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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 11, 1914

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
jINDUSTBIAL UNITT;,<* STBENGTH.
OFFICUL PAFEB s VANCOUVEB TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B.C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1914.
^►POLITICAL UNITT : VIOTOBTI
X*VBrgg)    HOOPER YEAR
mm
SET
TYPICAL LAND SCANDALS
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Result of Elections Not As
Favorable As First
Thought
I
Men Leave the State to Find
Work and Lose
Votes
STDNET, N. S. W., Nov. 14.—The
Ltate eloctions in Weat Australia have
lot turned out aa favorable for the Labor Party aa we thought they would.
Instead of holding a aafe majority, ae
in the recent parliament, the fate of
eht government in the far western
itate of Australia depends on the re-
aulta of the second ballot returns th..t
are yet to be fought out in the course
of a week or so.
Although the figures are not com*
Mete so far, it would seem that the
(Labor Party has in that state 24 seats,
ITory Party IS seats, and Country Party
■(in coalition with the Tories) 8 seats.
Ilhua Labor ao far haa a majority of
Jyoe, which would disappear when they
Appoint a speaker.   To hold offloe the
T^abor Party will need to win two out
pf the three deferred seats.
It seems hardly necessary to say any
(thing about the "defeat—the fact re-'l
nains that labor has lost ground there
during the last two months—since the
labor victory of the Commonwealth.
tt is said that the fault lies in the fact
.hat labor was over-confldent, following
on the victory two months ago, and
that through the war many failed to
rote. Then again, the worker's vote
kte much displaced through their moving out of their constituencies on ac*
Jnount of slackness of work. Be that as
nt may the fact remains we have had
Yj, set-back there. This should be
healthy in a way, since it will sharpen
1'ur wits in future.
"Back to the Land" lithe cry beard on aUeldes to British Columbia now.
The Pederatlonlit hu said on mene than one occasion that the government of
British Columbia la aiding and abetting to a scheme or system to lay tbe
foundations te build up a landlordism unequalled to any of tha European
countries, which ean be born* rat by facta and figures. Tha policy of t— Mc-
Bride-Bowser regime has been one to "give the speculator a chance," and this
it haa done with a vengeance. And still the great army of landless and jobless
goat on increasing to numbers by the thousands. As far back aa last December
12th, The Federattonist published a list shewing the way to which the landa of
Britlah Columbia bad Men disposed of wholesale by tha McBride-Boweer government Before that list reached this offlce, lt had been offered to tba dally
papers of the dty, Conservative and Liberal alike. Bnt they each declined
publication for the simple reaaon that members of both partlea ware on tho lift.
Since that time, and especially of late, Tho Federatlonist has been inundated
with requests for copies of the issue containing the article. For that reason,
and to tha belief that lt waa never more timely than now, tho article is republished below:
V
. .107,473
. 68,440
141,192
.,221,602
 61,840
. ..... 10,880
 17,660
Balrd
.  .... 11,174
. .... 14,103
PABKER WILLIAMS SPOKE.
I'jlailwaj Construction Camp as School
for Bank Bobbers.
, Parker Williams M. P. P., spoke in
(Vancouver laat Sunday night. He spent
ome time in dealing with the land
roblem in the province. The railway
lOlioy of the government he aaid, had
irought many men here from Bussla
nd n respectable proportion of theae,
iter seeing the graft going forward on
he railway building, turned bank rob*
IHe atated that he could scarcely
flame any man who turned bank rob*
er after studying the art in a C. N. B.
onatruotion camp* The independent
rorking class which ten years ago pooled the lower part of the province had
ieen driven out and to-day we find the
ountry filled with Qalicians, BohunkB,
loukhobors 'and so forth.
Ii Immigration had been dumped into
be province indiscriminately. The
Teat safety valve which up to now haa
Iways proved the salvation of the la-
or classes when the labor market be-
lime glutted, namely, the baok to the
Ind movement, wae now clogged,
there is no such outlet possible, but
tith our population of only 400,000
here should he enough land for all ex*
|»pt that the land sharks have grabbed
jlPABLIAMBNTABT COMMITTEE
ticket Completed and Campaign Com.
i mlttees Will Start ln Next Week.
A lively meeting of the central labor'
ody's parliamentary committee took
ince on Wednesday evening, lasting
ill nearly midnight. No additional
hndidates were available and the tick.
t will probably be confined to the
hree candidates already endorsed.
°bese are: B. B. Bailey, ward four;
Km. Dairin, jr., ward six; A. V. Loft-
ng, ward seven. Inasmuch as Mr.
Velsh, a union plumber who has an*
tounced his candidature in ward three,
louth Vancouver, refused to abide by
he decision of the central labor body,
he committee wilt recommend to the
iext meeting of the council that the
nevious endorsation of Mr. Mansel be
ifflrmed. A printing and publicity
Committee of three was named, and all
he sub-committees will begin active
pampaiga work next week.
OB UNION CASES IN 0OUBT.
Lbi
fudgment to Sleuter Case Beserved—
Typo. Case Proceeding Slowly,
i Echoes of the noted Sleuter case
vers heard at the court house again
ast week, Mr. J. W. De B. Farris
btrasel for Plasterers' union, argued
he appeal before the court of appeal,
'lth three judges only, Macdonald, Ir-
ine and McPhillips, presiding. Judg-
lent was reserved, and a deoision be-
ore the New Tear is unlikely.
The Todd case against the Typo-
Taphical union is proceeding slowly-
Ix-presldent H. C. Benson was up for
(scovery some weeks ogo, President
'.. P. Pettipiece was examined last
?eek, and Secretary-treasurer E. H.
Keelands was before the registrar yes-
nrday. The case will probably come
i> trial after the legal holiday season,
Hockey Line-up for To-night.
The,line-ups for the opening, hockey
atch of the season to-night at the
ancouver arena, has been announced,
ancouver will have both Mackay and
>ok out, while there will be only one
innge' in the team that represented
letoria alt last season, Bernie Morion replacing Walter Small on the
rward line. Tommy Paillips and
iiekey Ion wilt handle the game. It
111 be the first appearance of the
bmer since he played with the Mil
Iqalres two seasons ago. The teams:
•Vancouver. Victoria.
Ihman Goal .'.Lindsay
|ok  Point Genge
Ma..  ..
Capt.)
jrlor ....
okay..
rhbor..
lien. .V.
.Cover Point
. ...Eover ...
. ..Centre..
... Wings ..
....'Wings ..
. .L. Patrick
(Capt.)'
.Dunderdale
.  ...Morris
s Kerr
. . ...Poulin
VANCOUVEB.
Acres
Bonthrone, Lennard A Co.. 16,336
elo Bowser, Bold * Wall-
bridge 16,906
B. 0. Securitiei Co., Ltd 12,160
Croft ft Ashby.  ...101,326
Geo. Faixbairn        .. 12,710
Neil Getting      .... 81,490
Grand Trunk Land Oo  83,876
Grand Trunk Paelfle Development Co 14,233
elo GwlUto, Crisp ft McKay 13,300
c|o  Jas,  A.  Harvey   and
Partpers	
elo Stuart Henderson..
North Coait. Land Co
co Peace Biver Co...
co L. 0. Portorlold.,.
c o Shaw ft Shaw	
Star Boalty Co....
elo  Taylor, Harvey,
ft Orant	
loo. 0. Tretbeway...S	
VIOTOBIA
Acrei
L. Alexander 41,591
elo BodwoU ft. Lawson.... 38,215
Bond ft Clark 22,720
cte B. 0. Cattle Co 33,382
c|o Eborta ft Taylor (Mr.
Eberts is Speaker of tho
Legislature 30,720
c|o Gore ft McGregor 63,075
A. S. Innes....  10,720
elo J. O. Johnston. 10,880
0. 0. Leaek 30,693
ole Nell F. McKay 10,080
J. E. MiUer (Inspector of
Inland Bevenue) 22,083
c|o Pemberton ft Son 10,200
B. Porki ft Rons 14,080
Porpoise Harbor Land Co.. 17,163
F M. Battenbury    .
Bobertwn ft Helsterman .
B. 0. INTEEIOB.
E. T. Avlson, Quesnsl.. ..
elo E. H. Hicks-Beach, Hai-
elton ■'.. 19,552
Jno. 0. Kenworthy, Llllooet. 11,729
Western   Canadian   Bench
Co., Llllooet 41,003
c|o F. 0. McKinnon, Haeol-
ton... 11,480
Joa, 0. Tretheway, Nance-
Vttlo.,  14,193
TOBONTO.
Stuart   Valley   Land    ft
Investment Co 52,464
WINNIPEG
Wm. 0. Lestikow 44,403
SEATTLE
elo Bauman ft Keliher  16,600
Grand Trunk Pacific Land
Oo 47,729
F. M. Battenbury (ef Victoria), elo Trafford Hutl-
son 14,726
32,360
66,177
12,800
Total 1,719,709
Beyond these there ara many more
millions of acres held ln the names of
• 'dummies" and land-grabbing syndicates controlled from Seattle, Portland,,
Spokane, San Franciico, Chicago, New
Tork; alio London, Berlin, Paris and
other European centres of finance.
The foregoing list includes only
small portion of the vast areas such
exploiters are holding for higher
prices,' by which to wring from incoming settlers the savings from their
life-long earnings.
fuges which somo of the above resort
to hide the extent of their holdings, e. g., J.' 0. Johnston, of Victoria,
has about half of the tax notices sent
to the Empress hotel and the other
half to the Union olub, consequently
neither the assessor nor persons experienced in searching the- assessment rolls can be sure that J. G.
Johnston owns the combined areas, of
which 6,600 acres are notified to the
"Empress and 4,480 acres to the
"club," unless they know him, or
trace the combined cheques when re*
ceived.
Similarly, F. M. Battenbury, the
architect for the government buildings at Victoria, bas only part of his
tax notices sent to Victoria, where he
resides. As a large part of tbe notices are sent to him care of Trafford
Hutison, of Seattle, ihe workers of
the province now paying his commission on the new government buildings have the right to ask why his
tax notices are being sent to that, for
elgn country and what has become
of the 150,000 acres he had staked in
the Peace Biver country along the
track of the Grand Trunk Pacific railway, and held by him until recentlyf
The question to which the electors of
British Columbia are responsible to
demand a true answer is: How did
these people obtain control of such
vast acreages when the Land act provides that 640 acres Ib the most any
individual can buy from the B. C.
government f
HOW Land Is Staked ln the Names of
Dummies.
At the time arrangements were being made to' forestall' settlers along
the G. T. P. foute, five years ago, the
writer waB asked to join the party
then being secretly arranged to sub*
vert the birthright of settlers, and
wae astounded on learning the bra-
sen, wholesale manner in which that
pillage of public lands was being
carried out, to the permanent injury
of present workerB, future settlers
and provincial welfare
. A contributor to The Federationiflt
adds: "The party's'stakers/who invited me, were living at the Empress
hotel, Victoria, after their previous
season's exploitation. My being new
to British Columbia led me to infer
that their expedition was a rarity,
but recent investigation convinced me
those schemes were only one ot" the
.many., groups organized by financiers
intent upon plundering provincial  r»
sources.   My then position
Lad Those Schemers
to think that I was 'on the inside
track,' and as intent as they upon
grasping wealth by nubile plunder.
They were mistaken, however, aa I
was working and striving for the permanent welfare of British Columbia,
believing that honest government can
here develop the most energetic community in the empire. Consequently
they frankly explained their system
to me, with the assurance that I
could by joining their syndicate make
scores of thousands of dollars; so
with feigned reluctance their prof*
fered opportunity was allowed to pass
as family business necessitated my
departure for England, while I resolved to find out' later the burden
suoh exploiters bring upon workers in
British Columbia and Canada, * inflating prices of land to settlers and thus
inflicting upon the community the
increasing cost of living now crippling prosperity. The scheme was
based upon their being given secret
information from government sources
concerning the most fertile localities,
into which they were allowed to go
one year ahead of the surveyors employed by the provincial government,
and bo stake tbe best land in successive areas before the government sur-|
veyors arrived next season. Thus
while the surveyors were in district
'A' the schemers were picking out the
most valuable lands in district 'V,'
alongside the rivers, lakes and valleys where railways and roads were
likeliest to be made. Next year the
surveyors were
Surveying the 'Gleanings'
in district 'B' (noting the prime areas
staked and locating the hillsides and
marshy areas left unstaked, the
schemers would be 'staking' the beBt
lands in district 'C and so forth, feeling quite immune from interference
by government officials at such exploitation in advance of government
surveys.
Tha Schema.
