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The British Columbia Federationist Mar 12, 1915

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 [INDUSTEIAL UNITY:  fYTBENGTH.«
[Seventh -ye^T no. 11.
OFFICIAL PAPER : VANCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOH COUNCIL AND B.C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
.POUTIOAL UNITY: VICTOBYI
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 12. 1915.
(In Vancouver\
 C.trja.00 I
$1.50 PER YEAR
W I Pf
OF &IMLMN
['Keynote One Union — Membership Increases But
Unions Decrease
ICoal Miners Are Steadily
Winning a Long and
Stubborn Fight
OF
Governmental    Authorities
Refuse to Act and Work- '
ers Stand for It
Employers Decide to Ignore
Law and Starve Slaves
into Submission
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W,, Feb. 13.~The
annual conference of the Australian
'Workers' union opened at the new labor daily office, Sydney,, January 28th
last. There was a large gathering of
delegates from all parts of Australia.
The representatives of the journal ex-
'changed fraternal greetings with members of the conference, The president
_ of the conference, who is also post-
mmaster-general in the Commonwealth
parliament, gave a rousing address on
the value. and growth of unionism and
advocated the boosting of the "one
' union'' in the interests of the working
class.
■ He showed how the industrial move-
['ment had grown in Australia. In 1861
there were 124 unions with a membership of 54,888. Last year there were
710 unions with a membership of 497,-
925. Thua the unions have multiplied
nearly six times, while the membership
has multiplied nine times over. Australia led the world in union strength.
Organisation Percentage High,
The proportion here is 89 unionists
per 1,000 of population, England comes
j next with 71, and Germany third with
J 65. But there is a growing feeling here
that there are too many unions as
[seperate bodies. It would be far better
Jto have a closer welding together, al-
[lowing always for the industrial inheres ta of any particular section to be
Jconaerved. The one union question must
lbe faced, and that very Boon, in view
of the growing tendency of the other
side to fight.
Steps have already been taken to expand the operations of the union.. In
West Australia the General Workers'
union has come into the Australian
Workers' union. It is hoped1 that soon
the Australian Workers' union will
reach the 100,000 membership mark,
and thtiB absorb one-fifth of the total
unionists in the entire Commonwealth.
There is no reason why the wholo of
the unionists here cannot be in one
union. The Australian Workers' union
has alwayB advocated, this and it is
thought that the time is now come
when all unions must come in.
Miner's Btrike Still On
, The coal strike, over the afternoon
shift, that has now lasted for nine
months, is stilt on, and likely to continue for some time yet, though it is
ipparent that the coal barons are not
ilighting with the same vigor as of old.
Formerly they refused to make any concessions to the men at all. Now they
-vant to make some concession, but the
nen, seeing thnt they are winning the
itrike on all points, have refused to
jive way on any point whatever. The
nen, too, are gaining a great de-il of
lympnthy from the public, nor are they
mshed for finances.
Another Conference Held,
i A further conference was held at the
lend of January, wilm tbe coal barons,
[but although the owners offered some
Jusoncessions, which they have never
■lone before, the men refused to accept
them. The men have asked that tho
afternoon shift be abolished at various
times up to 12 months hence, according
to the development of tbe mines. One
or two of the mines on Btrike are purely in the development stage yet. They
were also willing to work for three
i months on the afternoon shift without
[nny extra pay, but after that date, till
! the shift was done away with, they required extra payment—0 cents per ton
extra on all coal won.
Mine Ownen Stubborn.
, The proprietors refused to have anything to do with these proposals. "Very
,well," said the miners' spokesman,
"there is nothing more to be said.
Good day." Now the barons did not
expect this sudden shutting up of mat-
, teres. They surely tnought that the
men would argue the mater out. So
when tho men wore willing to go, saying that it wns the last time they would
approach the coal barons, the oonl
, barons asked tho men to atay a while
till they thought the matter over.
I This wob exceodingy gratifying to
|the men, who could see that tho barons
| were giving. The barons came forward
then with a counter proposal, offering
6 cents per ton for pick-won coal and
i cents for machine won coal, taken
out on the afternoon shift, in addition
to present rates. They also asked for
three years in which to abolish tbe second shift.
Owners Important Admission.
The men woud not accept this, but
one good thing has come out of the
conference. The owners of the pits on
strike have aeknowedged that tbe
second shift can be done away with by
fixing a time limit themselves. This is
a fact that they have strenuousy de-
lied up to this date. They have always
mid that they would be ruined if the
iecond shift was done away with.
Now they are willing to do away
ivith it in three years. This it bo much
von to the men. Tho men now think
bey can ask the government to step in
md abolish tbo shift, as the owners
,ave acknowledged they can do with-
>ut it. -Even the plute press of Syd-
ley, N* S. W., say the owners should
;ive in to the men now tbat they adult they can do without the seoond
hift. W. F. A.
!■ Miners Btand Fat
The coal miners in West Virginia
tve decided by an overwhelming veto
rainst delegating their officials to set-
b the eleven months' strike through
ie good offices of Secretary of Labor
'Uson. Officials of tbe United Mine
orkers of America interpret the note
mean that the men feel their demand
r a 47-cent. mining rate cannot be
bmitted to arbitration.
BOWSER AND McBRIDE WITH
THEIR BACKS TO THE WALL
The pernicious system of sub-letting
contracts Ib not confined to railways, in
thiB province. It extends to even, government work, and is deliberately used
ns a moans of evading the eight-hour
day and'the $3 minimum wage. It goes
further. By sub-letting the Taws of the
province are violated and set at defiance. There iB a law on the statutes
which clearly defines mat men Bhall not
work, or be permitted to work, underground for more than eight hours out
of each 24 hours. But it is a matter of
common knowledge that this law is being ignored and no attempt is being
made to see that its provisions are enforced.
Not only are the authorities negligent
in this respect, but, truth to tell, the
workors themselves seem to be scared
stiff and ready to lay down like oxen
while the boss rubs it in. This beeause
the condition of the labor market makes
jobs very uncertain.
If there are employers mean and
small enough to take advantage of the
necessities created among workingmen,
as a result of the war and food-grabbing patriots, there should be fight enough and manhood enough left in any
wage-worker to resent the imposition
in terms so emphatic that they need
not be misunderstood.
Joint Sewerage Board an Offender.
Iii order to carry out a comprehensive
schome of sewerage for the territory
termed, Greater Vancouver, a Joint sewerage board was recenty named by the
provincial government, and1 each of the
municipalities was assessed at a ratio
agreed upon, to carry out the plans.
At the commencement the day labor
system was adopted and a minimum
wage of (3 enforced. Then followed
the old-time contract letting. This in
turn -was followed by sub-letting, with
all that that implies.
Now, it is asserted, that the third
parties are working two ten-hour shifts
per day at 20 cents per hour, underground and otherwise, in contravention
to all the laws of tbe land and1 ordinary
decency.
The- matter has been drawn to tbe
attention of the commissioners, but
there it ends. Appeal to the government? No use; too busy getting ready
to cop off working class votes on April
10th next. The fool-killer Is working
short timo and the stupidity of the
working class is reflected in many
many just such examples as noted
above.
Women's Olub Dance
The Union Women's Social club will
hold a dance and social evening in Labor Temple next Wednesflay night. A
good live programme is prepared, and
will well repay those who invest 25
cents in the price of admission.
No Labor Candidate
New Westminster Trades end"L*abor
council decided last Wednesday night
by a vote of 12 to 4 against putting a
labor candidate in the field at the coming provincial election.
Longshoreman Stabbed
Edward Somes, a union longshoreman
was stabbed last Wednesday during the
course of an interview between somo of
the longshoremen who are on strike and
some strikebreakers.
ORIENTALS IN
HOTELS DISPLACE
WHITE LABOB
' 'I have no color prejudice, but
I think ln this caw and ln the interest of efficient white female labor ln this city the board might
put a white labor clause In the
granting of hotel licenses, so that
work being done by Chinese help
to-day may be done ny white women who are now out of employment. " In these words Miss Outterldge, appearing on behalf of
the Women's Employment
League before the. license commissioners at tht city hall last
Wednesday afternoon, made her
application. The board decided
after some discussion, to hear the
hotel point of view at their next
regular meeting. Miss Outterldge appeared also as did Mr.
Graham on behalf of the cooks
and waiters' union. There were,
she said, between 400 and 600
Orientals employed ln the city
hotels whose places could be satisfactorily filled by white women. Mr. Ireland had told her
that there were 18 cooks, six waitresses and SO hotel helps receiving city relief. That meant that
the city wae keeping them, In
addition then were on the hooks
of the Women's Employment
League 136 women used to general house work and who could
do chamber work ln hotels,
There were alio cooks and chamber maids, housekeepers and
waiters numbering 344, all out of
employment and suited for such
work aa was being done hy Oriental! and particularly the bedroom work.
The parliament of British Columbia was announced u dissolved last Monday. A new one is to he elected. The McBride administration, one-of the most
insincere and shameful groups of politicians which have ever been ln control
of the affairs of the province, ia to-day a thing of the past. It has gone Into
the discard. It belongs to the limbo of tilings which are ng mor* because they
have more than outlived their use.
The arena of British Columbia politics is, for the time being, swept clear of
the iniquity which has defiled lt for the last ten years, Those, ten years have
been a decade of brigandage and piracy. The natural resources of the province
have been gambled and squandered, Financial sharks, land crooks, and Impostors of every hue and kind, have found a welcome awaiting them at the
seat of government lu Victoria. Public credit bas been bled I white by McBride to line the pockets of his friendi Mackensle and Mann. Every adventurer who could put up a plausible story, and a sufficiently picturesque appearance to catch the mountebank fancy of McBride has been welcomed with open
arms.
Now the reaction has come, and the grey dawn of the morning after confronts this political prodigal with the desolation Which ts the natural result
and outcome of his policy. Men, women and children are starving. Not figuratively starving, but actually wanting bread, notwithstanding their willingness
to work for lt. Here ln this land of virgin opportunities, with millions of
acres potentially productive, but actually barren, human beings are reduced to
the indignity of the bread line by the wanton mismanagement of the government which has Just relinquished office. And what alternative is it which
offers? The Liberals ln exchange for the Conservatives? What a. choice!
Wbat have they to suggest as a substitute for the sickening farce whieh has
masqueraded under the name of a government Criticism and condemnation
galore. But so far as we can see they have not a single constructive proposal
to offer. Tbey lustily belabor McBride and all bis works, but that does not
answer the question of What would the Liberals do? They bave no programme,
no policy, and for that matter no party nor men big enough to produce unity
in tbeir divided ranks. The wretched record of the McBride administration has
been a godsend to the Liberals, because criticism of it distracts attention from
the fact that nothing is offered in Its place.
That Is the situation, despite the fact tbat from end to end of the province
tbere is a seething revolt against the callous attitude of the late government
towards the real suffering of the working people ln every district, Time and
time again during the last two years, delegations have visited Victofla armed
with absolutely indisputable evidence of the widespread privation which prevailed, and shewing that unless something was done to relieve lt there would
be worse to face later on.
Those prophecies have proved only too true. But the invariable answer
was that there was no money to inaugurate any such comprehensive plans as
the dire needs of the case called for. But how that the accumulated results of
mismanagement have forced tbe government to seek a new lease of life before
further revelations make it useless for them to do so, McBride actually says
one of the chief reasons for dissolution Is tbat more millions must be provided
for one of the railway corporations which is already gorged with money raised
on the credit of the province.
That is characteristic of the policy of the MoBrlde administration from
start to finish. Whenever these vampires want more blood, plans are soon made
to give it them. But when it is a question of bread and bare sustenance for
citizens and tbeir families the wail Is made that the time Is not opportune for
raising money to put any scheme. Into practice.
It has reached the point of nauseation. The political fabric of British Columbia is rotten to the core. It needs tbe knife. The only section of th)
electorate which has any real plans and policy which lt could put into effect
if lt had the political power to do bo, ts the organized labor movement. Let lt
have a chance.
WHAT IL BE I
NEXT MONTH
Will Humiliation of Bread
Line Revolt on Day
of Election
Opportunity Again Presented to Workers to Make
Effective Protest
HELP FOR THE ^
UNEMPLOYED
The Central Employment and
Belief committee earnestly ' appeals for htelp for over 1,400 unemployed in- id register. The
majority of. these are married
men with families.
Wbat ia asked:        \   -   '
1. Gifts-of money to be used only
in providing work of a remunerative character.
2. Work, odd jobs and perman
ent positions. All hinds of
labor can. be had at once.
Employers, ranchers and con*
tractors are invited to use the
bureau, which is free.
3. Citizens  to  join  the  employ-
ment club. Members undertake to Supply so much work
or its equivalent in caBh
weekly; an hour's work or 25
cents; four hours' work or $1,
and so on.
Call up Dr. Millar, the bureau
superintendent.   -Phone 1637.   •
Cheques to be sent to Alderman
Porter at the city hall.
PARLIAMENTARY
COMMITTEE MEETS
NEXT WEDNESDAY
At last meeting of Vancouvtr
Tradea and Labor council It wis
decided tbat each trade union organisation would ba asked to send
three representatives to the meet-'
Ings of tbe parliamentary committee, instead of one as heretofore.
Tbe next meeting of the parliamentary committee will be- held
in tbe Labor Temple on Wednesday evening, March 17th, at 8
o'clock, and every onion should
see that lta fiat quota of delegates aro present
This because of tho decision
of the central labor body to place
a full ticket of six candidates In
tbe field at tbe provincial elections, to bo hole some time next-
month.
The sudden announcement of a
general election will of necessity
somewhat change the programme
of local unionists In tbe matter
of procedure in nominating candidates, but if every union will
do its full duty to their respective membership the difficulty
can be easily overcome.
Obstacles ara only created to
be overcome.
Let every union In Vancouver
be represented at next Wednesday night's meeting of the parliamentary committee, so that
fully-considered recommendations can be made to the regular
meeting of the Trades and Labor
council, which meets on tbe following evening, March 18tb. *
ONE STRIKE IN JANUARY.
Some Wage Increa&eB But Mostly De-'
creases.
There was one strike reported to the
department of labor during last Jan-
uury, and this affected only fourteen
employees, nnd was settled within three
or four days after commencement. Tho
number of strikes carried over from the
previous month was four, says the latest issue of the Labor Gazette, A num/
ber of changes in wages were reported
last month, a few being increases, but
most of them decreases. In reviewing
tho conditions of labor, mo Gazette
Btates that agricultural work was for
the most part quiet; conditions in the
Atlantic fisheries were fair; lumbering
operations generally were fair, tout in
the maritime provinces were active. In
a number of lines manufacturing waB
fairly busy, chiefly those engaged in executing orders for war material and
industries engaged in the preparation
or manufacture of foodstuffs.
MESSENGERS OO ON  STBIKE.    j
Readjustment Results in Payment on a
Mileage Basis.
The meBBenger runners of the*local
C. P. B. offices went on strike during
the past week, because of a rearrangement, by the company, in the wage
schedule. Prior to this week the company had been paying 2Vj cents per
inside call, and 7 cents for outside calls.
The new ruling made it 2 cents for inside and 10 cents for outside calls. On
Monday the boys mot at Labor Temple
and arranged for a committee to meet'
a committeo of the company. It was
later announced that a settlement had
been reached, with a Blmilar system of
payment to that prevailing with the
Western Union, on a mileage basis.
The messengers of the company have
decided to organize properly and line
up with local labor forceB, bo that in
future they will bo In a better position
to have some Bay governing conditions
under which thoy must work.
Timberworkers Settle Strike.
The strike at Port Angeles in which
more than a hundred shingle weaver
members of the Timberworkers' International union have been engaged for
130 days, was settled last week by a
compromise, the men accepting the day
wage scalo instead of the scale for
piece work, says the Seattle Union
Record. While this means a trifling
reduction in wages, it is in fact a moral
victory, aa the union men have been
attempting to secure a day wage scale
for many years.
Municipal Ownership.
Nelson, B. C, city council has granted
free light to the Trades and Labor
council of the Kootenay capital. This
because the central labor body discovered that the same courtesy had
been extended to the board* of trade
during the past six years, and immediately went after the same privilege.
The request was granted.
New Temple for Labor
Tho new San Francisco labor temple,
the home of the San Francisco Labor
! council, has been formally opened. The
i building is one of the most complete
labor assembly structures on the continent.  Its cost was more than (160,000.
