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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 18, 1914

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Array THE BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL UNITY: STBBNOTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER : VANCOUVEB TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B.C. FEDERATION OF LABOR
► POLTjtCAL UNITY! VICTORY I
SIXTH YEAR.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1914.
mm i
FILOCAL TYPO.
RE-ELECTS OLD
Government Erects Canvas
Towns Near Sydney
for Workers
Wheat in N. S. Wales
Seized to Defeat
Corn Hogs *
Is
* [Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W„ Nov. 26.—The
Australian government ia busy building
canvas towna near Sydney for the
housing of the unemployed, and while
ihey are not as palatial ub plutocrats'
homes, they are better than nothing.
Two-roomed canvas hornet are let by
.the government for 24 cents per week,
three-roomed ones for the larger families at 36 centa per week. If ihe people desired the floors Of wood instead
of the open ground the coet ia 21 centa
per week extra.
The roomt are 8x10 and have a lire
place and waterproof roofs, while the
•ides are treated with a coating of
tome paint or oil that makes them water-tight aa well. So after all, while
thty art not aa comfortable ae a city
residence, they are a god-send to the
people. The government are alao to
tract a government ttort at the canvas
towna, where people may buy their
wants at the cheapest price possible.
WlU Stitt Whtat.
Thie week, the government ie passing
a bill to acute all the wheat in New
South Wales—the new harvest—am*
ounting to about 11,000,000 buehele.
Thla ll rendered necessary owing to the
"wheat pit'1 getting to work to corner
the grain. The wheat pit ia asking Ut
ewts per bushel for the wheat, and the
government hu fixed the price at 120
tenti, and will iv thla direct to the
grower, and thua eliminate the wheat
pit. operator.
- If the government did not atep in,
tt wat ouite on tho tarda that the price
would nave gone to 200 centi per
bnehel, and 'the prloe of bread would
have reached the vicinity of 15 cents
per two-pound loaf. At it la the government foresee a rise in bread, and
will flx the price of bread at 8 centa
per two-pound loaf early next njjnth.
Mlntrt' rtdtratlon Fined.
I have already detailed in these columns how the miners in the northern
Ntw South Wales coal fields went on
ttrike against the working of the second or afternoon ehlft. It ia already
abolished in 44 minea in New South
Wales, and but five minea refused to
abolish it. Consequently the men went
on strike to compel the owners to stop
the afternoon shift. The government
wanted to appoint a royal*commission
to enquire into the matter but the men
would not have this. And ao the battle haa been waged now for several
months. So far neither tide has the
advantage, and the men are holding
out well.
The bosses, to beat the men, took
action by way of restraining the Miners' Federation from collecting money
to aid a strike and were successful in
Setting It. But the Federation did not
eed this but went on its way just the
tame. Then the bosses brought the
matter to a head and brought the
Miners' Federation into court for con
tempt of court and the Federation has
been fined 12,500 dollars.
This is made possible under the old
Industrial Law passed* some time ago
and-which the Labor Oovernment hns
been powerless to abolish owing to the
strong opposition in the Upper House.
But a curious thing arises, and it ie
thie.
Illegal Aid to Striken.
Under the industrial law it is Illegal
to gather in funds for strikers, yet un*
der the tradeB union law this is allowed. The government are now trying to unfathom the mystery aB to
which ie the correct law,
This much is certain*—the men will
never pay the fines, and unless the government-arc prepared to remit them,
the chances are that we will see a huge
miners strike in New South Wales and
perhaps throughout Australia. The
men are determined that they will not
ate the coal miners strike against the
afternoon shift lost, even if every man
in the Held haa to come out and light.
Tht Judicial Mind.
The judge was very bitter in his summing up on tbe court case which waB
heard in Sydney on November 13 last.
He said: The circumstances are certainly most grave. In May last a board
heard claims, somo of which related to
the question of the afternoon shift. Tho
decision which was arrived at after a
long hearing, was not agreeable to the
men who immediately went on strike
at several important mines.
"In July over 500 of them were prosecuted for Btrlking and fined $20 each
(which fines were never paid—W.F.A.)
In June an injunction was granted
against the secretary of one of the
miners' lodges forbidding him to aid
in the strike and on August 21st Inst
Injunctions were granted against the
president, treasurer, secretary and
others forbidding them to aid in the
ttrike.
"Yet in Septembor the series of aiding acts, which have been the subject
of the present prosecutions began, and
have continued till the present time. A
more formal, explicit, deliberate and
continuous move to defy the law it
would be impossible to conceive.
The Federation and its members
have gone to war with the act, and
have continued that war in a manner
which has shown with the utmost publicity a complete and absolute contempt for its provisions, Unlawful
acts have boen actually carried out in
the presence of the officers of the law,
ind have continued during these pro*
locutions.
"On July 31st last this court found
itself driven to mako a pronouncement
in which, after pointing out the extreme contempt shown for the law by
rarious unions, and the oomplete fail-
ire of the policy of leniency adopted
ny the court, it stated that in future
Tame. Election Results in
Endorsement of Former
Administration
Important Issues Must Be
Passed upon During
Ensuing Year
Election day of Local 226, I. T. U.,
passed off very quietly on Wednesday.
Owing to the re-election of the president, vice-president and secretary-
treasurer by acclamation at laat regular meeting little interest was evidenced in the result. In fact only 70
votes were polled. Messrs. Fleetwood
and W. Currie acted aa poll elerka. The
result:
President—B. Parm Pettipiece,
clamation.
Vice-President—-W. C. Metzger, acclamation.
Secretary-Treasurer—B. H. Neelands,
acclamation.
Executive Committeo—J. E. Wilton,
55; W. R. Trotter, 53; E. Kirkpatrick,
45; Bobt. Fleming, 45; B. 0. Marshall,
44; re-eleoted. C. A. Evans, 25; W.
Westell, 21; W. H. Jordan, IS; F.
Leach, 16; C. Tullidge, 10.
Trustees—H. O. Benton, W. B, Trotter, Oeo. Wilby, re-elected by acclamation.
Reading Clerk—J. T. Wilton, acclamation.   '
Sergeant-at-Arms—O. Proske, acclamation.
Delegates Trades and Labor Council
Oeo. Bartley, 60; H. L. Corey, 60;
J. E. Wilton, 60; W. R. Trotter, 57; R.
Parm. Pettipiece, 51; C. Orassie, 43;
eleoted,   C. A. Evans, 34; E, Odium, 27.
Delegatea Allied Printing Trades
Council—B. H. Neelands, 62; Oeo. Bartley, 61; C. Uren, 23; eleoted. R. 0.
Hnrtson, 22; R. J. Lukey, 22; L. E.
McDonnell, 14.
Sick Committeo—F. Fowler, 56; W.
H. Jordan, 50; A. Pelky, 46; J. Parisian, 44; F. Leach, 43; elected. H.
Bobina, 42; N. Williams, 29,
The membership teemed to feel that
thie waa no time for a change of officers. With scale negotiations pending,
the Todd case for £10,000 damages still
on, and trade conditions rudely effected
there is need1 for oareful administration. The re-elected officers are fully
appreciative of the responsibilities imposed upon them and will endeavor to
make tht best of their opportunities.
Tht Mtmbtr for Puddltton.
"Oentlemen, a member of this
House haa taken advantage of my absence to tweak my nose behind my
back. I hope that the next time he
abuses me behind my back like a coward he will do it to my face like a man,
and not go skulking into the thicket
to assail a gentleman who isn't present to defend himself."
(In Veaeonvu \
City, W.oo ;
&50 PER YEAR
Balls for Australia.
Chris. Pnttinaoii, well-known as one
of the officers of the United Mine
Workers of America on Vancouver island, has shipped as a seaman aboard
a six-masted Bailing vessel bound from
Nanaimo for Australia via San Francisco.
;        _	
SANTA—Billy Boss has had this puiile fpr several yean and dots not swm to be able to work It.  I dealt
know wbat else to do wltb It, so guess I'll leave lt wltb these boya.
THB BOTS (in chorus)—Oeet   1 thought he waa going *> bring me a*Job!
OF B. C.
How  2,000  Square  Miles
Have Been Filched from
the People
Ground Hog District Averages 57,000,000 Tons per
Square Mile
the powers given by the legislature to
check breaches of the law would be
fully used.
'' If the powers given are not fully
used now, I think the court will be trying practically to amend the act and
declaring that, in its opinion, the Parliament haB done wrong in the penal*
ties it haB authorized. If this is not
a cane for the maximum, then I cannot
see how there can ever be a case for
the maximum. In answer to these con'
siderations it has been urged that:
"First—The men thought they had a
right under their constitution to distribute moneys to the aid of the strike.
How could they think bo, when there
wns an injunction of the court forbidding itf Could they not, like anyone
else, take competent legal advice, and
is it suggested for a moment that anyone advised them that they could do
what they liked.
"Second—That, as to the officials,
thoy were in a cruel position. I myself pointed this out to them some time
ago, and told them that if they disobeyed the law for the Bake of their
pockets, that would bo no defence
whatever. Incidentally thia argument
shows how guilty is the Federation
itself, which plainly orders its officers
to break the law or go.
"Third—The colliery owners are attacked for not submiting to the men
and working one shift. This 1b as if
the shop assistants of Sydney were to
agree io all leave work at 3 o'clock
each day, and on the employers then refusing to. allow them to work any part
of the day, attack them as the real
authors of the trouble. As to the afternoon shift itself, the board enquired
into this, and came to the conclusion
that it should not be forbidden.
"Fourth—As to the appeal to the
humanity of the court, that should be
made to the parliament. If a mistake
has been made in making the aiding of
the Btrike a punishable offence, it is
for that body to alter it. This court
can only administer the law as it
stands.
'As the minister of the law, the
Federation, having gone to war with
the law, I must uphold it and obey the
law."
The Federation waB flood $5,000 each
on two counts and the ten officers of
the Federation were fined $260 each-
making a total of $12,500 in all. Costs
were also given against the Federation
to the tune of $430—in all $12,030.
As I said before the men say they
will never pay the money, and unless
the parliament remits the fines, then
the road seems clear for a general
strike. The miner, like any otler in-1
dividual, is no' going to see his fellow
man and family starve, no matter what
the law may say, and the sooner this!
Is recognised the better it will be for
all concerned.
[The article which we republished
last week, dealing wltb land scandals
In British Columbia, attracted a great
deal of attention, and baa brought a
considerable amount of commendatory
correspondence to this office.. At the
time theae articles flrst appeared in The
Federatlonist tbey were part of a
series.. We have received several requests for republication of one dealing
with the manner ln which tbe coal
landa bave been acquired. Tbe article
waa published January 23, 1914, and
la here reproduced.—Editor.]
This article will state how 2,000
square miles of best anthracite eoal
lands, averaging 57,000,000 tons per
square mile, in the Ground Hog district of Northern British Columbia,
are being filched from the people by-
spurious "powers-of-attorney":
The stupendous quantity and incredible value of this immense property
can hardly be realized, but as I am
simply recording the facts, after geologically considering the carefully collected data and evidence, corroborated
by no less than five mining engineers
of high standing, you may rely upon
this description: The location is south
of the 57th parallel about 128% deg.,
west longitude, 100 miles northeast nf
Mackenzie & Mann's proposed port
named Stewart, at the head of that
great inland fiord known as the Port-
land Canal.
