO, 881 Dunnaulr St Beymonr 8596
WHITE & BINDON, 157-150 Cordon St  .... Stymour 1215
Writ* "Onion Libel" on Your Oopy wben Too Send It to the Printer
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital "115,000,000        East  113,500,000
Main Offlce:   Cornet Hastings and Oranvllle Streets, Vancou«r
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
ALMA ROAD Cor. Fourth Avenue snd Alma Road I
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. Flnt Avenue snd Commercial Drive
EAST END  .Cm. Pender and Main Street.
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avenue and Granville Street
HASTINGS and CAMBIE dor. Baitings and Cambie Street.
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL  Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraier Road
Alio North Vancouver Branch, Corner .Lonsdale Annuo and Esplanade
I
UNION SHOP
Just a whisper off Granville, 704 Robson Street
The DELMONICO
VANCOUVER'S LEADING CAFE
Harry Ecckncr.   Ervin Switzer.    Phone Bey. 3343.   VANCOUVEB, B.C.
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate Prices
OOLD AND POEOELAIN OBOWNB, Each  t 6.00
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth      6.00
PERFECT FITTTNO PLATES    10.00
AMALOAH FILLINOS      1.60
ENAMEL FILLINOS      2.00
Diseases ot the gums, Including Pyorrhea, successfully treated.
All work guaranteed.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
.Phone Beymonr S3S1 Offlee:  101 Buk of Ottawa Bntldiog
(02 Haatinga Stnet Weat
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S  REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
.   ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT   MAT 7. 1915
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada will open its 1915 Convention in this building on
Monday, September 20th
"SAFETY FIRST"
Clothing,
Employees whose duties require them
to operate machines, or to be near them,
should avoid torn or ragged clothing
and should keep tbeir outer garments
buttoned or otherwise fastened so that
they cannot become entangled in the
machinery. A ragged sleeve, a loose ^
coat or a flowing cravat ean do incalculable injury if caught In any part of
moving machinery. Exercise caution in
removing and putting clothing near
moving machinery.
The Illinois Steel company, of South
Chicago, hns printed in booklet form
the rules and regulations in force at its
plants. They seem to cover the ground I
thoroughly.
"Remember," it says, "that whileI
every man Ib hired to do some particular work, the safety of himself and his
fellow men is more important than that
work."
'' Remember that all the rules and regulations that can bo adopted; all the
safety devices which can bo attached
to machines; all the guards which can
be erected; all the warning signs which
can be posted, are useless unless every
man is careful to see that they are
maintained; unless every man iB careful to watch for danger; unless every
man is careful to warn others of danger."
"Remember that at all times some
of the men in the plant are inexperienced and may not know where danger
exists. Warn any man when danger is
near- He may know all about it. If
to, no harm is done. If not, you may
save his life."
"Every man in a mill should consider it hia personal duty to see that
safety guards are kept in good condition and report dangers to his foreman
or superintendent."
IF THEY WERE ORGANIZED
The Hon. Carroll D. Wright is quoted
as saying that "two hours and fifteen
minutes' daily work by each able-
bodied man, if systematically applied,
would produce all the food, clothing
and shelter that people need," says the
Citizen. '
He meant, of course, with the use of
the modern instruments of production.
Tet many men are working four, five
and even' six times that number of
hours, and do not receive enough to
support a family in decency.
It is very plain that there Ib something seriouBly wrong with such a system of industry.
Of course, the labor unions have not
perfected the lot of the worker.
But what would his lot be if it were
not for tke unions.
The unions are responsible for every
improvement of conditions that has
been made.
And if the workers were organlied
as a whole tha adjustment would be
much more advantageous to labor.
"SAFETY FIRST
Special Rules to Foreman
Have a thorough understanding of all
the rules.   Until you know them all,
and are living up to them, you are not
doing' your full duty.
Tou will be held responsible for accidents to your men. %
Tou should caution your sub-foremen
regarding the prevention of accidents,
but you still will be responsible for your
nub-foremen.
Judgment should be used at fell
times in placing men on jobs. Heavy,
slow men should not be placed on jobs
where a light, quick man is required.
Slow-thinking, unintelligent men should
not be placed around machinery or in
places where presence of mind is required, for by so doing the probability
of accidents Is increased many times.
I If machinery, tools or other appliances, with which you are working, are
dangerous, do not oontinue to use them,
I but call your superintendent.
When you finish a job, leave the conditions safe; replace safeguards and do
j not leavo loose material overhead.
| Investigate every accident and try
i to prevent an accident occurring in like
, manner.
Never have a man in your employ to
[ whom no one can talk.
Foremen on one turn should report
| to and discuss with the foremen on the
other turn accidents they have had,
[with a view of preventing like acci-
| dents. '
All appliances should be frequently
| and carefully inspected.
j    Do not allow machinery to be started
I before the safeguards have been   re*
Make it your personal duty to see
that the safeguards and signs installed
to promote safety are always in good
condition.
THE COMPENSATION AOT
District Ledger Says One Commissioner
Is Not Enough
Referring to the proposed new
Workmen's Compenaation net of British Columbia, the District Ledger, the
organ of the miners of the Crow's Nest
Valley, says:
"We do not intend to go into a detailed criticism at this time, but do consider the vesting of plenary powers in
one individual has a tendency to autocracy rather than democracy. The plan
adopted by the Btate of Oregon in the
appointment of the board of commissioners precludes the possibility of political bins, ns it specifically provides
thnt there Bhall not be a majority of
members of a particular stripe on the
board.