Harry Bolton, president of tho Seattle labor council and vice-president of
j the State Federation of Labor, has been
(elected city councilman of Seattle.
CULINARY TRADES.
General Routine Business Occupied Attention of Last Meeting.
A rather poorly attended meeting of
Local 28, Cooks', Waiters' and Waitresses' union, was called to order at
8:30 p. m., March 5th, in Boom 206,
Labor Temple, President C. Davis presiding. Outside of routine matters
there was very little business transacted, the only interesting feature of a
rather dull session being a discussion
as to the attitude of Local 28 on the
question of segregating the culinary
workers and the bartenders into two
international unions, a subject which is
receiving a good deal of attention
among the general membership and
one which promises to occupy a very
large place in tho deliberations of the
eighteenth biennial convention of the
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International League of America, to be
held in San Francisco early next June.
On being granted the privilege of the
floor a representative of The Federationist gave a short address, in which
he supplemented tho contents of a circular letter received from the management of that paper, and dealt with at
the previous mooting. A regrettable
feature Of the past week in union culinary circles was the closing down of
the 'Couver Cafe, 40 Hastings street
west—a victim of tho general business
depression prevailing at this time. The
passing of the 'Couver removes from
the list of union houses one of the all
too few strongholds of Local 28, and,
apart from the unlooked for addition
to the idle roster of the union, will be
a distinct loss to the organization.
FARM HELP WAGES.
Dominion Government Figures Show a
Decline.
According to a government publication just issued, dealing with tho wages
of farm help, the average wages per
month during the summer, including
board, were $35.55 for male and (18.81
for female help. For tho year, including board, the average wages were
$823.80 for males and 4189.35 for fe-
males, whilst the average cost of board
per month works out to (14.27 for
males and (11.20 for females, as com
pared with $12.49 and (9.53 in 1910.
Average wages per month in 1914 wore
lowest in Prince Edward Ialand, viz.,
(24.71 for males and (14.48 for females;
in Nova Scotia they were (31.20 and
(14.80, and in New Brunswick (31.93
and (15, In Quebec the averages were
(33.5(1 and (15.05, and in Ontario (32.09
and (10.67. In the western provinces
they were for mnlea (39.13 in Manitoba, (40.51 in Saskatchewan and
(40.26 in Alberta, females receiving
(22,35 in Manitoba, 922%6 in Saskatchewan and (28.63 in Alberta. The
highest wages were paid in British
Columbia, viz., (47.85 for males and
(31.18 for females, these averages being substantially loss than in 1910,
when males received (57.40 and females
(38.
[By John Day.]       I
VICTORIA, B. C, March 9.—The
Central Employment committee of thiB
city is very eager to give publicity to
the attached, so will ask The Federatlonist to help them. Some 1,400 unemployed and tho majority married
men! Members are requested to supply so much work or its equivalent iB
25 cents or four hours* work (1.—(2 a
day for married cen with families!
6, Canada! .
I visited the superintendent during
the week, and had to practically force
my way througa u crowd of eager hungry-looking fellow-citizens, some of
them who did not know mo, jealous for
fear I should supersede tbem, and rob
them pf perhaps less than the $2. I
saw posted up applications for mechanics. I requested the superintendent to
inform mc if it was not possible* to allow these men an opportunity to wait
in the Labor hall, where thoy could hide
tho shame of boing forced to stand un
der the public gaze. A telephone call
was all that would bo required- Nothing doing! Mr. Super's demand was
that his wishes must be considered,
namely, every man and woman must
sign a book, showing that his or her
condition warranted this humiliation,
nnd then stand outside amongst the
crowd and take their turn.
Our financiers in the Old Country
would be well pleased To See thiB crowd
in the supposed land of plenty. The
best of our men fighting for their country in France, running the risk of
death; the best of our men fighting for
their wives and children, to get a loaf
in Victoria or else starvation. If you
want to hurry a man don't push him,
but kick him, he will get there quicker.
Sure, if kicks won't make a mnn think,
then what will? There is ono place that
a man never gets kicked, nnd that is
the mistuke. The kicking should be
done in tho ballot box. The opportunity is coming quicker tban wns antici-
ed.   Now is the time to think!
The Price of Goal.
Coal mining in 1914 cost the lives of
3,3 men in every 1,000 employed, while
in the year 1913 the death rate wns
3.73. This reduction means a saving of
more than 300 lives, reports the United
States bureau of mines. The number
of mlnerB killed fo* every 1,000.000
tons of coal mined in 1914 was 4.81.
In the year 1913 there were 4.69 miners
killed for every 1,000,000 tons mined.
GENERAL If If
ALL SHIPPING
Cut  in  Local  Longshore*
men's Wages May Result
in Trouble Spreading
Coast-wide Strike Would
Tie Up All Shipping at
Canadian Ports
MINERS' BENEFIT CONCERT
Balance Sheet Showing Proceeds and
Their Disposition
The South Wellington Miners' committee fund report a collection of (54
from the Imperial benefit concert, held
March 7th: Expenditure — Theatre,
(23.25; signs, Abbott ft Castleton,
(4.50; programmes, etc., 25c; balance
expenses, met privately—leaving balance of (26, placed in Bank of Montreal, pending satisfactory arrangements
for transference to losponsible parties
at South Wellington. The committee
desire to thank the Musicians' union
and -others concerned with this affair,
and tho labor movement for services
rendered on that occasion. On Monday
evening, March 15th, a concert and
dance will be held in the Finnish
hall, corner of Clinton and Pender
streets (Hastings east car line), at 8
p. m. Admission 25 cents. The proceeds
for the widows and orphans of South
Wellington disaster. The programme
includes.; Nelson Shaw, elocutionist;
Miss Louise Hounsell, contralto;
Messrs. Crissy and Jean Anderson, violin solo; songs, exhibition dancing, etc.
See press announcements.
MINERS' BENEFIT CONCERT
Held Sunday for Bereaved of South
Wellington *
A benefit concert was given on Sunday night, in tho Imperial theatre, for
the widows and children of the victims
of the South Wellington mine disaster
A band from the Musicians' Union attended under the direction of Mr. Hunt.
Air. Edward Bird presided and made an
eloquent appeal. Mr. Edwards spoke
and "Felix Penne" read a poetical
elegy on the victims and an appeal
which was warmly applauded. Miss
Frank, Miss Snee, Miss Rose Rosen-
gard and Mrs. Carson accompanied, and
Miss Izen, Miss Leah Rosengard, Mr.
Meyrick and others contributed to an
interesting and excellent programme-
The collection "will help some"—but
it is hoped that other concerts to bo
given will be also well attended and
generously supported.
Aid Given by Unions.
Trades unions on the American continent raised in 1913, (14,139,328. Nearly (9,000,000 were expended In death
benefits; only (3,500,000 for strikes.
The (1,355,000 used for sick benefitB
seems relatively small, but not all unions mako such allowances. The Typographical union paid (242,660 in old age
ponsions.
Organizing Rifle Factory
Lnbor organizers do not stand much
show to get in touch with tho workers
of tho Ross Rifle company plant in
Quebec. It is protected by a barbed
wire foncc, with soldiers on Bentry duty
everywhere in evidence. Tho works are
going full force every doy and -night
and organization is a slow process,
However, headway ia being made and a
number of the employees are now in
line with the International Association
of Machinists.
Competition Too Personal.
Donald U. McGilllvray, motorman,
2076 Third avenuo oast, was injured
ono day last weok by n jitnoy while
getting off a street oar at Prior and
Main streets. Mr. McQillivray was
rolled under the maohlno and Is said
to have escaped most serious injury by
a miracle. As it was, he was badly
brusiod. A doctor was summoned, who
ordered McGilllvray taken to the General Hospital.
Miners' Relief Committee Formed.
A committee hns been formed to receive subscriptions for the relief of tho
widows and orphans of tho unfortunate
miners who lost their lives in the South
Wellington disaster on Feb. 9, 1915.
Subscriptions, however small, will be
thankfully received and acknowledged
by N. Wright, treasurer of tho relief
committee, P, O. Box 6, South Wellington, B. C.
Make War Budget Feed
Mayor Martin of Montreal hns writ-
ton to Premier Borden, proposing thnt
municipalities throug-nout Canndn
should be allowed to draw on tho Canadian war budget for whatever money
they need to support tho unemployed
until hotter times come to Canada.
Dally People Suspends.
'Hide Daily People, the newspaper of
the Socialist Labor party of America,
has been forced to suspend publication
pending the reorganization of plana for
financing it.
EX-ALD. HEPBURN
SAYS 13 WAGE IS A
THING OF THE PAST
Mr. W. Hepburn, according to
a newspaper report or a meeting held by him in pursuance of
his campaign for tbe mayoralty,
said: "The trouble with some
people was tbat they could not
realize that the period of the
three-dollar-a-d ay wage was gone
for ever, and that he believed 30
cents per hour was enough for
civic employees." Such a declaration makes very plain what
working men must expect from
Mr. Hepburn if he Is elected
mayor of Vancouver to-morrow.
But Just because he says the day
of the (3 wage is gone, that does
not settle the point. If that day
has gone it will be more tbe fault
of the workers themselves tban
anyone else. As long as they can
demand that wage as the result
of their organization they will
get lt, and no longer. Mr, Hepburn has a mania for cheese-poring—for it is a mania with him—
Is well-known to all who followed
his career as an alderman. He
seems to be obsessed with the
Idea that if a thing is cheap It
necessarily follows that everything else about it is satisfactory.
It Is to be hoped that all workmen who want to Bee wages go
down will vote for him to-morrow.
"The general public are not aware
of the complicated nature of the ship*
ping industry and in order that OUT
position may be thoroughly understood
it iB advisable to review the situation
from May, 1913, when we entered into
an agreement with the employen, up
to the present date," said John Keen,
president of the Paelfle Coast Long*
shoremen, to The Federatlonist, on
Thursday.
"The agreement referred to waa sol
all tbat was desired by the longshore*
men, but was entered into by them il
a spirit of good faith, and we lived up
to it as long as it was in existence,
and have since Its expiration been eon*
ducting our business along the lines
laid down in it.
This agreement, whieh is a public
document, specifically provided that all
truekers and pliers should be not alone
union men but they should be ordered
from the union hall.
Employers Violate Agreement,
"At various times and by varioui
methods employers, under this agreement, have violated its terms, either by
resigning from the association to which
they, formerly belonged, by legal subterfuge, such as changing the name of
their company or (through the influence they appeared to hold in their aa*
Bociatlon) by openly ignoring it.
"On March 1st, without any notification, the employers cut the wages of
a large number of longshoremen, which
cut, by reason of the nature of our'
work, affected all of our members, and
taking into consideration the past attitude of the employers, there was nothing for the longshoremen to do but refuse to work.
"In accordance with instructions re*
ceived from the Vancouver, B. C, eon*
ventlon, tho district offleen were ne*
gotiatlng with the employen on the en*
tire Pacific coast, with a view to se<
curing better wages and conditions for
tbe men. When the war broke out the
British Columbia memben of our association requested the district offleen
to postpone their activities. Thia re*
quest was deemed wise and considerate
on account of the effect industrial unrest might have on the helpless men,
women and children of the warring nations.
May Order General Tie-up.
By the request of tho employen of
San Francisco, some of whom are operating out of Vancouver, the district
officers were negotiating an agreement
with them, which would insure industrial pence for a given length of time,
whon they received word that the Vancouver longshoremen 'a wages had been
reduced from 25 to 30 per cent., they;
immediately came to Vancouver, and
found tho situation of sufficient importance to warrant them in convening the
entire executive board of the Pacific
coast district, for the purpose of reviewing the situation, and according to
telegraphic advices received from members nf tho board I am justified in stating that a strike will be declared
against nil shipping coming from or going to Canadian ports, which will, undoubtedly, lead to a coast-wide action
against all shipping.
"In this connection, we wish to point
out that the majority of foreign shipping happens to be British.
"The responsibility of creating this
situation, which may yet involve all the
longshoremen of the continent, will, undoubtedly, in the minds of fair-minded""
citizens, rest on the employers of British Columbia, who will be called to tho
bar of public opinion, for creating this
situation in the time of the nation's
crisis."
"Business is Business as Usual."
The Labor Leader, Great Britain, under the caution of "Business is business as Usual," states cases of soldiers'
wives and children being ejected from
their homoB while their husbands aro
fighting the nation's battles, Bays the
Voice. "Tour king and country need
you" slogan does not appeal to some
landlords in regard to a- soldier's
family. The contracts for great coatr
are also qnoted as follows: Material;
3s. 3d.; wages, 2b. 3%d. The great
coat is then Bold to the war office foi
28s. Women get 3d. for making a pail
of trousors. It also quotes the Territorial shoe scandal. This evidently
shows that tho "patriots" in Great
Britain line up well with our own
"Proflt Patriotism."
Jewish Printers Lead tho Way
The Hebrew-American Typographical
union of New Tork is still 'way ahead
of everything elso in the labor organization line in tho country when it comes
to counting working houn and wages.
No. 83 has just signed up a new contract by which its upward of 200 members will recive (30 a week with gradual increase to (34 In 1919, when the
contract expires. The men will work
four and one-half hours on morning
papers and six hours on evening papen.
Years ago, before thoy were organized,
the Jewish printers worked lo houn
per day for (5 per week.
Non-union Firms Vetoed
Ban Francisco board of supervisors
has declined to consider bids for printing from non-union firms, and has approved n proposed charter amendment
making compulsory tho ubo of the union lnbol on all city printing. Thia
amendment will be voted on at tho special election next month, and is intended to mako legal a former resolution of city officials, which has been
declared void by the supreme court on
tho ground that a union label resolution is in conflict with the competitive
bidding clause of the city charter. PAGE TWO
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Total Anete 180,000,000
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It yon oan save each week
even a amall amount yoa are Invited to open a Savings Account
with The Bank ot Toronto.
Small depositors are aa well
cared tor as large ones. A dollar
will start a Savings Account, and
interest is added to Savings Balances halt-yearly.
MS HASTINOS STBBBT WEST
and
Corner HMttngi tnd Carrall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities ln Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stook aad
Tonltry. British Columbia
Orants Preemptions ot 160 acres
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TERMS—Residence on tho land
tor at leaat three years; improvements to tho extent ot 45 per
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at leut Ave aent.
For further information apply to
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THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlihed  every  Friday  morning  by the
B. C. Federationitt, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Office: Room 217. Labor Temple
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: 11.50 per year; in Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
in a body, $1.00
REPRESENT ATVEB
New Weitmlmter.. .W. 8. Maiden, Box 984
1'rinoe Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 581
Victoria A. S. Weill, Box 1688
Affiliated with the Western Labor^Press
Association.
-——-%	
■Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FBIDAY    MAECH 12, 1015
PBOVINOIAL
GENERAL   .
ELECTION.
THE TIME HAB COME which all
organized labor has been await-
for tho past tbree years.    A
goneral provincial eloction is to take
pluco    soon.     What     is     the     labor
movement going  to
do about it!   Is its
voting strength
again to be split up,
divided, and made
futile by being
squandered and distributed among the
old political parties! Or iB it to be
concentrated ia aa effort to secure by
political means some at least jf those
luws which labor has been seeking for
years? All possibility of labor legislation being obtained by economic press^
uro alone, and without 'organized political endeavor, is just so much foolish
tulk in face of the experience of the
last ten years? ,
t      •      •      •
As long as conditions were comparatively good for the working class in
British Columbia, it could afford to
tread the paths of political dalliance
by toying with academic demonstrations of the ultimate certainty of its
economic emancipation. But confronted with the stern necessity of finding an
immediate solution of the problem of
how to provide bread and butter for the
needs of to-day, it is forced by the sheer
pressure of its circumstances to seek
practical methods which will accomplish
that end. The various trades councils
throughout the province have been asking the late government for legislation
in the interests of the working class for
yoars with pitiful results.
t « « *
The B. C. Federation of Labor as the
provincial body representing organized
labor has now held five annual sessions
at considerable expense to the movement. After each of those gatherings,
the perennial pilgrimage of the pleading proletariat has performed its genuflexions in the executive chamber at
Victoria. It has "ever humbly
prayed" and tried all the methods
which maudlin mendicity could suggest.
With what result?  Nothing.
And now, with all this experience as
a guifle what is to be done? There are
signs all round that organized labor will
take practical measures in its own interest in this election, and providing it
decides to do its own work in its own
way nothing but good can result
from it..
wish to make
such a matter.
a mistake in regard to
A1
PERHAPS
THERE IS
A REASON.