Harriman's Combine (TJ. S. A.), the
B. & K. Syndicate, are reported to have
corralled about 92,800 acres.
Mackenzie ft Mann are reported to;
have corralled about 90,000 acres.
. The B. C. Anthracite Co. of Quebec,
nre reported to have corralled about;
30,000 acres.
Tho Western Development Co. are
reported to have corralled about 70,000
acres.
National Finance Co. are reported to
have corralled about 60,000 acres.
Many other syndicates have gobbled
up most of the remaining area for
financial exploitation, but as most of
them are composed of the keenest
American speculators, who delight in
taking this advantage, since the U.SA.
government stopped that wholesale
form of public plunder recently, and
they can thus gain more, I will briefly
explain particulars of the 92,800 acres
staked by the K. ft B. Syndicate's ex-
plitatlon.
We may readily estimate the developing danger to Canadian and British
interests on learning that the K. ft B.
Syndicate is controlled by tho Harriman railway and financial combine of
U. S. A., who, according to information I have been able to gather,. are
trying to negotiate provisional contracts with the Russian, Chinese and
Japanese governments with the double
object of cutting off the supply of
Welsh anthracite for war ships and
other craft on the Pacific ocean, where
the carrying trade is going to develop
as that of the Atlantic, and with the
still greater object of taking enormous
firofits from British and Canadian
nnds to abnormally enrich the most
dangerous wealth abusing magnates in
U. S. A.
Some idea of the vast extent of their
contemplated "profits" may be gathered from the fact that there are from
11 to 15 highly profitable seams of
thick anthracite coal under every acre
of those 1,280,000 acres, in well proven,
undisturbed coal measures, free from,
volcanic intrusions.   All consisting of
THE FEDERATIONIST
WILL PUBLISH
DECEMBER 23RD
Christmas Day falling on
Friday next week, the Federatlonist will be published
on Wedneaday. Tbe aame
course will be adopted the
following week when New
Tear's Day comei on tbe
regular publication /day of
the Federationist.
hard   (smokeless)   anthracite  of high
commercial grade.
By securing the passes through the
Coast Range mountains, these people
will hold the key to the vast coal-
bearing area beyond, unlessr estrained
as I submit they should be, in the
public interest) before Crtfwn grants
are allowed to be issued by the government of British Columbia. Otherwise they will perpetually establish
indisputable advantages over all competitors, and so impose upon British
Columbians and the empire a highly
dangerous monopoly, as they plan to
corner the economic outlet for that
vast area by securing prior railway
rights and extending railway spurs to
all future working collerles, to reap
unprecedented dividends.
There are good railway grades down
to the Naas river, and easy grades for
coal workings above 1,300 foot datum.
Ridges separating the valleys provide
banks of overhead tonnage by galleries
driven on drain level nearly horizontal,
so that railway -wagons can be run
direct into somo of the workings, facilitating the quickest and most economical production. The seams lie
parallel, and are adapted for return
airways on the other seam by brattice
cloth connections; thus there is scope
for many men to quickly increase the
output in abnormally short time, as
working, draining, ventilating and
hauling are very economical for profitable working an enormous output.
Careful-estimates of the cost of production, including the present cost of
wages, shows a cost of $2.14 per ton,
plus 80c. for railway operation, including the haulage of empty wagons, totalling $3 per ton, whilst we, in normal times, pay ubout $8 per ton for
both house and manufacturing coal in
Prince Rupert, Vancouver and Victoria,
and much higher for anthracite.
The estimated daily output of 5,000
tons per day is calculated to yield a
proflt of not less than $10,300 per day,
which would pay 10 per cent, interest
upon a capital of $30,900,000, or 20 per
cent, interest upon a capital of $15,450,-
000, or 31 per cent.upon the capital of
$10,400,000 actually required to begin
efficient development of this 92,800 aero
block as bolow:
Purchase from Government..$  928,000
Cost of Railway   4,750,000
CoBt of Terminals,    Bunkers
otc 1,000,000
Cost of Collenes     1,200,000
Cost of Preliminaries      522,000
Purchase of coal from owners  2,000,000
$10,400,000
The facilities for plunder of the
public resources here is evidenced by
the technical "owners" demanding
$2,000,000 "plunder" to let their
"staked coal lands" be used, in addition to the $928,000 the government of
British Columbia are to receive for
letting that part of our heritage to give
thoir friends the cream of that $2,000,-
000 before allowing it to be used.
A. P . Black Out in Ward Five.
Ex-Alderman A. P. Black is announced as definitely in the field as an
aldermanic candidate in Ward Five,
and his friends have already opened a
vigorous campaign for his re-election.
B. C. F. of L TO MEET.
VICTORIaTb. C., Dec.
18.—(Special to The Federationist) — The executive
board of the B. C. Federation of Labor have fixed on
Monday, January 25, 1915,
as the date of the next convention to be held at Nanaimo, V. I.    ,
COLORADO STRIKE OFF.
Mintri Aro Rtqnttttd to 8tay Aw«y
from tlit District.
[Special Correspondence.]
DENVER, Col., Dec. 15.—The miners' convention hat taken action on recommendation of the International
Executive Board. At a special meeting of tbe coat miners of Colorado, held
in thlt city latt week, it waa decided
to call off the strike which has been on
in Colorado for' the patt fourteen
months. The convention wat called tt
the instruction of the international
executive board. Frank J. Hayes, in*
ternatlonal vice-president, was at the
convention and explained the attitude
of the executive board. The international executive board recommended
that the ttrike be called off.
Six thousand striking coal miners,
who for fifteen months have fought ao
bravely for industrial freedom, losing
in the conflict 34 men, women and children, murdered by the tools of corporate greed, have ended their ttrike and
are applying for their old places in the
mines.
If the laboring men of the country
will ttay away from Colorado most of
these striken will be able to secure
work. TheBe coal miners have fought
the battle of the laboring olass of the
nation against Standard oil. Most of
you have aided splendidly both morally
and financially. The biggest thing you
can do for them now is to stay away'
from Colorado and let them secure
their old jobs.
ME
Jingle Pot Staff Rtductd. *.
Jingle Pot coal mine, Nanaimo, was
employing 250 union miners three
months ago. Now it iB only employing about fifty-five. This is believed
to bo partly due to the action of Vancouver school trustees and similar
bodies cancelling their orders owing to
the statement that a considerable
amount of German money Ib invested
in these mines.
A paper famine is threatened in Eng*
land and Canada. It looks as if the day
of tbe invisible newspaper has nearly
arrived. Which means, of course, that
the public will havo to guess the news
itself instead of letting tho journalists
doit.
A Century of Peace
It it many centuries since tht
first utttranct of tht phrase that
it to popular at this season of tht
ytar. Ytt, while "Peace on Earth
Goodwill Toward Hen" hat bttn
sung by caroltrs to tht chiming
of bells for many a frosty season, never, ptrhaps, until tht prt-
stnt ytar, haa a really determined effort bttn made to put ltt
principlci into tfftct.
Howtvtr vivid may bt tht
emotions intplrtd ln the Imagination aa lt attaint at tht mysttry
that tnshrouds tht tnd of Lift't
road, thtrt It a deep-rooted feeling in all men's minds that perfect peace Utt only ln tht gravt.
Thua, tht nations, invoking, at
thty now art, tht powtrs of
Dtath, to the limit of thoir.
ability, ara tending to eternal
peact such uncounted thousands
as to make thit the true Tear of
Ptace.
On tha wall in front of mt
there hangs a llft-slse portrait of
tht German 42-centimeter shell.
Tht gun that hurls this great
projectile Into the air, can scarcely bt said to voict a gentle sentiment, Still, though the booming
of cannon ia ln no way comparable to the intoning of a curate,
there lt ln thtlr clamor a genuine
Reqnltscat ln Face. Thty ensure
what it txprtsstd ln their wish.
Good-will, too, lllli all. lands
thlt season. Who it thtrt bnt
sptaks wtll of tht dtad? And
■nap Amu os tn utin ueqa
thtrt it little timt for aught but
wtll-tptaklng. True, millions are
filled with hate. But instead of
devoting thtlr tlmt to speaking
evil, they try to kill each other
ln order tbat thty may fetl
good-will toward tht departed.
So that thtrt lt no bitttrntss ln
thtlr hate.
. .All Bail, Death! tht angel of
Peact and Good-Will, tha agtnt
of Oovtrnments and Kings.
R. I. M.
WICKET
IN I FIELD
Messrs. Lofting, Dairin and
Bailey to Contest Wards
VII.,VL,andIV.
Ward Committees to Open
Campaign During the
Coming Week
PLATFORM  OF .CANDIDATES.
Endorsed hy Trades and Labor
Oouncll* of Vancouver.
An eight-hour day, with a minimum of 13 for day labor.. A wage
In other departments commensurate with services rendered. Aldermen to he laid an adequate remuneration.
Abolition of private employment
agencies, and the establishment of
municipal bureaus.
Free text-books in all public
schoola.
Equal suffrage for all men and
women over 21 years.
Municipal ownership of all public utilities.
The establishment and maintenance of free public baths.
A civic administration based on
the principle of the greatest good
to the greatest number; special
privileges to none.
Above aro some of the salient
clauses recommended by the parlla-
parliamentary committee to Vancouver
Tradea and Labor council for adoption,
as a guidance to its aldermanic candidates. In addition all candidates are
to be governed by the wishes of tho
central labor body in matters affecting
labor interests Wednesday night 'a
meeting wob a busy one and the meeting hall was crowded. Reports were
received from tho ward committees and
during the coming week tho supporters of the council's ticket will be active. Messrs, Lofting, Dairin and
Bailey were present and took part in
the discussion and deliberations of the
meeting. Next week The Federationist will publish "cuts" of the three
candidates and the campaign will be,
opened forthwith, Tho finance committee reported progress. The printing)
committee will issue election cards early next week.
Platform for the Municipal
Candidates b
Adopted
Machinists Elect Officers.
At tho regular meeting of Vancouver
local union of the Machinists was held
last Friday,, the following officers were
elected:: Presidont, J. Mclvor; vice-
president, W. Small; recording secretary, J. Brookes; financial secretary, J.
McVety; treasurer, F. Fisher; conductor, A. Stevens; sentinel, J. Taylor;
trustees, J. Sutherland, C. Mattison and
J. McQueen; delegates to Trades and
Labor council, J. H. McVety; J.
Brookes, A. Towlor, A. Stovons; representative to District No. 2, J. Brookes.
Winnipeg Elects Candidates.
Labor unionists of Winnipeg nominated two candidates for aldermen, and
one for school truBteo. Of the two aldermanic candidates, one, W. B. Simpson, of tbe Typographical union, was
elected. For school trustee, Mrs.
Brown wns nominated and elected.
Winnipeg Unemployed.
Nearly eight thousand names of unemployed were registered in Winnipeg
during the couple of days on which tbo
bureaus woro opened. The supply of
applicants for registration wns just
about as brisk at the closo as at tho
opening of the booths, and there is little doubt but that twice ns many could
have been registered if an exhaustive
liBt had been desired.—Voico.
Rockefeller's wealth is referred to
ns .tainted money. Probably Rockefeller would Bay 'taint.
W. E. Walker Leaves To-night.
W. E. Walker, who has boon business
agent for the cooks, waiters, and wait-
resKes in Vancouver for the past threo
yoarg, leaves to-night for southern California, "in company with Mrs. Walker.