"The particular expedition was being outfitted fer the Peace Biver district beyond the low divide separating
the headwaters of the Fraser from the
Peace river and its tributaries along
which the Grand Trunk Pacific railway was projected. A stern-wheel
steamer was being built for the
party north of the portage to take
the party several hundred miles up
those navigable rivers .and lakes,
alongside which the best agricultural
lands are located, and could be rapidly 'staked* by the party taking with
them a list of names to write on the
corner posts, with a so-called 'power
of attorney' for each, as a blind to
hoodwink tbe electors and hide that
basest form of provincial robbery
from the worthy settlers. By that
mean system settlers are impoverished continually so that very few
indeed are able to maintain their
families even when working tho land
to the utmost of their powers during
many years, because these scoundrels
sap the lifelong savings from the
settlers by exacting extortionate
prices for land they thus steal from
the people. To enable workmen and
citizens generally to understand how
This Nefarious System
is worked, we must frankly realize
that those 'powers of attorney' are
used by these wholesale organizing
devastators of British Columbia for
the same despicable purpose of rob*
bery that 'hold-up' men use handkerchiefs aa masks to hide their identity
while plundering their helpless victims. But they have neither the courage needed by the highwayman nor
the hardihood necessary for the
stool-pigeons, they use as stokers to
subvert the ' law their friends in executive power have taken oath to their
king to impartially administer. Tbeir
orations purpose to divert the anxious
thought of Buffering workers from
the real cause of the suffering and
misery and misdeeds of those in
power have brought upon the hardest
workerB now struggling for British
justice in British Columbia, where
nature has most lavishly endowed
this choicest provinco in the British
empire. Like useful handkerchiefs,
"powers of attorney" are necessary
when exceptional circumstances warrant their use; as for example, if the
grantee is through illness or absence
abroad unable to do the needful himself, he can rightly, by certified power
of attorney authorize a substitute to
act for him ao long as necessary—
but only to do what is right—certainly
such L bogus 'powers of attorney,' as
will be disclosed hereafter, cannot be
allowed
A. V. LOFTING.  ,
Trades and Labor council aldermanlc
candidate for Ward VII.—Recording
eecretary of the local Street Bailway
Employees' union—Besidenee address: 2636 Trinity Btreet; telephone
Highland 1579.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
TWENTY-FITFH ANNIVERSARY
Laat Saturday night, tto largo hall of the Labor Temple wu flUod with
local unionists assembled to celebrate tho 25th anniversary of tbo Tradea and
Labor Council. "Old-timers" ware there by tha aeon. It wu tbelr "occasion." Wben tbo proceedings opened at 8 o'clock tbo platfoem wu occupied
by Joseph Dixon, tbo flnt preildent of tba conndl, Oeorge Bartley, tbe flnt
secretary, aad J. H. McVety, tbo present president
In tbo body of tbo hall won many man who won connected with tbo flnt
efforts to establish tbo trada union movement ln tbo dty. To tbem lt wu a
chance to got together and "chow" over tbeir reminiscences of days gone by.
Ono noteworthy futon wai tbo largo number of woman preeent Tbo evening
wu chiefly taken np by speeclee of paat offlcen of thl coundl, who told of tbo
way thoy did thingi to early dayi. Interspersed with tbat won long! ud
brief addressee by tbo candidates wbo will contest varloua warda at tbo coming
dvic election!. To thoee wbo May to tbo rough and tumble of tbo movement
to season and rat of season, ud to whom progreu seems pitifully Saw ud
painful, tho realisation came that at leaat some advancement bad boon made,
Tbo coundl bad occupied a place to tbo working-clan and general pnbllc Ufa
of tho dty which no other body eould have dono, ud lti record wu ono which
had done credit to tho limited finances ud opportunities ot, thon wbo bad
composed tbo conndl during lta quarter century of activity.
The meeting waa opened by J. H,
VIOTOBIA TBADES OOUNOIL.
Hold!
Transacts
STREET mm
MEN'S HON
Quiet   Session   ud
Boutins BuHneii.
VICTORIA, B. 0., Dee. 9.—Preildent
Wells occupied the chair at the regular
meeting of Victoria Trades and La-,
bor council held December 2nd. There
was a fair attendance of delegates.
The question came from the Barbers
as to what had been done re the closing of shops on holidays.
Delegate Day reported, and it was
moved that the secretary write and inform the; Barbers to get busy and prepare to deal with the question in conjunction with the council.    -.
Letters enclosing $1 each were received from Machinists, Boiler-makers,
Tile-layers, Sheet Metal Workers and
Steam Engineers, on behalf of the
Workmen's Compensation bill.
Reports of organisations shewed the
state of trade to be still bad, with the
exception of Machinists, Brewery
Workers, Btreet Bailway Employees,
Barbers, Longshoremen, Steam Engineers, who reported, fair.
Delegate Fisher moved that the action of Montreal re the question of no
reduction of wages by that city be endorsed.
A communication was read from the
manager of the Variety theatre re the
question of using a.non-union man on
the stage.   Delegate Marsh. Stage Em-
{iloyees, explained the position of his
ooal and after discussion the matter
was referred to a committee—Delegates
Wells, Day, Philbrook and Scholes, who
would deal with the question in conjunction with the Stage Employees.
Delegate Day, reported1 on the hospi
tal chimney, stating'' he had, with tne
help of local builders, proved to the
immigration authorities that men could
be found in B. C, and Victoria who
could build it. The, immigration authorities had stopped the Webber company of Chicago, and the hospital
board had concurred in the action.
Sunday Mass Meeting.
"Can Liberalism Abolish Povertyf"
will be the subject for Mr. Ralph
Smith at the Globe theatre next Sunday evening at' a public taeeting, under the auspices of the Social Science
club.
Simpson and Bancroft.
The workers in Toronto are putting
up as candidates for the Board of Control, James Simpson and F. Bancroft,
the vice-president of the TradeB and
Labor Congress of Canada.
Platter Begina Temple.
Plasterers started on the new Labor
Temple building, Regina, last Monday,
and it Ib confidently expected that the
new building will be fully complete in
less than two weeks from then.
LETTER CARRIERS.
Federated Association of Letter Carriers, Branch No. 1, Elect Officers.
At the regular meeting of the above
association held on Friday, December
4th, the following officers, etc., were
elected for the year 1915:
President—Metcnlf, J. B., acclamation.
Vice-president—Derrick, W. J., 23;
Griffith, J., 33; Griffith elected.
Secretary—Buck, M. W., 9; Knowles,
F., 12; Wight, R., 35; Wight elected.
Assistant secretary—Cass, J., 26;
Cook, A. R., 4; Snowies, F., 31;
Knowles elected.
Treasurer—Cook, A. R., 41; DerriVt,
W. J., 20; Cook elected.
Tyler—Rivett, E., acclamation.
Auditors—Carl, L. C; Kemp, L. L.;
Squires, W. A.; acclamation,
CQllectors—Main offlce—Cbbb, J.; Le
Messurier, H. S., and Shandly, W.
Station "B"— Rivett, E. Station "C"
—Cook, A. R. North Vancouver—
Moulang, S. H.
Delegates to TradeB and Labor Council—Cook, A. R.; Dodol, J. J*,; Knowles,
F.; Kirkwood, R.; and Manders, E. D,
A Clean Labor Temple.
Robert Marrion, one of the inspectors on the staff of the city health department, after an examination of the
Vancouver Labor Temple, reported to
the health department as follows: "The
whole of. the sanitary conveniences
were absolutely clean, also the tile
floors and marble partitions comprising
tbe compartments, and form the most
up-to-date appointments I have seen In
the city, and reflect great credit upon
the caretaker in charge of same."
McVety, who introduced Mr. Dixon in
a short speech befitting the occasion.
He referred to his early work in the
movement and the consistent support
which lie had always given to organised labor, despite the fact that since
those early days he had become an employer of labor.
"Joe" Dixon.
Mr. Dixon, called upon to preside
over the gathering, said how much he
appreciated the invitation to be chairman on auch an occasion. Thingi had
changed almost out of recognition since
he occupied -the first chair in the first
council. Many of thoie who had been
active at that time had passed to the
last roll call. Others had drifted away.
But it was evident to Urn that however much the personnel might have
changed, the movement itself had gone
forward. The building in which they
were gathered was ajome proof of that,
and he was certain that the old-timers
never dreamt that such a place as the
present Labor Temple would ever be
the home and property of the labor
movement. When he looked back at
the old quarters in Sullivan hall, he
had nothing but Congratulations to
offer on the change which had taken
place. The change whioh had taken
place in this respect during the past
ten years did great credit to the movement, and he hoped that the next ten
would see equal improvement. He did
not wish the moment to go by without
saying that he considered the council
had done wisely in putting forward
candidates for the civic elections. In
respect to thiB he would remind those
preeent that the Trades and Labor
Couneil had been the flrst to advocate
the payment of a salary to aldermen,
so that working men might be put forward for election. In concluding, he
assured the audience that he had almost forgotten how to make a speech,
but before coming he had decided that
as soon aa he saw^alf a dozen people
had gone out, he would take that as a
sign to stop.
Legislature to Meet January 21st.
Premier McBride announced last
Wednesday that the provincial purlin
ment will meet January 21st, and thnt
the Bession will not likely laet more
than three weeks aB no contentious
legislation will be up for consideration,
CF. BURKHART
Business agent of the Barbers' union
and a steadfast delegate to the cen*
. tral labor body, who said good-bye
to local unionists at last meeting,
having retired and expects to leave
the city early in the New Year.
Mr. Tom Weedon, of the Typogra-
Shical Union, then sang "Till the
ends of the Desert Grow Cold" in
great style. He is a complete show in
hinjself. The opinion generally expend was that if he really knew what
he was about he would quit the typesetting and make a better living with
his singing.
George Bartley.
Qeorge Bartley, the flrat and preient
secretary of the couhcil, wai then
called upon. He said he had been connected with the labor movement from
boyhood up to what he almost felt was
approaching old age. He well remembered the formation. of the council,
when a email group of pioneer working
people assembled i^ the old Sullivan
halt 25 years ago to start it going. More
things had been hatched in that old
hall than he would either care or dare
to tell of. That was is the old Knights
of Labor Days, but politics got in and
away everything went. He regarded
the decision of the council to go into
municipal politics. aB a forward step,
and he hoped that the present effort in
that direction would be the starting
point of a more progressive policy for
the council. He dropped into a reminiscent strain in speaking of the activities
of the council in bygone yean. His
speechwas short, interesting and obviously gave as much delight to him
as   it   did   his   hearers It   was
"George's" night, and he positively
did a becoming little blush at the applause which followed his address.
Miss H Guttridge, the secretary-
treasurer of the council then spoke
brieflly, and B. B. Bailey, F. Mansell,
and F. W. Welsh, three of the labor
candidates for aldermanlc honors, each
made short speeches. Interspersed
with the addresses were songs and musical selections by Tom Weedon, Miss
Wardaugh, Mr. Pierce, a trombone trio
consisting of Messrs Gaunt, Kylo and
Slater, a song by Mrs. Sampson, piano
duet by Miss Appleby and Miss Evans,
songs by Miss Montgomery, Mrs.
Heatherton and Mr, Holden,. saxophone
solo by Mr. H. McDonald.
COLORADO   BONE   WAR.
Preparations to Withdraw Troops and
Repeat Ludlow.
.DENVER, Col., Dec. 7.—That Colorado coal operators and the Btate militia are already prepared to "put on"
another Ludlow massacre as soon as
the federal troops are removed is shown
by the following letter written to John
McLennan, president of the Colorado
Coal Miners:
Ludlow, Colo., Nov. 27, 1914.
Mr. John McLennan;
Dear Sir and Brother—Just a few
lines in regard to a meeting which was
held in Delagua, Colorado, Also
which the superintendent acted
chairman. He told all the men that
within a short time the federal troops
would be withdrawn and would replaced by the state militia) and tnat
any man wishing to leave could do so,
but the men who retained their work
would be given good protection/ and he
further stated that to insure their protection, each man would be ' given a
rifle and plenty of ammunition.
With best wishes for an early settle'
ment, I remain, sincerely yours,
J. Doralniske, Secretary.
T. Lowe, President.
The state militia claim they have
clean out the strikers as Boon as the
clean out the strikers as son as the
federal troops leave.
Governor Ammons and Governor-
Elect Carlson have been busy this week
trying to get President Wilson to remove his troops and give the gunmen
militia a chance to do their dirty work,
but thus far he has refused.
Ammons has given further evidence
of his stand with the operators by going
through the country Baying that no women and children wero killed at Ludlow. No, they were only massacred
nnd cremated, not killed.
[Note.—Since this correspondence
was received it hus been reported
through the daily press that the strike
has been called off by the miners.—Editor Federatlonist.]
Cooks' and Waiters' Officers.
Election of officers of the -Cooks' and
Waiters' union was held on Thursday,
December 3rd. The following were
elected: President, Chas. Davis; vice-
president, John Cretghton; financial
secretary and business agent, Andy
Graham; recording seoretary, Thomas
G, Crombie; inspector, E. H. Howard;
executive board—Murk Foster, Edward
Cosgrove, E. H. Howard and John
Cumming; delegates to the Trades and
Labor council—W. E. Walker, T. G.
Crombie, Andy Graham and M. A, Mar-
tyn; local joint executive board—Chas.
Davis, Andy Graham and W. E. Walker. The foregoing will all take offico
to-night.
Plasterer's Helper Gets $3,600.
A special jury before Mr. Justice
Macdonald in tho Supreme court Inst
Wednesday, awarded $3,500 damages nt
commou law to Ed. Allatio, a blaster's
helper, who was injured by an explosion in a mine of the Granby Consolidated Mining & Smelting company.
The young man's arm was broken in
five places.
Mr. J. W. de B. Farris appeared for
Allatio and tho defendant company wns
represented by Mr. H, S. Wood.
ONTARIO COMPENSATION AOT.
Employers Already Instal Safety Devices.