USTBALIA BUYS most of its
prepared lumber from United
States, according to the statement of a prominent saw mill company
official of Vancouver. In his opinion,
that is a bad thing
for British Columbia, and he is desirous of securing governmental help to
persuade the Australian government to give a preferential tariff to British Columbia exporters. This is nothing that organized labor need assist him in. On the other
hand it might be more desirable to go
out of the way to inform the Australian
government that practically all prepared lumber exported from here is the
work of cheap Oriental labor. They
have no love for such products in Australia, and it is very likely that is the
reason they buy mostly from the
States, where Oriental labor is not used
in the business of preparing lumber for
Bale. Here, as is well known, a man
might just as well apply for a job on
the planet Mars, as expect to get work
■" a lumber mill, unless he ia a Hindoo,
a Chinaman or a Japanese.
w
ECONOMIC
DETERMINISM
AT WORE
HEN THB WAR STARTED
the keynote of the American
press was neutrality. That
attitude was not due to any fervent
desire to condemn the horrible things
going on in Europe.
It aroBe from longheaded business instinct. If no friends
were claimed in either camp, It would be
easier and more profitable to sell goods
—including munitions of war—to both.
Big business was in sight and only fools
would sacrifice it to moral considerations- Now a blockade has been declared, backed up by threats to sink
or confiscate all cargoes of whatsoeer
kind, consigned to any of the countries
at war.
• * • «
American shippers are wrathy. They
did not mind the price of food stuffs
rising in their own country as the result of their shipments to Europe. But
now their dreams of exceptional profit
are dispelled—or at least seriously disturbed—they apparently would not object to plunging their country into the
shambles. It is to be hoped that pressure of opinion in America will prevent
any such disaster. If it does, then the
American shippers will be found among
the most ardent advocates of America
using all its influence and efforts to
bring about peace in Europe. Business
knows no morals, but it does know Its
business, i
PRAISES
PROM THS
GOLD BUGS
THE FULSOME EULOGIES showered on Lloyd George and the
cabinet by the bankers at their
annual meetings Bhould give food for
thought. That they .should heap
praise so plentifully
upon a man whom
they have unitedly
denounced hitherto
is proof positive
of a generous hand
to help them with the people's money.
The action of the government in August last undoubtedly saved the com*
mercial and banking world, if not from
ruin, from a disorganisation more serious than it actually was. How much
this assistance will cost we cannot estimate, but we can be sure that it will
be enormous; and the rendering of the
same service to the people in need, actually in want, aB a result of the war,
would have oost an insignificant sum
compared to th^s. Soldiers' pensions,
dependents' allowances, and alleviation
of distress needed a strong agltatidn,
and the increases were only given in a
niggardly way. The people and their
needs are but a secondary matter with
the government and the bankers' praise
iH a shameful indictment.
A Liberal love-feast is propheeied.
They will eat each other.
South Vancouver municipal council
bents any labor convention ever held
in British Columbia or elsewhere.
The capacity of the working class for
suffering is one of its least admirable
traits.  It is a vice it carries to excess.
The charge "Labor is never satis-
fled" is the highest compliment that
could' be _ paid it. Progress is eternal
dissatisfaction in practice.
Joe Martin's climb down of last Saturday, would be sufficiently ignominious to send any man really fit to be
trusted with public ofllce into retirement.
Government relief work has been
started this week in the vicinity of
Cumberland, Vancouver island. A provincial election will shortly be held.
Brrr.   Sit down.
Special, constables engaged to patrol
Vancouver water-front during the longshoremen's Btrike nre being paid $2.50
for 11 hourB' work, It needs, a very
desperate or particularly mean type of
man to do such a job.
w
SOUTH
WELLINGTON
RELIEF WORE.
E HAVE RECEIVED an appeal signed by "N.
Wright," asking us to give
publicity to the fact that a relief committee in aid of the widows and orphans of the miners
lost in the South
Wellington disaster
February 9th last,
has been formed to
solicit subscriptions,
Mr. Wright's address is P. 0. Box 6,
South Wellington. In publishing this,
we would suggest that any such appeals
should bear the signatures of the local
officers of the miners, also the seal of
their union. The communication we
have received carries neither. Moreover, it would seem to ub a desirable
thing that alt such appeals should come
from one central committee, so that
those who are able and wilUng to contribute can bo quite certain about what
they are doing.
»       t       •       •
At last meeting of Vancouver Trades
and Labor council, a request was made
that the council assist in securing a
permit to hold the benefit concert which
was held last Sunday night. The assistance waB gladly and successfully given.
But the person who applied for it,
whilo unquestionably of good faith and
perfectly bona-flde, was not known to
the council as a representative of the
minors or their relief committee. For
theBe reasons, and to protect both the
minors and those who are desirous of
helping them, we would suggest that
nil appeals for aid should bear plain
evidence of having tho sanction of the
minors, We know the miners, and are
anxiouB to do all we can to help them
and thoBO who aro helping them. But
we do not know others, and we do not
BOND BUYING
TIME
Tour spring dividends can now bo placed at an exceptional advantage.
A» Fiscal Agentswe oflfor City of Alberni nineteen yoar
♦100 dobontures at a price to yield 7 per cent, not, interest
payable half yearly.   Circular on request.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
 Patrick Donnelly-General Mana-gcn
LABOR
VOTE IS
THE TEST.
LIBERALS ARE DIVIDED into
many camps in Vancouver. Each
of the more prominent of them
has a following, and each of them is
anxious to convince the other by proof
that he is the most
important factor,
and the central
point round which
all the rest should
rally. The test
which is to decide the point is this: The
group, or person, which can prove that
it or he is able to produce an alliance
between the liberals and organized labor, for the purpose of putting a joint
ticket in the field to contest the six
seats in Vancouver, will be the winner
in the contest.
That being the situation, it Is not to
be wondered that personally, and
through their agents and henchmen,
they are moving heaven and earth to
bring about their object. One argument which is to be used is, that the
election has come so suddenly and taken both the liberals and organized labor
so much by surprise, that neither is
really ready for it. And that in consequence it would be a wise thing to join
forces. It is a really pretty scheme,
and all in due time, if it appears to offer hope of succeeding, an effort will be
made to pull it off. For the present we
will let it rest at that. In the meantime, those who do not want to see
labor ditched in the moraBs of liberalism will do well to keep their ears to
the ground and their eyes peeled.
WILL IT
MAEE ANT
DIFFERENCE'?
S IT POSSIBLE for politicians to
to patch up a lasting peace! Or
Ib all tho torture and brutality of
war always to end in preparation for
the next! Are the sons of men to be
periodically butchered, women outraged, the lives of
children blighted,
and the social works
of patient labor to
be destroyed all for nothing! What
will be the gain to mankind when the
last cannon has ceased its shrieking,
and the last man has been cast into Mb
namelesB hole in the eartht Will poverty have been banished from the
world! Will children cease to be born
to linger and die from starvation!
a        a        a        a
Will one in every four of the
inhabitants of the biggest city in the
world still die in a workhouse, a prison,
a hospital, or a lunatic asylum, as they
do now! Will men cease to live merely
to work, and at last gain an equal share
in tho things which go to make up the
beauty and joy of life! Will the rich
who now profess it a privilege to stand
in the Bnme trench as the poor, surrender any of their strangle hold on the
UveB of tho poor after the war! War
is called a great leveller, but unless the
levelling process is extended to the time
of peace, there will still be a war on—
the only ono really worth the while of
the workers.
Now that ahe has turned out flighty, he
uses that fact and tries to make a virtue of necessity. The whole thing is a
scream of mixed motives.
Many critics are so constructed that
their critical faculty will not work
while in meeting and the persons criticised are present. But on street corners
and in back alleys it travels a mile a
minute.
  i
The Austrian minister of education
has adopted the British plan of authorizing the employment of school children
in the fields, In a country like Austria, where conscription prevails, there
is more excuse for such an iniquitous
proceeding than in Britain,
The capitalist press, which says it
is always friendly to labor, has published far and wide that Elihu Root,
an exploiter of labor, was recently
awarded a Nobel peace prize, but has
kept singularly silent about the fact
that i.enri Ln Fontaine, working class
member of the Belgium senate, was
awarded a similar prize at the same
time.   Why!
What percentage of the children who
come into this world are here because
they were really wanted by their parents! If the question is answered honestly, it brings forth the unflattering
fact that about two thirds of the population of this world was never really
intended to be here, but came for the
reason that it could not be prevented.
Lnmbeth workhouse authorities—
Lambeth is where the bishop of London has Mb palace and his $15,000 annual salary—decided that in order to
bring home to the pauper cMldren in
the house the gravity of the war and
their responsibilities in connection with
it, they must forego the annual breakfast egg wMch they usually got at
Christmas. In Dickens' day Bumble was
a man.  Now he Ib an institution.
"Two hundred native Hindoos in
costume, taken from the lumber camps
of British Columbia, will take part in
the animal section of the parade"—
Seattle Sunday Times, last Sunday, describing a street parade to be held in
Los Angeles next Monday.
"News.Ad." last Sunday- "We are
trying to get along in this province
without alms-houses, or municipal
homes, such as are found in the east.
This may not always be possible." The
"News-Ad." evidently believes we
shall be thoroughly civilized in British
Columbia some day.
At last session of the provincial parliament, provision waa made for the
payment of a sessional allowance of
$1,500 to "the recognized leader of the
opposition,'' in addition to Ms ordinary
salary. This is following the method of
ex-federal Premier Laurler. Just before the close of the last federal parliament similar action was taken. Then
the- Laurler administration was defeated. It looked like preparing for the
deluge. Is McBride doing the same for
the same reason!
Some advocates of compulsory military service, have a clumsy way of
pointing their arguments, which their
opponents should be thankful for. Lord
Methuen, arguing in favor compulsory
cadet corps, quotes the example of the
South African citizen army thus:
"Little did we anticipate that
within three years this force would
have scotched a Btrike and quelled
a rebellion."
If he had only understood his case
half as well as we do, he would have
left out the strike part at least.
No race on the face of the earth
occupies such an ironical position as
the Jews. Despised and rejected of
men. Socially ostracised. Hunted
from country to country till they haye
none to call their own, they yet wield
through some of their more prominent
mon a life and death influence over the
affairs of mankind. It is they who
have the final say in whether war shall
be, continue or cease. The "honor" of
nations is tho collateral security of
these international pawnbrokers.
The cow thnt jumped over the moon
had1 nothing on the bum bovine which
jumped on Mr. Price Ellison, the provincial minister of finance. How he
could treat a cow with such a nice
name like that, we cannot understand.
She was called Meta Clothilde P.,
bought by the government for $420, and
sold to tho portly Price at the price of
$75. If it had been a father cow instead of a mamma cow, no doubt he
would hnve been an old reprobate more
than deserving of Mb fate. But to
treat a lady so, only adds to tho argument that the age of chivalry is dead.
The crowning touch in the farce was
supplied by Ellison's answer. After
Baying that he never saw dear (!)
Meta before she was sent to his farm,
he went on to say that sho turned out
to be a bad bargain, and for that reason he should not be accused of questionable prnctice in buying her so
cheaply. The point as we see it iB,
that he did not buy the lady becauso
he knew sho wns not all she ought to
be, but for exactly the opposite reason.
In the political world we have the
same disintegrating spirit in operation
which runs through our industrial and
commercial systems. To suoh an extent
has this spirit demoralised our professional politicians that the most base
misrepresentation of each other is regarded aB mere clever partisanship, and
too often the most dishonest Ib the most
honored. WMle ostensibly they go to
parliament to make laws for the good
of the whole people, yet when they get
there the great majority of them spend
tho most of their energies in party
wrangles and in the interests of financial groups.
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
3. 3. JONES, Man. Director. J, A. BENNIE, Sec.-Treas.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATORS AND EECEIVEES
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STOBE8 AND MODERN SUITES FOB BENT
at a Big Seduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Beat at $2.60 up
Wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Fer Cent. Allowed
on Dally Balances.
BUIINMt  AUINT  DIRECTORY
VANCOUVER UNIONS
Ask for Libor  Tomplo  'Phono Exchange.
Soymour .7*495   (union  otherwise  stated).
Bartendern—Oeo. W. Curnook, Room 208.
Bricklayers—Wm.  S.  Dagnall,  Room  215.
Cooki, Walters, Waitresses—- Room 208;
Andy Graham;   phono  Ber. 9414,
Electrical Workors (outside)—-E. H. Morrison, Room 207.
Elect.rieal Workors (Inside)—F.' L. Estinghausen, Room 207.
Engineers (steam)—Room 816; B. Prendergaat.
Laborers—John Sully, Room 220.
Longshoremen's Association — Offlce, 145
Alexander itreet: F. Payne; phont Ber.
6850.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfield, Rooms 804-805,
Lafcor Templo,
Stroet Railway Employee!—Fred. A. Hoover;
phone Sey. 508.
Typographical—R. H. Neelands, Rooms 212-
18-14.
TRAD!  UNION   DIRECTORY
Reeve Gold of South Vancouver according to newspaper report, describes
himself as the "Chief Magistrate,
whose main reason for sitting here is
that he iB one of the moat heavily interested property owners in the municipality. '' Such candor is unique. We
always thought men in his station occupied their offices and carried out
their duties purely and simply from a
desire "to serve the people." This one
iB evidently sometimes na truthful, aB
he is eligible to be the big noise in a
donnybrook. His brutal honesty is as
rare as his namesake is in the pockets
of South Vancouver working men.
America and Mexico remind ub of a
police-sergeant in Leeds, England. He
had been on the force many years. A
row started one Saturday night In one
of the slums just after the "pubs."
closed and the sergeant waB sent thither
along with a "green" man who had
just joined the force. On the way to
the front, the older man did not walk
quickly enough for the enthusiastic tenderfoot, who urged him to get a move
on. The wise one said "We are going
quite fast enough. The more they wallop each other before we get there, the
i they will be able to wallop ub, and
we can handle 'em much easier that
way."
"It is folly to complain about the
lack of opportunity so long aa yon vote
to give the power of employment and
credit of the country to those who will
flnd it profitable to limit opportunity.
MENTION THE B. 0. FEDERATIONIST
PHONB SBYMOUB 9086
^^_^__n__wf^
THIS TRUST
COMPANY
performs Invaluable service to
the community, alike Important
and necessary.
Service Is our keynote, and faithful service ahould be valued and
appreciated
Bring us your
Financial Business
We Know How
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
Notary Public
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouvtr, and  McKay Station,
Burnaby. B. c.
Cloae at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Allied Printing Trades Council—R. H. Nee-
lands, Box 66.
Barbers—S. H, Grant, 588 Georgia atroot.
Bartenders—Qmu. W. Cuniuoh, ituum
208, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Matoolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders:—W. H. Cowderoy, 1885 Thirty-
fourth avenue east.
Hi-ik-itiiaiu-i.- -a. fraser, 1161  Howe St.
Brewery Workera—Frank Graham, Labor
Temple.
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
215, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenters Dlstriot Council—F. L. Barratt, Room SOO, Labor Temple.
CinarmakerB—Care Kurts Cigar Factory, 72
Water Street.
Cooks, Waiters, Waitresses—Andy Graham,
Room 206,  Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside )-~E. H. Morrison, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workeri (inside)—Room 207; F.
L. Estinghausen,
Engineers—E. Prendergast, Boom 816, Labor Temple.
Granite cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workera—Labor Temple.
Horseshoers—Labor Temple.
Lottercarrlers—Robt.   Wight,  Dlstriot  82.
Laborers—George Harrison, Room 220, Labor Templo.
Lathers—Victor R. Midgley, Labor Tomplo.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineers—0. Howard, 607 Davie itreet.
Loco. Engineers—A, E. Solloway, 10SI
Purine.    Tol. Sev. 86711*
Longshoremen—F. Payne, 10 Powell street.
Machinists—J. H. McVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 804-806,
Labor Temple.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B.C.
Molders.
Moving Picture Operators—L, E. Goodman, Labor Temple.
Painters—J. Tram, Room 303, Labor
Tempte.
Plumbers—Room 206 1*2, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plastt-rei-s—John Jamea Cornish, 1808
Eleventh Ave. Eaat.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4869 Argyle Street.
yuarry Workers—James Hepburn, eara
Columbia Hotel.
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. MeCorvllle,
Box 248.
Railway Carmen—A, Robb, 420 Nelson
Street
Seamen's Union.