During the time he has held office as
ngent, bo has dono splendid work for
his organization. He hns also occupied many offices in tho larger affairs
of the movement, among which wns tho
presidency of the Trndes and Labor
council. To thoBo who hnve known and
worked with him, his going awny is regarded as a distinct loss to the looal
nbor movement. Tho Federationist
joins with thom in wishing him the
beBt of good luck wherever he goes,
"Tou say sho Is a, business woman!
What business is she Interested int"
"Everybody's!"
Large Percentage of the
Union Membership
Unemployed.
Last night the Tradea and Labor
council convened in regular session
with a good attendance of delegatea
when the call to order waa made by
President J. H MoVety. Eight new
delegatea were seated.
Letters were read from officers of
various tradea councils throughout tbe
province, acknowledging receipt of invitations to attend the celebration of
the £6th anniversary of the couneil.
Westminster Tradee and > Labor
council wrote protesting against any
plan of relief work which only gave
board and shelter in return for work.
The council adopted the following resolution:
' "Whereaa—In order to comply with
the conditions imposed upon the trustees of the 'Vancouver Labor patty,'
in whose bands the funds belonging to
that said defunct body ia vested—it is
hereby
"Resolved—That the Trades and
Labor oouncll call a convention of one
representative from eaeh body 'eon*
tributing to that fund; such convention to consider the taking oyer the
business left by the Vancouver Labor
party, and to devise a way to continue
in active polities, and to carry on the
work previously undertaken by the
Vancouver Labor party; be it further
" Resolved—That the trustees -be
asked to attend such convention, and to
assist in furthering the purposes in
view" .
Delegate Dunn,   reporting   for   the
J parliamentary committee, said tbe fol*
owing platform had been adopted for
the candidates for municipal offlce who
are running under the auspices of. the
council: "
Platform of Candidates.
An eight-hour day, with a minimum
of $3 for day labor. A wage in other
departments commensurate with services rendered. Aldermen to be paid
an adequate remuneration.
Abolition of private' employment
agencies, and the establishment of
municipal bureaux.
Free text-books In all public schools.
Eqnal suffrage for all men and women over 21 years.
Municipal ownership of all public
utilities.
The establishment and maintenance
of free public baths.
A civic administration based on the
principle of the greatest good to the
greatest number; special privileges to
none.
Delegate Dunn also drew attention
to a news item which appeared in the
World last night, which, in his judgment, was calculated to give the opinion that the Trades and Labor council
favored the candidature of ex-Mayor
Taylor for the mayoralty. In the short
debate which followed it was made
plain that the council was in no way
connected with the aspirations of Mr.
Taylor.
No South Vancouver Candidate.
The fact was brought out that besides the candidate endorsed by the
council for ward three, South Vancouver, another labor candidate was in the
field in the same ward. The parliamentary committee reported having tried to
persuade one of the candidates to retire but had been unable to do so. The
committee therefore recommended that
no candidate be endorsed for that ward.
The recommendation of the committee
was adopted and no candidate in South
Vancouver will carry the endorsatlon
of the council.
President McVety reported that he
had been requested by theh school authorities to arrange for representatives
of tho building trades to go on the
board controlling technical instruction
in city schools. Ho had been requested
by the immigration authorities to secure a return of union men unemployed.
Reports of Unions.
Cooks, Walters and Waitresses reported 88 out of work. Cigarmnkers—
Only six working. Musicians—Out of
200, 125 not working. Tile-layers—AH
out of work. Printers—Trade slack,
over 100 idle. Plumbers—Some 7-p nut
of work. Electrical Workers (outside)
—100 out. Sheet Metal Workers—25
out. Bookbinders—Out of 32 members,
12 unemployed, throe enlisted. Hail-
way Carmen—50 out. Laborers—Over
.100 working half time, 70(1 members.
Street Railway Employees—Working
short time. Paintors—00 of their 70
members unemployed. Letter-carriers
—All working, Brlcklnyers, 230 members, 200 out of work. Molders—62
out. Pntternmakers—23 out. Tailors
—Very slnck, hnd strike on against
Staroy's, Granville street. Bnrbors—
12 unemployed.
Secretary-treasurer Miss H. Gutteridge reported on tho work of tho Women's Employment League. This meeting was the Inst held by tho council
for somo timo. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA I-'EDEKATIONIST
FRIDAY.
.DECEMBER 18, 1914
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Biwrw,    -    M.800,000
86 Branches in Canada
A general banking bnalnasa trane-
aoted
Savings Department
Interest allowed »t nlihoit
Curant Bat.
EAST ENS BRANCH
150 Button Street Bait
A. W. Jarvl.. Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED INI
Paid-up Capital • • • » 11.MM*
Raaarve      1M0O-00*
Tatal Aatttt ISftOOMSS
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account and your
bualneaa will bo welcome  bo  It   largo  or
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
BANK OF
TORONTO
...151,000,000
. .101,000,000
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Banian Aeeoant la th. ua* ot
two or mon ladl.ld.iU frequently
pooeuu element, ol waildiraMt
convenience. Ia aa .Mount •■ this
nature funds mar b. dipoilttd or
withdrawn at wffl br ettlw party
lo th. account, on hi. or hli Individ*
aal tlfnatnn. IntwMt Is added to
btluoM half-yearly.
tM HASTINOS BTREET WEST
and
Oomor HatUngt ud Carrall Sta.
IHC0RF0MTED
IISS
British Colombia
LAND
Splendid opportonltiea in Mixed
faming, Dairying, Stack and
Poultry. Britlah Columbia
Grant. Pre-emption, ot HO acrea
to Actual Settlera—
Free
TERMS—Rnldenee on the land
tor at lout three yeara; Improve*
menta to tho extent ot $5 per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at leaat Ave acrea.
For turtner information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OP
'LANDi, VICTORIA, B.O.
SECRETARY, BUREAU OF
provincial npOBMAtioir,
VICTORIA, B.O.
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published evary Friday morning by tha
B. C. Federatlonltt, Ltd.
R. Pann Pettipiece Manager
J. W. WUkluoo   Editor
Directors:   Jas.    Campbell,    preeldent;    J.
H. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Glbb; G. J. Kelly; R. P.'Pettlplece
Office: Room 217. Labor Temple
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7488.
Subacriptfon: $1.50 per year; ln Vancouver
City, 92.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, $1.00
REPRE8ENTATVE8
New Weitmlmter..  .W. E. Maiden, Box 084
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Boa 681
Victoria.. .., '   '     ""    """
n. u. -uenmnic. nva doi
.A. 8. Wells, Box 1688
Affiliated with the Weitern Labor Praia
Association.
'Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FRIDAY DECEMBER 18, 1914
WE FORECASTED THAT when
the time came round for the
provincial parliament to
meet, Premier McBride would use the
war as an excuse for'the appalling condition   into    which
STARVE the P™41**1 iBCom"
patency of Ms gov-
IN CALM eminent     haB
DIGNITY brought    the    pro-
•a vince.    There   was
no; anything particularly brilliant in
such a prophecy. Anyone who has
watched McBride for a few years,
knows that he has no capacity for real
constructive statesmanship. His policy
Ib to have no policy at all, but to trust
like Micawber, to something turning up
in time to furnish him with an excuse
to side-track critics, and to divert at'
tention from his corrupt administration.
«       *       a       •
So it came as no surprise to us to
read in an interview given by him to
the press, that he ascribes the want and
starvation which prevails all over the
province, to the war. Therein he ad
vises that "we must as a people com'
port ourselves in calm dignity until the
date of our victorious triumph." He
says that the coming session of .the
legislature will not last more than
three weeks, and that practically nothing will be dealt with beyond a measure providing for a redistribution of
electoral districts, and for a moratorium. Nothing about workmen's
compensation, or relief for unemployment, or anything of that nature.
»      •      *      •
If he thinks the working people of
British Columbia believe that the present conditions are due to the war, then
must assuredly consider them to br
as easily gulled as he has every reason
to believe they are, considering they
have voted for him and his party election after election. But we know that,
as a matter of fact, the war has not
made any difference. Unemployment
and destitution were rampant from one
end of the province to the other before
the war broke out. That is quite a
happy idea of his to'advise starving
men and women and children to '.'comport themselves in calm dignity."
*      #      •      *
There is a notable inttance in history of an eminent person advising the
poor to eat grass. His end was a little
sudden, but marked by an. artistry entirely befitting his case. It Ib not the
custom nowaday to adorn th'e public
highway with the heads of corrupt
statesmen. But in MoBrlde's case he
ought to be kicked out of office and
kept out. As a politician he is callous,
impudent and corrupt. Nothing but
the ox-like stupidity of the electorate
could have enabled him to stay in offlce as long as he has done.'
SUNDAY
MUSIC 18
ANATHEMA
Office Phona
148
Residence Phona
Fairmont 16931
D. W. V. MCDONALD
Barrister, ioUdUr, Notary Public
Office: 44*48 Flaek Hack
Cor. Haitlngi and Cambie Sti.
Tmeearer, 8. O.
SUNDAY SYMPHONY concerts
brought forth some illuminating aspects of the Aldermanlc Mind, at laet week's
regular meeting of the civic finance
committee. Two ill-
starred representatives of the Orphic
art, had the temerity to request the
committee to grant
permission for a symphony concert to
be given in one of the theatres one
Sunday afternoon each month during
the winter. No admission to be charged, but a collection to be taken up to
pay the rent of the theatre. To the
normal pagan mind—meaning thereby
the capable persons comprised ln the
average community of nominal Christians—there does not seem to be any
thing particularly atrociouB in the re
quest. Nor would there have been, if
the supplicants had only had to deal
with men of some tolerance, and a little Teal-culture—not much, but just en*
ough to save them from the oharge of
being intellectually barren.
*      »      *      •
But on that committee were Aldermen Hepburn, Mahon, White and
Crowe.   It made disaster   a   foregone
conclusion; i This quartette of Sabbatarian champions fell upon the delegation in a fashion worthy of the best
traditions of New England Puritanism.
The balance of the committee, Aldermen Woodside, Trimble, Evans and
Mayor Baxter—the latter* being ex-offi-
cio and having no vote—wilted like
grass before the consuming fire of their
wrath. The redoubtable Hepburn concentrated his uncompromising opposition to the proposal in the statement
that "He would like to Bee a grill
across the door of each theatre every
week-end.   Mayor Baxter—
. . . believed   there   were a lot of
people who would shut off the concerts in the parks on Sunday afternoons in the summer, yet it was
one of the finest experiences one
could have to sit in the shade there
and listen to good music. What objection could there be to listening .
to the best music in a theatre on
cold, wet Sunday afternoons!"
Obviously tho answer is the mental
attitude of such aB Alderman Hepburn
when placed in a position where they
can force their intolerant and inartistic
views on citizens who have better fortune thon tfiey, in the matter of musical taste.
*      «      »      »
Every Sunday—at several times and
places—the Salvation Army gives uproarious demonstrations in brazen acoustics, in the city streets. Will that
be stopped toot It will be said that Ib
concerned with religion, but it is doubtful if anything has brought forth more
justifiable profanity. Its rancous rending of the Sabbath quietude, annihilates all the power of polite language.