The Workmen's Compensation act,
Which comes into force on January 1st,
1915, is already being anticipated by
beneficial results, and amply demonstrates that the arguments advanced by
the advocates of the measure and so
strongly opposed by tho manufacturing
interests is working out exactly as predicted by them when the proposed legislation waB before the house.
There waa nothing in the past that
would have prevented tho Canadian
Manufacturers' Association from starting a campaign of accident prevention, and it is more than significant to
note that it is only after the compensation act has been placed on the
statute books that they have apparently awakened to the necessity of such
action.
Hereafter the workers of Ontario can
rest assured that industry in the province will bo run on a saner and safer
basis than was the caBe before legislation to properly safeguard their interests had been enacted into law. Under
the old and obsolete Employers' Liability act it cost too much to expend
money in safety devices to safeguard
the lives or the limbs of the employes
in industrial establishments, but now
tbat the Workmen's Compensation act
is a reality, it Ib cheaper to expend
money in making machinery as safe as
possible, because under the law as it
now stands, it is going to be a costly
proposition to kill or maim a worker.
But for the persistent agitation and
sacrifices of organized labor there
would be no Workmen's Compensation
acf on the statute book to-day, and the
old and useless Employers' Liability
act would still hold the boards.—Labor
News, Hamilton, Ontario.
TORONTO WORKLESS MARCH.
Procession to Parliament House — Demands Action of Premier.
A week ago last Thursday, a deputation of unemployed, numbering 1,000
men, marched from the Labor Temple,
Toronto, to the provincial parliament
buildings waited on Premier Hearst
and demanded that the government do
something in the way of relieving the
situation.
The premier stated that the government would discharge any duty that
devolved upon it in connection with the
present conditions.
Ono speaker is reported to have said:
A hungry stomach has no conscience." "The men are not going to
starve," be continued, "they are going to fight. I don't want to make any
threats. I nm merely speaking from my
observations and knowledge of the situation, but thoy mean business and
something will have to be done soon."
The delegation carried banners inscribed with tho phrases as "British
subjects we wore born, British subjects
we will Boon be dead," and "Canada,
homo of millionB, but has no bread for
Publication by President W.
D. Mahon  Shews  the
Advance by Figures
Canadian Members Benefit
by Higher Wages and
Lower Hours
A booklet, setting forth tke wage hiitory of tke Amalgamated Aetoeittloi
of Street end Electric Bailway Employees, ku jut been leaned by W. 0,
Mahon, International preaident of tM
orgtniztfion. In tke preface ke sey.i
"In addition to tke lncreue of tin ,
received by tke memberahip of this u-
aociition, tkere ku eome te them
through tke efforts of tke organlzttiot
many otker benefits too numeroue te
mention. Tke' Amalgamated Ateocit-
tlon of Street and Electric Bailway
Employe! of America waa organlied il
September, .1888. At tk* time of organization tke, wise wu low tnd tk*
houra of labor long, tnd there wu t*
protection of tny kind either by ltw or
tny otker wty for thi. clue of workmen. ,
Tke organization tt once took up tk* '
struggle to improve tud better the eon-
dltiona of tke atreet ud electric railway men of America. Tke Int work
wee tkat of protecting tke motormen
tnd conductor, by having ltwa compelling til the we to be veotibuled,
for prior to thtt time a veatibule wu
unthought of tnd the motormen tnd
[conductors stood expoaed to all klnda of'
1 weather.
The fight for the veatibule wu t htrd
one. Tke emulation wu oppoeed by
preetietlly til tke companies. Tke flrat
ltw wu eecured tnd adopted it tk*
atate of Ohio, requiring vestibulea from
the let of November to the lit of
April etch year.
The work wu carried from atate to
etate, until today tke veatibule U
found upon tbe ean, not only in tk*
organized cities, but throughout the entire length tnd breadth of tke Unite*
Statea and Canada.
In Vancouver tt tke time of orgtn-
icing the work dty wu ten houra ud
the* wage 20c per hoar. At the preeent
time the work dty on city lines ie nine
hours. Wages: 87c per hour the tret
year, 29c per hour the second yetr, Sle
per hour the third year, 33c per hour
the fourth year and SSe per hour thereafter, Wtge rate on interurbtn Bnt*
and work train service is: 28Mc. per
kour tke Int yetr, 80He. per hour th*
second year, 32Vic per hour the third
year, 34%c. per hour the fourth year
and 36 He. per hour thereafter. Work
day on interurbtn lines is ten hour*.'
This scale applies also to Vietorit
and New Westminster.
In Winnipeg, at time of organising
carmen worked eleven hours a dty.
Wsges: #35.00 per month the first
three months, £40.00 per month tho Beit
nine months and #45.00 per month after
one year. They now have a nine-hour
work day and the wage rate is: 25c. per
hour the first aix months, 27c. per hour
the seeond six months, 28c. per hour the
second year, 31c. per *our the third,
year and 34c. per hour thereafter, with
ten houn' pay for eight tnd one-half
houra' work on Sunday.
Begina, before organizing bad a ten
hour day, and wagea were 25c. per kour
the first six months, 27 Mc. per hour the
second six months, 30c. per hour the
second year, 32c. per hour thereafter.
Are now working nine and one-half
hours a day and six days tweekv
Wages: 27Kc. per hour the first six
months, 30c. per hoar the seeond six
months, 35c. per hour the second year
and 37<4c. per hour thereafter. Time
and onoqaarter for work on Sunday,
time and one-half for work on holidays.
Saskatoon men, at the time of organizing were receiving 28c. per hour.
Present wage rate: 28c. per hour the
first three months, 30c. per honr the
second three months, 32 Mc. per hour
the second six months, 35c.. per hour
tho second year and 3714c. per hour
thereafter. Mon employed after January 1, 1014: 28c. per hour the first aix
months, 30c. per hour the aecond six
months, 35c. per hour the socond year
and 37Mc. per hour thereafter. Work
day, nine nnd one-quarter to nine and
one-half hoars. Sundays, seven and
one-bnlf hours or over for nine and one-
half hours' pny. Time nnd one-half for
work on public holidays.
When the union stortod in Peterborough, Ontario, street railwaymen were
receiving 15c. per hour and working
eight, nino and ten hours a day. Present wage rato: 17c per hour the first
year, 18c per hour the second year and
20c per hour thereafter. Work day,
ten and one-quarter hours.
Seattle rate, prior to organization
was: 24c per hour the first six months,
20c per hour the second six months, 27c
per hour the seeond and third yeara,
28c per hour the fourth and fifth years,
20c per hoar the sixth, seventh, eighth
and nine years, 30c per hour thereafter.
Present rato is: 25c per hour the first
six months, 26c per hour the second
six months, 27c per hour the second
year, 28c per hour tho third year, 20o
per hour the fourth year, 30c per hoar
the fifth year, 31c per hour the sixth
year, end 32c per hour thereafter.
Temple Shareholders' Meeting.
Tho annual meeting of shareholders
of Vancouy^r,,Labor Templo company
will bo heldsln the Labor Temple, Friday, DecoiUBer 18th, 8'p. m.
HELP UNEMPLOYED WOMEN
Store Opened for 8*1* of Dolls, Toys
tnd Ohrlstmu Goods
The Women's Employment League,
which has dono so much during tho past
few weeks, with the limited resources
nt its disposal, to help some of the destitute women of the clty.has now
opened a atore for tho sale of tho dolls
and toys of every kind which have
been manufactured by the women, at
tho Robson atreet headquarters of the
league.
The store is next to the Whito sewing machine store, on Granville street,
nenr Bobson. Anyone with any money
at all to spend on dolls or toys will be
well advised in inspecting ' tke stock
there. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
1MOLSONS
BANK
Capital tnd Reeerve, - $8,800,000
SI Drenches In Canada
▲ general backing buelnesa transacted.
Savings Department
Interact allowed tt highest
currant rato
East End Branch
1(0 HASTINOS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvie, Hutger
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED IKt
Paid-up Ctplttl ■
Total Auet* •
• | 11,IOMi
.     12,M0,0M
-11
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On*   Dollar will
th* account, tnd
•ualneu  will   b*  '
mid*  be  It   lirg*
yaur
FOURTEEN BRANCHES
VANOOUVER
IN
THE
UCOirOlATU
ISSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Dopaolts.,
...151,000,000
..(U.OOO.000
L
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Savinn Account Is the names ol
two or mora individuals frequent!/
pommt element! of considerable
convenience. In an account ol tbls
nature lands mar he deposited or
.withdrawn at will br either partr
to the account, on Ui or her Individ*
«al iignature. Interest U added to
baluieei  __S-jtat]f.
Ue HABTINOB 8TBEET WEST
and
Comer HaiUogi and OatraU 8ti.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities ln Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock ud
Poultry. Brltlih Columbia
Ortnts Praemptlona et 160 ures
to Actual Settler*—
Free
TEBM8—Besldence on the lend
for tt leut three yeara; improvements to th* extant of iff per
acre; bringing nnder cultivation
tt leut Ave tcree.
For furtuer information tpply to
DEPUTY 1UMSTBB OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SECRETARY, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
IB.C.
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federation let, Ltd.
S. Parm Pettlplece Manager
JJJ^Wllkinio^. Editor
Directors':   Jas.    Campbell,    preildent;    J.
H. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Olbb; 0. J. Kelly; B. P. Pettlpleoe
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: $1.50 p§r year; In Vanoouver
City, |2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, fl.00
REPRESENTATVES
New Weitmlmter.. .W. E. Maiden, Box 984
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 631
Victoria.. .. '     	
tv, —. .Venning, dux oai
.A. S. Weill, Box 1538
Affiliated with tbe Western Labor Preis
Aiioclatlon.
"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FRIDAY.
..DECEMBER 11, 1914
THE SOCIAL
SERVICE
COUNCIL.
LABOR AND THE dfeuBCH were
brought into prominence at last
week's meeting of the Trades
and Labor Council. President McVety
had been invited by the Social Service
Council to deliver
an addreu on labor matters at its
annual convention
recently, and had
done bo. Reporting
on his experiences, he made the statement that he had often been surprised
at the lack of information possessed by
most clergymen with respect to those
questions which especially concern the
daily life of the working class. But after having had an opportunity to gauge
the mental equipment and outlook of
their lay followers—as represented at
tho convention—he felt he could understand the situation better. He did not
say that he found them to be actually
benighted, but he did imply that he
found a particularly bigoted and obtuse attitude of mind. Not the intentional opposition of the shrewdly informed, but a dull, bovine stagnation,
of mental processes.
*      •      «      •
Here was "a nice derangement of
epitaphs" indeed—as Mrs. Malaprop
would have it. But after all, it is
doubtful if there is anything more effective in clearing up the hazy points
of a debateable matter like this, than
a little refreshing brutality thoughtfully administered by way of criticism.
And having thus paved the way with
kindly and charitable feeling,' the busi
ness of discussing the merits and demerits of the question is placed upon a
perfectly amicable basis. One thing
can be taken as a starting point. That
is that the Social Service Council, as an
institution, is an established fact. And
like most other institutions, it must
have its uses or it would die of atrophy
and inanition—a thing whieh it does
not look like doing for quite a while
yet, if one may judge by its activity,
wise or otherwise,. Organized December, 1907, it is a federation of churches
and other bodies, banded together for
the purpose of advocating reforms
which it believes will conduce to the
enhanced moral rectitude and social improvement of Canadians. In the United States, the appropriate title for its
mission would be "uplift"—and all
which that implies to those who have
the necessary sense of humor and mental penetration to appreciate the meaning of the word as used in such circumstances.
«      •      •      «
The first of Its objects, as set forth
in its platform is that it stands—
"For the application of Chris*
tian principles to the operations of
industrial associations whether of
labor or of capital."
Thinking that over carefully, it
would appear to an observant man in
this day and generation, that there is
need for a pause. What precisely are
Christian principles just nowf We
speak as being less wise, but venture
to ask—of course with becoming deference and all humility—whether the attitude of the majority of Christian nations towards each other at the present
time' in, Europe, may fairly be taken as
a practical example of those principles!
If so we beg leave to decline. Or, on
the other hand, if it is meant that the
principles of life as laid down by
Christ Bhould be applied to the operations of industry as carried on nowadays, we frankly Btate that in our opinion such a proposition is ridiculous.
And if members of the Social Service
Counoll would only read and think about the sayings of Christ half as much
as they talk about them, surely, thoy
too would Bee that such a proposal is
ridiculous—that is unless inane repetition of phrases and puling sophistry,
has made them blind to the obvious.
«       •       a       «
The labor movement does not believe that a rise in wages, or a reduction of hours, can be got by praying
to Heaven, or quoting scripture to employers.   Neither do employers.   And
that ,1s one of the reasons why the Bo-1
cial Service Council meets with the
moral approval and financial support of
those Canadian capitalists who have
sense enough to know which side their
bread is buttered. If it can shew them
that it can persuade workmen to
'' turn the other cheek,'' it will have
done them excellent service. In the
course of-a year it performs a tremendous amount of patient research work,
covering a wide field of subjects such
as immigration, sexual prostitution,
drunkenness, gambling, and so on, as
a perusal of the reports of its annual
conventions will shew. The mysteries
of "the labor problem" are also
among the most entrancing of its perennial activities. But the impression
left upon us after studiously conning
the records of its work is, that it does
not seem to amount to much more than
bo much curious poking and probing in
the garbage .can of modern industrial
ism, and fishing up the more unsavory
of its contents for the purpose of producing thrills of charity in the backbones of respectable persons who have
neither the time nor inclination to do it
for themselves.