Structural Iron Workers—Room 208, Labor
Temple.
Stonecutters—James Rayburn, P. 0. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers.
Btreet Railway Employeea—James E. Griffin,
166 Twenty-fifth avenue east.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482.
Trades and Labor Counoll—Geo. Bartley,
Room 810 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H.  Neelands, Box 66.
Tailora—C. MoDonald, Box 503.
Theatrical Stag* Employees—Geo. W. Allln,
Box 711.
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
TRADES    AND    LABOR    COUNCIL  J
 Meets first and third Thursdays. Exe-,
cutiye board: Jas. H. McVety. president;
narttvJt*Sag]miMn*   ^president!    G»<
Bartley,   general   seoretary,   210   Labor
SEP1?  %iw H*  Outteriifie,  treasurer;
Fred A.  Hoover,  statistician j  sergeant*
-mriSh Jo&? S^ft A> J" Crawford, twd?
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees,
AU#?D  £WNTINO   TRADES    COUN-4
CIL.—Moots  second  Monday  In  tha
tary, R. H. Neelands, P. 0. Box 66
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No.' 676.-OF-
„ floe, Room 208 Labor TemDle Msata
flrst Sunday of each nmnthTpra."^
F. F. Lav gne; flnanolal secretary, Oe£
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor TempleT
BRICKLAYEBS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
« „ « e£ta evej;yw1»t and 3rd Tuesday,
8 p.m., i-toutn 307. Preaidftnt lamii
Haaleti: •grremo-lag^'SSSSar'y, W™2
Uagnall, Bo; 63; flnanclal seoretary   F.
iaitWSi JiT""'■"■•• W* * fW
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILEH MAKERS
.nd Iron Ship Builder, ud Helper.
ot Auterio., Vanoouror Lode. No. Wl—
Meet. Int and third Monilsrii i n «.
President, t. ButUt7o.es Oo'rSorf %aSi
secretary, A. Fraier, 1181 How, .tru't.
COOKS,    WAITERS    AND    WAITRESSES
Union—Meet.    first    Friday    in    eaeh
month, 8:80 p. m., Ubor Tomple.    A. Graham, business representative,   office:   Room
206, Labor Tsmple.   Hour.:    8:30 a. m. to
10; 2 to 6 p. m.   Competent help furnished
on abort notice.    PhoneSeymoiir 8.14.
DISTRICT    COUNCIL   OF   OAgpgNTEM
meet, ln room 209, Labor T.mpl., ..»
ond and fourth Thunder of eaoh month. «
P. ra. Preeldent, G. £ Hardjrj iemUry.
JVL Barratt; treaiurer, W. T.*TayloT L*
oal No. 217 meet. Unt and third Min-
nay of eaeh month, and Local 2647 mMta
«m jnd third Tue.d.y of eaeh month
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. 21S
—Meete room 801, Labor Temple, every-
««?■'S1 8, ?' mV. ,PM-l--«n'. Sam. C.wk.7
557 Tonipluton Drive: recording secretary
B. Hogan, Labor Tomple; financial secretary
and business agent, i. H. Morrison, Room
207, Labor Temple.
ORGANIZED  LABOB  COMPANIES.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED—
Dirocton: Jas. Brown, president; R, P.
Pettipiece, vlce*presldent; Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, Oeo. Willi)*, W. J. Nagle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing director and secretary-treasurer, J.
H. MeVety, room 211, Labor Temple.
0. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—Meets
at call of president, Labor Temple, Vanoouver, B. 0. Directors: James Campbell,
president; J. H. MoVety, secretary-treasurer;
A. Watchman, A. 8. Wells. R. Parm. Pettipiece, manager, 217 Labor Temple. Tele*
phone:    Seymour 7401
WILLOW HOSPITAL
FOB
SICK CHILDREN
Corner Broadway and Willow
Phono Fairmont 2165
Hlsi HaU and   Miss  Worthy,
Graduate Nurses
PANTAGES
Un.quall.il Vaudeville   Muni
.    PANTAOES  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.48, 7.20, 2.18     S.aaon'1   Price.:
Matin.., 180*1 Evenings, 1!c, Me.
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MINING  REGULATIONS
Coal mining rlghta of th. Dominion,
tn Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
tha Yukon Territory, the Northweat Ter-
rltorlM and ln a portion of the Province
of Britlah Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one yearn at an annual
rental of fl an aore. Not mon than
2,680 acrea will be leaaed to one applicant.
Application, for lease mult be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlatrlct In which th.
rlghta applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and ln unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application muat be accompanied
by a fee of IB, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not avallabl.,
hut not otherwise, A royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of th.
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for th. full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghta
are not being operated, auch returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W Ht CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement wtll not be paid for—MI80.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.'
...iJ2!. ('•»'••• Men)—Meete first and
tlilrtl Mondays of each month. Room 206.
■8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; recording secretary, J. M. Campbell: busl-
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 107.
HODCARKIERS, BUILDING AND COMMON
ill jLib?;i,r'' »nl0°! ""• 86—Meeta Snt nnd
thlrd_Friday of each month, Labor Temple.
President, B. C. Appleby, 1410 Pendrlll St.;
secretary, Ooorgo "Harrison; business agent.
John Sully, room 230, Labor Tomple. Alfi
laborers invited te meeting.
MACHINISTS,   NO.  182—MEETS  SECOND1
i »t*Va '-"mh FId*-" *' 8 ■>* m* •"•rasMsnt,
J. Mclvor; recording secrotary, J. Brookea*
financial secretary, J. H. McVety.
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL    PROTECTIVE
Union, Lycal No. 148, A. F. ot M.—
Meets sscond Sunday   of   eaoh  month,
•"—. n»M. ouuuny    oi    eacn  m
802 Laber Temple.   President.  J.   BVwrwj
 -—"-'   fi   "  ■" • "    r. K /.
;lce.presidsnt, F. English; secreUry, _. ..
BrasHold; ^treasurer, w. Fowler. Phon.
Seymour 7498.
PLASTERERS' OPERATIVE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 80 —
Meets every first and third Wednesday ln th.
month in room 801, Labor Temple, Presl*
dent, A. Hurry; vice-president. A. Berentsen;
corresponding secretary, Joe Cornish, 1802
Eleventh avenue east; flnanclal secretary,
George Montgomery; treasurer, Harold Reld)
PAINTERS'.. PAPBRHANOERS'. AND
Decorator;', Local 138-Meota every
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Oram);
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, 102!
comox Btreet; recording seoretary. H.
Dowding, 622 Howe street. Business
agent, James Train, Room 803, Labor
Temple.  '   *"■""■
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE Ot
NORTH AMERICA—Vancouver and
violnlty. .Branch meeta 1st and Srd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 205. Robert
C. Sampson, Pros., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos. O. Lyon, financial secretary, 1731
Grant street! .J. Campbell, secordlng see.
retary, 4888 Argyle street.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYP-
,„ ."S D.n,lon.' No* 8I' »' Vancouver and
Victoria—Meets Becond Wednesday of
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. President, Chaa. Bayley; recording secretary.
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser;"
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY Eli-i
PLOTEES, Pioneer MvMoa. NoVtol-
Meets Laber Temnle Int and third W.dnee*
days at 2:80 antf 8 p. m. Prasldsnt, Joe.
Hubble; recording aeeretary, Jaa. I. Grlfln;
financial aeeretary and business agent. Fred.
A. Hoover, 2400 Clark Drive.
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 887—Meeta every Wednesday
I p. ra., room 204, Labor Temple. Flnan-
clal secretary, B. Prendergast, room 111.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meetinga
held first Tuesday In eaoh month, 8 p. m.'
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; reoordlng
secretary, C. MoDonald, Box 508; financial sec, K. Paterson, P. O. Box 603.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, MO. IM—
Msets laat Sunday er eaeh month at I
?• "■' Jfre.,ld;.*"' "' p* Fsttlplese; vlHpnsl-
aent, W. 8. Mstsssrj secretary-treasurer, B.
H. Neelanda. P. 0. Box 68.
PBOVINOIAL UNIONS
B.    0.    FEDERATION OP LABOR—Meeta
In annual convention in January. Executive offlcors, 1018-16: Preaident, A. Watchman ; vice-presidents—Vancouver, W. F.
Dunn, J. H. McVety; Victoria, B. Simmons;
New Westmlnstor, W. Yates; Prince Rupert,
W. E. Denning; Revelstoke, J. Lyon; District 28, U. 31. W. of A. (Vancouver Island),
S, Guthrie; District 18, U. M. W. of A.
{Crow's Neit Valley), A. J. Carter; secretary-treasurer, A. S. Wells, F. 0. box 1588,
Victoria, B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Connell-—Meets overy aeooad and
fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor ball.
President,  H.  Knudson; flaanelal aeeretary.
R. A. Stoney: general     „.
Maiden,   P. 0, Box 084.   Tbo publlo la Invited to attend.
aeoretary,
PLUMBERS AND BTEAMFITTER8" LOCAL'
No. 496—Meets every aeoond and foortfe
Friday of month in Laoor hall, 7:80 p. m.
President, P. Webster; ■ecretary, A. He*
Laren. P. 0. Box 950, Now Westminster,
B. 0.
VICTORIA, S. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR OOUNOIL—Meets flrat and third Wedneaday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston atreet, at 8 p, m.
President A. S. Walls: seoretary, Thos, f.
Mathlson, Box 803, Victoria, B, 0.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Minora—MMta
Sunday evenings In Unloa hall, Preaident,
Alex, Wilson; secretary-treasurer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. 0.
MENTION THE B. 0, FEDERATIONIST  I
_ . Of America <-Q** •-"*■■■■
^™
■py
-Mpapm
OITIOIAL     PAPBB    VAUOODVER
TRADES   AHD   LABOR   COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
omoiAL ram
tnoiA
PIDMATIOM   or  LAMB
SEVENTH YEAR.   No. 11*
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 12,1915.
SIX PAGES.
Our Display of Summer
Wash Goods is the Talk
%     of the City
We never had iuch a showing u this season.. The variety
is almost unlimited and the prices are enticing and tempting*
Wise shoppers are purchasing now, while the stock Is complete, instead of waiting till later, when many lines will naturally be broken, • These several lines are specially worthy
of notice..   Bead  ..       •       ,   .
WHITE VOILES—1 inches at, per yard.. tOc. to 66c.
ORIMPLED WHITE CREPES Yard. 80c.
WHITE COTTON MARCjUISETTW at «c.
and '. 88c.
WHITE SFOTTEP SWISS MUSLINS-Per Yard 30c.
WHITE OOTTON RATINES-YMd. BBc.
WHITE POPLINS—40 Inches wt«, Yard 60c.
WHITE PIQUE COEDS At 50c. and 86c.
SWISS EMBROIDERED VOILES       11.00
to $r.60
MATTING WHITE SHIRTINGS — Per Yard 26c* and 36c.
WHITE OOTTON OREPE-Yard 60c.
-WHITE CASHMERE DUCK—Yard 26c.
tafittdson'sBauCompanjL
iwwMtti  nn     www i artmlta, ttatitt tanmitutata \
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
HAKE THE HOTEL LOTOS TOUR   '
HEADQUARTERS
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
160
ROOMS V
100
With Oonnect-
lng»Bat»s
Largest and
Beat CAPE ln
the Olty
Tariff:
Without Bath
$1.00 up
With Bath
$1.60 np
Absolutely Tire-Proof
HOTEL LOTUS
Howard 3. Shoehan, Manager
WRITE NOW FOR YOUR RESERVATIONS
CROWN and BRIDGE WORK
Dr. Brett Anderson, dental expert and specialist ln Crown and Bridge
work. Formerly lecturer and demonstrator of Crown and Bridge work,
College of Dentistry, University of 8. O.
OOLD AND PORCELAIN CROWNS, Each I 6.00 UP
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth.      6.00 UP
PERFECT FITTING PLATES ' 10.00 UP
AMALGAM FILLINOS        1.00 UP
ENAMEL FILLINOS      2.00 UP
OOLD FILLINOS.  2.00 UP
Painless methods. Work guaranteed.
Dr., BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour 33S1 Offlce:  101 Baok of Ottawa Building
Great
Saciiflcoa •» being mtdt to clou til fupufluoui Stook
at tho Storo of
Wm. TURNER
A TtBit to oar ito» wUl oasily conrinco you wo aro doing thli.
PRICES now woro ao Low and wo can inpply Anything
or Everything (or tht homo ln tbo way of Koniehold
FURNITURE
Particularly note that Pricei aro Lower thu ever.
Tour opportunity ia NOW1   Save yonr dollara.
Every article guaranteed aa xepnaented.
,wr,.     mTin-M-rn 906GRANVILLJ1
WM   TURNER Next*• *•"-M«k«*^
Event
Phone:   SEY* 8746
Boy's Department
SUITS THAT WEAR
Mad. with double aeati sad double elbows th.lt an "built to wear." Honest
maSrlali and Son.it workmsMhlp ara oamblutd to produce reallj dur.bl. and
Ions lived suits
Ther com. la D.B. and Norfolk atylaa. at prlcea from
$3.50 Up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
300-315 HASTINOS STBBBT WEST -fl-one Seymour '02
Thomson
I *   Stationery Co., Ltd.
M. 3. OA8KELL, Pres.
Stationery Printing and
Bookbinding
; 326 Hastlngi Street West
VANCOUVER, B. O.
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
We are making a Clearance of
all present stock of Offlce Furniture.
Oome early and make your
choice. •
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street West * Vancouver, B. O.
HfiTITI  mrnPNT Ai>»olutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Dlatanco
nUlJUiKIiUEini   phone ln Every RoomXafe In Conneotlon. Rates
Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests.        ♦
-     * ' lie Haatlnis Strset Bast
Sl.00 per day up. _- _
otuaiua A Beatty, Proprietors
PENDER HOTEL
618 FMDIB STBBBT WEST
New, Modern, Flrt-Ulua
team mated, Elootrle Lighted
Telephone Soymour 1989 -
j    Rates 11.60 per Pay end Up
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447  2337 Main Street
THE JfTNEY BUSSES
' UNITED-
More Than 4500 Running in
Forty American
Towns v
Large Jitney Companies Organized in the Bigger
,     '       Cities
There are about 4,500 jitney bAses,
of every type and description, in opera*
tion iji the United States to-day.
In Spokane they are fighting- for
stringent regulation of the "jitney
johuB,"'as they are called.
Three million dollars taken in fares
from the street railway companies will
be this year's achievement of the Los
Angeles jitneys, according to an auto
expert on the spot.
In San Diego the railways are trying
to get an injunction out against the jitneys, before they are ruined by them.
From Pueblo, Colo.; Salt Lake City and
Ogden, Utah; Nashvile, Tenn,; Birmingham, Ala., and scores of other points,
complaints^ are arising, from the street
railway offices.        „
Perhaps the most ironic situation of
all, however, is in Toledo, Ohio,
Here Councilman John Mulholland
has introduced an ordinance to collect
some $45,000 from the street railway
company as back rental for the use of
the streets and to use this Bum for ea*
tablishing a municipal jitney line to
compete with railway company!
One of the most novel developments
of the whole jitney business Ib reported
from New Orleans. "The jitney is the
people's own conveyance." thinks Dan
Foitel, president of the Jitneyville Company. So he has thrown the stock
books open to the public, and passengers are actually buying stock in the
concern and paying for it in car fare.
Another jitney novelty is reported
froin San Francisco, where jitney tunnels ■- under downtown street cornels
are being planned to eliminate the con*
gestion.
The Monterey and Pacific Orove
Street Bailway Company, which has
been operated by the United Railroads
of San Franseisco, has defaulted its
bond and is being driven out of business by the jitneys.
Watching these developments, a
representative of one of the biggest
automobile concerns in the country predicts that the trolley cars will be chased
f torn the streets in many cities, and the
jitneys too.
'' Automobile expresses, built expressly for carrying ten fo twenty people
through the city streets, will replace
them/' he declares. It is known that
several manufacturers are at work on
the idea to-day.
The following Items, culled from recent dispatches, give a rough idea of
the jitney situation throughout the
United States:
Salt Lake City—Twenty pay-as-you-
enter jitney buses, seating ten people
eaoh, have been ordered to-day.
San Antonio—There are 100 jitneys
in regular operation hero. They are
tremendously popular on Sunday, when
more than 200 are running.