But what harm could come of those
who are so disposed, going into a public building to listen to twenty-five expert musicians playing the world's best
music f Would it be calculated to stir
up the beast in ment Or would it give
lots of fellows, who never have a
chance any other tim&, a glimpse 'of
some 'of the charming things which
Ufe might hold, if it were not for the
idolitors of ugliness Who are so often
found in places of authority! There
aro thousands of men—and women too
—in this city> who live in the solitude
of single rooms. Sunday to them iB desolation, and they do not all want to
go to church, and listen to a disciple
of the Prince of Peace extolling war.
Little wonder if some of them, in such
a desperate dilemma, purchase a little
of "the subtle alchemist" on Saturday
night to drive away the dreariness of
the lonely morrow, Such possibilities
may not occur to puritan aldermen
spending Sunday at home, in company
with their harmoniums and cheerful
fires, with well-conducted tabby eats
sitting on the rug. But there are more
things in heaven and earth than are
dreamt of in their short-sighted minds
—and the incalculable benefit to be derived from good music well performed,
is one of them.
the other end of the social scale. The
emaciated body of the child worker
balances the spoilt and pampered little
tyrant with nurses and toys to surfeit.
The female factory worker, with progenitive organs diseased and barren
from standing at work almost to the
very moment of child-birth, is the reflex of the super-dressed women who
have brought sartorial salaciouBness to
an art. The, broken, "too old at forty"
men, are the explanation of the thousands of aimless "men of means" who
have, and want, nothing to do but go
through life with the maximum of
ease, and the minimum of concern as
to the reason they are able to do so.
Unfitness is not by any means confined
to one end of the social scale, and if
the learned professor gets his lethal
chamber to work he will, if he is conscientious in his selections, find lots of
work to do in quarters where it had
perhaps never before occurred to him
that he might flnd scope for his skill.
KILLING
OFT   THE
m%
m     -it
'Vr-^-v
a^jtvjyr
Have You
Made Your WUl?
If not, hare an soma polnti In favor of employing thli Company.
Abiolute lafety and permanence.
Beperate aceoute for each trait properly audited.
Government restrlotlone ai to manner of Inverting trait fundi, ai
provided hr Trust Companies' Act.
(Mdian Financiers Trust Comrwy
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C.
i Patrick Donnelly ■ Geiw*-&jJ1wa|eyr	
IN   ANOTHER   COLUMN    will be
found the account of an address
delivered before the British Association by an eminent medical scientist* It deals with the problem of uhflt
and   defective   human     beings     and
what to do about it.
It contains no maud-
EHSIT lin   sentiment,   but
expresses with dispassionate conviction the opinion that
they should all be "worked off," as
Dennis, the hangman, in "Barnaby
Budge" would have called it. The
criminal, lunatic, feeble-minded, and
diseased, as described as "cankers."
And in the view of the learned professor, he and his kind have a sort of
mission before thom,. to convince the
lay minds of the millions that such
types must be "restrained." Careful
reading of the address, leaves little
room for doubt that the limit of "restraint" would not be reached, in
some cases, short of tho lethal chamber.
*   '    •       *       a
Equally careful reading, also fails to
shew that the professor had any other
proposal to make than this of systematically destroying effects. That
much would be expected from an unscientific and ignorant person.. But
science is supposed to deal with causes
too. And if the increase of defective
human beings has reached the point
where it clamors for the attention of
thoughtful folk, then there must be a
cause for it. Moreover, in these days
there Is no lack of evidence as to
causes. Students of social conditions,
pathology, criminology, and kindred
matters, have piled that evidence up
mountain high. And what the world
needs now, more than lethal chambers
for effects, is intelligence to enable it
to study causes, and a few more honest
scientists to point the way. To simply
kilt off the unfit, and sterilize the pro
ducers of the unfit, will not abolish the
causes which produced the producers of
the unfit. Such a policy is only a vicious circle, going round and round with'
out getting anywhere.
a       a       a       a
Unfit human beings are the result of
unfit social conditions. Unfit social conditions are the result of unfit industrial conditions. And before those
things can be changed, the motive of
industry will also have to change. Its
object now, is not the production of
perfect persons, but perfect profits,
AU investigation shews that the
lower the social grade, the higher
the percentage of physically and men*
tally unfit. Slums, dirt, squalor and
ignorance, are the breeding, grounds.
Theft are congregated, in promiscuous
poverty, the million bodies of the poor
from which the profits of industry are
drawn. The unfitness which breeds
there, is the co-relate of unfitness at
matic religion is quite impossible, beeause, wherever it is introduced in a
mixed assembly, there is danger of a
free fight. What the state has got to
do is recognize that fact, and not being able to teach all religions, refrain
from teaching any.
COLORADO MINERS' STRIKE is
at an end.   According to reports
received,   it   has   been   called
off  by  the  mine-workers  themselves.
The   combined  powers and forces of
the Rockefeller in-
EVEN AB A terests, backed   up
by   Governor   I
TALE THAT mong and the entire
IS TOLD executive  power of
the state, haB doubtless made further resistance at this
time impossible. Federal troops Bent in
some months ago to restore order, were
about to be withdrawn. Every mine
worker in the Btate knew that the coal
companies had been preparing for that
by importing machine guns, rifles and
ammunition. To avoid the charge that
men, women and children had again
been shot down by hired private mine-
guards, the gunmen of the Baldwin-
Feltz strike-breaking; agency had been
formerly enrolled in' the militia. All
these plans pointed plainly to the
strong likelihood of another massacre,
like that of Ludlow, as soon as the regular troops withdrew,
.*      *      *      *
Thus bo far ub the main objective of
the strike is concerned, that has failed.
But the incidents which have transpired in Colorado during the past year,
have advertised the political shame and
corruption of the state to the four corners of the earth. It has shown the
American nation—if it can be shewn—
the industrial anarchy and political
domination made possible and exercised
by such a vast accumulation of wealth
as is personified in John D. Rockefeller
and the progeny which does him bo
much credit. Of all the great struggles
which have made the path of American
industrial progress one unbroken trail
of blood, none perhaps, has attracted
such general attention since the
Homestead holocaust, as the fearful
massacre at Ludlow:
a       a       a       a
It is to. be presumed that, the struggle having ended for the time being
aB it has, the citizens of Colorado are
either indifferent, or that they do not
consider they need bother as most of
the victims are non-English speaking
'foreigners." If they chose to thus
ignore the principle—or lock of it—
which is involved, they may be rudely
awakened to find that similar treatment will be just as readily accorded
them, if they should decide to go in
pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness" in a way which seemed calculated to injure the investments of
Rockefeller. . One significant feature
of the case is, that while it was fully
proved that women and children were
ruthlossy shot in tents and twenty or
more burned alive in a holo where they
had crawled to escape the.bullets, yet
at the state elections which have taken
place since then, the administration
which was in office at the time of the
massacre has been re-elected. That
must be partly due to the votes which
the women of Colorado have had for
the last twenty-one years.
Nothing can be plainer than that the
mad race for armamentB has grown directly out of the development of industry. The expense of modern warfare
is so great that only high industrial development can support it. Hence no
nation has attained a front-rank plaoe
in the race except its armaments are
founded upon industrial development.
Oreat Britain, France, and Germany
are direct cases, while the might of industrially backward Russia rests largely upon the gold of her allies.
LABOR STANDS FIRMLY for secular education. It has to. On
no other sort of education can
democracy build its house. That is
why, when attempts are made to undermine the unsectarian
SECTARIAN bMi8  of pubUo  *<*■
™„-™~„.-,~,,     struction  labor  op-
INSTRUCTION     _•__■_  «,„■,    •'*
poses them  uncom-
IN SCHOOLS promisingly. By ev-
ery social principle
it is demanded that nothing Bhall be
taught in the public schools upon which
the whole of the people are unable to
agree.
t       «        a       a
Sectarian instruction in the public
schools is a back stab at democracy.
It sunders the children from one another. It segregates them into creeds,
as into compounds, over the barb-wire
fences of which they peer suspiciously at
one another, wondering what's wrong
that they cannot all be taught togeth
er, but must dodge one another's spiritual paddocks as though they were hot*
beds of disease. The public school can
only rightly teach the 'universally accepted. It dare not include in its eur*
riculum anything that threatens unity.
•       aaa
Nobody wants to send you to the
stake for declaring that twice two Ib
four. Syntax and prosody do not divide mankind into a hundred hostile
camps. So these and similar subjects
can be taught with perfect impunity
and general approval. But if there
were many different kinds of geography, each of them fraught with
storms of human passion, the public
schools would have to keep clear of the
mountains of Africa and give the rivers
of Asia a wide berth.
a       a       a       *
Even history is a dubious theme, because history is mostly Bias with an
eye at the back of its head; but dog*
PROVINCIAL UNIONS ' VANCOUVER UNIONS
NEW SOUTH WALES government
ia the latest to appear in tbe
garb of the baker. It will acquire a bakery plant and material in
the near future, it is announced, and
will supply all upb-
BUT THAT lic   il>-ltitutio,",   <rf
_ the   state   with
IS STATE bread at two Mnt8
CAPITALISM tt polmd] T]ie pU.
eral public will,
however, not be supplied as yet with
government-baked bread, though there
is absolutely no reason, beyond the interests of private bakers, that they
should not be. The New South Wales
government is by no means a pioneer
in this matter. Municipal governments
in Europe, notably in the cities of Austria, have long since assumed the functions of the baker, and other suppliers
of food also.
«...
The strangeness of the government
appearing as a baker is only due to the
conception of government now prevailing. Instead of being regarded as'an
instrument of the community, to be
used for every function that pertains
to its welfare, it is as yet regarded
mainly as something outside of and
above the community, too dignified and
important to undertake such a trivial
matter as the production of bread. It
is this conception that gives rise to the
idea of "paternalism," which Ib merely the protest of capitalist interests
which perceive their profits endangered by the government in a small way
fulfilling its function as an instrument
of the community. The capitalist conception of government excludes from
its functions every activity that would
abolish profit.
....
In othor words, government, instead
of being an instrument of the community, must confine itself to being a tool
and weapon of the capitalists to insure
them a free and unlimited field for private exploitation. If It goes beyond
that, or limits it in any way, it be*
comes "paternal'1 nnd "socialistic."
The government will bake bread for
the people when the people own the
government, and it will also do a thousand other things now left to private enterprise for the sake of private profit.
There will be no "paternalism" in the
condition, either, when it ia predominantly recognized that it Ib simply the
community, through their instrument,
the government, doing for themselves
collectively what was previously left
to individuals. When that conception
prevails, there wilt be no difficulty
whatever in recognizing bread as a
public utility. State capitalism or no
Btate capitalism, if it means better
bread and cheaper bread the finer
points'of the economic aspects of the
case can be settled afterwards.
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR-
Meets In annual convention in January.. Executive officers. 1914-16: President, A. Watchman: vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, O. H. Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria,  B. C.	
NIW WMTMINSTIR, B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Council—Me... .very seoond tnd
fourth Wednesdsy st 8 p. m. In Labor hsll.
President, H. Knudson; fln.nol.1 secretary,
R. A. Stoney: generil   seoretary,   W.    E.
Maiden.   P. O. Box 984.   The pubUc b In-
vltad to attend.	
PLUMBERS AND 8TEAMFITTEBS' LOCAL
No. 405—Meets every seoond ud fourth
Friday of month In Laoor null, 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webiter; seoretary, A, Me*
Lsren. P. O. Box 066, New Westminster,
B. 0.
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR OOUNOIL—Meet, first and third Wednesday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston street, at 8 p, m.