#      •      *      *
It also renders very valuable assistance to enterprising clergymen, desirous of infusing a semblance of life and
reality into the dry bones of theological dogma. This is an age of cynics
and scepticism, due in no small measure
to a lack of candor and truthfulness on
the part of the clergy in years gone by.
It is much harder than it used to be to
get intelligent reading and thinking
people, to attend church, and take what
they hear seriously. The situation is
somewhat reversed. Instead of the
people seeking the church, the church
is seeking the people, as it was told to
do by its founder, but did not do as
long as people would swallow anything.
And so now, instead of parsons droning
along for half an hour about some such
abstract and mythical matters as the
trinity, we see them inserting advertisements in the Saturday papers announcing that they will preach a moralizing sermon on the question of the red-
light district—something which they
usually know as much about from actual knowledge and experience as they
do about the trinity. Their chief remedies for such evils are to increase
the severity of the criminal code, and
to enlarge the opportunities for unvir-
tuous ladles to take lessons in needlework and family washing.
WORK
FOOD
AND WAB
THE NOVEMBER ISSUE of the
Gazette, published by the British Board of Trade, gives some
interesting   figures   regarding   employment and prices in England and other
countries.   Any   increase in the figures
of      unemployment
haa for the present
been    arrested     in
Oreat Britain, partly because of the huge army of workers employed' on   war   contracts, and
partly   because    young   wage-earners
have enlisted by tho hundred thousand.
Quite a number of trades are abnormally busy,-the armament   trades   for
instance, and the trades   that   supply
khaki and boots for the soldiers.
•   '    »       »       #.
Taking industry all round, there has
been considerable slackening in the
volume of work, but, for the reasons
stated, thiB does not reflect itself in the
figures of unemployment. Apart from
the cotton trade, which, as is well
known, has boen hit with peculiar severity, just over 4 per cent, of trade
union work people are idle, and
practically every instance the number
of unemployed is less than it was a
month before. Of the "insured" workpeople, 2,388,000 in all, there are just
under 100,000 out of employment. Between trade and trade there are wide
differences in the, degree of unemployment, the figures ranging from 1.7 in
the glass trade to 12.8 in the tobacco
industry. ""
FBIDAT.. .. ..DECEMBER 11, Ifl
canal decreased to seventeen hours, one
minute. All ships using the canal, no
matter what their nationality, are
treated alike. On an average nearly
five thousand ■ vessels a year pass
through the canal.
THE SAVING
GRACE OF THRIFT
SAVING fortifies you against
the uncertainties of the future.
SAVING money means making money, but
saving must come first.
HXKE A START by opening a savings account to-day.
This Company allows interest at 4% on deposits, compounded quarterly.
Omm Financiers Trust Commny
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST.W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly* OenercJ M&n&fei?
In this respect, the Sooial Service
Council does reflect the average lay
member. And that, after all, Ib per?
haps no more and no less than its chief
duty and mission. To offend the susceptibilities of the mediocre Ib fraught
with disturbing possibilities at all
times. The fate of Christ was a. demonstration of that, and perhaps it is
expecting too much of his professional
followers to ask them to deliberately
ignore such a wqfiing. The main
thing nowadays for those who would
pass through life pleasantly, Ib to find
out what the people like and give it
them* Be hanged to the truth—can she
not take care of herself. Hath it not
been said and Bald again "the eternal
years are hers"! Well then, on with
the dance.
w
LABORERS'
WAOBB OET
IT AGAIN.
HEN IN DOUBT, wallop the
bottom   dog.   That   is   the
policy ot the< business  men
who would control municipal affairs in
Vancouver.   Trust companies are going
bust,  the   province
is on the verge of
bankruptcy,    real
estate is collapsing
like a pricked bubble, everything, everybody, everywhere, seems to be going
to the "demnition bow-wows."   Some
say it is the just ehastisement of heaven, others say it is just hell, some say
it is the war.   Each one of a hundred
critics has his own particular view, but
it was left to the bright boy of the
Board of Trade to put his linger on the
spot. '
....
His name is A. Wallace, and at the
meeting of the Board last Tuesday
night he said "that the standard of an
eight-hour day at 3714c. per hour, as
set' by the city council for laborers is
the curse .of the city." According to
his view, and that of the others present, it is duo to this wage that industries are prevented from coming here,
and employers are up against the
standard set by the city. As a matter
of fact they are nothing of the kind.
Laborers and workmen of all kinds are
actually starving, and can be got for
almost any price. If that li not true,
why ia it that single men are working
on city relief work for mere board and
shelter?
....
The principle reason which prevents
industries from coming here is the abnormal price of sites, due to the mad-
dog speculation in land which has been
going on for years. People such as
those who belong to the Board of
Trade, have bought such sites not for
the use they ever intended to put them
to, but so that they could hold up anyone who wanted one of them on which
to establish a business. Labor is oheap
enough. But the trouble is that these
who bought industrial sites last, can
now see that they have been bitten.
That is why they are squealing so
loudly. Every day is bringing them
nearer to the place where they will
have to let go at a sacrifice, which is
breaking their hearts by an inexorably
slow and painful process, tn classic
terms, they have bitten of more than
they can ohew and will have to spit up.
they can chew and will have to spit up
—or choke,
Do your Chrlttmaa shopping early—
before you spend that dine.
The German figures as available up
to the end' of September shew that
glass workera are unemployed to 41.6
per cent.; in Britain, 6.7 per cent, of
the printers, in Germany 33.2 per cent.;
in Britain 3.1 per-cent, of the iron and
steel workers, and 14.4 per eent. in
Germany. In regard to food prices the
contrast is less marked. Ia Britain the
increased cost of food in an average
working-class home since the war began amounts to 13 per cent., beef, mutton, fish/ and eggs' going up greatly in
price. .In Germany beef has hardly
risen in price, but barley is 40 per
cent dearer, split peas 60 per cent,, rice
20 per cent. Potatoes, which in Britain are cheaper than before, have
risen 33 per cent, in Germany, and in
both countries the price of eggs has
been advanced by over 40 per cent. In
Germany the price of sugar stands
where it did, but 'in Britain there has
been an increase of 75 per cent. The
patriots evidently got busy on the
sugar..  .
"I'm ;here, I'm there, I'm everywhere. Who tries to catch me catches
but (hot) air. "---Joe Martin.
', Mr. Jonathan Rogers is president of
the Board of Trade. The way the
meeting of. that body raved against the
city laborers' wage rate of 43 per day
of eight hours, last Tuesday night, is a
fair indication of .the amount of truth
there may be in the rumor that Mr.
Sogers thinks of entering the mayoralty scramble this year.
A movement has been started to abolish the state constabulary of Pennsylvania. As the. state constabulary is a
powerful ally of the oppressors of labor
and is used solely to crush strikers who
rebel against the tyranny of industrial
despots, it is doubtful if the movement
inaugurated will be successful in relegating the American Cossack to private
life. ___
Single men on relief work are to be
given in return, board and bunk. That
means just enough to reproduce their
power to labor so that'they can do as
much work to-morrow as they did to*
day. As there is a difference between
that remuneration and wages, does it
follow that wages represent a little
more than the money necessary to purchase commodities sufficient to just reproduce the power to labor!
If the government ever does put any
considerable quantity of provincial
lands on the market at a cheap price
for settlers, many of those who are advocating suoh a course now will want
to oppose the cheapness out of fear that
it will knock down the price of lands
which they bought at boom time asd
boom prices. They are between the
devil and the deep sea, but they have
not noticed it yet.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets in annual convention in January. Executive officers, 1914-15: President, A. Watchman; vlce-presldentA, W.
F. Dunn. Jas. H. McVety. O. H. Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudson. J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Vlotoria, B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Council—MeeU every seeond snd
fourth Wednesday at 8 p.' to, In Labor hall.
President, H. Knudson; flnincltl secretary,
R. A.  Stoney;  general    secretary,    W.    E.
Maiden.    P. 0. Br- *•"     -*■*■---'-'* -   ■   ■
vited to attend.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
Boa 984.   Th. publlo U In-
OPEBATOB8
WANT TO
FIGHT.
EOPLE WANTING A FIGHT
usually find one. The reply of
various Colorado mining com*
panics to President Wilson's suggestion of a truce is that of men who evi*
" destly prefer war
to peace. While a
few points are- conceded, opposition to
trades unionism,
which is at the root
of all the trouble, is adhered to as ten*
aciously as ever. Industrial wars, like
wars between nations, result from
wrongs, real or imaginary, and are intensified by hatred and prejudices..
....
Although concealed by many words,
the position of the mine operators is
that of feudal barons intent on maintaining themselves* by suppression and
force. Workingmen who cannot organize for their own .welfare, who cannot
present their grievances through thier
own representatives, who are denied
the protection of the laws by local officials, in most oases on the pay rolls
of the mining companies, and who may
be shot down by a mercenary "militia," made up in part of imported gunmen, are slaves in every essential respect.
BAST
WEBT
AND TRADE
STUDENTS OF SOCIOLOGY, aud
the way in which the necessities
of commerce bring nations of
widely different antecedents and outlook into contact, will watch with profound interest the
clfsh of Mohammedan and Christian
in Egypt. Motives,
many of them of
different nature
from those animating the contending
armies in Europe, will play a part in.
the eastern conflict For the white com*
batants,* the Suez canal,. with its immensely powerful trade Influence will
the central objective. It is controlled by an Egyptian company authorised by the Khedive on March 19,
and is controlled in Paris. The
directorate consists of thirty-two members who constitute what is called the
London Committee. Of this, however,
twenty-one are French, ten English, and
one Egyptian. The manager and secretary, the president and even the manager of the London offlee are French.
-.      .      .      •
The British government does not own
the canal, but ranks as a private shareholder, having purchased 176,202 shares
from the Khedive In 1875, The capital
authorized and issued is 200,000,000
francs, in 400,000 shares, of which 378,-
231 shares of S00 francs fully paid are
now taken up. Each year a certain
number of ahares are redeemable at par
through a system of drawing. At the
end of 1911 some 21,768 ahares had
been redeemed in this way.
'.      .     -.      .
During recent years, the business of
the canal has so increased as to warrant the directors in reducing tht
charges for tolls and at the same time,
the profits enable them to Increase thi
dividends. In the past three years tht
tariff has been reduced by twenty per
cent., while the dividend haa increased
from 188. franca to 165 franca. In tht
paat ten years tht tonnage increase hat
beta twenty-nine per cent., whllt thl
average time of passage through thl
A Worker" writes from Victoria
pointing out that when that "scrap of
paper" happens to be a wage scale
agreement, fine points of "honor"
don't seem to be noticed by the capitalist press. As an instance he refers
to firms who had agreements with
building trades workmen in Victoria.
The terms called for three months notice. One week waa given. So much
for a "scrap of paper," when the shoe
is on the other foot.
Saya the Greater Vancouver Chinook
of last Saturday:
Some of the energetic young liberals attached to the Main Street
Club, beaded by Mr. G. G. McGeer,
have conceived the idea of organizing a brass band in connection
with the club.
The association of the one and only
G. G. McG's name with any such enterprise desposes at once of any speculation as to who will operate the big
drum.
A doctor, of the University of Chicago, told the National Academy of
Science last Tuesday thnt "The pain
cauBod by starvation is almost purely
imaginary." ' He says the chief thing
necessary is to adjust one 'a mind to the
conditions It is such flap-doodle as
this, that third rate saw-bones, have to
rely upon for getting their names before the public .at least once in their
career, The best way to treat auch
people would be to feed them on doughnuts—chiefly the holes.
A news Item in the Daily Province
says of the coming aession of the provincial parliament, "As there Is very
little money to spend the session will
doubtless be a short one." Just so.
After the government haa passed a
Workmen'a ompenaation act, and put
most of the recommendations of the
Labor Commission into law it will adjourn. It will likely be the laat session before a provincial election. If
the workers of the province did what
they ahould, it would be the last time
that Bowser, McBride and all their
scurvy tribe were ever seen in that
house.
Vorwarts, the journal of the German
social democrats, has been suspended
"for cauae" by the military authorities. Perhaps the following irom an
issue just before suspension, is part of
the cause.   It says:
"To-day, three months after tht
outbreak of war, the businesses In
many towns are still completely
closed down. A small part of the
men thrown out of work is leading
a miserable life, with paltry wages,
at emergency work—skilled professional workmen laboring in the
woods, on roods, and in the fields
ln all weathers. The remaining
thousands and tens of thousands
have nothing but the trifling tup-
port of their trade unions, which
is hardly enough to stay the hunger
of their children with dry bread.
Are the trade unions to be left to
pay out their last penny, and is
the need ef the unemployed to be
allowed to reach the climax at
which there ia no more prospect of
relief I Would not the help of the
state perhaps come then too latef"
PLUMBERS AMD 8TEAMFITTEBS' LOCAL
No. 495—Moot, every sound and fourth
Frldsy of month in Lftoor nail, 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webster; sseretary, A. Me*
Uren.   P. O. Box 988, Mew Westminster,
b. :o.