Mr. Bowser's explanation for the appointment of one only commissioner on
the plea of economy, is weak when the
amount of remuneration is practically
equal to that paid to four representatives to the provincial parliament. We
Bhall have more to say on this aot
later."
TANGO
STREET
CAR
TICKETS
$50.oo
INCASHPRIZES
FOR THE LARGEST LISTS OF WORDS FORMED OF LETTERS CONTAINED IN THE WORDS:
"TANGO TICKET"
This Competition is Open to all Residents of Vancouver. All Entries must be in the Company's hands
by May 17th, 1915.
Prize Money Will be Distributed as Follows:
First Prize - - - $20.00    Second Prize- - $10.00
Third Prize   -   -   $5.00    4th, 5th and 6th Prizes $3.00 each
7th, 8th and 9th Prizes $2.00 each
The Prize Winners will be announced in these columns as soon after May 17th
as the lists can be checked.
CONDITIONS OF PRIZE OFFER:
Any person residing within the city limits of Vancouver may submit lists.
Lists must be sent by mail addressed "General Superintendent, B. C. Electric By. Co., Vancouver,
B.C." with envelope plainly marked "Tango Tickot Competition" so aB to roach the offlce before May 17,
1916, by 5 p.m. *•
Lists must be submitted in typewriting or legible handwriting, the words being consecutively numbered as follows: "1-Tnngo, 2-Ticket, etc.
Only words contained in Webster's Unabridged Dictionary can be used.
Prizes are to be awarded on decision of the Goncrnl Superintendent, who shall be the final judge in connection with all lists submitted.
J
NON-TRANSFER-Good in Vancouver City Limits
Not Good on any Interurban Car
On Sale-Monday, May 10th
w^asae^t^Baammmtea^mm^^memeet^^fttae^i^ttmttatmattmmme^attttteaaeaattmetaa
In making the above announcement of a reduction in city car fares the B.
C. Electric would call special attention to the following extracts from the formal statement issued by its General Manager, Mr. George Kidd, when announcing the new rates which make travel over the B. C. Electric lines within the
city limits of Vancouver and Victoria practically the cheapest rate on this continent.
"It will depend largely on the increased use which the
public make of the street cars whether it is economically possible for the Street Railway Company to sell 8
tickets for 25 cents. If it can be done, The B. C. Electric will do it"
"The matter now rests with the Public, who
must lie the final arbiters." ^^m**uWE
FBIDAT   MAT 7, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
|ecki£)hoes
C&ailt lor Wear.-Style
~u3ovi'
Made In
•British
Columbia
Theie beautiful Spring days an
din when mtn—and women—appreciate tbe  great  out-of-doors.
In the parks, on tbe boulevards,
on tbe daily business journey,
discriminating men require shoes
of greateit comfort and wearing qualltlei.
That', why LEOKIE SHOES tre demanded everywhere- -onc.il.. men
.re rapidly beilnnlng to appreciate thst LEOKIE SHOES an shoes ol
CHARACTER—.hoe. of distinction.
The reuon LEOKIE SHOES outwear other mates it bectute HONEST
leather—HOMEBT Ubor—.killed workman.hip COMBINE la every pelr.
The "n.per" upper or "cardboard" sole variety lt NOT found In LEOKIE
SHOES.
LECKIE SHOES are mad. In Brltlih Colombia to live you the MAXIMUM thot value—they are the ONE Ideal thoe Invettmtnt.
LEAD-WO DEALERS HANDLE LEOKIE SHOES.
World Shoe Co.
M Halting. St, VV., Phone Sey. 1770
Beit Sho. RepalrlM "While You Wait"
Work called for and delivered
Loggers' Mlnen' Cripplei' and any kind
of special Shoot made to order
Named Shorn are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shot
no matter wbat ltt nam*, unlets It been t
plain and readable Impression or thla stamp.
All shoae without tbt Union Stamp tn
alwaya Non-Union.
HOOT A SHOE WORKER* UNION
IM Summer atreet, Boston, Httt.
J. F. Tohln, Pree.   0. L. Blaine, See/Treat.
PREMIER
Pancake and Waffle Flour
Agreeable To Any Sense
MADE IN VANCOUVER
JINGLE POT COAL
ONLY UNION BONED OOAL ON THE FAOZFIO OOABT
Our Nut Ooal has been increased in size, making a big improvement
in value. This ia an ideal Bummer fuel and just the eoal yon need for
your range.   Try a ton.   The price is $6.60.
WOOD
. Choice 16in. Fir and Millwood.
PHONE US WHEN YOU NEED FUEL
McNEILL, WELCH& WILSON, Limited
SETMOUB 1936
BEST QUALITY
EIGHT PBIOES
Phene Sey. 539. Vancouver, B.O.
Bedding
Plants   Kew Gardens
_ iGUlbO      503 Pender St, W. near Mehaidi
i i a:^= j 	
Patronize the Union Label
byuiing
IDEAL (UNION-MADE) BROOMS
For Bale at All Dealers
IDEAL BROOM WORKS
295 Dufferin Street
PENDER HOTEL -^sSU*****-
PENSIONSI
What Washington State Is
Doing for Widows
and Wives
Coining Congress Convention Should Urge
Measure
618 PBVDBB STBBBT WBST
TsUphont Seymoar :	
RstH $1.60 per Dty and Up
[By Miss Helena Outterldge.]