President A. S. Well.: seoretary, Thos. P.
Mathlion, Box 808, Victoria. B. 0.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
Sunday evening, in- Union hall. President,
Alex. Wilson; leoretary-treaaarer, J, W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. 0.	
Alfred Bernhard Nobel, a Swedish
engineer and chemist, died in 1896. He
ia best remembered by the general public for having left a legacy whereby the
man who doea the most .to promote
peace in the world during any one year
receives an award of $40,000—known
as the Nobel Peace Prize. He also left
a similar legacy for the benefit of him
making the best contribution to the
world's record of phyelcal research.
Two yeara ago Professor A. A. Michel-
son, an American, won that prize. This
gentleman, last' week announced that
he had discovered a new steel, which,
he said, would revolutionize warfare by
making fortifications as well as amuni-
tion many times stronger than at pres
ent. The new steel would advance
peaceful projects, he said, by permitting the erection of skyscrapers to
heights never yet undertaken. It's enough to make the noble Nobel turn over
in hla grave, and take it all back.
The Bank of Montreal haa disbursed
in dividends and bonuses, since laat
March let no leaa than (1,920,000, representing an interest on sharea of 12
per cent. Mr. H. V. Meredith, the
preaident, in hia addreaa to the annual
meeting of shareholders last week said,
spooking of trade conditions is Can*
ada:
Considerable unemployment exists, but the extent of it is probably overestimated, and I think our
position in this respect will compare favorably with that of other
countries.v -
The term "our position" is very
gohd. The financial institutions are
bearing their burden of unemployment
with patience and fortitude, re-
enforced with that 12 per cent. Precisely what the gentleman meant by
our position comparing favorably with
other countries is not plain, Perhaps
he means that the slow starvation now
being endured by thousands in Canada,
is preferable to the plight of peasants
is Belgium and Poland. If so, it's
quite a brilliant idea, which, of course,
is equal to Saying it would never have
occurred to ua.
Thomas
coata
imas A McBaln are selling over*
at 831*3 off for a few days.    "
City Aoction ud Commission Co.
Cash paid for hou.ee and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction k»r»nteed, prompt
sottlemcpto.
ARTHUR 1. BETOBLBT
Smyth, aad Oranvllle Stmts
Auctioneer phsu tty. 9979
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prioes and terms to suit
your pocket-book.
Our Stock of .
FURNITURE
matt  bs  leen  to  be  appreciated.
Oil! lit Ud look It owr.
Hastings Furniture Ca
Limited
tl HASTINOS STRUT WEST
SOUTH WELLINGTON
SCREENED LUMP
COAL
$6.50
In ION LOTS, USUAL LOUTS
PlMM Seymour 2930
SOS PENDER STBBBT
DOMINION FUEL CO.
We are now prepared to accept
orders for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
This coal, because of ltt price,
ia by no means a small alze, inferior nut coal, but high grade,
large sized WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen uae
We know what this coal will
do, having aold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to atand behind it and guarantee that it will
give you aa good a kitchen Ire aa
any high-priced coal you are now
usiag. If you uae wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire than either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for it,
but try It on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
929 MAIN STBBBT
"26 Tun in Victoria."
Seymour 1441
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING   HIOU
LATIONS    "
Coal mining rlghu of tha Dominion,
In llanltoha.8Mkatoh.wan and Alberta,
tha Tukon Territory, tha Northwest Territorial and In a portion of tha Province
of Britlah Columbia, may ba lsaa.4 for
• term ef twenty-one years at an annul
rental of 11 an aore. Nat mon than
l,6N acrea will ba laaaad ta ona appll
~ant
Applications for laasa muat ba made hy
tht applicant In person ta tht Atsnt or
Sub-Agent ot tht dlatrlct In whloh th.
righta applied for ara situated.
In surveyed territory tht land muat b.
described by sections, or legal subdivision! of tactions, and In unaurvaytd tit.
rltory   tht trait  applied   for ahall   hi
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Meets firat and third Thursdays. Executive board: Jaa. H. MoVety, preaident;
Frank Estlnghauser, vice-president; Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Fred A..Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnook. F.
Knowles, W> R- Trotter, trustees.
ALLIED   PRINTING  TRADES    COUNCIL.—Meets  second  Monday ln  tha
month.    President,  Oeo.  Mowat;  secretary, B. H. Neelendj, P. 0. Box 66.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS' LOCAL
i.u-ii.LMu No. 46.—Meet, seoond aad
E_Wi ssS'sJTKira:
BARBERS1    LOCAL   No.    120.—MEETS   ■
second Tuesday In each month 8.80 m
p.m.   President, J. Bruce; reeoorder, C.
E. Herrltt: secretary-business agent, C,
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple
Hours: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m,
staked hy tht applicant
Eaeh application muat -.      	
by a ttt o? H, whlofi will bt r.fund.d If
oust ht accompanied
tha rlghta applied for art not available,
hut not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on tha merchantable output of th.
mint at tht rati of fivt emit par ton.
Thi person operating tht mini ihall
furnish tha Agent with tworn returns
aeotuntlni for tht full quantity of mar-
ohantabla coal mlnad and pay tha royal,
ty thsraon. If tht ooal mining rights
ara not being operated, such returni
ihould hi furnished at leaat onoa • ytar.
Tha leu. will Include tht ooal mining
rlghta only, hut thi lisata may ha par*
mlttid to purehaa. whatever available
surface rlghta may ba oonaldartd necessary for tht wirklng of tha mine at tht
nte of lit an acre.
For full Information application ihould
bt madt ta tht Secretary or tha Department of tha Interior, Ottawa, tr to any
Agent or Sub-Agant of Dominion Landa
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of tht Interior
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advtrtUemen* wilt not bt paid for—«MK«
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.-
Dlrectors: Fred, A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdoch Me-
Kensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing Director, J. H. McVety, Room
211.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 476.-OF.:
«_."£*' "•"»*• I(»-x>r Temple. Meett
dm Sunday of eaoh month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; financial secretary, On
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS: NO. 1
—Meets every 1st and Srd Tuesday,
' Wj, «--*» S". President, Jamee
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W. S.
Ba*S?"i„BoJ 6?' "-"-no-al secre ary. F.
R. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dag.
nail, Room 216 "
BROTHERHOOD OP BOILER MAKERS
•ndi Iron Ship Builder, ud Helnm
of Amerlcs, Vucouver Lodge No. Wl—
MeeU >>st and third Monoay., 8 ,,._.
Preildent, P. Barclay, 868 Cordova East-
.ecretsry, A. Prtior, 115t Howe street.
00°n!!l. W4,ITFB«8 ."HP WAITRESSES
Onion—Meets Int Prld.y lu eaoh month.
8:80 p. m., Ubor Temple. W. E. Welher.
builueis representative, OlUce:' Boom 901
Lebor Temple. Hour.: 0 a. m. to 10:80: 1
to 2:80 and So. m. to 6:00 p. m. Com*
pentent help furnished on shor
Phone Sey. 8414.
DISTRICT OOUNOIL OP CARPENTERS
meets tn room 800, Labor Temple, seoond snd fourth Thursday of eseh month a
°* ."•» President, o. S. Hardy: secretary!
-L. Bsrr.lt; treaiurer, W. T. Tsylor? L»*
csl No. 817 meet. Unt and third Mon.
day of each month, and Loos] 8647 Jneets
4nt and third Tuesday of each month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. 911
u..r*M"tl1 """" ,0i UMt Temple, every
Mond.y, 81 p. m. President, Dan rink;
vice-pro. Went, M. Sander: recording J»
retery, Roy Elgar, Ubor tfemple;  Bn.n'lS
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO,
.hiJ2L (Intld. Men)-Meets first and
third Mondaya of eaoh month. Room 205,
• p.m. President, H. R. Van sickle: ra.
cording secretary^ J. M. Campbell; iunU
neas agent, F. L, festlnghauaen. —nn\°«n
HODOARRIERS, BOILDINO AND OOMMON
,uJiS!"' union. No. 66—MeeU Int and
third Pr day of each month, Ubor Temple.
Pre.ld.nt, Oeorge Gibson; eecretary, Oeorge
Hsrrlion, room 380, Ubor Temple. All laborers Invited to meeting. ■
MACHINISTS, NO.  188—MEETS SEOOND *
ni..?'   T»»lOT;, recording   secretary.    J i
Brooke.; tnanclal secretary, J. H. MsV.tr.
MOVING   PICTURE   OPERATORS.  Lo.
cat 8411, A. T. 8. E.-M?,taK  tea-
dsy     of     eseh     month,     Ubor     Tern- ,
Pie, < p.m.   President it C. Roddan* m?- '
retary-treasurer,  L. E.   Ooodman*   Si
coming secretary, a. O. Hansen: bus!  '
ness agent,  O.  R.  Hamilton.      OfBoa
Room 100, loo Bldg,   Tel, Sey. ___
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL    PROTBCTTVIB s
„  Union, Local No. 1«, a"fT^M_!
Meata aeoond Sunday   of   each month!
rooma 99-80. Wllllamif Building, «j a£&
villa atreet.    Pretident, J. BowyJr; vSSl
l™*.W' .P'  Bn«"«hi aeoretarV, 'h.  J, '
Braelleld; treaaurer. W. Fowler.
OPERATTVE PLASTERERS'  INTERNA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, Ni. I»_\
Meets every first and third Wednesday
In the month In room 801, Ubor Temple.,1
Preildent, A. Hanri-snrapendlag secretary '
P. Sumnter, 1880 Tw.nty*tblrd «enue ea.7
nnanelal secretary, D. Scott, 677 Richards I
street; treaiurer,   L.  Ty.on """■» [
PAINTERS',.   PAFERHANGERS'.   AND
Th.,SSx"*,.°2!'  '•""i1   "«-Moets  evei-y
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Grand:}
flnanolal  aeoretary,   J.   Freckleton,  10181
Comox atreet;   recording   secretary   stl
Dowding,   622   Howe   Btreet.     Builneiil
Timple *"■  Tt°om  m  ***"]
PATTERN    MAKERS'     LEAGUE     OF I
,   NORTH AMERICA.-Vancouvw andl
si™".1:' rf£ancA miu ,rt ™a»"»£3-1
dayt at Labor Temple, room 80S. Robert I
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave* \
Jos. O. Lyon, flnanclal ieStiuy. Hli']
Grant street; J. Campbell, aeoordlnz sec. I
retary, 4968 Argyle street. "°°"""-' M0- I
STEREOTYPERS' AND BLECTROTTP.
art' Union. No. 88, of wKuve?I5dJ
Vlctorla-Meata    second    Wednesday of I
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. Sit?- '
dent, Chat, Bayley; recording lecretary
A. Birnle, co. ''Newt Advertfier,"   ~g.
STREET   AND   ELECTRIC  RAILWAY]
Employeea, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple second and fourth
Wednesdaya at 2 p.m.,   and  first  and i
third  Wednesday!,  8 p.m.     Preaident, J
W.   H.   Cottrell;   recording   secretary,*
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity atreet;
flnanclal aeoretary and business agent
Fred, A. Hoover. 2401 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
.   al Looal 897—Meata every Wedneaday ,
9 p.m.. room 904, Labor Temple. Flnan- '
clal aacwtary, B. Prendergaat, room 919,
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (IN-
i. «,*.rnyten*,i' L<!0*1 "?• "I-Meetlnga J
held flret Tuesday ln each month, 8 p. m. I
President, Miss ft. Gutteridge: recording I
lecretary, C. MoDonald, Boi 999; Sua-
clal sec., K. Paterson. P. o. Box 602. '
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES, LO- ,
CAL No. 118-Meeti secoad Sunday of
eaeh moath at room 904, Ubor Temple,
President, H. Spears; recording Msretary,
Oeo, W. AUIa. P. O. Box 711, Vaaeeatst.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    XO.    941 —
Masts lsst Saaday tt saeh asaath al 9
p. m.   Pneldoat, I. P. Ptttlplowi florpreol-
hskurrirr-*"**""'* *
Printers and
Publishers
Lsbor Ttnplt
Bsildbf
Fhu. Sty. 4440
Printers of The Fan.