Victoria, a. c.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOB COON*
. OIL—Meet, flnt and third Wednesday,
Labor ball, 781 Johnston street, at 8 p, m.
Pruldent A. S. Walls; seoretary, Thos. F.
M.lhlion, Bex 809, Victoria, B, O,
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Weitern Federation of Minus—Meat.
Sunday evening, ln Union hall. Praaldant,
Alex. Wilson; seerotary.trea.arer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberhy, B. 0.
City Auction ud ContHiiion Co.
Cash paid for homo, aad aaltas
of furniture or Auotlon srraniod.
BaMsfaetioa .a.r.olHd, prompt
SBttlemenU. ■»—1~
„  ABTHUR a. BITOHUT
Smyth, and Graa.UI. Straits
*"" -rasas ley. 1971
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prloea and tanas to salt
yonr pocket-book.
Oar Stook of
FURNITURE
meat  b. aaen  to  b. appreciated.
Call la ail leek tt ever.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
ti HASTING! STREBT WMT
SOUTH WELLINOTON
SCREENED LUMP
COAL
$6.50
In TON LOTS, USUAL LOUTS
Phont Stymour 2930
808 PBNDBB STBBBT
DOMINIONFUELCO.
Thomaa A McBaln are selling overcoata at 331-3 off for a few days.    "
P. M. Draper, aeoretary of Trades
and Labor Congreaa of Canada, and
wife took in the A. F. of L, convention
at Philadelphia. Everything looked
good till they got baok to their home
in OttawB, when it developed that a
water pipe had burst in the attlo and
almost wrecked the home.
mdtabd's Lnrnmrr quibs
DIPHTHERIA
We are now prepared to accept
orden for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
Thit eoal, beeause of iti price,
is by no means a small sise, Inferior nut coal, but high grade,
large sired WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen use
We know what this coal will
do, having aold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to atand behind it and guarantee that it will
give you aa good a kitchen Are aa
any high-priced coal you are now
using. If you use wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire than either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for It,
but. try it on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
989 MAIN STBBBT
"M Ytara In Victoria."
Stymour 1441
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Meets flrat and third Thursdays. Bs
cutlve board: Jas, H. McVety, prealdei
Frank Estlnghauser, vice-president; Q<
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Lab
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge. treasun
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergean
at-arms, John' Sully; 0. Curnock.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover, J. -j
McVety, James Brown* Edward Lotlila
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdoch M
Kenzle, F. 'Blumberg, JI. H. Fr<
Managing Director, J. H. MoVety, Roo
Ml. ....
ALLIED   PRINTING  TRADES    COU1
CIL.—Meets  second  Monday in  tl
month,    president, Oeo.  Mowat;  seer
tary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS' LO04
i.k.,,..Mu No. 48—Meet, aeoond al
t OtsJhttt t 'earth Saturdays at 7 li
oaWPfCSS P-n*- Preildent, H. O. U
- worthy;  corresponding si
retary, R. J. Adams; bai
Sass agent, J. Blsek, nt
10 Labor Temple.
BARBERS'    LOCAL   No.    120.—MEE]
second Tuesday in eaeh month 8.
ay      ._.  „
J. Bruce; reeoorder,
„   tary-business agent,  I
11 .» i81?1? 2-08' Lall°r   Tempi
11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
Bm.   President, „, „. Hv», ,.»uiunr,
. Herrltt;. secretary-business agent,
F.  Burkhart,'nnnm  MS   T.I.—  1"	
Hours:
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 678.-OI
flea, Room 808 Labor Temple. Mae
flrat Sunday ef each month.   Preside!
F. F. Lavlgne: flnanclal secretary, Oa
W. Curnock, Boom 808, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASON?, NO.
—Meeta every 1st and Srd Tuesda
8  p.m.,  Room  807.    President,   Jami
Haslett; corresponding seoretary, W. .
Dagnall, Box 68; flnanolal aeeretary, I
R. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dai
nail, Room 218.
JTHERHOOD OF BOILER 1IAKE1
lad Iron Ship Builders aad Help*
of America, Vanoouver Lodg. No. 181-
Meeta flrst and third Mondays, 8 p. i
Preaident; F. Barclay, 868 Cordova EM
eecretary, A. Fraaer, 1161 How. .treat.'
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITBESSl
Union—Meata flrat Friday la each moat
8:80 p. m., Labor Temple. W. B.'Walks
business representative. Offlce: Room 80
Labor Temple. Hoars: 0 a. m. to 10:80;
to 8:80 and 5 p. m. to 8:00 p. m. Coi
pentent   help   furnished   oa   short    notls
Phon. Ber. 8«1«.    	
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CABPENTEB
meats la room 200, Labor Temple, ss
ond snd fourth Thursday of eaeh month,
p. m. President, G. H. Hardy: ssorstar
F. L. Barrett; treasurer, W, T. Taylor. L
cal No. 317 meeta flrst and third Moi
day of eaoh month, aad Local 9847 m.t
flrst and third Tuesday'of eaoh moath.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. 11
—Meets room 801, Labor Temple, .v.i
Monday, 8 p. m. Pr.sld.at, Dav. Flal
vice-pros id.nt, M. Sander: .recording aa
retary, Aer- Elgar, Labor -Tempi.; flnaaet
aeeretary and business agent, E, H. Morrtsei
room 807, Lsbor Tempi..
ELECTRICAL- WORKERS, LOCAL N<
IM (Inside Men)—Meets first an
third Mondays of each month. Boom III
I p. m. Preaident, H. R. Van Blckle; n
cording aeoretary, J. at. Campbell; bun
         F. L. Estl—■*—*— ~— ""'
HODCARBIER8, BUILDIN8 AND COMMO
Laborers' anion. No. 88—Mods flrst an
third Friday of eaeh moath, Labor Tempi
President, George Olbsont sserstary, Omm
„._,    m SIO, Leber Tomple.   All 1.1
to meeting.
IYNOMII OF OOAL MINING RIOU-
LATIONI
Coal mining rlghta of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
tha Yukon Territory, tht Northwest Territories and In a portion of tha Province
of Britlah Columbia, may ha leased for
a term af twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of fl an acre. Net mora than
8,610 acres will be leaaed to ont applicant.
Appllcationa for least mutt he made by
tha applicant In person to tho Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
right! applied fer ara situated
In surveyed 	
described, by , .. ..._ ..........
lent of sections, and In unsurveyed tar-
... surveyed territory theiand must be
describe} b] "—  ~ '—
rltory   the tract
staked hy tha a]
sections, or legal suodlvls
— —   .
be
applied   ... _
• hlmaelf.
Each application muat ba accompanied
by a fee of II, which will bs refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
hut not otherwise. A royalty shall bt
paid on tht merchantable output of the
mine at the rata of Ave centa per ton.
The person operating the mine ■>»»"
furnish tht Agent   with
sworn returns
ty thtrtbn.^n'the* rati  mining rights
aocuntlng for "th. full" quantity      	
ohantable coal_ mined and pay the royal*
are not  being operated,  auch  returni
iould be furnished at least once a year.
The leaaa will Include the ooal mining
rlghu only, but tha leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary 'or tht working of the mine at the
ntt of 111 an aore.
For full Information application ahould
he made to the Seoretary of the Department of tha Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Bub-Agent of Dominion Landa
W. H. CORT,
*„.,.... —....... n. tv- -----
N.B.-
Deputy Mlnltter of the Interior
... _.—Unauthorised publication of this
adtarttaemenr will not be paid for-sntst
Harrison,' room
orers Invited
MACHINISTS. NO. 182—MEETS SEOOltj
snd fourth Frldys at 8 p. m. Presldsnt
A. R. Towler; recording sserstary, i
Brookes; flnanolal seewtary, J. H. Msvetj
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Ui
otl 848 I. A. T. S. E.—Meets flrst Sui
*---    ef    each    month,    Labor    Toil
p.m. President H. C. Roddan:
retary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; ...
oordlng aeoretary, A. O. Hansen: bus|
ness agent, a. R. Hamilton. Offloj
Room 101, Loo Bldg. Tel. Sey. 8046.
MUBICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIV
Union, Looal Ne. US. A. F. ef M.-
Meeta aeoond Sunday of eaeh. montl
rooma 88-10, Williams Building, 418 Oran
vllle etreet    President, J, Bowyer; vim
Eresident,  F.  English;  secretary,  H.
iratfleld; treaaurer, w. Fowler.
OPERATIVE
TIONAL      ..—»v».     ...   „
Meets every flrst snd third Wednudi
in th. month in room 801, Labor Tempi
President, A. Hurry;, ooieeopondlng .scrotal
F. Sumpter, 1880 Twenty-third avenue .sal
flnanolal aeoretary, D. Scott, 677 Rldutfi
atreet; treasurer, L. Tysoa
PAINTERS',
PLASTERERS'
ASSOCIATION,
    PAPERHANGERS'.   AN]
Decorators',  Local  138—Meets  even
.......        ., ...—«.M   even
Thuraday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Grand
lal   secretary,   J.   Freckleton,   10J
flnanclu   	
Comox atreet;
SKrfcJK n-T  «■«'•.. Buifnei
Templi
recording 'seoretary, 1
i. — J?0?'*- street. Bualnel
ames Train,  (loom 8087 LabS
PATTERN MAKERS'. LEAGUE C
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver ai
vicinity. Branoh meeta 1st and Srd Fr
days at Labor Temple, room 806. Robe
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Avi
Jos. Q. Lyon, flnanolal secretary, 17
Giant street; J. Campbell, secordlng sei
retary, 4818 Argyle street.
STBBBOTTPERSrAND ELECTROTTH
era'. Union, No. 88, of Vanoouver anl
Victoria—Meete seoond Wednesday d
eaeh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. Presl
dsnt, Chu. Barley; recording secretarj
A. Birnle, o.o. "Nowa Advertiser."    _j|
STREET  AND   ELECTRIC   RAILWAl
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meeta Labor Temple second and fourtr
Wednesdaya at 2 "' '
third Wedneadt._,
W.   H.   Cottrell;   recording    —m
Albert V. Lofting, 2611 Trinity atreefl
flnanclal seoretary and bualneaa agent
Fred. A. Hoover, 2408 Clark Drive.
«r-s- -v - P«m.,'and  flrat* an
.Wednesdays,  8  p.m.      Presldenl
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION
al Local 167—Meeta every wednesda;
I p. m.,. room 804, Labor Temple. Flnan
clal aeoretary, E. Prendergaat. room 111,,
.-^PVATMAJ*   UNION   (IN|
TAILORS' -...„.,   ...ti
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meeting!
held flrat Tuesday ln eaoh month. So. vet
President, Miss H. Outterldge; recording
aeoretary. C MoDonald, Box HI: lata-
olal aeo., K. Paterson, P. p. Box 608.    ^
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    MO.    ....
Meets last Sunday trt each moath at .
X. m.   Preaident, I, t, Pettlpleee; flergfeel
•at, W. 8. M.lr—•	
H. NxlSBds, P.
SMMery-taaaam,
H
Printers and
Ltbor Temple
Building
Pheae Sey. 4410
Printers of The Pan.
FREE!   FREE!   FREE!
Sixty Watt
Tungsten Lamps
A Sixty Watt Tungsten limp of tht highlit grade (auch gi li regularly Mid ovtr out counters at 40 ctnti) will bt givtn uy lighting cui-
tomtr of tht B. O. Bltctrlc who purchases at ragnlv sale an Eltctric
Household Appliance, valued at 13.00 or onr at uy B. O. Electric sales
room during the month of December.
THIS SPECIAL OFPEB IS MASS TO CALL TOTO ATTENTION
TO ELECTRIC HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AS HANDSOME, USE-'j
PUL, DUB ABLE AND SENSIBLE OHBISTMAS OUTS.
VISIT OUB SALEBB00M8-OUB LINE INCLUDES OD7TS
SUITED TO BVBBY NEED AND WITHIN THB BEACH OF ALL.
Hetdags Stseet
B.C. ELECTRIC
IIMCssarlaSt!
Near Onto THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PKDKRATIONIST.
BAVID SPENCER, LTD.,
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Dr. Denton's Sleeping Garments for Children
These garments are indispensable for the
child that is restless and throws the covers
off. Every mother who sees them immediately notes their advantages and even the
children are partial to them, as they admit
of the greatest freedom while keeping every part of the body snug and warm. The
prices, too, are practically the same as any
other form of good night attire.
For age 9 months.
For age 1 year....
For age 2 years...
For age 3 years...
For age 5 years..,
For age 7 years.
For age 9 yeara.
Drop eeat style for girls 10c extra each site.
City Market
MAIN STREET
AfrPLES
Are now at their best and cheapest Your choice of
No. 1 Apples at $1.00 per Box. Cooking Apples all
varieties very low prices.
POTATOES
Potatoes are now at their best for winter storing. Highland, well graded, 85 cents per Sack.
DRESSED POULTRY
Prices are very low this season, also butter and eggs
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
SPECIALS EVERY SATURDAY
Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Iffl-™
HflTFI   BPfiPNT  Absolutely  Fireproof.    Local end  Long-Dletence
nUlCliHXiUE.nl  Phoni ln Ev,r, Roomcafe i„ Connection. Ratea
1.00 per day up.     Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests.