With millions of dollars being spent
daily for the purposes of war whereby
thousands are slaughtered, to talk of
economy of expenditure for the preservation of Ufe seems almost absurd.
Nevertheless it almost seems that the
need for economy of vxpenditure in preserving "the nation's greatest asset,"
the child of to-day, the man of tomorrow, will ba the means of securing
that, which al9ng lines of right and
humanity, has hitherto been denied:
namely. Mother's Pensions.
In tne city of Vancouver.when the
demsnd for woman's labor was more
or less equal with the supply, and a
widow* or deserted wife was left with
children, various ladies connected with
charitable organizations would hustle
round and flnd employment for the
mother (usually underpaid) helping her
along with an occasional dole of food
or clothing.
If there were several children, perhaps one br two would be placed in the
-orphanage.
Latterly the enormous increase in unemployment has made it impossible for
these mothers to find work, and they
find themselves on the labor market,
where the demand Ib 60 per cent, below
the supply.
108 Deserted Wives in Vancouver.
The charitable organizations, being
themselves dependent on voluntary contributions from the public, find that
owing to the financial stringency, dona*
tions are not coming in andl they are
therefore unable to faapense charity aB
heretofore. The result is that over a
hundred widows and deserted wives,
with two hundred and sixteen children
between them are now dependent on
the city relief nsociation for support.
The average number of children to the
hundred and eight women is two, some
have only one, but some have seven*
while some have three or four.
At the very lowest estimate it must
cost at least five dohars per week per
family for the city to support these
mothers and their children, and at
that it is only a bare subsistence.
In the various orphanages throughout
the city there are nearly four hundred
children. At least one-half of these are
the children of widowed mothers or deserted wives. The cost of maintaining
these institutions must surely be at
least five dollars per week per child,
or twenty dollars per month.
In addition the children are deprived
of a mother's care and love, become institutionalized, while the mother bears
all the pain and heart-break of being
-separated from her children.
Mother's Pensions ln TT. 8. A.
During the year 1913- eighteen states
of the union enacted mothers' pension
laws: namely, California, Colorado, Illinois, Idaho, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada. Nebraska, Minnesota,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah
and Washington.
Enquiry shows that the results in
these states are most satisfactory, and
no more expensive, probably less, than
under the old system of orphan homes
and charitable doles.
The only objection raised came from
the charitable organizations, the complaint from them being, that the certainty of receiving the pension month
by month tended to make the mothers
too independent.
The following is a copy of the act te
force in Washington:
MOTHERS'   PENSIONS.
Counties to Help Destitute Mothers.
In every county it shall be the duty
of the county commissioners to provide
out of the monies of the county treasurer an amount sufficient to meet the
purposes of this law, for the support
of women, whose husbands are dead,
or are inmates of a penal institution or
an insane asylum or who are abandoned
by their husbands and such abandonment has continued for more than one
year or because of total disability   of
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Leave*. Johnson's wharf 9.S0 t.m., Hon.,
Wed. and Friday, tor Wison Greek, Seohett,
Half Moon Bar, Redroofe's, Welcome Pass,
Hardy Itland, Nelion Ialand, Pender Harbor,
Stillwater, Myrtle Point and Powell River;
returning tho following dsys,
Johnson's Wharf  Seymour 4230
Phono:   Soymour 3260
Supplies and Bopalrs ot AU Kinds
M. SOOVILL
BIOTOLBS
Harloy-Davidion Motorcycle!
1018 Pender Stroot West
Vancouver, B. 0.
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE SO  EASY
their husbands, and who are unable to
support their children, when suoh women are destitute and are mothers of
children under the age of fifteen years,
and such mothers and children reside in
such counties.
Allowance.
The allowance to each of such women
shall not exceed fifteen ($15) dollars
per month when she has but one child
under the age of fifteen years, and if
she has more than one child under the
age of fifteen years, -it shall not exceed
the sum of fifteen dollars a month for
the first child, and five dollars a month
for each of the other children under the
age of fifteen years.
Juvenile Court to Make Allowance.
Such allowance shall be made by the
juvenile court in the counties where
such court is held and elsewhere by the
superior court, and only upon the following conditions: (1) The child or
children for whose benefit the allowance is made must be living with the
mother of suoh child or children; (2)
When by means of such allowance the
mother will be able to maintain a home
for her child or children; (3) The mother must, in the judgment of the court,
be a proper person, morally, physically
and mentally, for the bringing up of
her children; (4) No person shall receive-the benefit of this aot who shall
not have been a resident of a county
in which such application is made for
at least ono year before the making of
such application for suoh allowance.
Whsn Bsnsflts Cease.
Whenever, any child shall reach the
age of fifteen years any allowance made
to the mother of such child for the
benefit of suoh child shall cease. The
court may in its discretion at any time
before such child reaches the age of
fifteen years, discontinue or modify the
allowance to any mother and for any
ohild.
Penalties.
Any person procuring fraudulently
any allowance for a person not entitled
thereto, shall be deemed guilty of a
gross misdemeanor.
Prosecuting Attorney to Begin Proceedings:
In eaoh case where an allowance, is
made to any woman under the provisions of this act, an order to that effect
shall be entered upon the records of
the court, making such allowance.