FREE!   FREE!   FREE!
Sixty Watt
Tungsten Lamps
A Sixty Watt Tungsten Lamp of tht hlghttt grade (inch u it regularly aold otm onr counters tt 40 etatt) will bt girtn uy lighting customer of tht B. O. Electric who purehatM at rtgular salt is Eltctrlc
Honatbold Appliance, valued at 13,00 or ortr at any B. O. Eltctrlc tales
room dniing tbt month of Dtctmbtr.
THIS SPECIAL OITBB II MADE TO CALL TOTO ATTENTIOH
TO ELEOTBIO HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AS HANDSOME, USEFUL, DURABLE AND SENSIBLE CHRISTMAS OUTS.
VISIT OUR SALESBOOMS-OUB LINE INCLUDES OITTS
StlTED TO EVERT NEED AND WITHIN THB BEACH OP ALL.
Canalised D   P     El CPTP1P
IIMC.earill.3l.
NaatDnit flDAY DECEMBER 18, 1914
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Uuderwear at its Lowest Price
All the underwear b.rgsini tt would be pouible to offer eould
not tempi tome men', allegiance from St.nfl.ld. underwear. All the
».iur»nce they want Is thst they are not going to be celled upon to
pay more for It than thoy have need to. ,
Beit way to mske sure of thie Js to buy lt st Spencer's. Here
are our prices, whloh compare favorably wtth any In Coned.:
STANFIELD'S NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEARr-Medium weight,
elestic rib.   A very popular line. .
Sim to aa...-  91.99
Slue .4 to 60. 81.75
Combinations.   Slse. to 42 92.90
STANFIELD'S LOOSER UNDERWEAR—Heavy grey.
Sizes to 44 ...... 91.96
STANFIELD'S HEAVY WEIOHT NATURAL LLAMA WOOL UNDERWEAR—Special, a garment 81-75
STANFIELD'S FULL WEIOHT NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR
 •>.. 81.60
Combinations.    ......... 48.00
STANFIELD'S  CREAM  LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC  BIB  UNDERWEAR—Hesvy weight.   Per garment      98.00
Combinations        '....46.00
STANFIELD'S   HEAVY   LOGGERS'   UNDERWEAR—Blue   lsbel
 ,.  .   9L76
STANFIELD'S BLAOK LABEL, heavy weight pure wool underwear
 : 42.00
STANFIELD'S SILK AND WOOL UNDERWEAR—Cream, medium
weight 12.00
Combinations 94.00
STANFIELD'S HEAVY WEIGHT WOOL UNDERWEAR—Red label
 91-60
Combination 98.00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Turkeys!   Turkeys!    Turkeys!
Large consignments are arriving
daily, dressed and live
also
LlVE and DRESSED geese
LIVE and DRESSED FOWL
Quality the highest
Prices the lowest
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
T«ADE  {fiftl
Braids
Best
Coffee
„W*1 HKAII1.
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
nATFT PEflFNT Absolutely Fireproof.   Looal and Long-Distance
nUlEiLi lU-iUClll   Phone •„ EvOTy Room.Cafe ln Conneotlon. Rates
J 1.00 per day up.     Attractive Ratea to Permanent Ouests.
otttniham a Btttty, Proprietors 189 Hsstings Strsst I
WM TURNER
906 Granville St
Neat te tht Market
-DEALER IN-
New ind second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid. «
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
yo OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAR DRUG STORE.
i Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
raithtr tha Bom Industry llorsmsnt by hariai
this labal appsarsa yonr prlntsd mattsr.. It——-
lor fttd workmanship, food dtissi—
waits aad tha ap-telMus of tta dty.
ALLIED PBDRDIO TBASBS
Haa't Union, Press _       ,
Bookbinders' Unltn, Photo-snirarers
Typoiraphleal Onion, Wth Pressmen's Onion, Prlntlni
u Assistants' Union, attrsotyptrs' and Blectroty»artr
n, Photo^airanrs' union.
Prsss-
Unlon,
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUS but-they
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
BUILT
IN THE
MOUTH
Luxury
Necessity
Efficiency
tht »ew     .
■undue. Buk
Bld|.. lleharda
inr-kastlap
Sscond Ploor
 Ui
Phone Sty.
i.e.7.i
THESE "Nature Teeth'" of mine (entirely different from
ordinary tnd ugly "Fahe Teeth) whloh are made to
match the ones that pit in soar jaws—in shape and tlie
and exact tfnt—and to lit like the ones Nature give you.
f OBESE "Nature Teeth" are truly luxurious because you
X ean bite, chew and smile with them ln perfect confidence and comfort.
BUT they are alio necessary to health and efficiency. The
old "False Teeth" an truly fall*, for they  are  but
makeshift! and do not perform the functions of Nature's own
teeth,
mastication of the food—whloh means stomach health and
NATURE'S own teeth, then, or their worthy successors
—my "Nature Te«""   	
general efficiency—and to   _.._
which makes for that efficiency.
"TOO BUFFER MO PAW" OUABANTHBD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE ttat all dental work
performed by me will be absolutely painless. II the
slightest twinge of pain la experienced by the patient no money need be paid to rae, or If any hat
been paid lt wQl be Instantly refunded by me.
I tarter guarantee that all crown or bridge work
or fllling will remain tn flrst-eiasa eonditian fa* a
period of TEN TEARS.   If an
defective during that time I wt
FREE OP        	
Nature Teeth"—are necessary to the proper
- * *    the luxurious sense of well-being
r of my work beeomea
11 replace It Ubiolutely
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIHT.
a X .   . ' -
t-OIY
IN
Reporte of  Unions Show
Trade Conditions Still
Very Dull
| Labor Interests Carefully
Safeguarded   by   Its
Representative
NEW WESTMINSTER, 8. C, Dec.
9.—T^o regular meeting of the Trades
and Labor council was held this even-
ing, President H. Knudsen presiding.
Credentials: From the Cigarmakers'
union for Oeorge Bacon, vice Oeorge
Dailey, resigned. Received and delegate
obligated and seated.
Communications.
From R. Rogers, Ottawa, re land
clearing; flled. From N. W. city council, stating free electricity was not
given to B. C. Electric Bailway company, but to ladies who boosted made-
in-B, C. purchasing movement, also to
proposed grant to the Y. M. 0. A.
flled. From the Vancouver Tradea and
Labor council, invitation to attend
celebration of its 25th anniversary; received too late, also flled, with secretary's acknowledgments of same.
Reports.
Delegate Jameson reported for the
campaign committee that it held meetings on December 3rd and 4th. Former Committee Seoretary R. J. Fell had
submitted a statement showing that he
'had some $22.40 on hand, and there
were some (37 in bills outstanding.
From tho Typos. $10 had been received
this year, Cigarmakers 0 and Painters $2.50. At the public meeting last
Friday, Mayor Oray was endorsed for
re-election, Aid. W. Dodd and D. S.
Cameron nominated for aldermen, and
T. A. Barnard and Richard Oreenway
for school trustees. 0. McMurphy, R.
Oreenway, D. McMillan, D. B. Ferguson, Jas, Vincent, A. B. Christie had
been added to the committee. It was
decided to hold a free concert in the
upper hall of the temple on the coming Friday evening, when the mayor
and the other candidates would be present and deliver addresses. All were invited to attend.   Received and flled.
Delegate Yates reported on behalf of
the special committee that a new proposition had come up in regard to the
"baby" bonds which might enable the
city to buy its own bonds without waiting for legislation, as it was proposed1
to have theh city take the place of a
trust company. He did not think the
Board of Trade was in favor of the
baby bond idea, as most members were
too closely affiliated with banks and
trust companies. Further time was requested and was granted.
For the Municipal committee, Delegate Yates reported the same old trouble in getting a majority of the committee together. However, the committee had protested to the R. C, hospital board re the steamfitting being
done by a Vancouver man. To this protest no answer had been received. The
alleged reduction in the wages of certain teamsters by the city was justified,
'as most of those affected were teams
owned by companies, who paid the
drivers low wages and then used the
men and teams to do work after they
had put in a regular day for the city.
Received and flled.
Reports from Unions.
Typos.—Nothing new; work about
the same; donated $10 to the campaign
fund. Plumbers—About the same; no
material change. Barbers—Quiet, nothing much doing; Cosmopolitan shop,
which was unfair, is closed. Bartenders—Nothing new. Cigarmakers—Situation unchanged; donated $5 to the
campaign fund. Carpenters — Worse,
but couldn't get much worse; some
men working at low wages on a waterfront job.
Delegate Cropley—Is the firm leasing water 'lots from the cityf
Delegate Matthews—Yes.
Delegate Cropley—This thing is u
shame and a disgrace and Aid, Dodd
should show h{H hand along these lines.
. Delegate Dodd said he did not run
the oity of New Westminster. He did
'all he could to have an anti*Asiatic
clause inserted in waterfront leases,
but couldn't succeed. How could he—
only one in eight—get a white man's
wage clause in . such a matter! He
couldn't do it.
Delegate Cropley said he ■ did not
blame Delegate Dodd, but expected
him to keep a watchful eye on these
matters. •
Delegate Dodd said he did not get a
square deal from Delegate Cropley, as
he constantly harped on civic matters
andr eferred to Aid. Dodd alone, and
not to any other member or the city
council.
Delegate Cropley remarked that Aid.
Dodd had said lessees of city property
had to pay fair wages.
Delegate Dodd retorted that he had
never said anything of the kind. He
said a fair wage clause was the lowest
current wage, while city contracts provided for the standard union wages.
Delegate Stoney said Delegate Crop-
ley waB laboring under a miBapprehen-
cently adopted the same policy aa the
C. P. B.
President Knudsen said he peddled
| dodgers to menjrorklng on the Sapperton sewer and was not allowed to
speak to the men. He understood the
men were not allowed to smoke nor
speak to anybody while working, being
worse off than tne convicts inside theh
fence near where they worked. He also
had heard that the McLean oompany
waB having men from Vancouver working there.
Delegate Dodd said the men working
on the sewer had to be bona fide residents, vouched for by reputable citizens and have cards from the municipal
labor bureau. There had been two
Vancouver .Italians working there* but
they had been found out and discharged.
Unfinished Business    .
An amendment to the constitution
passed unanimously at the previous
meeting, came up for final passage, necessitating a two-thirds vote.. The
amendment is: "That the council
shall not recognize any charges made
against afflliated unions or members
thereof until the local union involved
has had a chance to defend •self. Nor
shall this council investigate differences between afflliated unions unless
requested to do so by at least one of
the locals concerned.'7' Carried finally
with but one dissenting vote.
vOood and Welfare
Delegate Stoney said members of the
campaign committee would report back
, to their unions asking for financial as-
sistenoe to carry through the campaign.