New Orleans—There will be j.00
twenty-passenger buses lh operation
soon, .according to officials of the company, who claim they are making $10
a day per car at present.
Kansas City—The jitneys number 200
now and are carrying 40,000 passengers a day.
Spokane, Wash.—There are ninety
jitneys running regularly here, while a
(50,000 corporation is planning to install fifteen thirty-passenger buses soon.
Portland, Ore.—America's largest jit*
ney bus company has just been incorporated here.   It is a (200.000 concern.
Denver.—In spite of the efforts of
private interests to nip the jitneys
in the bud by passing an anti-jitney
ordinance, a company has been formed
which plans to start a jitney service
on regular lines at the rate of 4 cents
a ride if tickets are purchased.
Milwaukee, Wis.—Within several
days 100 jitneys will probably be in
the streets- A regular 10-minute service on a three-mile line, in big comfortable buses at a fare of eight tick
ets for a quarter Ib assured before
spring. '
, Washington, D. O.—A service of
about 200 autobuses will be opened
March 1.
Others of the two score large towns
which the jitneys have invaded or soon
will have are, Columbus, Cincinnati,
Toledo, Dayton, Akron,.Hamilton, Ohio;
Springfield and Peoria, 111.; Terra
Haute and Indianapolis, Ind.; Omaha,
Neb.; Jackson and Vickaburg, Miss.;
Atlanta, 6a.; Louisville, Ky.; Birmingham, Ala.; Memphis, Tenn.; Des.
Moines, Iowa.;,St. Joseph, Mo. Scores
of smaller places report that they have
one, or two buses in operation.
Victoria "Moyie "of Unemployed.
Editor B. O. Federationist—The enclosed is a photo that was taken lust Friday week morning outside
the Central Unemployment and Belief
Bureau. Those displayed in the picture are not by any means the whole of
the unemployed in the city. There, are
more insido the Bureau and many have
given up as hopeless any possibility of
getting a job and consequently they are
not in the picture. When one remembers what B. C. politicians say about
this being a land of great opportunities, one is inclined, when looking at
|this photo, to ask "Where?" At all
events that is the question asked by
those in the photo. Morning after
morning the same ie repeated. One -is
inclined to' wish he was in Belgium
for there British sympathy is displayed;
it certainly is not displayed at' honte.
Great Britain haB decided to starve the
German people; It looks also as if it
is not at all particular how its own
subjects are starved. It proves that
British justice ia on a par with German
culture. Trusting that you can find
room in The, fed. for the picture.
'Yours in search of the "invisible,
JOHN L. MARTIN.
Victoria, March 3.
Troopers' Proper Address..
Post Office Department,
Ottawa, Ont-, March 1, 1915.
Editor B. C. Federationist-—It is desirable that the correct method of addressing the troops, as per card herewith, should be given as wide publicity
TOO MUCH
EMPHASIS
cannot be placed on the statement that the
Edison Diamond Disc
Phonograph
excels beoause it is the product
of a mastermind in the science
of acoustics.
It was not given to the public
until it had reached a degree
of perfection to satisfy the high
ideals bf the inventor, Thomas
A. Edison, who said: "If music
is worth anything—and in my
opinion it is worth much—it is
worth recording and reproducing
properly."
Mr. Edison spent 37 years perfecting his New Phonograph,
Will you give 16 minutes of your
time to hear his latest? Come
to-day.
THE
Kent Piano
COMPANY LIMITED
558 GRANVILLE STREET
B. M. COULTER,
Deputy Postmaster General
Addressing of Mail
In order to facilitate the handling of
mail at the front and to insure prompt
delivery it ia requested that all mail
be addressed1 as follows:
(a) Rank „	
(b) Name	
(c) Regimental Number	
(d) Company,   Squadron,   Battery   or
unit  ,  	
(e) Battalion	
(f) Brigade ".	
(g) Firat (or Second)   Canadian  contingent	
(h) British Expeditionary Force	
Army Post Ofllce,
LONDON, ENGLAND.
U. M. W. of A. Local Union, No. 2155
• Editor B. C. Federationist: In last
iBsue of your paper an article, ■ under
the caption of "War and General
Strike," wns above my signature. I
wish to say thnt while the article was
submitted for publication through my
medium as secretary of this local union
and my instruction of the press committee, yet I was not the author of the
article, credit for sumo being entitled
to Jas- 8. Robertson.- Please rectify
this in the next .sane ot your paper.
Tou might also say that the article of
the previous week, on "Picketing,'"
was from the pen of Geo. Pettigrew.
WM. WATSON,
Secretary.
Nanaimo, B. C, March 8, 1915.
'White"
No Oriental Lumber for
Australia.
Editor B. C. Federationist: I saw in
the Daily Province that Mr. Eric W.
Hiamber, of the Hustings saw mill, out'
lined a scheme whereby British Colum
bio could capture the Australian lum
ber trade which iB now going to the
United States. And all he is going to
do is build ships to carry it there. Now,
Mr. Editor, this gentleman evidently
does not know the spirit of Australian
people. Why are "we" not getting
this trade now? Is it because they had
no ships to carry the lumber? I say
no! This is the reason, and one Mr,
Homber will soon find out when they
go for a lumber order from some of tho
dealers: We do not manufacture the
lumber WITH WHITE LABOB like
they do in the United States. We use
Orientnls of nil types, and until the
mills of British Columbia manufacture
lumber with white labor, Australia will
keep on buying lumber in the United
Stntes. I know whereof I speak on be*
half of the government of Australia.
MARK LUMLY.
Capitol Hill, March 6, 1015.
REGULATE   THB   JITNEYS
Ban W* D. Itahon, President of Street
Railwaymen.
"As to what tho outcome of the present Bystem of jitney bus operation will
be Ib another question. The question
confronting our people is how to deal
with it. In many places they are competing and injuring the service and tho
work of our people to a great extent.
In my opinion, the only way to deal
with them is to insist upon the Btate
or municipal government properly regulating them. The government haa always assumed the right to regulate the
carrying of passengers and hauling of
goods whatever the instrument of car*
riage might be."
FromParm's
Potato Patch
Tho Rabbit Hill Gazette is Well represented in this vicinity, by a live
correspondent, who lives on the third
hog's-buck north of Roberts Creek. Inasmuch as Editor Benedictine has
failed to remit for some weeks he confidently advises Piirm'a Potato Patch
Peeler that ho has secured a situation
with tho government near Sechelt, and
is nt present manipulating scenery with
a pick and shovel. Ho says that this
may be degrading, but his noted ability,
to Bee tho foreman first removes a good
deal of the disgrace.
SADDEST FEATURE
OF WAR IS THE
• WASTE
Loss of Human Life and Destruction! of Products
of Labor
If Labor Only Understood It
Could Easily Put Stop
to the Iniquity
/ [By John D. Barry.]
Perhaps the saddest feature of war
is the waste, caflsed by wholly unnecessary human anguish, by maiming and
.by death, by destruction of the products of labor, by loss of economic and
social usefulness. Like so, muoh waste,
this kind of waste cftn manifest as
gain. It will cause many, people to profit during the war, among others, those
who provide the necessaries of war, and
those who take the pmces of workers
drawn into the war. It is notorious
that war, even while causing impoverishment to vast numbers of people, ca*1
seem to make -what we call "good
times." Things hum ih war time.
There is excitement in the air, intense
human interest. People lose something
of the prudence and the moderation
thatf' characterize them in peace. They
tend to break away from their selfish
and limited little groups and they become identified with a larger life, cur*
ously free, from pettiness, It is when
the war is over that the truth' is discovered, through the mactions from
false values, from the illusions of,war.
Then, it is made plain that waste has
to be paid for and dearly paid for,
too.
In war the loss of life Ib not the
only human sacrifice... Thei-e is human
sacrifice in the wanton destruction of
the human life that has gone into the
material things destroyed, the things
made by the sweat and the blood of
labor. War; is a monstrous joke, with
labor as the butt. It might juat as well
fling to the winds the labor of millions
of men, extending over a long period,
and laugh aloud at the sport.
Labor, unhappily, doesn't understand
as yet. If it did, it could easily put a
stop. to this iniquity. For the most
ghastly feature of this joke is that the
wanton destruction of the products of
labor is done by laborers themselves,
under the gnidence of masters., After
serving one group of masters to add to
the labor products of the world, they
serve another group of masters to destroy the labor products of the world.
It is to laugh ud to weep at t
same time. How can the Great Master
feel in looking on at such defiance of
all the teaching accepted as devine.
The behavior of laborers in war is,
indeed, one of the wonders of living.
They will not only destroy their own
products, but they will fight against
and destroy one another, the members
of their own class, their- brothors in
blood and in disinheritance. And they
will do this monstrous thing to the applause of the masters; There will be
great soldiers' monuments raised in
honor of the dead among them, those
who, in trying to kill their brothers
were killed1 by their brothers, glorious
reminders of fratricide.
But suppose those laborers were to
get together as one laborer, and suppose they were to refuse to destroy
the products of labor and were to assert the claims of labor, their inalienable right? What'would the masters
say then? It is safe to say that the
masters .would be scandalized and
would say that the laborers were behaving like law-breakers and ought to
bo punished. They have said exactly
such things and they have felt in this
way when a comparatively few laborers have gone on a strike. And yet
they will organize a strike disturbing
the whole world, and, because they
give it the name of war, they will
expect tho laborers to keep it going
and to risk giving up their lives for it.
War, after all, is essentially a strike.
But. it is more impudent and ruthless
and more destructive and far-reaching
than any strike has ever dared to be.
Tho present war is so appalling that
if it represented the revolt of lnbor
the members of tho manter-class, the
small minority, would feel that the
end of the world was at hand. And
yet, representing minoroty control, by
B ridiculous paradox, it justifies itself
and uses laborers as players in the
game, pawnB on the firing line, strikers not in nnme but in fact, strikers
against thoir own, facing deadly foeB
without and being foes of their own
and controlled by foes. Most of all
nre they to be pitied, tho laborers in
this war.
C-aggg)     $1.60 PER YEAR
OUR MAY DIRECTORY
Closes March 13/15
All changes Names, Addresses, Advertising, etc., must
be in by that date.
B.C. Telephone Co., Ltd
Take that Watch to
APPLEBY
who will tell you what is tho
matter, cost and guarantee all
Repairs.   438 Richards Street.
m
lte moli £?obc
acco.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
Poultry Netting at the Usual Wholesale
Prices at Spencer's
We cirry til sties in itock, ud taU lt onl. In tolls of 80
yards. Thl quality Is thi but possible to obtain, ind OB
price delivered will to found equal to wholesale^
TWO-1JJOH MESH
Per Bell
12 inches wide..
..  .(1.20
18 inches wide..
..  .♦1.71*
24 inches wide..
.. 42.15
30 inches wide.',
..  .(2.46
36 inches wide..
..  **2.95
48 inches wide.
.. 1.(3.25
60 inches wide..
. ..(4.20
72 Inches wide..
.  ..(5.90
lVs-IMCB MESH
Per Bell
12 inches wide.
.. ..(1.5ft
24 inches wide..
. ..(3.25
30 inches wide..
.. .(3.80
..  .(4.45
36 inches wide..
48 inches wide.
.. ..(5.90
ONE-INCH MESH
Per Bell
12 Inches wide..
..  .(2.15
38 inches wide...
. ..(3.26
24 inches wide..
..  .(4.25
30 inches wide..
..  .(5.05
36 inches wide.1.
. ..(6.10
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
CAN YOU'AFFORP
Anything tat ths Uik.it skill sad tauwlsdfs, ths peatest csn »< the Ml Urns
nscssnry te pit row tMth lit thst psmusnt sttte or perfection whieh Is aooM-
ssqp to keep pen In food hwtth sad comfortl
I have atted mp offle.i np with the latest scUntUo appelates aad I eaplep
sll ths esse ud skill at mp command oa overy pattest, for 1\ Is mr paipoas ta Mid
np a reputation aad a practice.
I nso ths onljF tho hlfhsit class of materials and whsn I It pon with mt
" NATURE TEETH " "•"
—made to match YOUB tooth In slse snd shape aad wad Hat—I am la a,
goilUon to sap te pon thep will stand snrp lsst."
BEMEMBER that pon do aot ban pear dsntlstrp done every dap er ersrp
pear. I ot you nnlet life with tho most Important mon)hors et pair enure hedp.
And my prices sn ao hlihsr thsn ordlnarp dentists.
Dr. HALL
STANDARD BANK BUILDING
 ROOM 211 '
PHONE SEV. 4679
THB MODERN DENTIST
T»A[)r. i'6vj\ MAR*
Braids
Best
Coffee
OPBK EVEKIWM, 7 te I
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Guaranteed Genuine South Wellington
   Coal mined at South"WeITington, Van-
couver Island, B. C, and Sold by us in Vancouver
at practically Cost in order to keep our men and
teams employed.
BUY
OOAL.      Per Ton.
Lump, screened (6.50
Nut, No. 1    5.60
Nut, No. 2    5.00
Slack    3.00
PEASPEOIAI    4.00
WOOD,    Per Load.
Dry coriwood, stove l'gth. (2.75
Inside fir    3,00
Fir bark    8.60
Kiln-dried kindling     3,60 '
Dry 'eordwood, stove length
 (cord) *5*50
Service the best.   Satisfaction guaranteed.   Competition Defied.
lit J.Hanbury & Co.*.Ltd S£3tm
NOW  is the time to get in early
SEED POTATOES
SWEET PEAS
Special Mixture
2 ozs. 25c
ONION SETS
Extra Good
2 lbs for 35c
AT ALL OUR BRANCHES
BROWN BROS. & CO., Ltd.
FLORISTS, SEEDSMEN AND NURSERYMEN
Phones:   Soymour 8258 and 8259
THE
Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
604 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
T. B. CUTHBERTSON & Oo.
Mon 'b Hatters and Outfitters
Three Storei
ELECTRIC COFFEE
PERCOLATORS
Complete      _*£_ r_£\
With Cord vJO.-JU
Without
Cord
$4.50
(Any B. O. Electric Iron or Hotpolnt Household Appliance cord can ho
used with the percolator.^
THIS SPECIAL PRICE PREVAILS ONLY UNTIL MARCH 02 OR UNTIL THE STOOK OF PERCOLATORS ON HAND IS EXHAUSTED.
The Percolators may he purchased at the Company's salesrooms or from
a number of dealers In electrical supplies throughout the elty.
B.C.
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
ELECTRIC
1138 Oranvllle St., near Davie.
j PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAY  MARCH 12, 1
See the Display
of Allied Army Shoes
On exhibit ln the windows of the store of OLUBB ft STEWART, S16
Hastings Street W.—between Hamilton and Homer—is a SHOE DISPLAY of Interest.  This exhibit shows:
REGULATION BRITISH ARMY SHOES
REGULATION FRENCH ARMY SHOES
REGULATION BELGIAN ARMY SHOES
THESE SHOES HAVE JUST BEEN
RECEIVED IN VANCOUVER
See LECKIE SHOES
for use of the armies
In this exhibit are LECKIE SHOES—Mode ln British Columbia for
tho Allied Annies. According to authorities only TWO CANADIAN
MANUFACTURERS PRODUCED A SHOE TO WITHSTAND ALL THE
REQUIREMENTS OF THE ARMY. One of thom wis J. LECKIE ft
CO., LTD., of Vancouver.  This is a great tribute to tho LECKIE SHOE.
Thli exhibit aln contains the pair of LECKIE SHOES, of which
Quartermaster John Macmillan of the Seventh Battalion, First Canadian
Contingent, wrote. Thl Shoos won in daily nw in British Columbia for
ONE YEAR ud it Salisbury Plain for in additional SIX MONTHS.
Tho only repairing was half-soloing. The Shoos still hive many weeks of
hird use left in thom.
"Made in British Columbia"
AN EGG SUBSTITUTE FOR
ALL BAKING PURPOSES
Use it Instead of
Expensive Eggs.
PURE AND WHOLESOME
60c. Tins contain thl equivalent
,    of 6 doi. eggs.
25c. Tina contain thi univalent
of 2'/, doi. eggs.
SPECIAL LARGE TINS FOR
BAKER'S USE
See Our Demonstration
in the Grocery Department of David Spencer
Limited.
Crown Broom Works, Ltd.