Proceedings to obtain the benefit of this
act shall be instituted and'maintained
in the same manner aB proceedings are
instituted and maintained in the juvenile court, and the prosecuting attorney
shall render all necessary assistance to
applicants under this act, and shall appear in every snch proceeding and
through the probation officer, the charity commissioner or any person having
knowledge of the facts, shall carefully
investigate the merits of every application to the end that this aot may be
fairly administered and no person
granted relief hereunder except those
justly entitled thereto, and no officer of
the court or county officer shall receive
any fees for any services rendered in
carrying out the provisions of this act.
A certified copy of said order shall be
filed with the county auditor of the
county in which such child's mother is
resident, and thereupon and thereafter
and so long as such order remains in
force and unmodified it shall be the
duty of the county auditor each month
to draw his warrant on the current expense fund of the county in favor of
the mother for the amount specified in
such order, which warrant shall be by
the auditor delivered to the mother
upon her executing duplicate receipts
therefor, one to be retained by the auditor and the other to be flled by the
clerk with the other records in the proceedings relating to such child or children. It shall be the duty of the county
treasurer to pay such warrant out of
funds in the current expense fund of
the county.
Criticism of ^ct
The chief criticism that can be directed against this act, is that the
monthly allowance is too small. Nevertheless Beveral hundred mothers in the
city of Vancouver and throughout the
Dominion of Canada would be only too
either an overcrowded 'labor market or
happy to exchange the uncertainties of
oity relief and charitable doles, for the
certainty of a settled sum absolutely
sure every month as under the Washington act.
Urge Congress to Act.
In view of the fact that the Trades
and Labor Congress meets in Vancouver in September next, every member
of organized labor should make an
effort to see thnt all delegates attending
the\ congress are instructed to urge the
congress to follow up the excellent
work of the last three years by further
action, and also to separate the question of pensions for mothers from that
of old age pensions.
SPOILED BY
'wofis;
Big   Business   is   Really
Charitably Disposed
to Employees
Every Law to Protect the
Workers Originated in
the Unions
Women and Unemployment.
In volume, unemployment ambng women is less serious than among mon.
In effect it is more serious, and its increase carries with it social and economic dangers, not onlyvto industry, but
to home and tho community. Any
attempted solution concerned only with
unemployment as it relates to men will
fail, for unemployment among women
is inherent in the peculiarly general
conditions of women's work—lack of
standards in the work, lack of organization and solidarity in the workors.
Any study of the industrial 'position of
women discloses nt once that very vital causos of unemployment, lack of
oquipment in workers, lack of regularity in work, aro horo involvod, and in
a degree thnt necessitates particular
attention to the organization of women's work beforo unemployment
among women is oven susceptible to
tho same remedies as it unemployment
nmong men.—Life-nnd Labor.
Women's Average Wage.
The avorago wnge of the 72,571 women wage enrners employed in tho
manufacturing industries of Canada, in
the year 1910, arc Hhown by the Dominion census of manufacturers to have
been 83 cents a day, or $21.75 per
month. These women were all over 16
years of age, and many of them had
children or parents to support. Upwards of 13,200 children under 16 years
of age were also employed in the mills
and factories of Canada, in the same
year, and received 50 cents a day, or
$13.25 a month. The 376,872 men working for wages in our great manufacturing establishments received an average
of $1.46 a day, or $38.33 a month.
While women work for $21,75 and men
for $38.33 a month, inorder that millionaires and multi-millionaires may be
created, it cannot be claimed that protection protects the worker.—Industrial Banner,
■B. C. Special" Whisky is specially
made in B. O. for those special people
who know good whisky when they taste
it.    .
"We have heard much of the bene*
volent intentions of employers of labor;
of the great improvements in the living
and working conditions of their employees they intend to bring about, sometime in the future, if only they are not
interfered with by the 'agitators of
labor,' but ever, when laws are proposed in congress or legislature for safeguards against accidents, or occupational diseases,' there will be found the representatives of these employers, opposing through every influence they are
able to wield, by threat, cajolery, or
bribery, the passage of such law; and
there, also, will be found the much-
maligned representative of organised
labor,| urging the passage of every law
that may safeguard life or health,"
says the United Mine Workers'Journal.
"There is not a law on the statute
books of state or nation intended to
conserve the life or health of those who
toil but was proposed first in the halls
of the labor union; was fought for, and
won, in spite of the opposition of the
employers, by representatives of organised labor.
"And the same applies to every law
for the protection tof women and children in industry; every anti-child labor
law, minimum wage and maximum hour
law for women and minors.
"While the labor union is intended
to prevent dire want rather than to relieve, yet, there is not a benevolent
society; certainly not a charity organization, that does as much practical
work for the relief of actual want, or
has a more comprehensive program for
the relief of the membership than has
the labor unions.
"In times of sickness, or other undeserved distress, it is better and safer
to be a member of a labor union than
of any other known society. The labor
union will discharge its every obligation, and will go further than that. It
offers aid to the needy ones with not
the least stigma of pauperism. With
true fraternalism it lifts those who have
faltered and aids them to help themselves.1 .'
PAGE JIVE
Women Are EMigting
Mow Ai* Needed to Us*
Royal Crown Naptha Soap
9
log ttttn bf latum BOTAL CROWN
NAPTHA BOAP do tk* hart put of tt*
waiting (ot thom. Up » ooko ud jron
trill loot no tlma radiating.