There would be a free concert on the
following Friday evening, and he wanted the members to bring their ladies
and fill the hall.
Delegate Dodd said the unemployment in the city was alarming, as there
.were over 600 men out of work. He
did not think the rotation of jobs was
advisable. The mayor had taken the
matter up with the provincial govern-
. ment, who were giving It their most
serious consideration. Back to the
land was the true solution of the problem. The city council would welcome
any feasible scheme to alleviate conditions in the city.
I EFFECTS
OF
Most of the Young Men Are
Nov in the Army
Regiments
[Labor Papera Publish But
Under Military
Censorship
I sen SAYS
IT
Social "Cankers of a Calm
World and a Long
Peace."
To Preserve Diseased
fant Life Is a Wanton
Cruelty.
In
sion.
On motion of Delegates Yates and
Dodd the Municipal committee was instructed to take up the matter and protest to the city council against the action of this firm in taking advantage
of economic conditions by paying only
$2 a day to carpenters; also to interview the contractors.
Molders—Pretty bad; about ready
to close down in this city. Painters-
Two men got 4H days. Electrical
Workers—Four men laid off by Telephone company. Street Railway Employees—Buffered another reduction,
six men, from the car shops and one
man from the barn; other men in the
barns wanted to go on short time to
give the men work, but the company
refused to let them do so, having re-
ProfessorW Bateman, in a recent address before the British Association,
one of the foremost scientific bodies,
said:
"The powers of science to preserve
the defective are now enormous. Every
year these powers increase This course
I of action must reach a limit. To the
deliberate intervention of civilization
for the preservation of inferior strains
there must sooner or later come an end,
and before long nations will realize the
resposibility they have assumed in multiplying theBe "cankers of a calm
world and a long peace."
"The definitely feeble-minded we
may with propriety restrain, as we are
beginning to do even in England, and
we may safely prevent unions in which
both parties are defective, for the evidence shows that as a rule such marriages, though often prolific, commonly
produce no normal children at all.
The union of such social vermin we
, should, no more permit than we would
j allow parasites to breed on our bodies.
Further than that in restraint of marriage we ought not to go—at least, not
yet.
Something, too, may be done by a reform of medical ethics. Medical students are taught that it iB their duty
to prolong life at whatever cost in suffering. This may have been right when
diagnosis was uncertain, and interference usually of small effect; but delib-
I erately to interfero now for the pre* j
'servation of an infant so gravely diseased that it can never be happy or
come to any good is very like wanton
cruelty. In private, few men defend
I such interference.
Most who have seen these cases lingering on agree that the system is deplorable, but ask where can any line
[be drawn. The biologist would reply
that in all ages such decisions have
been made by civilized communities,
with fair success, both in regard to
crime and in the closely analogous case
of lunacy.
I The real reason why theBe things are
I done is because the world collectively
cherishes occult views of the nature of
life, because the facts are realized by
few, and because between the legal
mind—to which society has become accustomed to defer—and the seeing eye
there is such physiological antithesis
that hardly can they be combined in
the same body.
So soon as scientific knowledge becomes common property, views more
.reasonable, and, I may add, more humane, are likely to prevail."
Hans Fehlinger, Munich. Germany,
writing at the end of October, says of
industrial conditions over there; _■
In the streets and other public places
you see only few men below the age of
44 who are not wearing the military
uniform. The chimneys of factories
are Smoking, thus proving that industrious hands are still at work. However, there are exceptions. Some establishments have shut down, and others
are working shjort time. Export trade
is almost at a standstill, and home consumption has considerably decreased.
Large numbers of workpeople are unemployed, a*
The Unemployed
Statistics just published by the General Federation of Trade Unions, comprising a membership of about 2,500,000
I at the close of 1013, give an idea of
the extent of unemployment. These statistics show that, at the beginning of
September, 370,120 members, 21 per'
cent., were unemployed, and that the
weekly cost of unemployment benefit
amounted to $302,410. The percentage
of members unemployed varies greatly
in the individual unions; it was highest
in the case of the musicians, 88 per
cent.; the hatters, 67 per cent,, and the
' glass workers 64 per cent., and lowest
in the unions of butchers, municipal
employees, and agricultural laborers,
between 1 and 2 per cent. In some
parts of the empire the unemployed are
receiving assistance out of means provided by state, provincial and municipal authorities.
The unions affiliated to the General
Federation reported that up to the beginning of September 680,705 members,
28 per cent, had been called to do military service; the actual number, however, is higher, because the reports are
incomplete. The families of the men
under the colors are receiving public
assistance, but of the 48 unions affiliated to the General Federation 36 are
paying ' 'soldiers' family benefit'' in
(some form.
Retail prices of food have not in
creased in any considerable measure
since August 1st
Labor Papers Censored.
Trade union papers continue to be
published; they are, however, under
military censorship, whieh is true also
of every other publication. Most trade
union journals have reduced their Bpace
—some consisting only of two pages per
issue. Other reform papers have, for
tbe time being, suspended publication.
The social-democratic Vorwarts, published at Berlin, has been suspended
by the military authorities, who, how-
' ever, after a few days, gave permission
to continue the publication of the newspaper, provided that it makes no mention of "class struggle," and that its
contents generally conforms to the
wishes of the authorities.
It would be useless to speculate as to
future developments in the industrial
and political field. Only one thing is
sure: That great changes will follow
the present war, and I hope that the
changes will be such as to secure lasting peace to the nations of Europe.
BUSINKSS  AOINT   DIRECTORY
.Ask for labor Temple  "Phone Enbuit,
'Soymour .7496   (unless  otherwise  stated).
Bartenders—Room 208; Oeo. W. Curnook.
Brlcklayen—Room 215; Wm. S. Dagnall.
Barbers—Room 208; C. F. Burkhart; phono
Soy. 1776.
Cooks,    Walters,    Waitresses—Room    20B;
Andr Graham;  phone  Soy.  3414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room 307; E.
H. Morrison.
Electrical Workera  (inside)—Room 207; F.
L. Estinghausen.
Engineers (steam)—Room 216; E. Premier-
Longshoremen's  Association
Vie*--* '  "   ~
Offloe,   14S
phono   8ejr,
One-quarter off all Semi-ready suits
this week. Thomas ft McBaln, 655
Granville street. **
MUSICIANS
Alexander street; 7. Payne
6859.
Moving Picture Operators—G. R. Hamilton;
room 100, Loo building; phone Bey. 8045.
Musicians—H.   J.   Brasfleld;   rooms  20-30.
Williams  building,  413  Granville  street;
phone Sey. 2580.
Street Railway Employees—Fred. A. Hoover;
phone Bey. 508.
Typographical—Rooms 212-13-14; R. H. Neelanda.
Officers Are Elected for the Coming
Tear.
At the regular meeting of the Musicians Mutual Protective union held
on December 13th, the annual election
of officers took place. The following
members were elected for, 1915: President, J. Bowyer; vice-president, F. A.
English; secretary, H. J. Brasfleld;
treasurer, W. Fowler; sergeant-at-arms,
J. H. Stark; executive committee. E.
Hunt and E. A, Jamleson; examining
committee, E. Hunt, James T. Bundle
and Geo. Redfern; trustees, J. Lawson
aad P. Suguid; auditors, F. A. English
and G. W. Tallamy; Trades and Labor
delegates, A, J. Malacord and Fred.
Parsons; Theatrical Federation, J. H.
Stark, H. J. Brasfleld and F. A. English.
President J. Bowyer was elected a
, delegate to attend the A. F. of M.
convention to be held next year in San
Francisco, Oal.
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patter son 4 Chandler
Manufacturer, of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Ofllce and Worki:
Cor. 16th Ave. ud Main St.
Branoh Offlce: 40th A Fraier Ave..
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Sen-ice
1041 GEORGIA STRICT
One Blook weet of Court Houie.
Uie of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlon free to all
Patrons
Du •» 1
.   Seoond thought! are
Int.
beat   thought
theee tej. 221
NuBD, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
USlkWJiSt.       Vucener, I.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  OIRECTORS  AND
■EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce   and    Chapel.
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Soy. 348J.
North  Vancouver — Ofllce and
Chapel, 122-Sllth St. Welt, Phone
PAGE THREE
I
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
TOU HAVE A CHANCE TO OBT
■   TOUR DOLLAR* BAOK
When you hoy
British  Columbia  Made
Goods
Every dollar apent ii Eaeternn or
Foreign Goodi ie gone forever
Leckie Boots are Made in
Vancouver
Built ea gating tbem, ud yon get
honeit valna for year money every
J. LECKIE CO., limited I
Vancouver
HEALTH li mere to vt deeded aad is ef mora vital Importance to ttae
well-being end happlneii of tke IndlvMael thsn greet itches. . Poor
teeth sooner er Inter mesn poor health. To be healthy we moit have
the power to aertmllate onr food. Before It can be sMlmHstsd, it mast
be thoroughly digested, before it cen be dlgoetod it mast be thoroughly
■Mitigated, snd before it esa bs msttlgsted yon aast hsve good teeth
with which to mutilate.
Owing to the etrlsgeney of the money market I em offering to do dental
work at very moderate prieei
SilverfiUinf    $100
Platinite filling     2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    5 00
:     Bridge-work, per tooth.     5 00
Plates.    10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour 33S1 Offlee:  101 Bsnk sf Ottawa 1
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW POR ENGLISH MAILS
•XMAS GOODS ARIUVnia BVEBT PAT
AIX LINKS NOW BUNG SHOWN
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
I HASTINOS STREET WEST
■1ST IN THI WIST
VANCOUVER, I.C.
■STAILISHID last
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Aay Shoe
no matter whst its name, unleu it bears s
plain snd resdsbls lmpreeelon or this stsmp.
All shoee without the Union Stsmp sre
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNIOM
141 Bummer Street, Boiton, Haas.
J. F. Tobln, Pres   O. L. Blaine, Soo.-Troas.
COAL!!
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Compsny whioh sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
S
The Company whioh sells
AMERICAN
OOAL
and Employs
Oriental Labor
Fifteen Tears in Vancouver Ooal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL ;
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
427 Seymour Street
Phono Sey. 210
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.50, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
aaeweo amtcitLcv roa
xoret m rtmtv rttoe
___
oZt'Stftfttl      'tttiaamwoortrtta
miWamtmaemM&mml
VANCOUVER   B C
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AI ANT PRICE, IN ANT
COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON. MNTB, SIX
for nrrr cents, """
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd. PAGE POUR
THE,BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT DECEMBER 18, IS
This Great Shoe Sale
Has Taken the
City by Storm
Hundreds of women aro* taking advantage of its economies. Our
patrons tell us "they never saw auch good shoes for so little money."
It's all in the buying. We bought them right, that's how we can sell
theBe
$5.00 Shoes for $3.25
They are American manufacture, every pair Goodyear welt sewn and
guaranteed by the Hudson's Bay Company to give the same wear, comfort and service as any of our S5.00 lines There are three styles to
choose, from with patent colt and gunmetal calf uppers and dull kid and
cravenette cloth tops. Sizes 2 1-2 to 7 and B, C, D and E widths. Standard $5.00 values.   Special for     13.25
\_        J tmaaaaama   tata     trtaautt a tytaaiiaa. ttttott mhhisswm
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
T. B. CUTHBERTSON A Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
Cake ttat Watoh to Apple** SOS
raepn Weat. Cor. Pander and
rtleharde, tor niih-claai watch,
clock and Jewellery repadra. All
cleaning and raalnaprlnaa Joba
guaranteed for 11 months.