332 FRONT STREET EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1148
Manufacturers of the
Mother Goose, Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province) Ladies' Carpet Perfection, Favorite,' Ceiling-
Broom, Warehouse Brooms
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY
Sey. 3f59
Hourly
Deliveries
GENUINE   OLD   COUNTRY ORAIN-FED
Pork Sausage, Poloneys,
Saveloys, Collard Heads,
Jellied Hocks and Pure Leaf Lard
HOME INDUSTRIES
,
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIRCULATION AT HOME
THE MEMBERS OF ORGANIZED LABOR IN GREATER VANCOUVER ARE SPENDING $20,000 PER DAY. FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS ARE ENTITLED TO THE PATRONAGE OF TRADE UNIONISTS AND
THEIR FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS.   LOOK OVER THE LIST ON THIS PAGE:
NOVA SCOTIA TO
Present Compensation to be
Overhauled and
Amended
Sweeping  Changes  to  be
Made in the Coal
Mines Act
Proposed legislation recently introduced in Nova Seotia includes an
act respecting the Laws Relating
to the Liability of Employers to make
Compensation to their Employees for
Injuries Received in the Course of their
Employment, gives power to the gov-
ernor-in-c ouncil to appoint a commission of three or more members, whose
duty it shall be to examine into and
report as to the laws in force in the
province of-*-Nova Scotia relating to the
liability of employers to make compensation to their employees for injuries received in the course of their
employment; to examine into and report on the societies exempt from the
operation of Chapter 3, Acts of 1910,
and the terms and conditions under
which such societies should continue to
be so exempted or otherwise, and to
Bubmit to draft bill in accordance with
such report.
The societies referred to as exempted
from the operation of the Workmen's
Compensation Act of 1910 are those existing at certain collieries in the province at. which miners' relief societies
have been established, among which
may be mentioned the Dominion Coal
company, the Acadia Coal company, the
International Coal Mining company,
limited, the Dominion Iron and Steel
company, limited, the Nova Scotia Steel
_ Coal, company, limited, and the Sydney & Louisburg Railway company,
limited.
Ooal Mines Regulation.
A number of amendments are made
to the Coal Mines Regulation act of
1908 and amending acts. That part of
the law relating to the establishment of
boards of examiners for the purpose of
recommending certificates of competency to managers, underground managers and1 overmen, is changed by re'
pealing a former section, which required as members of an examining
board two mechanical engineers holding first-class certificates of competency, and by the addition of sections
providing that no person shall be entitled to a certificate of competency as
a manager, underground manager, or
overman who is not a British subject of
the full age of 21 years, and has not
had at least four years' experience underground in a coal mine, one year of
which must have been at the working
face; that every candidate for a certificate of competency as a manager must
be the holder of a certificate of competency as an underground manager,
and have served one year at a working
face and one year as an overman or examiner.
Certified Workmen
That part of the original law relating to certificated workmen which provides that no person not employed as a
miner in a mine previous to the llth
day of March, 1898, shall be permited
to cut, mine, bore, blow, sheer, loosen
or extract coal by hand, machinery,
or otherwise unless he has been employed in some capicity in a mine for
the period of one year and holds a
certificate to that effect from a board
of examiners of workmen, is amended
by leaving out the word "sheer" and
adding the words, "And unless he is
accompanied by some person entitled
to be given charge of a working face."
That part of the Act defining who may
be given charge of a "working face"
is changed by leaving out a clause
which provided for tnls position being
filled by a person who had "been employed in a mine in some capacity for
a period of one year." The present
law provides that na person shall-be
given charge of a "working face" in
a mine who does not hold (a) a certificate of service as a miner; or (b) a
certificate of competency as a miner
granted by a Board of Examiners of
Workmen; and that unless such person
has been employed in a mine for at
least one year as a miner.
Payment of Wages
Section 22 of tho original Act dealing with questions of payment of wages
the measurement and weighing of mineral, etc., has added to It a section providing that the Commissioner of Public
Works and Mines may make rules prescribing the procedure to be observed
in the appointement by the persons em-
filoyed in the mine, of a person to act
n tbo adjustment of questions arising
out of payment for wages, or in cases
where they have been unable to agree
upon the appointment of such a person,
or have failed to make an appointment.
Defective Mines
That part of section.43 of the original act which deals with defective
mines and the procedure to be followed,
and defines the duty of the owner,
agent or manager of a mine after being
given notice of an inspector to and providing for arbitration of objections put
forth by any owner, agent, or manager,
remedy defects complained of, is
amended by the addition of a clause
which provides that .such owner, agent
or manager neglecting to comply with
the provisions of the act shall not only
be guilty of an offence, as mentioned
in the original act, but shall be "liable
to a penalty of at least eighty dollars
for "each and every day he fails to comply with the requisition or the notice,
or with, the award, and the notice and
the award shall be deemed to be written notice of the offence."
Timbering.
Rule 31 of section 46, relating to the
support of coal in working places,
which in the original act provided only
for the support by sprags or wooden
props of coal during the operating of
holing or under-cutting, is repealed and
a new section substituted, which provides that in every coal mine, unless
otherwise, directed by the inspector,
the coal and the roof in every working
place, during the operation of boring,
holing or undercutting Bhall be safely
supported by sprags, or wooden props,
or other support,.and any person failing
to comply with this provision shall be
guilty of an.offence against the act,
and may, in addition to other penalties,
have his certificate (if the holder of
one) temporarily suspended or cancelled.
Sections are also added providing
that a sufficient supply of timber or
other material suitable for supports
shall at all times be kept at suitable
and convenient places; that it shall be
the duty of every underground manager, overman and mine examiner to
see that theBe provisions are strictly
carried out, and that it shall be the
duty of the deputy inspector for the
district to fortowith report to the commissioner the names of all persons holding certificates who are convicted of
any offence under the provisions of
this rnle.
Employees to Receive Information Re
Act.
Section 51 of the original act, which
provided that employees of mines, upon
application, and those employed for the
first time, should be provided .with a
copy of the aet, iB amended by providing for the supplying to employees of
"a prescribed abstract of the act, or
of such parts of the same as are deemed
necessary,'' and a section is added that
copies of said abstract shall be supplied
free of cnarge to tho owner, agent or
manager of any mine who applies for
the same.
Section 58 of the old act is amended
by changing the penalty provided
against every person other than an
agent, owner, manager, underground
manager or overman guilty of an
offence against the act, from not less
than one nnd not more than eight dollars, as in the old measure, to not less
than five, or more than twenty-five
dollars.
Stationary Engineers.
A number of changes are made in
that part of the act which deals with
stationary engineers. Where the old
act provided for the granting of certificates of competency by a board of
examiners to stationary engineers, the
new act adds the words, '' and provision
is made for the signing of certificates
by the commissioner, after being countersigned by some member of the board
of examiners. The composition, also,
of the board of examiners le changed
by including with' the Inspector of
mines "not more than four ther qualified persons" to compose the board1,
whereas in the old measure the board
was to consist of the inspector of mines
and '' such persons representing the
managers of mines and the engineers,
and such qualified persons, not connected with mining as the governor-in-
council determines."
Provisions in the old act for the establishment of local boardB of examiners and their conduct are repealed in
the new measure. The essentials for
examination for a certificate or license
under the act remain almost the same
as in the old measure, with the necessary change to cover the inclusion of
licenses to firemen. In filling up an application form the old1 measure required
the applicant to state the nature of his
employment for five years previous to
the date of application; the new measure requires the information also, the
section which provides for the furnishing of satisfactory certificates as to
service, sobriety and general gool
character, contained the words "or he
shall be already the holder of a certificate of competency." These wordB
are dropped in the new measure. A new
section is added providing that all applications for examination shall be
made to the commissioner of public
works and mines at his office in Halifax at least ten days before the date
fixed for the holding of said examinations.
That section of old act relating to
the granting of licenses to firemen
which provides that "every peTson
who has served for not less than one
year as fireman shall be entitled to receive from the board of examiners a
license aB firemen under the like conditions as to age and character as in
the caBe of engineers" is changed by
striking out all words after "firemen"
and substituting the following: "at a
steam boiler, and who satisfies at least
one member of the board of examiners
after an oral examination that the applicant has a sufficient knowledge of
boilers to have charge of them, Bhall,
upon satisfying the board as to age
and character, be entitled to receive
from the board of examiners a license
as a fireman."
The act also ratifies and confirms
all certificates of service and of competency nnd of licenses to firemen
granted before the coming into force
of the new measure.
The Mines Aot
The Mines Act of 1911 Ib amended in
a few particulars, having to do chiefly
with questions involving the leasing of
mineral lands. Amendments are made
giving fuller powerB to the government
to take jossession of mineral lands under lease in order to ensure the payment of royalties, or to maintain mining properties unimpaired and generally as an usset to the province. The
government's power of lien also is extended to include not only the lease or
leases and the workings, plant and
other property in connection therewith,
but aslo the areas held by the lessees.
The part of the old aot which provides
GERMAN PAPER ON
E
Vorwaerts Describes Food
Regulations in the City
of Berlin
Forecasts Serious Split in
the Social Democratic
Party
Vorwaerts, tie newspaper of the German social democrats, continues to de*
mand the fixing of minimum prices for
foodstuffs, especially in respect of animals bred for food. It declares that
the orders of the government to the
municipalities to purchase and slaughter
animals and preserve meat for the
needs of their inhabitants has caused
a tremendous rise in prices.
For instance, the price of ham has
risen in Berlin 100 per cent, sinee July,
and that of fresh pork over 50 per cent,
in the same period.
The three trades councils of Berlin,
(Social Democratic, Christian, and Hir-
ch-Duncker) have issued a joint manifesto to the workers of the oity in whioh
particulars are given of the government
regulations with regard to the supply of
bread. It is stated that eaoh person
is to be alowed two kilogrammes (about
4 Mb.) of bread per week, and no more
than 'this may be purchased. If flour
is bought, the amount will be deducted
from the regulation quantity of bread.
Trades Unlona ud Bread.
To maintain order at the bakers'
shops the trades unions are organizing
a corps of stewards. The manifesto
also appeals to the workers to behave
in an orderly manner when purchasing
bread, and to submit to tho regulations
without question. The form of the
loaves to be baked is set out in detail,
but, except for small rolls, no maximum
price is fixed.
The differences in the German social
democratic party continue to develop,
and it seems probable that there will
be a serious split in the ranks in the
near future. The action of Bosa Luxembourg and her friends in continuing
to criticise the party's support of the
government and the war is bringing
forth angry denunioations and demands
for the expulsion of those who will not
toe the party line.
The Volkfreund, an influential German socialist newspaper, declares that
the time has arrived when the party
should not content itself with protests
against Bosa Luxembourg, and those
who agree with her, but should repudiate them and drive them outside the
ranks.
On the other hand, Eduard Bernstein,
who belongs to the right wing of the
party, is contending, as "against Herr
Scheademann, the parliamentary leader
of the party, that the social democrats
should do everything possible to secure
international peace at the earliest opportunity. '
Demands of Social Democrats
Torwaerts publishes   the   following
resolutions, which the social democratic
party'is proposing to bring before the
Beichstag at the earliest opportunity:
That at least $375 worth of furniture shall be left in the posesslon
of those dependents of those men
in the army whose go.ods are liable
to be seized for rent.'
During the period, of the war
the enforcement of payment of
debts of soldiers and their dependents, incurred for rent and goods
obtained on the instalment system,
shall be postponed for two years.
The establishment of a better
system of pensions for invalid soldiers and their widows and main-
tainence for their dependents.
. The establishment of a proper
system of dealing with unemployment.
Vorwaerta declares that those ques*
tions are urgent) but does not seem very
hopeful of obtaining the fulfilment of
the demands* Under the German constitution, even if the Beichstag carries
the proposals, the government can refuse to carry them out, as it is completely independent of parliamentary
control,
Ubor to LoTingeUi Politic*
Los Angeles unionists, who have
waged many brilliant municipal campaigns in the paat, have chosen Balph
L. Crlswell as their candidate for
mayor in the pending municipal elections. Fred Wheeler, the socialist
councilman, has been renominated.
for the reservation as a barrier of a
space of ten yards in width immediately within and along each of the boundary lines of the land covered by any
lease, is amended by the addition of a
provision that the inspeotor of mines
may, at any time direct that the width
of the barrier may be increased, and
may also direct the reservation of bar'
riers within the boundary lines cov*
eredjby a lease. Penalty is provided,
also, for non-compliance.
Slight changes are made in the section of the old act relating to the re*
turnH to be sent to the commissioner.
In the old measure it was provided that
the return Bhould cover the number of
persons "ordinarily" employed in or
about every mine. The amending act
drops tho word "ordinarily," and in
addition to providing that returns may
be in the form prescribed by the
schedule attached to the act provides
that returns may be sent in such form
as the commissioner may prescribe.
%ma&tk
-AnrXitHiuArift
B.C.
Distillery
Co., Ltd
Established 1903
^—•^^tt^t^aaa______aar—rm—m^^m^^^mmm^^mm
B» G. Special
RYE
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY
ANDFLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE,
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for "B. CSpecial"
"Satisfaction—or Money Back, at Any Grocer's."
' ESTABLISHED 1904.
B. C. VINEGAR WORKS
Manufacturers of
Vinegar - Cider - Sauerkraut
BRANDS:
mJL'tSS*v'.Malt •"■*• WMte* Wine Vinegar, "Special" Malt and
White Wine Vinegar, "Mackenzie's" Malt and White Wine Vinegar
Okanagan Cider Vinegar, Okanagan Sweet Older, Boiled Older. B o'
Sauerkraut.
Manufactured in Bond under Inland Bevenue Supervision.
Factory:   1365 POWELL ST., VANCOUVEB, B. O.
CAPACITY 16,000 GALLONS PES MONTH
Manager:   James H. Talconer phona:   Highland 285
Healthfulness, combined with good fia-
vor and taste, means real quality in ■
Beer.  These are Impossible without the
very beet material and the highest or- <
der of treating.   In
PREMIER BEER
we provide the public with a good palatable and wholesome Beer of the highest quality.
Order a case from yonr own dealer.
New Westminster Brewery
PREMIER
Pancake and Waffle Flour
Best Ever - Agreeable To All Sense
MADE IN VANCOUVER
How Can I Make a Success
Of the Poultry Business?
EASILY    AN8WEBED
Vet in Essex Modal Hot
Air or Jubilee Hot Water Incubator, and an International Sanitary Ho-
SUOOESS WILL
FOLLOW
We specialize ln all
kinds of Poultry Supplies.
.  MARK DUMOND
Hardware and McOormlck Parm Machinery
1018 MAIN STREET Writ* for Catalogue and Prices FBIDAY  MABCH 12, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE FIVE
Ask for   "NABOB     Products
TEA
COFFEE ICINGS
JELLY POWDEB PUDDINGS
FLAVOBINO EXTRACTS BAKING POWDER
AT YOUR GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
10c.
10c.
Pkt.
Al\_t    THE BEST YET   A
RED ARROW
BISCUIT
When its Biscuits say "RED ARROW"
Manufactured by the
National Biscuit Co., Ltd.
Manufacturers of Red Arrow and National Biscuits
Haida Confections
VANCOUVER       -       ■       B.C.
$*JR%
USE ONLY
SHAMROCK
LEAF
PURE LARD
P. Burns & Co., Ltd
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
MAKE YOUR ORCHARDS GREATER
The British Columbia APPLES ln a world competition «ith the btit, hsrs
taken the OOLD MEDAL PBIZE.
TM. inssns thst B. 0. OBOHABDS if deTslopsd nil! lead the world.
A word to ths wlae is sufficient. _
Ws sn offering FBDIT TEEE atock at exceptionally low war price.. Wrlu
' snd tell ns whst yoa wsnt.
Oar exparts will advlsa yon snd send yon a Catalogue Free.
We hare a Laria Stock of Flowering and Enrgraen Shrubbery—Holly, Laurel
anl FrlTet Hedge Stock, Boss anl Shale Tree Stock, Foliage anl Flowering
Plants.
In short ia our stook of 1100,000, we hare everything yon want to make you
garden beautiful
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Hoal OSes:   710 Dominion Building, 207 Heatings Street West
Telephone:   Seymour 6558
Store:   alio OranrUlo Stmt, Falrrlew
Telephone:   Bayrtow lait
Nurseries anl drsenhouses at Boya! on Eburnt Line B. 0. Electric
Telephone:   Eburna 13
Baaidanco: 2838 Birch Strset.
Phono:    Bayrtow 1305 8
OOes:    424 Birks Building
Phono:   Seymour 7075
Vancouver, B. 0.