Either drink good whiskey or bo a
teetotaler. Aak for "B.O. Special" and
avoid the necessity of .wearing off. ***
AN EAST WAT TO HELP.
A Little Thoughtfulness on tho Put of
Purchasers Smoothes th* War.
Honest, fellows, this advertising bus-
ines is a serious proposition, or we
would not be continually dinging it into your thick tanks. Without advertising the -paper would be a poor stick,
small and insignificant appearing. It
would receive no attention from you or
anyone else. With advertising, we can
make a showing of comparative pros*
perity before the public and impress
them with our strength.
Now, this is your paper. It is owned
by you and controlled by you, and
serves only your interests. Therefore
we have no hesitancy in asking you to
take hold and to do your part to make
it a howling success. Tou are spending
your money overy day, anyhow, and
spending it with our advertisers. Tou
have to, for we have most of the best
advertisers on our list now. The only
thing needed to make that expenditure
count for the labor movement is to say
just a few words when making your
purchase. Tou cannot conceive of the
magic in the words: "I saw your ad. in
The Federationist" until you have
tried it once or twice. A lot of you
are stating it. The rest of you ought
to. Begin to-day, and never make a
purchase without saying, "I saw your
ad. in The Federationist," and your
reward will be a bigger and better
labor movement.
HAMILTON OARHABTT
Tho world'* largest O-rarall Manu-
faetvav.
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
Toronto, Detroit, Unrpool, Delia*
Mr. UNION MAN
Do yoa boiler* ln British Cohabit;
LET us stand togttktr        <
My long years of exp.ri.nc. ku
made Carhartt'a overalls perflation.
I hav* op*n*d * factory In Vaoooint
to supply   Brttlab   Columbia   toad*.
THB   WORK   IS   DONE   BIOHT
HEBE BT UNION LABOB.
MB. UNION MAN, if your Mhf
won't supply you Carhartt'* orttoSa.
•and mt * postal with your walat ut
leg measure, and I will sa* thai jron
get thtm.
Writ* m* anyhow for a weekly tim*
book, engineer'* Unit book, or farmer'a account book. Th*** are fre* tt
you.
With a boon companion and "B. 0,
Special" gladness envelopeth the heart,
'and monotony taketh wings.
GOVERNMENT REFUSE AID
..;
Three Miles of Jobless March ln Winnipeg, Man.
Ten thousand jobless men assembled
undor tho Bhadow of Queen Victoria's
stntuo, Parliament square, Winnipeg,
Man., lust Thursday, und pleaded for
bread.
Premior Boblin was asked to divert
funds for work on now parliament
buildings to the purchnso of food for
starving unemployed. Ho waB also
asked to rniso a loan of *20,000,000 for
placing joblofls mon in Canada on Canadian farms, to bo sold to thom on easy
payment plan.
Tho promior said ho could do nothing.
Tho procession of unomployod was
threo milos long.
PHONE:  SETMOUB 0086
Kind Lady—Tou look to me like a
hard drinker.
Hobo—Oh, no, ma'am; it comes easy
to me.
A spark or a fused wire may
start a Are or destroy your homo
and belongings at any time.
ABE YOU INSURED AGAINST
FIRE7
If not, let us insure you against
loss in a •
GOOD  BOARD  OOMPANY.
DOW FRASER
Trust Company
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and  McK.y at.tlon,
Burnaby, B. C.
Grow Your Own
Vegetables, and cut down household expensw. In all our txpwlnc* w*
pant had n*tt*r vegetable growing Mock. D*dd* now—tt* ideal Un*
to tot; climate conditions art favorable.
SEED
POTATOES
AU tht Btlt for
Early Sitting
Parsnips, Carrota,
Lettuc, Radish,
Rhubarb, Bttn*.
Extra Good
2 lba. far SSo.
At AU Our Branches.   Catalogue and Information Pre..
ONION
SETS
BrownBros.ftCo.Ltd
FLORISTS, SEEDSMEN AND
NURSEBTMEN.
BOYS' SUITS
from $3.50 up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
309-310 HASTD«aa STBBBT WMT Phon. larmrtl 701
How Can I Make a Success
Of the Poultry Business?
EASILY   ANSWERED
Um an Bsmx Modal Hot
Alt or Jubllao Hot Wafer Incubator, and an International Sanitary Ho-
SUCCESS WILL
FOLLOW
\
Wo apaciallM in all
kinds of Poultry Supplies.
y   MARK DUMOND
Hardware and McOomlck Farm Machinery
1048 MAIN STREET Writ* for Catalogue and Prlcot
The Cost of Operating Electric Household Appliances
is Merely Nominal
STUDY THIS TABLE OF HOURLY COSTS
FOR OPERATING A NUMBER OF THE MOST
POPULAR APPLIANCES AND REMEMBER
THE COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE ENJOYED, ESPECIALLY DURING THE SUMMER
MONTHS, BECAUSE OF THEIR USE.
ELECTRIC IRON
4 to 5 Cents per Hour
Total cost varies according to frequency
and duration of use.
COFFEE
PERCOLATOR
31-2 Cents per Hour
Generally used from 15
to 20 minutes for one
operation
ELECTRIC GRILL
4 to 51-2 Cts. per Hour
From 15 to 20 minutes'
use prepares an ordinary light meal.