 ^.-j j j.  - 	
i Butty, Proprietors
IM Hainan Itreet Bail
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Next to tha Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Forum the Bene industry Mevsmat I
tale label appear ea your printed natter.,
for lood wnkmaasUp. |oed dUMMhli
wens aad the np-hnlldini ef the dty.
aiubd tatattaa xiadm
kavlai
I stands
Composed
ana's Union, Pun
et Tnenapalcal Union, Web Prsssmsn's Union, Printing Press-
Press Assistants' Union. 8t.wot7p.rs' aid EUdrotj-p.rs' union,
MSI   union,  m»  asiumum    uu»vu.  wm,
Boekbindsrs' Union, Photo-.nirav.rs' Union.
r-nvsi
I OBBT. DISCOUNT TO ALL TOIOB .
ION OB IHBIB FAWLIBS
I Do Not Practice "Hurry-up" Dentistry
lha Heath
aad the
(as Bew  >  ■
Itaaaard.laak
Bldr. Blcharda
aadfasUaia
Sound Heel
?wr
"Tha Lut Word
^  ln Dtntittry"
"HUBBY-UP," "eat*rate," and slipshod dsntlitrr la
distsstsfal, to sir the lesst, to people of refinement.' In such
an Important matter sb settlor ths month ln proper condition
to prepare tbe food for tht stomach, ossr the hlfhoet skill
ths most Improved methods aad tho but malarial, should ba
considered.
ONLY ths most conscientious .are aad the mut soloatllo
methods are employed la mj oflse. Mr "Meter. Tasth" are
worth, suoosssors to Nature's ova. w.iaarealM I. plain
and sincere. I charge aothlal for uamlnalloa aad aMte. Bf
fore I esubllshsd mr own oiee I wu in duaaad at th. hl|h-
sst sslsrr ae a skilled operator.
"YOU IUTTBB BO PAW" OUABABIBBD
I HIBIBY OUARANTBE that all dsatal work
parformad br m. will b. ebaolalclr palalaes. If ths
sllibttst twui. ef pain la up.rl.and hr th. pa*
tlaat ao mean MM bs said to ms, or li tar has
bssn paid It will bs iastaailr rtfeadM hr m«.
1 tartar aaareatee that all ertwa or bridle week
or lilies will Hauls la Irst-elaas conditio, fer a
period el TEN YKABB.   If aa|	
jefecllve darlat that time
not or chaboi
If ear of mr workbeeomea
I replace It hUelalelr
nl
&
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
WILL GOVERNMENT
INVESTIGATE THE
TRUST IN BRITAIN?
[Following la the continuation and
coropltHon of tht article which ap-
ptartd in our Issue of lut week dealing with the question of Investigating
tht affairs of tbt armament truat In
Britain, undtr tht provisions of tht
ntw Defence oft ht Etalm Consolidation Act.-—Editor Federationitt.]
Mtmbtra of Parliament.
Bight Hon. 3. W. Lowther, P. C—
Speaker of the House of Commons.
Shareholder   in Vickers, Ltd.
Admiral Lord OhaS. Beresford, K. O.
B.—Unionist M. P. for Portsmouth.
Author of the "Oreat Betrayal."
Chairman of Hy. Andrew A Co. (whom
"Who'a Who in Business" describe as
specialising in steel for rifles, swords,
shot, and shell). We have no evidence
to show that thiB Arm ia in the War
Trust,
Lord H. Cavendish-Bentlnck—Unionist M. P. for South Notts. Shareholder
in Vickers, Ltd.
Bight Hon. Sir J. Compton-Blekett,
P. C—Liberal M. P.. for Osgoldoross.
Treasurer of the National Free Church
Council. Ex-chairman of the Congre- J
rational Union. Shareholder in John
■Brown A Co., Ltd.
I   J. 8. Fletohei-—Unionist M.   P. .for
Hempstead. '
Sir Stephen W, Furness, Bart.—Lib
eral M. P. for West Hartlepool. Croat
ed Baronet.by present Liberal Minis
try, June, 1913. Member of National
Service League! Director of Bichard*
son, Westgarth 4 Co.
Lord Claude Hamilton—-Member of
the Council of the Corporation
of Foreign .Bond Holders. Director' of the London and Southwestern Bank, Ltd. Unionist M. P. for
South .Kensington. Director of Had-
fleld Foundry Co, Ltd.
Col. Harrison-Broadley—Unionist M.
I P. for Howdenshire, Torks, Sharehold-
1 er in John Brown A Co., Ltd.
J., F. Hoperr-Unionist M. Pi, tor Central Shefleld. Shareholder in John
Brown A Co., Ltd.
Hon. H. L. W. Lawson—Unionist M.
P. for Mile End. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Sir J. B. Lonsdale—Unionist M. P.
for Mid-Armagh. Director of Lancashire and Yorkshire Bank. Shareholder
in Armstrong, Whitworth ft Co., Ltd.
Hon. H. D. Maclaren—Liberal M. P.
for Bosworth. Eldest son of Baron Ab*
erconway. Private Secretary to the
Chancellor of the Ezechequer, 1908-10.
Shareholder in Palmer's Shipbuilding
Co, Ltd.
Sir: Alfred Mond, P. C—Liberal M.
P. for Swansea. Created Privy Councillor by present Liberal Ministry, June,
1913. Vice-President of the Navy
League. Chairman of the Mond Nickel
Co, Ltd., which shares two directors
with Armstrong, Whitworth ft Co., Ltd.
Godfrey M. Palmer—Liberal M. P.
for Jarrow. Shareholder in Palmer's
Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.
Sum Roberts—Unionist M. P. for Ec-
cleshall, Sheffield. Debenture trustee of
the Falrleld Shipbuilding Co, director
of Cetnmell, Laird ft Co., shareholder
of Vickers, Ltd., and Armstrong, Whitworth ft Co., Ltd.
Bight Hon. C. E. Schwann, P. C—
Liberal M. P. for North Manchester.
Shareholder in Cammell, Laird ft Co.,
Ltd.
Stuart Wortley—Unionist M. P. for
Hallam, Sheffield. Debenture trustee
of Vickers, Ltd., and of Cammell,
Laird ft Co., Ltd.
Qeorge Younger—Unionist M. P. for
Ayr.  Shareholder of Vickers, Ltd.
Ntwspaptr Owners.
Hon. H. L. W. Lawson, M. P.—As
above.   Eldest son of Lord Burnham,
chief proprietor of the Dailv Telegraph
(London). Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Charles Clifford—Part owner of thl
Sheffield Daily Telegraph.   Shareholder
in Vickers, Ltd.
A. 0. Jeans—Proprietor of the Liverpool Daily Post, Shareholder in Cammell, Laird ft Co, Ltd.
W. C. Leng—Managing Director of
John Leng ft Co., Ltd, owners of
the Dundee Advertiser, People's Jour-
PAGE THREE
WU. B. OWEN
Who will this year be a candidate to
succeed himself as Park Commissioner.
Mr. Owen has been a member bf the
board for the paat Ave years, and chairman of the board if or the last two
years. Largely because of Mr. Owen's
agitation the principle of public ownership haa been adopted insofar as the
bathing beaches and concessions are
concerned, Where the board, under
the old system, used to get a revenue
of 41,700 a 'year, it haa earned more
than 014,000 during the past two years,
besides giving -128,000 women and children free bathing ; facilities. During
the past Ave yeara more than (200,000
has been expended under the supervision of the; board in the maintenance
and upkeep of the civic parks, while
more than $1,000,000 has been' expended
in the purchase of- additional park sites.
No discrimination has ever been made
by the present board against employees
who joined the Laborers' union, and,
unlike the school board, union men are
employed wherever possible.
of England.   Director of Vickers, Ltd.
Banka Etc.
Baylis ft Kimball, New York—Bankers. Shareholders in the Harvey United
Steel Co, Ltd..
Deutsche Bank—Holds shares in the
Nobel Dynamite Trust and had 1,360
shares in the Harvey United Steel Co,
Ltd.
Deutsche Vereinsbank, Frankfort-
Shareholders in ths* -Nobel Dynamite
Trust. '■■ .■■:      '    ."
Hannoverscha Bank—Shareholders in
the Nobel Dynamite Trust.
Moulet, Switzerland—Bank. Held 300
Lares in the-Harvey United'
'Ltd.
nal, People's Friend, and other publications. Shareholder in Cammell, Laird
ft Co, Ltd.
B.   H.   Dunbar—Bctired   newspaper
owner, Buxton. Shareholder in Vickers,
Ltd., and John Brown ft Co., Ltd'.
Othtr Financiers.
Lieut-Col. Hon. E. Baring-—Son of
Lord Bevelstoke, head of Baring Bros,
bankers.. Debenture trustee of Vickers, Ltd.
Sir E. Beauchamp, Bart.—Created
Baronet by present Liberal Ministry,
1911. Chairman of Lloyds, 1905. Shareholder of Vickers, Ltd.  -
Les Bougeres Freres — Bankers,
France. Hold 3,000 shares in the Harvey United Steel Co, Ltd.'   •'!        ,
Sir Carl Meyer, Bart.—Born at Hamburg, 1851. Created Baronet'by Liberal
Ministry, 1910. Director of the National Bank of Egypt. Director of the
Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.
Hon. A. H. Mills—Partner ln Olyn,
Mills ft Currle Co., bankers. Debenture
trustee of Vickers, Ltd.
Ernest Buffer—Head of A. Buffer ft
Sons, foreign bankers. Held 6,169 shares
in the Harvey United Steel Co, Ltd.
Hon. Nathaniel Chas. 'Rothschild—
Son of Baron Rothschild. Director of
AlHance Assurance Co. Shareholder of
Vickers, Ltd.
Bight Hon. Sir Edgar Speyer, P. C-
Educnted Real Qymnnsium, Frankfort
on-Main. Created Baronet by Liberal
Ministry, 1906. Member of Speyer
Bros, London; Speyer ft Co, New
Yorkj L. Speyer-EUIsscn, Prankfort-on-
Maln.  Shareholder of Vickers, Ltd.
V. C. Vickers—Director of the Bank
MTNABD'S LINIMENT CUBES
COLDS, ETC.
BERRY BROS.
Altai, for
Cleveland Cycles
The Blerele with the BtpntaUoa.
Pall Uae ef Accessories.
Bepalrs promptly excelled.
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
.    Phone Hlihlaad Ml
Union
HADE
5«r
.~vi.*v», MTiibtciiaiiu—Dana. AOMl iJUU
shares in the Harvey United Steel Co,
National Provincial Bank of England
—Shareholders in Palmer's Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.
North-Eastern Banking Co., Ltd.—
Shareholders in -the Harvey United
Steel Co, Ltd.
Union Bank of Scotland—Shareholders in the Nobel Dynamite Trust.
Union of London ft Smith's Bank-
Shareholders in Armstrong, Whitworth
ft-Co,. M*"      .
National Oeneral Insurance Co., Ltd.
—Held 2,709 shares in the Harvey United Steel Co, Ltd.
United States Truat Oo, Ltd.—Held
1,198 shares in the Harvey United
Steel Oo, Ltd.
Mlsctllantou.
Tho Countess of Crewe-—Wife of the
Lord Privy Seal.   Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.'
Lady Ampthill—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd. Baron Ampthill is a member
of the National Service League and is
vice-president cf nnd regular speaker
for the Navy League.
Prof. Biedermunn, Berlin—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd. .
Admiral the Hon. Sir F. B. Fremantle
—Member of Expert Advisory Committee and regular speaker for the
Navy League. Member of the British
Deperdussin Aeroplane Co., Ltd. We
have no evidence that this firm is con*
nected with the Trust.
Horace Lamb, M. A, LL. D, D. Sc,
IF. B. S.—Professor of Mathematics at
the University of Manchester. Share*
holder in Cammell, Laird ft Co., Ltd.,
and Armstrong, Whitworth ft Co., Ltd.
■' Vice-Admiral May — Commander-in-
Chief at' Plymouth. Member of the
General Committee of the Imperial Services Exhibition. Holds 1,200 shares In
Vickers, Ltd.
Henry Whitehead—Director of the
Lancashire and Yorkshire Bank. Head
of Henry Whitehead ft Co., torpedo
manufacturers.
Right Hon. Sir O. H. Murray, B. C—
Private secretary to late W. E. Glad-
atone, and to Earl Rosebery whilst Premiers. Director of Parr's Bank, Ltd.
Director of Armstrong, Whitworth ft
Co, Ltd.
Sir Walter Bunciman, Bart.—Father
of the Minister of Agriculture. Share-
holder of John Brown ft Co, Ltd., Cammell, Laird ft Co, Ltd, Fairfield Shipbuilding Co, Ltd, and Vickers, Ltd.
His Excollency Andres de Azals
Conde del Puerto—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Benjamin Borck, Berlin—Holds 1,1150
shares in Vickors, Ltd.
Bight Hon. Lord R. F. Cavendish, P.
C.—Brother of the Duke of Devonshire.
Created Privy Councillor by present
Liberal Ministry. Director of the Lon-
don, County and Westminster Bank.
Shareholder in Cammell, Laird ft Co.
Bt. Hon. Sir S. B. Crossley, Bart, P.
C.—Member of the National Service
League.  Shareholder in Viekers, Ltd.