DR.A.McKAYJORDAN
20 Tears a Specialist
Eyes Examined     —    Glasses Pitted
Perianal consultation Friday ail Saturday
Eighteen thousand patients In B. 0.. thousands of whom previously suffered from
chronic stomach anl Heart troubles, Back
anl Haalache, ln Ignorance of the cause.
Don't Tell Ue Tour Troubles.  I'll Hal
thom.
Befareace:   Manager of this pspsr.
Lines it will pay you to buy
All of our pay-roll does to support B. C. families.
When you buy one of these lines you are helping
B. C. industry.
BEOOMMEND OUB
WHITE LILY PURE LARD
OAK LEAF LARD COMPOUND
V. P. R. HAMS
V. P. R. PICNIC HAMS
V. P. R. BACON BACKS
V. P. R. BACON
Vancouver-Prince Rupert Meat Co.,
VANOOUVEB
VIOTOBIA
LIMITED
NBW   WESTMINSTEB
COQUITLAM
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
-   COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON. POTTS, SIX
POR PTJTY CENTS, """
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANOOOTER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
HOME INDUSTRIES
OUR HAL SUM
BASED UPON
Women Had No Voice in
Bringing About
War
Is There Any More Community of Interests
Now?
[By Hiss Helen Gutteridge.]
Every country involved in the present war and every group within the
country claims, with pride, that the result of the common danger to all its
citizens has been to unite them lu a
common devotion to their country.
Each nation is convinced that it is
lighting in self defence, and each in
self defence hastens to self destruction
and all in the name of patriotism and
love of country. Thousands of men are
shooting each other down while the
agony of the wives and mothers is being soothed by the assurance that their
loved ones have died a glorious death
in the heroic performance of their duty
in defending their country, their women and children from destruction by
the enemy.
Why? Because our so-called civilization is based upon false economic and
social conceptions.
A close analysis shows that the assertion "that under the pressure of a
common danger, and through the fire
of a common enthusiasm eaeh nation is
welded into unity, and that the interests of ther community imply a community of interests/' is an assertion
only and not a fact.
True, political parties in the legislatures of the countries involved in the
war have agreed to introduce no contentious legislation while the. country
is in peril, or passing through such a
trying period. True, many organizations working for reforms have ceased
their activities for a period) that governments may not be embarrassed at
such a trying time as the present. True
also, that huge sums of money have
been donated by citizens to relieve
those in need through the war, and
that money and labor has been expended by thousands of women who,
after the manner of women, have postponed their struggle for the franchise
because the immediate need of creature comforts for the mothers-* sons
called to the front has roused the mothering instinct in all women.
Making the Best of It
Also because the war is going on and
women have had no voice in the bringing abont of war, they are, as usual,
making the best of a bad situation and
using all their efforts to patch np the
wounded and conserve, where possible,
tho lives that a reckless mnsculine electorate and parliament, in.the name of
patriotism, ore willing to sacrifice.
Much enthusiasm has been shown over
this unity of the people rising as one
man to protect the common interest,
when it is seen that every contingent
of men mobilized for active service has
its full complement almost aB soon as
the order of mobilization goes forth.
While not doubting for one moment
thnt every man loves his country who
enlists, how many enhst for thnt reason.
Does it not soem that, judging by the
immediate applications for assistance
from some of the dependents of men
enlisting, that economic determinism
has something to do with iff
Is there any community of interests,
when capitalists take advantage of the
war,to force up the price of commodities and at the same time cut the wages
of workers because of the hard times f
Is it a community of interests when,
as in the old1 country, the mine owners
forced np the price of coal and ask for
the suspension of the "eight-hour day"
because of the shortage of labor, when,
at the same time, they ask the miners
—many of whom are only working a
few days a week—to accept a cut in
wages 1
Is it a community of interest, when
women are paid sweated wages for tho
making of soldiers' clothes, by a contractor who is making the most of the
war to increase his banking accountf
There is no fair-wage clause In the contracts for army work when it is done
by women.
Is it a community of interests when
tho shipping interests, while enjoying
through the war a period of exceptional
prosperity, cut the wages of longshoremen twonty-flve per cent., relying on
the hundreds of unemployed men to
take thoir place if any objection is
made by the victim?
Is there a community of Interests between capital and labor at the present
time, any more than there was before
the war, or will be after the wart How
much will the worker gain after all
this talk of a community of interests
After the war is overt
Better Off After the War
Suppose the map of Europe is completely altered, not one foot .more of
land will come into the possession of
the workers now being applauded for
their splendid unity in protecting their
country; not one little bit will it alter
the position or condition of those who
pay in blood and tears or heartache
the cost of the war, or will it relieve
one bit the result of the war tax, either
direct or indirect that will fall upon
our children "even unto the third and
fourth generation." .
Will all the glory and power of added
commerce accruing to -the few in the
nation give to the worker any more
than he possessed before the war/ after
the war is overt
Will the acquiring of a few hundred
miles of land for the capitalists of the
winning side be any compensation to
the mothers and wives on each side,
whose sons and husbands were slaughtered wholesale!
Everyone is entitled to their own
opinion in regard to the war and its
outcome, and many are hoping that this
will be the last war. It may be, and it
may not be. If it is it will not be because this side won or that side won in
the present struggle.
It will be when an enlightened people establish a system of self government that is truly democratic, a system
that means the doing away with armaments, the manufacture of which (for
profit for the capitalist) has had no
small share in the bringing about the
war,*, a system of government which
means the ownership of the means of
production and distribution by the people, for use and not for profit.
Then there will be no need for Britain or any other nation to be mistress
of tho seas to protect their commerce.
Then there will be no need for nations
to go to war to obtain a foreign market for their surplus production.
When the profit for a few is taken
out of the scheme of things, no longer
will the militarists and jingoists seek
to implant race hatred in the hearts of
men under the name of patriotism.
Then will the children be taught in
our schools the shame and horror of
war,instead, as now, the gjory of wholesale slaughter, and also the beauties of
internationalism instead of "my country, right or wrong."
HIGH FOOD PEIOES.
Mass Meeting Demands British Government Take Action.
A big labor demonstration was held
in Trafalgar square, London, last Sunday, to protest against the prevailing
high prices of food and coal. A resolution was adopted expressing indignation and disappointment at tho government's refusal to take "effective measures to deal with the alarming increase
in the cost of food and fuel."
The resolution demands government
control of carrying ships, the commandeering of home grown supplies for
aale at the lowest possible price and
the fixing of maximum prices for the
necessities of life.
The meeting called on the government to purchase all available wheat
for the use of the people of the country at prices ruling for 80 days before
the outbreak of tho war, the loss incurred to be paid out of the national
revenues.
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Serrke
104B GEORGIA STRUT
One  Blook  west of Court House.
Use of  Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral   Parlors  free   to  all
Patrons
Telephone Seymour 2125
tnta ttf. 221 Day sr Ni|kt
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Mdurdi St.        VsMensr, B. C.
MINBES NOT QUILTY.
Colorado Court Acquits Members of the
0*. M. of A.
. The seven coal miners on trial
charged with the murder of Luke Terry,
a chaffour, near La Veta, on Nov. 8,
1918, were declared not guilty in the
verdict of the jury, returned in the district court last Saturday.
The men acquitted, all members of
the United Mine Workers of America,
are Charles Shepherd, Frank Eroupa,
Daniel Richards, Edward Bichards,
Oharles Bichards, Peter Eich and Marcus Martinolich.
The charge upon which the men were
tried grew out of the killings of Terry
and Harry Bryan, Walter Whitten and
B. G. Adams, mine guards, and the
wounding of W. H. damning, all employees of the Oakdale Coal company,
while automobiling to the Oakdale
mine from La Veta, during the recent
Colorado eoal mine strike.
The Vancouver Milling company has
ent the Longshoremen's wages, on their
deck at Victoria 33 per eent. while, at
the same time, they have increased the
price of all commodities they handle to
the consumer. ***
EASTERN BOOTS RECALLED
British Columbia Soldiers WUl Wear
Vancouver-Made Boots
No oastorn boots will be worn by
any Vancouver or British Columbia
soldiers. The consignment of eastern
footwear which was to havo been worn
by the men now being mobilised has
been recalled, it has been announced.
The men will be supplied with boots
made in a local factory which was paid
high honors by the investigating committee that probed tho boot question of
the first contingent. Over 10,000 pairs
of boots will be manufactured here, it
is Baid. Vancouver is rapidly becoming
known as a manufacturing centre of
high-grade boots. Both tho Russian
nnd French governments, together with
the British war office and Canadian
government havo all been supplied with
samples. *.**!
Labor Press Is a Strong Weapon.
Bid it ever occur to you that the
labor press Is one of the strongest wea*
Eons that the workers can possibly
avef There aro about SOO papers in
America advocating the organization
of working men into unions. Did you
ever hear of a body of working men
publishing a paper whose main object
was to discourage mon from joining
the unloni If not, why notl
Warning to Worksrs.
Warning has been issued to workers
to koep away from the copper country
in upper Michigan. In spite of advertisements for help printed ln capitalist
Jiapers by employers there are many
die men in that region now. Additional
men are being attracted there simply
to keep down wages and enable the
mlno owners to onforoe their blacklist
against union men.
HIRED SPIES OF
Insidious Methods Used to
Break Strikes and
Strikers
Highly Organized Business
of the Gunman and
Union Spy
The terrible scenes which have marked some industrial battres of the United
States, have not been the haphazard
outcome of events, but have come about
as the result of systematic preparation.
It is well-known that there are certain
organizations which make it a business
to supply gangs of gun-men and trained
ruffians to break strikes by causing disturbances and lawlessness which are
then blamed on the union men on
strike, This business is a science, conducted according to rule and method—
just like any other commercial enterprise. The following letter helps one to
realize more clearly how it is done.
"The Corporations Auxiliary Company
"Chamber of Commerce Building,
"Cleveland, 0.,
"January Fifteenth,
"1915
"E.J. Brettell, Gen. Mgr.,
"Brettell Brothers
' - Mingo Junction, Ohio.
"Personal and Confidential.
"Dear Sir: You, no doubt, are contemplating operating your mines, permitting such of your employees as are
willing to return to work, to do so irrespective of the arbitrary position assumed by the leaders of the United
Mine Workers. In order to insure the
success of this venture you will require
assistance such as thiB company, is prepared to furniBh, both in the way to
discourage them and in recruiting a sufficient number of workmen to conduct
operations. You will also of necessity
have to keep yourself informed as to
what the attitude of your disloyal employees iB and what steps their so-
called 'leaders' will take to frustrate
your plans.
"We have handled many strikes and
have yet to lose a single one and many
of these strikes were won without the
loss of a single guard or the destruction
of one cent's worth of property. Among
recent large strikes of national prominence that we have handled we might
mention tho Boot and Shoe Workers'
strikes in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Brooklyn, N. Y.; the Furniture Workers1
strike in Grand Rapids; the Teamsters
strike in Indianapolis, and the Bubber
Workers' strike in Akron. The officers
of our company are men of repute and
we have a reputation to sustain which
we have built up by doing our work
thoroughly at tho least possible cost to
our clients. In handling labor troubles
we aim to bring thom to a successful issue as quickly as we can, fully appreciating that it ia amy by our proven
ability to accomplish this that we can
hope to enjoy the future patronage of
our clients. Wc aro widely and favorably known not only in this state but
throughout the country, numbering among our clients some very prominont
conl operators who have gone on record
as saying that our representations are
true in overy particular, this despite
the fact that we have gained but little
publicity, it having always been our
aim and the desire of the people we do
business with to avoid this.
"In conclusion let us say a word regarding our industrial or community
control service, which comprehends
placing men in labor and political organizations with the idea of having
them work up to bo leaders, not with
the object of writing history after
somebody else bas made it but for tbe
purpose of making history by influencing or dominating that particular organization- This is a big proposition
but by no means an experiment with us
us wo are doing this to-day for some of
the largest manufacturers in this country and thero is absolutely no reason
wiiy, with the support of the coal operators, it cannot be accomplished in
the coal industry.
Safety first
"Our methods, as you appreciate,
have no placo in correspondence, but if
you will write or 'phono us, appointing
a time wben our representative can call
so that your timo us well as our time-
both of which aro valuable—may not
bo wasted) wo will bo glad to explain
everything fully to you and know you
will bo interested.
"Anticipating your early and favorable reply, which carries with it no obligation whatever excepting a candid
discu6sion of a subject that is of vital
importance to you, wo remain,
"Yours very truly,
THE CORPORATION AUXILIARY
"By Dan. G. Robs,
"District Manager."
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Pattersons Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Office: 40th A Fraser Avefl.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Olllco and Chasol,
1034 Qranvllle St., l'lionu Soy. 3481.
North Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 122—Sixth SI. Weat, Phone
134.
RENNIES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS FREE
Write, Call ot Phone for a Corf TO-DAT
Wm. RENNIE CO.. Ltd
1138 Homer St Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, B. C.
AIM at Toronto, Montreal anl Winnipeg
Jitney Tickets for Sale
Six for Twenty-five Cents, and will be redeemed for cash
from Jitney operators at the office of
The Auto Public Service Co., Limited
Corner Hastings and Howe Streets -
All persons handling; tickets in our office are UN DE R BONO
Read the "jitney Press" on Saturdays. Articles of intense
interest to all citizens
~
We Unhesitatingly Recommend
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
aa helng the beat SOAP on the market for general household purpoeee.
Positively the largest aale of any Soap ln Western Canada.
There is a Reason    Try it and See
HAMILTON OAEHAKTT
The world's largest Overall Manufacturer;
VANOOUVER, B, 0.
Toronto, Detroit, Liverpool, Dallas, Atlanta
Mr. UNION MAN
Do you believe ln British Columbia;
LET us stand together
My long years of experience has
made Carhartt'» overalls perfection.
I have opened a factory ln Vancouver
to supply Brltlih Columbia trade.
THE WORK IB DONE EIOHT
HEBE BY UNION LABOB.
MB. UNION MAN, If yonr dealer
won't supply yon Carhartt's overalls,
send me a postal with your waist and
leg measure, and I will see that you
get tbem.
Write me anyhow for a weekly time
book, engineer's time book, or farmer's account book. These are free to
you.
OMDRKERS UNION/
UNIOIWSrAMP
Named Shoe* we frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Bummer Street, Boston, Maes.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.    C. L. Blaine, Sec Trees
JINGLE POT COAL
UNION MINED AT NANAIMO
MORE HEAT-LASTS LONGER
THIS COAL WILL SAVE YOU MONEY-TRY A TON
Lump, $7.00; Nut, $5 50; Pea, $4.00; Slack, $4.00; Briquettes, $6.00
WOOD, Choicest Pry Fir, $3.00 per load
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANOOUVER OOAL COMPANY
TELEPHONES :  SEYMOUR 5408 and 5409
-> VANCOUVER ♦>
CITY MARKET
MAIN STREET
Are held every Tuesday and
Friday at 10 A. M. If you
really wish to reduce the
cost of living, you can do so
by attending the AUCTION
SALES
At Market Prices; these are
the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition
AUCTION
SALES
Potatoes ■ •
Vegetables
Apples- ■ ■
IMa-ur    T ai J   Are now arriving in large
ll C W ■" LidlU.   quantities. You can always
EGGS
All kinds at most reasonable
prices; in quantities to suit
all buyers.
Large variety winter stock
at $1.00 and $1.25 per Box
rely on Eggs which are sold
as new laid
AT THE CITY MARKET
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Leaves Johnion'a wharf B.B0 a.m., Mon.,
Wed. and Friday, (or Wlson Creek. Soobolt,
Hall Moon Bay, Redroofo'a, Welcome Pass,
Hardy Ialand, Nelson Island. Pender Harbor,
Stillwater, Myrtlo Point and Powell River;
returning tbo following days.
Johnson's Wharf   Sirmosr (230 PAGE SIX.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY   MARCH 12, 1911
Hotel Irving Grill Room
101 Haatinga Street East
To tbe hundreds who attended my Grand Opening,
Saturday, March 6th
THANK YOU
John L. Sullivan
The same high class service will be maintained at all times
Music from 5 to 12
To the Lady Readers
Dear Madam:
It is with the greatest pleasure
that I announce the Opening of
the
Clover Leaf Butter Store
at the corner of  Granville and
Nelson streets, on
Saturday, March 6th
was a good success.