ELECTRIC TOASTER
5 Cents per Hour
Gives very intense heat,
but is operated for only
a very short time.
ELECTRIC WASHER, 3 CENTS PER HOUR
Total cost depends upon amount of washing
to be done
ANY OF THESE APPLIANCES WILL BE
DEMONSTRATED FOR YOU AT
OUR SALESROOMS
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts. 1138 Granville St
Near Davie PAGE SIX.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY  MAT 7, I
Men! Come to This Store
for Your Straw Hat
The weather Bays wear them. FflBhion as well as comfort says wear them
And you'll want to obey their orders when you see our 1916 straws—
handsomer than all previous styles, better too, yet no higher in prices.
We have the real Panama, and the popular boater styles—hats to fit every
head—blocks to become every face—and prices to meet the reuirements
of everybody's purse.   Bead:—
From Pann's
Potato Patch
MEN'S STBAW HATS of English sennet straw in boater style,
with black silk bands and leather
sweat band with medium high
crowns and 2 1-4 inch £4 QC
brims.     Price ......tpl.ttO
MEN'S HATB in New Tork and
British makes, of sennet and split
straws, with high taperingcrowns
and narrow brims, together with
tho more conservative styles,
trimmed with best quality silk
cord ribbons.     Prices
ENGLISH SENNET STBAW
HATS in pineapple weave, with
black silk bands, butterfly bow,
leather sweats, 3 inch crown and
2 Inch brim
Price	
MEN'S PANAMA HATS in the
newest and most popular shapes,
bought direct from the makers,
and blocked to suit our patrons.
The best, values to be had anywhere.   Prices—
$2.00
$3.50 to $5.00      $5.00 to $12.50
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
MAKE THB HOTEL LOTUS TOTO
HEADQUARTERS
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
Larg* Commodious Loung*
Room* and
Parlors
Largest and
fait OATE ln
the City
Tariff:
Without Bath
$1.00 up
With Bath
11.50 op
Absolutely Pin-Proof
HOTEL LOTUS
Howard J. Sheshsn, Ksntfer
WHITE NOW POR TOTO RESERVATIONS
Five Thousand Labor
temple Shares at Par
The Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depression.
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few
businesses in Vancouver which have a balance on the credit
side of the ledger at this time. '
With the completion of the Georgia-Harris street viaduct
very shortly, another step towards this section becoming
"newspaper row," Labor Temple stores will soon be in demand, whioh should result in dividends at the olose of next
year.
Vanoouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment
—conservatively estimated the property is worth three times
the par value of the shares.
The executive board have authorized the sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1,00 each.
Every union man in Vancouver should own- at least ten of
them.
Call at Room 211, Labor Temple, for particulars.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE CO.. Ltd.
-> VANCOUVER ♦>
City market
MAIN STREET
A TT P T T fi W  Are heW eTO'y Tuesday and
A U U 1 1U11   Friday at 10 A. M. K you
SALES
Potatoes
really wish to reduce the
cost of living, you can do so
by attending; the AUCTION
SALES
At Market Prices; these are
the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition
VaH a•*•* o hi Aa  A" k,n"s at most reasonaWe
V ege la UJ.69   prices; in quantities to suit
all buyers.
Apples- ■ ■
New-Laid
EGGS
Large variety winter stock
at $1.00 and $1.25 per Box
Are now arriving in large
quantities. You can always
rely on Eggs which are sold
as new laid
AT THE CITY MARKET
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
W* an making a Olaaranot of
all proant itock ot Offlce Finite*.
Com* tarty ind mak* your
eboloo.
EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
Tht moit importtnt, lh* meit vradnfol ud thi molt popular library «m
lawM.   Sma hudftd wlamti to Mtoot from.
8HKD FOB XiMT
THOMSON STATIONERY CO., LIMITED
OukoU Book * attttonory Co., Ltd.
15 Huttnfi Stroot Wort 679-611 OrtnfUlo gtrort
Great activity is apparent in agricultural circles. A new clam-bed haa been
discovered.
Buck Bilkine, a seaside rancher, haB
invented an automatic dip-net for the
rescue of children who fall out of the
garden. '<.
Mr. Hiram Hoskins left by parachute
yesterday for a trip to town,
A new conical-shaped variety of potato has been produced. It is claimed
that this potato will stay on the farm
in which it is planted. This will greatly reduce the number of accidents
among ranchers Who have hitherto been
obliged to pursue their crops down the
mountain several times a year.
Friends of Mr. Hank Hawkins will be
grieved to hear that he recently learned
the latin name of the cut-worm ahd is
not expected to recover.
LETTERS TO
ED
New Grocery Ittm.
Attention is directed this week to
the new grocery firm of Wm. H. Edgett,
doing business at 118 Hastings Street
west.
An All-Onion Moving Plctur* House,
The Colonial theatre, corner of Duns*
muir and Granville is one of the most
popular movie houses in Vancouver.
Manager Quaigliotti Ib not only an old-
time union man but employs none but
union men, a little something that a
few of the others on Hastings street
have overlooked. All tUngs considered
the union men of this elty should know
what to do.
Editor B. C. Federationist: Whatever
else may be thought of the Liberal and
Social-Democratic programmes, one is
constrained to admits tlie courage displayed. Both parties make a strong
point of the need for retrenchment in
the large staff of petty officers maintained throughout the province by the
government.