Baron Nugent*—Baron of the Austrian Empire. Shareholder In Armstrong, Whitworth ft Co, Ltd.
1 Bight Hon. Sir F. Pollock, P. O.—
Created Privy Councillor by the present
Liberal Ministry, 1911. Authority on
Law and Philosophy, author of "A
Short Navy League Catechism," from
which the following is an extract: (J.
Can the Navy be maintained on a sufficient footing at small cost I A. By no
means; and less now than at any time
formally. Shareholder of Armstrong,
Whitworth ft Co., Ltd., which last year
Increased its dividend-from 10 per cent,
to 12 1-2 per cent, and has this year
given to its shareholders a bonus of
more than £800,000.
Admiral Sir Percy Scott—Inventor
of Control Fire System. Holds 2,500
shares in Vickers, Ltd.
Basil Zaharoff—French Government
contractor. Shareholder In Vickers,
Ltd.
Industrial   Commission   Says   Wafts
Lower Where Married Women Work.
The married women and girls liviiig
at home, bnt competing with workera
who must depend entirely on their own
earnings for support, are the main factors in reducing the wages of female
help, is the finding of the Pennsylvania
Industrial Commission.
In laundries, where wages art much
lower than the average, thirty-three ptr
cent of the workera are married; in
mercantile establishments thirteen per
cent, and in faetoriea twelve per eent.
The percentage of' married women
among office workers is negligible, the
report shows, and the same is true with
telephone girls.
The percentage of married women
workers and. of girls "adrift" increases in proportion as population increases, a survey of the atate thows. In
Seattle 26 per eent. of the working women are married; in Spokane 18 per
cent.; in Taeoma 12 per cent, and in
Everett lesh than 10 per eent. Divorced
women, widows and deserted wives are
not classed as married women, the percentage including only women living
with their husbands. ...
Most employers prefer to hire girls
living at home, the report says, because
they think that such girls require only
pin money. Declaring this theory to
be false, the report attacks industries
of this class u "parasitic." Of 1,716
girls living at home who were investigated two-thirds reported that' they
contributed a definite 'amount eaeh
week to the family income.
MAYORS OF VANCOUVER.
From tht Date of Iti Incorporation ia
April, 1888, to 1914.
1886—M. A. MauLean.
1887—M. A. MacLean.
1888—David Oppenhelmer.
1889—David Oppenheimer.
1890—David Oppenheimer.'
1891—David Oppenheimer.
1892—Fred. Cope.
1893—Fred. Cope.
1891—B. A. Anderson.
1895—Henry Collins.
1896—Henry Collins.
1897—William Templeton.
1898—James F. Garden,
1899—James F. Garden.
-1900—James F. Garden.
1901—Thos. O. Townley.
1902—Thos. F. Neelands.
1903—Thos. F. NeeUnds.
1904—Dr. W. J. McGuigan.
1905—Frederick Buscombe.
1906—Frederick Buscombe.
1907—Alexander Bethune.
1908—Alexander Bethune.
1909—O. S. Douglas.
1910—L. D. Taylor.
1911—L. D. Taylor. \
1912—James Findlay.
1913—T. S. Baxter.
1914—T. 8. Baxter.
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by f
using goods-produced by Union Labor*! ' '
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house. ■'"■'. 'X'-X'-.X ,.,    v
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
HEALTH lian tt bt dMlMd and Is of more vital Importance tt tht
wall-bung ud »i|ilBHl «f tht individual than gnat rldtM. Paw
tttth sooner oritur man poor htalth. Tt ht htalthy wt mut kin
ttt power to uriadlttt oat tatt, Btfort it ea ht flmntttit, It wM
ll* ftwwirf^ *.■■—..   in.'.'.   »* •--  »- *   -  -- -  -
ht thoroughly digested, btfort It oan bt dlgtittd lt mut bt ttoroafhiy
mastlf attd, and btfect lt tin tt mutfcatad yoa muit ban good tttth
with which tt Mtffttt.    .       ..   .■
Owing to thl etrlageaey Of tht money market I am offering to do dental
work it vtry moderate priett
Silver fillta*.. $100
Platinite fitting.. ..     .........    2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crown.    5 00
Bridge-work, per tooth;...        ..    S 00
Plates....   ...   10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phont Seymour 8SS1 Offltt: IM Btnk tf OtUwt 1
WHITE STARTS!
Portland, Me.
Dae. llth
Halifax
IwfQVpOOl
Dm. llth...
.» VAD-nLAKD''—11.000 Teat
8S~'VADraMlriV'~l"iro'o6 'tms!'ecndse'ltaat, 'eno'tut third class.
"   IshflH.
Operating aad.r British .. ,
Canadian Padlo Tsarist Mseplni Oars te BsWax.
WHITE BTABLOn
Hew York .      Qntenitown
D... II—an 09. "X.|satle" D«o. 11—as. "Baltic'
Ds«. le—N.w 88. ■•Lapland" (11,000 teas)
Hew Tork.
Liverpool
AlMEIOANUrfi" Lhfwrpool
tASt BXPBBM OBB	
Dec. llth.—SS. "St. Paul. ...	
. oohmbt's ornoss.—in tad AvaavB, marli
in) OBTitm nott-toir itbaubbi
Das. llth.—88. "Hew Tork."
PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S VIEW.
Machinists' ExaenUn Says Ntw Offl-
ctri Needed.
The actions of this convention, said
President William Johnson at the recent eonvention of the A. P. of L.,
prove conclusively that before the progressive trade unionists who compose
the majority of the rank and die of the-
labor movement can hope that the A.
F. of L. will take an advanced position
or adopt a progressive policy, that they
—the rank and file—must see to it that
a change is made in the personnel of
the international officers and delegates
to the conventions. The members of
labor organizations have the power to
make this change whenever they so decide.
The defeat of the resolution favoring
the establishment of a shorter work
day by legislative enactment is abundant proof that many of the present
leaders do not represent or reflect the
views of the rank and file and I believe
I will ultimately result in the working
membership electing officers and delegatea who are broad-minded enough to
take a more advanced position than the
men who now dominate the labor movement.
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH MAILS
'XMAS OOODS ABMVIHOIVIKYDAY
.  AU.UMESHOWBHNOSHOWH
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
aaa MAaTiaiaa eraaar wamr  - -
SIO HAITI NQI STRUT WIST
BUT IN THI WIST
vancou van, to,
■ITABLItHID HM
A BOtTNDABOUT WAT.
'As I understand it," said the
heathen, "you propose to civilize met"
"Exactly so."
"Tou mean to get me out of habits
of idleness and teach me to work!"
"That is the idea."
"And theu lead me to simplify my
methods and invent things-to make my
work lighter!"
■Tea."
'And next I will become ambitious
to get rich bo that I may retire.and
won't have to work at allf"
"Naturally." .   ,
"Well, what's the use of taking auch
a roundabout way of getting , just
where I startedf  I don't have to work
UNIO|wb\MP|
ficroiy
Named Shoei are frequent!* nade iiNea-
Union Fadoriu-Do Not Boy Aay Skat
no matter what ltt umt, unlett It bttn t
plain ud rtadablt Impression or thlt tUmt
AU thoai without tht Union Stamp art
ilwtyt Non-Union.
i      BOOT A SHOE WORKER!' UNION
IM Summer Strut, Boston, Mut.
J. R Tobln, Pm.   O. L. Blaine, 8to.-Trtta.
PENDER HOTEL >«SaP
111 PBBDBB STBBBf WBSI
Batw |l.li m Day aad Op
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
x FOR* ST., AT DOUGLAS
■ RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
MTNAED'S LINIMENT CUBES
DISTEMPER.
It ia no harder for the rich man to
enter the kingdom of heaven than it Is
for the poor man to get out of, the
hadet in which capitalism haa placed
One-quarter off all Semi-ready suits
this week. Thomaa * UcBaln, 6511
Oranvllle atreet. '*
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main 8t,
Branch Office: 40th ft Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wt manufacture every kind ef
work shoe, ud ipecialire ia line,
'or miners, railroad construcboe.
»nin|, tie.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
CENTER & HANNA, Lti
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA STREET
One Block west of Court House.
Use of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
neet Sty. 221
Dares NifBl
Nam, Thomson & i
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
I EMBALMERS
SMI
,I.C.
ancweo anciatLr na
to'cl a nmiv rteoe
olert'S^uia      _t. "«•"*•""•" * ""
mmm ummt& mm
VANCOUVER   0 C
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTOR! AND
SMBALMERI
Vanoouver—Offlce   and   Chapel,
list Oranvllle St., Phone 8ey. Ull.
North  Vancouver — Ofllce and
Chapel, Ill-Sixth Bt. Watt, Phone
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT TOO CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PUCE, UT ANT
OOUNTET, OBI BEES WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
TON ITFTT CENTS. ~"
BRBWED AND BOTTLED IN VANOOVTBB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd. PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT .DECBMBEB 11, 1914
This Great Shoe Sale
Has Taken the
City by Storm
Hundreds of women are taking advantage of its economies. Our
patrons tell us "they never saw such good shoes for so little money."
It's all in the buying. We bought them right, that's how we ean sell
these
$5.00 Shoes for $3.25
They are American manufacture, every pair Goodyear welt aewn and
guaranteed hy the Hudson's Bay Oompany to give the same wear, comfort and service as any of our $5.00 lines There are three styles to
choose from with patent colt and gunmetel calf uppers and dull kid and
oravenette cloth tops. Sizes 2 1-2 to 7 and B, 0, D and E widths. Standard $5.00 values.   Special for    $8.86
\...  _) ._ mmtama i»r>    aamtmtsaoaatrW.ntaat gggfgjgg -      J
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
I THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Cepltl
..111,000,000        Rett-
..111,111,111
Main Of/let: Cerntr Hittlntt and Qranvlllt Strtttt, Vanttuvtr.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
HASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Baatlnit sac Camhle Streets.
BAST BND  Cer. Pender and Main Streete.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE "     -    •■    ■ 	
rAiRvntw
MOUNT PLEASANT .
KITBILANO -...
POWELL STREET	
SOOTH HILL :_
.Cor, Firat" Avenue aiid Commercial Drive.
.Cor. Hath Avenue ud Qranvlllt Stmt.
...Cor. Eighth Avtnut tnd Main Straet
...Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Street
....Cor. Vlotoria Drive and Powell Street
...Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue tnd Fraaer Road,
Altt North Vtneouver Branoh, ear.  Lontdtlt Ava. and  Itplanadt.
Cate thai watoh le Appl.br, aot
Midtc Witt. Cor. Pender ud
Rilfiarda. fer nlih-clase watch,
clooh ud Jewellery repairs. AU
eltulng ud malnaprlnga Jobt
suarutttd for 11 monthe.
In ihe hurl of ihe retail diatriqL_ AbtyKitJy
hreprool and modem in every respect. Limine
uneKelled. Euiopcan plan, $1 to $3 per day,
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS AU TRAINS. Orad ml
tfsnHd by Ths Prcmnciil Houk Compiny. linsiStl
HOWARD | WgtHW, tmim
PATRONIZE "FEDERATIONIST" AD-1    Ar* *w ■ tuhlerlbtrf   If not, send
VBRTIBERS, and tbll THEM why. j In your name new.
THE WIDOW.
[A Flea for Widows' Pensions.]
Agaunt and pitiful figure
At the close of day.  I see
A woman alone and hopeless,
Caring for babies three-
Pale and thin and worn—
Shabby of clothes and sad.
Never a hope for the morrow, -
Never an hour to be glad.
Tou ask me why she is lonely!
Why is she worn and sad!
Why is she hopeless, disheartened!
Why can ahe never be glad!
Never an hour in the sunshine,
Always the wolf ot the door-
Living in dread of starvation
In face of earth's bountiful atore.
Listen I    "Tie the usual story—
A blot on our nation's fame—
A cause that has driven hundreds
Of women and children to shame.
It has wrenched little babes from their
mother;
It has blasted innocent lives,
Sent. hundreds of souls to damnation,
Crushed thousands of dutiful wives.
She is one of the penniless widows,
A victim of industries' greed,
Whose husband  waB killed while on
duty, v
Producing for {(rents and need.
Now alone she must light for her babies,
Bowed by the weight of her load,
Black lies the future before her,
Alwaya a hill on her road.
Ah, great is a mother's devotion
And sacred the children of men,
And powerful-the nation whose mothers
Have leisure to train and to plan.
Oh Ood, how long will we watch her,
Falter and labor in vain
Before we arise and defend her
And lighten her burden and pain!
—Rose Henderson.
Ward Biz Candida**,
B. H. Gale, I860 Twelfth avenue, is
announced ae a probable aldermanlc
candidate in ward six, having heen endorsed by the West Fairview and South
Kitsilano Ratepayers' association at a
meeting attended by some 600 reel,
dents. He is an employer of union labor.
Belief Work in Nanaimo.
Nanaimo city council  voted)  $1,000
.use Monday night for unemployed re
lief work.
Union's Otntury Celebration.
Washington,   D.   C,  Typographical
union will celebrate its 100th birthday,
January 10th, 1915.
The prices of all English rubber
coata are cut exactly in two at the
Semi-ready, 655 Oranvllle street.
The system that exploits sex for profit and slays sons and husbands in war
pretends to love the home. What a
hypocrite it ia.