Having been * connected for a
number of years with the Produce
and Grocery Business, both
wholesale and retail, and more
Particularly catering to the BEST
UTTER AND EGO Business of
thie City, I feel that I am in a
position to satisfy the most exacting tastes.
Considering the high standard
of goods which I intend to sell,
and by comparison of prices, you
will find them tne equal of any
in the City.
Hoping to be trusted with at
least a portion of your patronage,
I remain, yours respectfully,
A. I.. GROUT.
P. S.—The Motto of the OLOVER LEAF BUTTER STORE la:
Study QUALITY and PRICE,
SeU for CASH ONLY,
And he CONTENT WITH
SMALL PROFITS.
HOW TO STOP WAR
Must Be Dene hy the United Action
of the Working Class
The only way to secure lasting peace
is by the united action of the masses
everywhere to secure the conduct of
the relations of states in the open instead of behind elosed doors, and by
democratic control rather than by the
elosest form of bureaucracy governments have ever evolved. It Ib this
bureaucracy, this diplomacy, which has
proved such a tragic failure, and its
aupercession by popular control is a
matter of paramount importance in
which all people have a common interest. It is true that in every country there is now a strong national
sentiment, and a good deal more hatred than we could wish. But all that
has been fanned and flogged up by
the government and their henchmen,
the newspapers. The people nowhere
wanted war. Their normal sentiment
tb inhabitants of other lands is that
which found - expression, on Christmas
day, when German and British soldiers
made an unofficial truce when an official one had been denied; when they
"swapped" cigarettes and were photographed together; when our men wrote
home that the Germans "wern't half
a bad lot." French and German soldiers did the same, not only talking
and exchanging smokes, but dancing
together in rings. To these jollifications there was an unexpected sequel,
according to the Paris correspondent
of the Manchester Guardian. The men
refused' to fire on one another, and
had to be replaced by others. Men
db not naturally want to kill other
men who happen to have been born
on another patch of the earth's surface. After the dancing the French
and the Germans appeared to one another as fellow-men. So men who had
hot met and fraternized were placed
opposite one another in the trenches,
and then both sides were faced by, not
men, but "the enemy." The stupidity
of wart—Cotton Factory Times, Man
Chester, England.
Provincial Election.
Editor. B. C. Federationist—As the
time for a new oloction is drawing near
und in the past the workers, or the people, have had bo little to choose from
us regards its representatives; I would
like to suggest—if the people (men)
nre really in earnest and want an improvement and have the common good
at heart—now is tho time to begin and
gather together their forces. In the
pnBt the people have had very few of
their own class to choose from. It has
either been Liberal or Conservative,
practically the same, as paBt records
have proved. Recent electons show
that the people want a change. Party-
ism in this twentieth century should
be a thing of the past.
As a woman, who is interested in the
welfare of all the people, I would like
to suggest that as many candidates as
possible be nominated by and from the
working class, so that the people will
have every opportunity to elect their
own men, if not satisfied with the present state of affairs.
In the past the working people have
never been represented in the house in
proportion to their numbers. The people must be more positive and ask themselves if conditions which we are all
facing today are good enough. If they
are, well let all the politicians continue
tho play. If they are not, put in independent, public, progreBsive-minded
candidates up for election, and do it
naw.
The women should all get busy and
see that the men who run for election
are ready to grant them a full franchise, as women will be the majority—
after the war. If we had a just parliament the soldiers' wives, mothers and
sisters would be allowed to vote for
the absente ones. But no, the government is looking after the best way to
get into office again.
When "Laurence Irving," the actor
and teacher, was in Vancouver, he
spoke to a large gathering on suffrage.
His opening remarkB were: "I am not
a politician; I would blush to be one.'
I think he was right, for surely we
should have got beyond that stage. As
Robert South, the English divine and.
author, says: "A politician is ready
to do anything that he apprehends for
hiH advantage." So the people must
be honest to themselves, and if we
want a thing done, well, as "Longfol*
low" says, we must do it ourselvese
and not leave it to others. It Is too
late, in this day of evolution, for ono
part of the human family to ignore the
other part. The interest of one
shoufa be the interest of all. I should
like to see this question taken up at
once bv theh people interested.
. LOUISA PARR
Vancouver, B. C, March 11, 1916.
Payments Too Low
Half the worker's wages is an adequate proportion for compensation according to a report on the New Jersey
compensation law isBued by the American Association of Labor legislation.
The report attacks the New Jersey
system for having fixed the basis too
low. Under the act the injured worker is entitled to only two weeks' medical attendance with a $50 maximum
and to 50 per cent of his wages, one
of the lowost scales in the country.
Beceht laws tend to fix compensation on a more liberal scale. New
York and Ohio started with a 66 2-3
per cent scale. Massachusetts, after
two years' experience with 60 per
cent, recognized its inadequacy aad
raisod it to 66 2-3 per cent, at the
same time extending the period of payments. In a dozen states this year
active legislative campaigns to establish compensation on a basis of 66-23
per cent are in progress.
Labor has the   ballot,   but   doesn't
know how to use It.
It's a pity that all the fellows who
know how to ran a labor paper *« not
in the business. They wonld get a lot
of "experleud/" aa the Italian pita tt.
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S  REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
WILL TAKE PARI IN
I MUNICIPAL
I
Victoria Convention of Affiliated Unions Will Be
Held December 1st
Many Subjects Discussed at
Last Meeting of Capital
City Central Body
VICTORIA, B. 0., March 9.—Victoria
Trades and Labor councU held its regular meeting on March 3rd, President
Wells in the chair.
Organization Oommlttee Beport
Delegate Wells reported that the
meeting to organize civic employees
had been called off on account of a
meeting held by the liberals, and the
matter was left in the hands of Delegate Day to to arrange for a more suitable night.
Special Committee's Beport
Delegate Sivertz reported for the
parliamentary committee, appointed at
last meeting. The report was of some
length and contained the following recommendations:
1. That a committee be appointed for
the city of Victoria and the municipalities of Oak Bay, Saanich, and Esquimau, for the purpose of assisting and
placing names of working people entitled, as householders, to have their
names on their respective voters' lists.
2. That a municipal campaign be
undertaken in the following manner:
(a) The Trades and Labor council to
decide, as early as convenient, but not
later than the first of October, how
many candidates shall run, whether for
council or school board.
(b) Said decision to constitute a call
for nominations, and to be sent to affiliated organizations, with an invitation
to them to nominate one o* more qualified trades unionists and to have such
nominations returned to the secretary
of the council not later than the first of
November. The council also to nominate, if desirable.
(c) The nominations being thus
clOBed on the flrst of November, the
secretary shall forthwith refer them to
the parliamentary committee, which
shall arrange for a series of public
meetings, to be addressed by the several candidates nominated.
(d) On or before the first of December the parliamentary committee shall
call a convention of trades unionists
for the purpose of selecting, by ballot,
the candidates who shall run as the official ticket.
3. That the committee be instructed
to arrange for the holding of public
meetings from time to time for the purpose of discussing matters of public importance.
4. That application be made to the
proper authorities for commissions, under the Provincial Elections   act,   to
filnce names of voters on the voters'
ists. The commissioners to be recommended by the couneil and to constitute not less than two for the city of
Victoria, Oak Bay, Esquimalt and
Saanich.
In the general discussion of the several delegates it was shown that if the
workers were to get a fair share of the
good things, it would only be got by
such action. It rested with the workors themselves and instead of the general apathy it needed direct action-
Civic Employment Bureau.
Delegate Day reported that Delegate
Wells and himself nnd attended the
last meeting held in the city hall and
that they were convinced that there
were other reasons behind this scheme
than alleged1 benefits whioh would help
the condition of the workers. It would1
be the means of helping unscrupulous
employers to further cut down wages
and would give opportunities for the
workers, in their effort to get a meal
ticket, to further compete against
each other, and conditions, bad as they
now aro, would become worse.
Dr. Millar, who ran the slave depot,
was determined that unless a man registered his name and placed himself in
the already full crowd of hungry work-,
ers no help should1 be or would be given
to him.
Delegate Day stated that he had suggested that the labor hall should be
phoned in case men were required, so
thnt the men who had respect for themselves should be allowed to respond. By
this means the men would still retain
their self-respect. "Nothing doing/'
was the reply of the man in command
and he was told by the delegate that he
was raising a hornet's nest around the
labor bureau.
After a lengthy debate it was decided that Delegates Wells and Day attend these meetings and oppose any actions of the committee which would
tend to degrade the workers. The
mayor of the city, having Been fit to
resign his position as enairman, Delegate Watchman moved:
"Whereas—It has come to our notice, by the report of our delegates to
the central unemployed committee,
thnt when men are sent out the wagoB
to be paid aro not stipulate, and
"Whereas—Wo renlize that it is in
the best interests of the city that all
laboring men and women who are engaged in industry should receive a reasonable wage, computable with the high
cost of living; therefore be it
"Resolved—Thnt the superintendent of the unemployed bureau send out
no men, women or children unless conditions nre such thnt will assure the
workerB a reasonable return for the energy expended, euch wages at all times
to bo above the amount necessary to
keop an Oriental, ns we are of the opinion that unless some protection is given
the white workers, that they will have
to leave the province to the Orientals;
and thnt our delegates bring this matter up at the next meeting of the central unemployed committee."
The motion was carried unanimously.
Whites Should Replace Orientals.
Delegate Philbrooke brought up the
question relating to the stnrting up of
the Puget Sound company, suggesting
that the council take some action In the
matter of placing white men in the
placo of Chinamen. Delogate Watchman moved, and it was duly seconded
and carried, that—
'' Whoreas—The provincial government has deemed it fit to place a sum
of *G0,000 in the interest of developing
the timber industry, and
"Whereas—The Conservative party,
now in power and the government of
the province, have repeatedly gone on
record as favoring a white British Columbia; therefore be it '
" Resolved—That we, the Victoria
Trades and Labor couneil, respectfully
request the executive of the provincial
government, when . expending thiB
money, to give due consideration to
thoso saw mills employing white labor
only."
Barbers Thank Organized Labor
The delegate from the Barbers' union read correspondence from the attorney-general, and Btated that, on behalf of his local, he wished to thank
the Victoria Trades and Labor council
and the B. C. Federation of Labor for
the help and advice given.
Organizer Present. *
Organizer Clark, of the Painters' local, wns given the floor, and in his remarks stated how pleased he felt to.listen to the many questions brought up
and the businesB-like way they were
doalt with. It wub only by such action
as was now being taken that trades unions would be successful.
Stage Employees' Stand.
A communication was rend by tho
delegate from the Stage Employees'
union, covering thu following motion,
passed by that body in reply to a motion passed at the last meeting of the
Trades and Labor council, which read
as follows:'
"That the men who were employed
in the theatre, controlled by- Mr. Qujig-
lottia, must return to work in the same
theatres in which they were formerly
employed before the said theatre will
be coiiBidored fair to organized labor."
Moved that the request be concurred
in, and the letter be filed.   Carried.
Chinese-made Brooms.
A communication from the British
Columbia Federation of Labor in re
Chinese broom factory in Victoria, was
read. Moved that the president and
secretary get all information and forward same. ■
Osborne Lecture.
Communication from J. B. Osborne,
with reference to giving a lecture at
Victoria. Moved that the funds would
not permit and reply be sent.   Carried.
School Board's Wage Out, •
Delegate Simmons reported1 on the action of the school board of Saanich, in
reducing wages, and Delegate Watchman moved that:
" Whereas—It has come to our notice
that the school board of Saanich is
making an endeavor to give their
school teachers and employees a living
wage; and
"Whereas—We realize the education
of the children should be the concern of
the community; therefore be it
"Resolved—That we, the delegates
to the Victoria and District Trades
and Labor council, appreciate the Btand
taken by the Bchool board of Saanich,
to give the children of the workers the
best possible education under the conditions now existing, and be it further
" Besolved—That we have a copy of
this resolution spread on the minutes,
and a copy be sent to the chairman of
the school board."
Oppose Piece Work.
The same delegate mentioned the action of the same authorities with refer;
ence to piece work, and it wns duly
moved that:
'' Whereas—It has come to our notice
that the Saanich municipnl council has
deemed it advisable to revert to piecework on municipal undertakings, and
"Whereas—The workers have at all
times Btrenuously fought against this
form of sweated labor; and
'' Whereas—The same body has
shown its callous disregard for the best
interests of the white workers of the
municipality in placing a rate of wages
at $1.50 per day on relief work; and
" Whereas—This wage is not sufficient to give the worker the necessities
of life, or to give any comfort to hia
wife and family, should he be married,
under the present high cost of living;
therefore be it
Resolved—Thnt we respectfully request the said council to seriously consider their action and1 make an endeavor to give a wage for this labor thnt
will be such as to onable the white
worker to exist in the municipality."
The "Jitney" Bus;
Motion for extension of time called
for and granted.
The jitney bus came up for discussion, several delegates taking up question for and against; but it was apparent that the delegates were satisfied
that the jitney was a menace; that the
drivers were, with few exceptions, men
who were opposed and had been fighters against trades unionists. An instance was given where a man worked
as a journeyman in the day time, estimating as foreman and running a jitney at night. All that was asked was
that the conditions ahould be equal as
to those which the street carmen had
to abide by, and that the street railwaymen should and would have the support of the Trades and Lnbor council.
At 11:45 a motion to adjourn was
called; when a moBt interesting and
lengthy meeting came to a conclusion,
Bevernl good union men having the
pleasure of walking home, after the decision of tho council on jitneys waB
reached.
B. O. Vinegar Works.
At their factory, Powell street, Vancouver, tho B. C. Vinegar Works have
a capacity of 15,000 gallons per month.
They are manufacturers of Vinegar,
Cider and Sauerkraut in bond under Inland Revenue supervision. Their many
brands can be obtained at your grocer
on tho "Sntisfnotion—or money back"
basis. The firm is ennbled to give this
gunrnntee upon an eleven years reputation. So you 're assured of a square deal
when buying this home product. In addition to the superior quality received,
you will have the satisfaction of supporting a home industry ***
B. C. Purdy, Ltd.
When it's Chocolates-the name of
Purdy is synonomouB with purity. Chocolates are recommended by all the best
phyaicinns ub being nutritious and1 very
digestible, Purdy's purity and perfection Chocolates have obtained the reputation of high-class and it is the concensus of opinion that they are tho
most deliciouB and healthful confection.
750 Robson Btreet, Vancouver; phone
Seymour 9020. ***
START NOW!
om PITMAN'S«,.
eldest and best business college
in British Columbia
The fees nre lower than any other   college;,  up-to-date   business
methods   adopted;   success   gunr-
teed each student.
16 YEARS INDIVIDUAL
TUITION 8UOCESS
Cor. Hastings and Bichards Sts.
Vancouver, B. C.
SAFEST and QUICKEST
To and From
New Westminster
Blue Funnel
MOTOR CARS
Leave 110 SEYMOUR STBBBT. (one
door off Hastings St.) daily at 8.30
a. m. and every 15 minutes thereafter •
until 7.30 p. m.t after which we too
a car every 30 minutes. We have
large roomy cars going DXBEOT- TO
WESTMINSTER without parading you
np and down the streets, thereby giving a service you are sure to appreciate.
PHONE SEY. 1615
Phone:   Seymour 3800
Supplies and Repairs of AU Kinds
M. SOOVILL
BICYCLES
Harley-BavldBon Motorcycles
1018 Fender Street West
Vanoouver, B. C.
HOTEL ST. REGIS
H. TALFORD FITZSIMMONS, Manager
Greater Vancouver's
Newest Hotel
European Plan
RATES:
$1.00 per Day and Up
Seymour & Dunsmuir Sts. Vancouver
One Block from Labor Temple
The 8,000 Members of Organized Labor in Vancouver, affiliated with 52 Unions, Are Earning and
Spending $24,000 Every Work Day
Merchants, Manufacturers, Professional Men, Caterers and those who
desire a share of the above patronage can secure the most direct results
by using the columns of The
B.C. Federationist
Official paper of Vancouver Trades and Labor Council and the B. O. Federation of Labor—issued every Friday morning from its offices in Organized Labor's Qunrtcr-of-a-million-dollar Home, at the corner of
Homer and Dunsmuir Streets.
ADVERTISEMENT
Vote for..
WALTER
HEPBURN
FOR
MAYOR
He is the Candidate
who will uphold the honor and dignity of the City
of Vancouver.
He stands for the best
interests of organized labor and Will give the
working-man everything
that he is entitled to.
ELECTION COMMITTEE

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