As thiB implies taking away the liv-
lihood of a large section of the voting
population it is not likely to be hailed
with universal, enthusiasm. Money
promotes general welfare only when it
moves, and expenditure is pf course the
prime mover. To those who have not
access to large, amounts of money, much
more is to be hoped for from an expensive than a saving policy.
A great many people are disposed at
pesent to credit the administration
with marked ability in having the
means to maintain a great deal of public work during conditions so distressing as those in which the whole country finds itself.
The great trouble is the lack of that
actual production which alone provides
a Arm basis for any civilization. No
country or provinoe can long carry on
work calling for large expenditure without permanent sources of revenue.
Credit has limitations. Any degree of
permanency is only to be derived from
the extensive operation of productive labor. Productive in the sense that it
must produce commodities that supply
the daily needs of humahity.The party
most likely to provide the greatest encouragement for such development la
the party entitled to receive the support of the electorate. From its personnel and the field from whieh it is
Provincial Election
Manifesto
Adopted by Vancouver T. &L. Council
The condition of th* working claw ln British Columbia has been
getting steadily worse for th* past five years. To-day it Is a hard
struggle for thousands of citizens to get mart bread and butter. Industrial activity la at a very low ebb, and the labor market is glutted
with workless* men reduced to the Indignity of accepting food at th*
hands of civic charity. The organised labor movement has spent a
gnat deal of Urn* and money during recent years ln gathering from
Ume to timo to consider tho industrial and domestic circumstances
under which th* working class of th* province works and lives. Ont
of thos* meetings bas com* the conviction that laws should be enacted
by th* provincial parliament, which would Improve the working and
living conditions, not only of thot* who are actually members of labor
Anions, but tho wholo working class and dttiena generally. Legislation of this kind has beon repeatedly asked for by organlied labor,
and just as repeatedly has it been refused by th* government. Many
strikes hav* taken place. Some of them have been long and bitter.
The industrial power of tht workers has boen tested to the limit of
ihen and money. But alone, and unassisted by sufflclent political
presetige, it haa failed to accomplish the work of securing the redress
which lt sought. Out of all this experience, haa come tho opinion that
labor must organiie its political power, to supplement lt* Industrial
infiuence, by electing working class members pledged to th* task of
securing U tho provincial Legislature tho passage of those laws which
labor Is convinced would bo to the Interest of the wholo of the working clan population.
Liberals, ilk* Conservatives, stand for the corporate ownership,
and exploitation of natural resources, by the wage labor of the workers for the sake df profit to be derived from it. Thoir party programmes contain no plan tor the transference of tho ownership of Industry from corporate hands to public control. Vancouver Trades and
Labor Council haa placed candidates In the field for th* coming provincial elections. Chief among the laws which will be sougnt through
lti representatives, if they are elected, ar* th* following:
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION
A Workman's Compensation Act based upon the principle of state
taxation of Industries according to tho risk Involved In them. Th*
revenue thus derived io be paid ont by a ttat* commission in the form
of definite awards to injured workmen according to th* gravity of
the injuries sustained. Legal fees, along with tho vexatious delays
and uncertainty of litigation, would be eliminated. Th* lata government brought down such a propond act at tbe close of th* last session
and Mid lt on the table for one year, it contains many faults from a
working claw viewpoint. Moreover then ii no guaranteee that lt
will b* pawed in any form without adequate working claw represents-
tlon ln th* next parliament. At the pnscnt moment it is no mon
than a scheme of til* Conservatives to secure the working daw vote.
ABOLISH ELECTION DEPOSITS.
The abolition of tho 1100 deposit which must at present be put up
for overy candidate nominated for election will ho fought for.
ADULT SITPPBAOB.
Adult Suffrage for both sexes In provincial elections.
WAGES IN LEOAL TENDER.
A law making lt Compuliory for all employers to pay wagea In
legal t*nd*r Instead of cheque, Ume slips, etc.
BI-MONTHLY PAT DATS.
Th* payment of wages ln all Industries at Intervals of not mora
than two weeks.
EIGHT-HOUR BAT.
/ Legislation providing for the eight-hour day ln all industrial, and
a maximum working week of not mon than ilx days.
IMMIGRATION SUBSIDIES
Tho abolition of the practice of panting government subsidies to
immigration concern!.
THB LAND QUESTION.
An expert investigation of the records of   the  Department   of
Landa,   Th* subsequent expropriation of   lands  fraudulently   held.
Better facilities for small pre*emptors,   and  long-term   government
loans, at low interest, for thos* desirious of acquiring small holdings.
PREE TEXT BOOKS.
Tho free provision by th* government of school text book* In all
grades of public whooli.
THE UNEMPLOYED.
Tha establishment of a comprehensive government schlm* of productive publlo work for the relief of the unemployed at a minimum
wage of 93.00 p*r day of tight hours.
The parliamentary work of candidal**, if elected,, will b* dir*ct*d,
flrst of til, to tho task tf securing legislation dealing with th* f ongoing matters. Thty will alio be required from tim* to timo to present the claims and demands of the working class on all current questions affecting lti interests.
Edgetts
The Store of Plenty.
118 HASTINGS BTBBET WEST
PBOVISION DEPARTMENT.
BUTTEE: Celebrated Edgewond
Local   Creamery—reduced  to  old
Price 3 lbs. for *1.00
HAMS—-Swift's Premium   Cured
Picnics, at Us
BOOS: Strictly New Laid Locals
i dos. tor 11.00
OBOOBBT  DEPABTMENT.