Polly—When they came back from
their wedding trip he had just $2.60 in
his pocket.   Peggy—The stingy thingi
, A country cannot make a reasonable
claim to be civilised which fails to find
employment for Its citiaens.
Whtrt tht Son Sets
Teacher—Now you have In front of
you the eaet, on your right the aouth
and on your left   the   north.     What
have you behind you!
Small Boy—A patch' on my pants.
I told mother you'd see it.
Semi Stunt.
"Where did you  go  last   night!"
"New stunt.   Heard a deaf-mute deliver an oration."   "Did he make a aet
speech!"   "No; he spoke offhand."
Frit Bpttch.
Powerful Person: "I like a good argument on politics, but I like a man
ter tork 'sense.' If a man don't tork
sense ter me I punch him In the face.
Now, wot's 'your' opinion o' the government t"
The Chicagoan whb mistook another
man's wife for his own affords additional evidence that every prudent man
In the big oitiea should hasten to get
acquainted with his wife.
Tht Land Question in India.
Only those who have lived in India
can realize how the proprietorship of
the land affects the lives of the masses.
The soldier who has left his village to
serve in the army of the Sarkar dreams
of the day when he shall return with an
honorable pension to his family holding, Your khansamah or your bearer
will tell yon with joy that the monsoon
haa been favorable in "his country,"
and from time to time perhaps ask you
for leave so that he may share in the
work of harvesting.
The possession of land is to the Indian workers in tbo mills at Calcutta
and Bombay a guarantee againBt unjust treatment at the hands of their
employers, for if they consider themselves aggrieved they have a place of
refuge where, unless the monsoon has
failed, they oan find a home and a frugal livelihood.. Agrarian problems are
therefore the real problems of India.
The Indebtedness of the people to the
banla is the greatest difficulty to be
surmounted. It is estimated that the
agricultural debt of India amounts to
£500,000,000, on which interest ranging
from 15 to 100 per cent, and even more
is paid. In innumerable cases land has
passed from the peasant proprietor to
the bania In satisfaction of the moneylender's claim.—J. A. Woolacot, in London Chronicle.
Judge Gary of the United States
Steel Corporation says: "Without giving reasons in detail at the present
time, I venture the opinion that the
struggle for commercial supremacy waB
the underlying cause of the war, or at
least had a decided influence upon its
precipitation, that the questions at issue . largely relate to dollars and
cents."
HTNAED'S LINIMENT CUBES
OABOBT IN COWS.
Buy Coal in Balk
NOT IN SACKS
Buy
a two-ton load of Diether
South Wellington Coal in bulk
and you will get a city weight
ticket which guarantets you
net weight and permits you to
ttt what you are buying.
Diether Coal is the highest
grade South WtUlngton, the
kind chosen by the United
States Navy Department in
preference to American Coal,
because it was of highest efficiency.
NUT
W.00
±=?        5^3
0a*V
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Means
PANTAGES IVAUDBVILLI
THRII SHOWS DAILY
tM, 7.20, 1.18    season's Prices:,
Matinee, llo. I Ivanlnge, lie., Me.
Fine selections of LADIES' LINEN
INITIAL HANDKERCHIEFS—On
sale for half dosen, (2.00, $1.50,
$1.25, (BA
75c and      UUC
75 DOZEN LADIES'" LINEN
HANDKERCHIEFS — Usual $1.50
per dosen 7-5#»
Sale price, per dozen ' UV
300 DOZEN LADIES' PUBE UN-
EN HANDKERCHIEFS —Usual $3
value.   Sale price 4 M
per doien X.UU
50 BOXES LADIES' EMBROIDERED HANDKERCHIEFS-Come in
assorted designs. 4 AA
6 in a box l.UU
30 BOXES LADIES' EMBROIDERED HANDKERCHIEFS—Come
half a dozen In carton box. Sale
price, 4 thB
per carton A.AtO
LADIES' INITIAL HANDKER*
CHIEFS-6 in a box 4 AB
GENTS INITIAL HANDKERCHIEFS—Beautiful work. Come six
in a box 4 QB
for 1.-6U
GENTS* SUPERIOR QUALITY
INITIAL HANDKERCHIEFS— Six
ir.."0.1...;'. 2.00
600 DOZEN GENTS' PURE IRISH
LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS — Reduced sale price, 4 AA
per dozen X.vU
300 DOZEN GENTS' PURE IRISH
LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS —
Usual $4.25 dozen O AA
Sale price, per dozen w.VV
BLANKETS—All wool, superfine
quality; rog. $9.60 fj (SA
value.   Sale prico * .*JV
NOTTINGHAM LACE CURTAINS
are selling very low. We have 900
pairs and are    offering   them    at,
%75 and 1.00
LAUNDRY BAGS—Pure linen, embroidered. On sale at O'f A
76c, 60c and............... ...*-S*»C
'     -' : ' '■*   'll: ■•
Linen Means
Quality
Fine linen has from time immemorial been the symbol
of quality. The kings of old dressed in "purple and
fine linen," and the housewife has been judged largely
by her napery. Irish linen has ever been the standard.
Our stock is composed entirely of imported fabric, and
from now until Christmas we will sell a large part of
our
400 PAIRS SHEETS—Full size,
ready to use; very fine quality;
usual price $2.25. 1   fi A
On sale, per pair... *t*W
LINEN PILLOW OASES —Hemstitched ende; very flne quality.
Usual price $2.25. IOR
Sale price, per pair l.aSO
PILLOW OASES —Value 65c pair.
Sale price Rft/.
per pair UWC
EMBROIDERED PILLOW CASES
—Value $2.00. Sole price QC1
per pair   UOQ
GUEST TOWELLING—A variety
of patterns.   Sale price Afim
30c, 35c and .WC
CLUNY SETS selling less then
manufacturers' cost; all handmade; 13 pieces to set. On sals per
aet $8.60, -  — -
$7.00 and	
6.50
MADEIRA  LUNCH  NAPKINS at
Quality Linen at Cost £.~~.".TIB
HEMSTITCHED SHEETS — Flue
quality. Size 80 by 100. Regular
price $4.60. 9 QR
Sale price tm.VD
CLUNY LACE TABLE CLOTHS,
CENTRES, SIDEBOARD SCARFS
—Every sizo and pattern at greatly
reduced prices.
50 ONLY EMBROIDERED BED*
SPREADS—Double bed size; very
nicely worked and with drawn-
thread   work.    Usual   price   $0.00.
X 3.50
76   SCALLOPED   EDGED   PURE
X.INEN    BEDSPREADS    at    half
price; all hand embroidered.    Usual -
price $15.00.
Sale price	
7.50
Very special lot of REAL IRISH
LINEN and the finest hand-embroidered BUREAU SCABFS; 45
inch, 54-inch and 72-inch. Value up
to $4.00. |  AA
Snle price, to clear A tW
700 YARDS OF VERY FINE LINEN—36 inches wide; slightly Imperfect. Usual 85c "IR*.
value.   Sale price OJJC
60 BOLTS OF BLEACHED TABLE
DAMASK—Comes ln ten assorted
designs. Good values at 75c yard.
On sale, Rft«
per yard.... Ol/C
50 DAMASK TABLE SETS—
Come in assorted designs; sizes 2 by
2, and 2 by 2K. A  ("A
On sale, per set. -f.OV
Irish Linen Stores
532 GRAflVJLLE STREET, - VANCOUVER, B. C.
MADEIRA LUNCH NAPKINS at
less tban cost. Per dozen $7.60,
$6.00
and.
LINEN BABY CASES, hand embroidered sheer linen with Irish
crochet medallion inserted. Usual
$2.50 value. 1   OR
On sale  M. -eO
DRESSER, SCARFS, pure' linen
scalloped edge, hand embroidered,
with Irish crochet medallions inserted. Usual $4.00 A t%f>
value.   Sale price em._%9
IRISH HANDMADE CROCHET
YOKES—Very flno work. Usual
$2.75 value. TRi»
Sale price $OC
CUSHION COVERS—Linen crash;
75c and 50c value. OR.f»
Sale price tmOC
LINEN HUCK TOWELS, all pure
linen; large sizes. We have some
' hundreds of pairs to' atlect from.
On sale, per pair, $2.00,
$1.50, 75c and	
HAND CROCHET DOYLIES-On
sale for 35c Ai
and aiOC
MADEIRA LUNCH CLOTHS,
LUNCH SETS, SCARFS AND
DOYLIES at greatly reduced prices.
50c
Fairville, Sept. 30, 1902.
Minard's Liniment Co., Limited.
Dear Sirs—We wish to inform you
that wo' consider your MINARD'S
LINIMENT a very superior article,
and we use it as a sure relief for sore
throat and chest. When I tell you I
would not be without it if the price
was one dollar a bottle, I mean it.
Yours truly,
CHAS. F. TILTON.
PHONE 8EYMOT7B 9086
4%
INTEREST
ON
SAVINGS
Credited Monthly  *
Regular—Safe
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vtnetuvtr. and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Clttt it 1 o'clock Saturday.
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
•KEEP your HOMEY IK B. O.'
BTusara
South Wellington Coal
as supplied ay
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .$6.75
Washed Nut, ton..$5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Your Order Now,
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined ln B. O. by B. O. Labor for
B. 0. People.
IT
tWasT—"wm
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
NONE   'SO   E-ISY
Vacutm—aA\tf(—*i—tt*
Don't msttlj say saataodess
President!
MADE IN CANADA
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
Outfit Inolndei eibinot of Famed Oik
beautifully finished, hinged oorer,
very litest horniest type of phono*
graph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond .pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly adjusted and regulated. Removable
front and top. Outfit Includes 12 four*
minute Blue Amberol (Indestructible)
records of your own selection. Terms
. .8.80 cash, balance at the rate of
95.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
S58 GRANVILLE ST.
$5 Down and $5 per Month
No Interest—No Taxes
Secures You a Choice 10-Acre Farm
Call or write st oae. for fall particulars of this cholcs scrcsg., situate In
the heart of the Bell. Cools aad Llllooet Districts. Open meadow-like lead,
•ultsbl. for miied farming, chicken ranching or hog raising. Soil a rich, silly
loam, floaty of good watsr, the laud lying en river and lake. Seed roads,
telegraph sad telephone comualeatioa right te the property. Will hare railroad communication with Vancouver ln a short tun..   Price only ISO psr son.
J. I. EAXM * OO.
SOS Boldsn Building Nam. ,  ,,,
16 Eastings atreet Bast
Vancouver, B. O. Address.. ,	
Phon. Seymour 888S
BARGAINS
We art giving 20% of all our Hen's and Boys'
Clothing and Underwear
Aid Begular Pricta on Bvtrxthing Is tht Stort
CLUBB   &  STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West      Phone Seymour 702
COAL!!
8
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Company whioh sells
AMERICAN
OOAL
and Employs
Oriental labor
"fifteen Years in Vancouver Ooal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL
WHITE LABOB ONLY ~~
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
437 Seymour Street Phone Sey. 310
The Company whioh sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
The Federatlonist
WUl TM mailed ts s~ addrtts outsldt
of VancouYtr Olty, ln Canada, from now
until January 1, IBM, for »1J».
OVERCOATS   SELLING
AT LESS THAN
HALF PRICE
Your can have yonr choice of our fine stock of Overcoats at the following prices:
10 Only Medium Weight Twttd Overcoat   Sites, 3d to *g aa
M   Regular Prices up to $16.60, for  tpO.UU
8 Only Mtn't Heavy Twttd Overcoat.  Sins, 34 to 40. 0_Q Qf
Begular prices to IS.6.0O, for  ejHI.OD
10 Only Hut Dirk Twttd. Owrcoat, Btrtrtlfelt Col- Af n qjj
!ar   Sites, 34 to 40.  Begular pricts up to $26.00, for «P 1 ^.OO
19 Only Asiorttd Colors in Twttd, Convertible Collars. * f _t jj£
Slits, 34 to 40.   Regular pricts up to $30, for ylt-OO
36 Only Vtry Oholct Overcoats, newest Stylet and 6,4 a a j;
Mtku. Regular pricts up to $36.00, for «P I U.OO
.    WE ABE SELLINO OCT OUB BOT8' DEPARTMENT AT ABOUT HAU BEOULAK PBIOES.
Remember the address.. Look for Red Arrow Sign
J. N. HARVEY, Ltd
125-127 Hastings Street West
Also 614-616 Yates Street, Victoria, E C.
Five Thousand Labor
Temple Shares at Par
The Vanoouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depression.
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few
businesses in Vancouver which have a balance on the credit
side of the ledger at this time.
With the completion of the Georgia-Harris street viaduct
.very shortly, and another step towards this section becoming
"newspaper row," Labor Temple stores will soon be in demand which should result in dividends at the olose of next
year.
Vancouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment
—Conservatively estimated the property is worth three times
the par value of tho share.
The executive board have authorized the sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1.00 each.
Every union man in Vancouver should own at least ten of
them.
Call at Room 211, Labor Temple, for partculars.
VANCOUVER UBOR TEMPLE CO., Ltd.
JOHNSTON _ SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE
STANLEY'S PLANES, LEVELS, etc., STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS" SAWS. CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHON* aivMoun im « Hastings st. bait
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 4*7  8387'Main Btreet

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