Specials
TEA:  'Edgetta' our Ceylon only
    25c.   per  lb.
Regular  60c.   Seller
COFFEE:  'Edgetta'    our   Fresh
Ground  (Special)   ....  26c. per lb.
Equal any 40 cent sold elsewhere
SUGAR:     181b.    Sack    Rogers'
Granulated (flne)    11.40 Sack
FLOUR: Seal of Alberta, No. 1
Hard Wheat, 491bs. sack, no better value—Regular 12.85 82.00
CREAM: B.O.   or   St.   Charles,
8 tins   ;    25o
CANNED GOODS: Salmon, regular 20c    2 for SSe.
Okanagan Plums only lOo.
Extra Special—In Horn, Ptai, Torn**
Wei 3 tins for 26c.
farm department
APPLES:    Nice    Sound    Fruit
Special     11.15 per box
ORANGES:  Fresh    Juicy  Stock
10c, 20e., 80o..  per doi.
LEMONS: 20o. do.., extra large 85c.
ONIONS: Spaoial LaxsTHard Onions
lOlbi. fer sto.
POTATOES: OMUIwack, only 90c. Ik.
Strawberries, Lettnce, Orten Peas.
Oakes, Aipamu, eto., fresk every
morning.
* fchone Order, delivered promptly
Seymour 6866
Mall orders shipped day received.
Store open 7 a.tn.*7 p.m. - Saturdays
till 11 p.m.
drawn, the Labor unionists' ticket certainly calls for consideration.
I NECTBALIS.
| Victoria, B.O, May 3, 1915. '
Poor whisky undermines the national
character. "B. 0. Special" saves the
I situation. ***
Acquire the true British Columbia
spirit. Make "B. 0. Special" your
favorite liquifier.   That is, try it once.
Say "B.O. Special" Whisky. Don't
be put off with "something just as
good."   It does not exist. *"
THB TELEPHONE
The advance egint of.
OOMTOBT AND CONVENIENCE
Forms a closer anion of Home, Bull*
ness and Friendi
FOR A LIMITED TIME
Business   or   Residential  Telephones
will be Installed upon payment of
16.00 Rental in Advance
For particular, call Seymour 6070
Contract Department
B. 0. TELEPHONE COMPANY,
LIMITED
AROUt!
^clbffeAwc
acco.
HOYT'S
„ 10 Cent Cakes
"ALWAYS FRESH"
ASK YOUR GROCER
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vludovlli*  Mesne
PANTAGES  VAUDKVILLI
THRU (HOW* OAILY
!.«, 7.10, J.15    Saaeon'a   Prlcee:
Matinee, IBo.) Ivenlnga, 16o., Me.
Take that-Watch to
;     APPLEBY
who will tell you what Is the
matter, coat and guarantee all
Repairs.   438 Bichards Stmt
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturer* of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing. Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offlce: 40th A Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
rtewSey. SI
Dar sr M|ki
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
ud EMBALMERS
S20 Richard. St.        Vaacemr, I. C.
CENTER ft HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 OlORdIA STRUT
One Block  west of Court Rous*.
Us* of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
Telephone Stymour MS5
HARRON BROS.
RENNIES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS £REE
Write, Call or Phon* for a Copy TO-DAT
. Wm. RENNIE CO., Ltd
1138 Homer St Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, B. C
Alio at Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg
To England Under Neutral Flag
m__m_______mmm^___m_u_mm_m_j___im_mmm^_m*_
American Line from Nfc# YOrk-Liverpobl
Large fast American Steamera under American hag
Cabin Rate   __ __ ss. "st. Louu"....Miywtt
'Bt Paul"....May sand
"Haw tork...May 20th
'Philadelphia" June lth
, and Weekly thereafter
and UP Cabin and third claas only
Company's Offioes: 619 SECOND AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
OR LOOAL RAIL AND STEAMSHIP AGENTS.
wmatamm
^abin Kate ss.
$50.00 S.S.-":
CANADIAN
STANDARD PLOTO IS IBB HIGHEST IN IBS WORLD
OGILVIE'S
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD
CANADA'S BEST FlOtfit
TRY IT i
UNION MEN
HOTEL REGENT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Distance
nuiHL HLUH1U   phon> ln Ever„ RoomCafa In Connection. Ratea
•1.00 per day up.    Attractive Ratea to Permanent Quest*.
OeWajkMi A Beatty, Proprietors IN Haitian Itreet Ian
Boiidence: list Sink Street.
Fkene:   Barrio* 1I00B
(Mice:    Ot Birks Balldinf
Phone:   Seymour 7075
Vancouver, B. O.
DR.A.McKAYJORDAN
SO Yean*a Specialist
Eyes Examined    —    Glasses Pitt*d
Personal consultation' ttiity aa* Saturday
Bitttou thraunl patients tt B. 0, thorn*
anli ef whom praviooaly scleral from
chronic Stomach aal Heart troubles, lack
anl Headache, ia Imaiaace ef tke cause.
Don't Tall St* Tour IrouUas.   I'll Till
tkSBL
lefereaoe:  Hauler ef this paper.
B.C
B.C
Distillery
Co., Ltd.
Established 1903
B. C. Special
RYE
Whisky
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
ba
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for "B. CSpeclal"

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