VENTION THB B. 0. FEDERATIONIST
=Here is Actual Coal=
Economy which'
means MORE HEAT
for LESS MONEY
Bor a two-ton balk laid of Diether,
Genuine South Wellington Coll,
which I. bituminous and hlih.it in
neat value.
Two-ton load, are inarantMd full
wolfht b*r > City Weigh Ticket. Tou
do not boy wet sicke, but all coal.   '
Diether Ooal—-mined In B. O.—
highest hut value—end full weight
without tick.. That', the .tory.
Look at the price.
Wuhod I>n
Pea Ooal 0
*<.2S I
a ton a
°qaV
'KEEP TOTO MONET IN B. 0.'
BT USING
South Wellington Coal
as supplied by
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .$6.75
Washed Nut, ton.. $5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Your Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined in B. O. by B. 0. Lahor for
B. 0. People.
in ihe heart of the retail ibtricL. Absolut
reproof and modem in eveiy respect.   Cuuine*
unexcelled.   European plan, $1 to $3'per day.
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS.  Orned ut
cpenled by   The Provincul  Hclell  Compiny, Limited.
HOWARD | IHfBViH, tmtm
MENTION THE B. 0. FEDERATIONIST
MENTION THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S  REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
Brisbane Hall, tbe Home of Organized Labor in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
THE VALUE OF PUBLICITY
A Healthy United Labor Press Could
Move Men and Governments
There is no more effective way to
control men than through their minds.
Control over mind-stuff material constitutes control over the lives and destinies of men and women. Tbe material
whieh most largely enters into the creation and tbe shaping of public opinion
is in tbe pages of the newspapers. Tbe
power that controls the press determines to a large extent political, social
and economic development. A truth can
make or break a sentiment. The truth
has the power to move tbe heart of a
man to compassion or to fire bis soul
with some great purpose. Tet tbe
press has the power of life and death
over many truths. That which is not
known for all practical purposes does
not exist. Facts, causes, conditions,
tbat are unknown to the public have
no part in determining public opinion
and policies. The workers have found
tbat in struggles for industrial justice
one element vitally important for success is getting the facts about their
cause before their fellow workers and
the public, says tbe executive council
of the American Federation of Labor.
Public opinion is formed almost entirely by the press. Back of the
press is an invisible power autocratically determining what information
shall be published and what suppressed.
That power controls the great news-
gathering agencies. It extends to tbe
editorial rooms. It Ib felt in tbe publishing houses. This invisible autocrat
owes its resources to business and property interests, consequently either
consciously or unconsciously it serves
those interests. To give publicity to
the cause of those wbo contend for reform or humanitarian purposes there
must be a press free from the domination of this throttling control. Such
a press has been steadily growing in influence and numbers. The number and
the character of theh labor paperss
published to-day are most gratifying.
The labor press haB been tbe champion
of the workers—the masses of our people; to speak the right word at tbe
right time for those bowed by heavy
burdens and weary hearts—tbe victims
of injustice, heedlessness, greed, and
brutality; those whose cause did not
have popular favor. Many of those who
have ungrudgingly given the toil of
heart and mind to the labor press bave
found reward only in the consciousness
of worthy work worthily done. Many
a weary hour goea into thhe preparation of theh newB columns and the editorials of each issue. The difficulties
are discouraging but the labor editor
knows that every bit of truth, however small or fragmentary, that he is able
to inject into tbe thought material of
tbe public is an entering wedge to blast
away prejudice and misrepresentations.
Every effort helps the ultimate purpose—tbe freedom and the welfare of
humanity.
The labor press has a very great
work to perform. Its business is to get
before the people the real news of life
—the truths about living and working.
Tbe metropolitan press ia largely a
commercial undertaking—for it living
and working are newspaper materials
for stories that appeal to popular interests. For the labor press the point
is to make truths about living and
working known to everyone. These
truths have power to move men and
governments. The' labor press must
have support and opportunity in order
to accomplish its purpose. Every one
loyal to theh cause of labor should feel
the duty devolving upon bim to support
financially and morally the labor press
that haB done bo much for tbe cause
and can be enabled to do infinitely
more.
Miners' Wages Cut Ten Per Cent.
All miners, both union and non
union, working in tbe coal mines at
South Wellington, Vancouver island,
have had tbeir wagea reduced 10 per
cent. Strike-breakers, many of whom
are still working there, are particularly
sore.
It's a curious world, right enough.
Melbourne Leader features an article
on "How to ward off diseases from
pigs," while over in Europe men are
being backed and slaughtered in hundreds of thousands. After all, human
beings are only human beings, but, bb
somebody has remarked before, "pigs
is pigs."
Music
A love of music inspires a man
with cosmopolitanism. He cannot hate nationalities whose
music stirs his heart strings. He
hears in music, faintly or clearly, according to his gifts, the
universal voice of humanity. In
many parts of Europe music has
always been cIobo to the peoplo,
as all sincere art must be. No
upper clasB ever had a monopoly
of the ability to make and appreciate beautiful things. In that
respect, with all its burdensome
traditions, its castes, its blood-
thirstiness, Europe has surpassed
us in civilization. There the people still sing at their work and
at their festivals—or rather they
used to before the black year of
Nineteen Hundred and Fourteen
came to put an end to lightheadedness. Music has not been a
luxury for Germans and Italians;
it has been one of tho necessities
of life accessible in its purest
forms to almost everybody.
Judge—Tou are charged with breaking a chair over your wife's bead.
Prisoner—It was an accident, your
honor.
Judge—What I Didn 't you intend to
hit her?
Prisoner—Test but I didn't Intend
to break tbe chair.
Normandie—Can you dress within
your income f
Bartram—Yes, but it's like dressing
in an upper berth,
"Mirandy, Mirandyl Git upl They's
ten automobiles gone by already this
mornin', an' th' chickens ain't bin turned out into the road yit."
Fatheiv-I hear Prof. Wiseman, the
prophet, declares that the world will
come to an end next Christmas day.
Tommy—Before or after dinner, pa.
1'Their home life is ideal." "Is that
sot" "Tea; she goes abroad in the
summer and he goes south in the winter.   Perfect, isn't it!"
The prices of all English rubber
coats are cut exactly in two at the
Semi-ready, 655 Granville street.      **
Nothing is better calculated to bold
together the miners' organization on
Vancouver island, and build it up for
future use, than the ruthless attitude*
of the operators who seem for the moment to be drunk with conceit at their
bitterly bought Buccess.
TRADI UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Council—R. H. Neelands, Box 66.
Baken—J. Black, Room 220, U.bor
Temple,
Barbers—S. H. Grant, Room 208, Labor
Temple.
Bartender*—Geo. W. Curnoch, Room
101, -Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 118 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraaer  1161 Howe Bt
Brewery Worken—Frank Graham.
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpentera Dlstriot Counoll—F. L. Barratt, Room 209, Labor Temple*
Hod Carriers, Builder* and Common Laborers'—George     Harrison, Room 220, Labor Temple.
Cigarmakers—Care Kurts Cigar Factory, 72
Water Street.
Cooks,  Waiters,  Waitresses—Andy Graham,
Room 206, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers  (outside)—B. H. Morrison, Room 207, Labor Temple,
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room 207; F.
L. Estlnghauson,
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Room 216, Labor Temple.
Granite cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Labor Temple,
Homeuhoera —AC. MaoArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Uttercarrlera—Robt. Wight, Dlitrlet 12.
Lather-*—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 10*4.
Loco, Firemen and Engineers—Jamea
Patrick, 118! Homer etreet.
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway, 1031
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomaa, 140 Alexander Street.
Machinists—J. H. MoVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple,>
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-30,
Williams Bid*., 41S Granville street.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. 0.
Molders—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—L. B. Goodman, Room 100, Xoo Building,
Painters—J. Train, Room 203, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 208, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple,
Plasterers—John Jamee Cornish, ISO!
Eleventh Ave. East,
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4869 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, eare
Columbia Hotel,
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 711
Beatty street,
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. McCorville,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor, Main and Hastings-
Structural Iron Workers—Room 208, Labor
Tomple.
Stonecutters—James Raybnrn, P. 0, Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
6, Fifteenth Ave. Weet.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2628 Trinity Street
Stereotypera—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box 61.
Tailora—C. McDonald, Box 602.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Geo. W. Allin,
Box 711,
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
Upholsterers—A. Duthte. 1088 Homer Bt.
*
PHONE SETMOUB 9088
We Write
FIRE
Insurance
IN GOOD BOARD
COMPANIES
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vaneouvar, and  McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Cloaa at 1 o'clock Saturday.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Meana
PANTAOES   VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
tM, 7.20, (.19    Seaaon'e  Prlcee:
Matinee, 180.) Ivenlnga, 1Bo., 880.
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE - SO-EOSY
MADE IN CANADA
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
Outfit Include! cabinet of Famed Oak
beautifully finished, hinged cover,
rery latest hornless type of phono*
graph, giving the pnreit tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer,
Powerful aprlng motor perfectly ad*
lasted and regulated, Removable
front and top. Outfit Inoludea 12 four*
minute Blue Amberol (Indeatruotlble)
record! of your own selection. Terms
.,0,80 eaeh, balance at the rate of
$5.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
$5 Down and $5 per Month
No Interest—No Taxes
Secures You a Choice 10-Acre Farm
Cell or writ, at ooee (or foil particolara o< thli choice acreage, altuete Is
the heart of the Bella Ooola and Llllooet District.. Open meadowlfta land, \
■oltable for mixed farming, chicken ranching or hog rolling. Soil a rich, eilty
loam. Plenty of good water, the land lying on river and lake. Good node,
telegraph and telephone oomonlcation right to the property. Will have railroad communication wilh Vancouver In a ahort time.   Price only ISO per acre.
3.1. EAKOr * 00.
80S Holden Building Name.	
16 Hiitlng, Stmt Bast
Vancouver, B: 0. Addreu  	
Phone Seymour 8888
BARGAINS
We are giving 20% of all our lion's and Boya' .
Clothing and Underwear
Aid Regular Prices on Everything in the Store
CLUBB   &   STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West       Phone Seymour 702
WOOD
_ BEST 16-inch Fir Oordwood at $8.00 per load. This is an
exceptionally good lot, and juat what you need this oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1963 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money.  Quality guaranteed.
Thi) is the only UNION MINED Goal in British Columbia.
Phone Seymour 6408
McNEILL WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANOOUVER OOAL COMPANY
The Federationist
WUl he mailed to any address outside
of Vancouver Olty, ln Canada, from now
until January 1, 1916, for $1.60.
Five Thousand Labor
Temple Shares at Par
The Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depres-1
sion. J
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few I
businesses in Vancouver whioh have a balance on the credit 1
side of the ledger at this time. I
With the completion of tho Georgia-Harris street viaduct ]
very shortly, another step towards this section becoming
"newspaper row," Labor Temple stores will soon be in demand, which should result in dividends at the close of next I
year. I
Vancouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment I
—conservatively estimated the property is irorth three times (
the par value of the shares. j
The executive board have authorized the sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1.00 each.
Every union man in Vancouver should own at least ten of |
them.
Call at Room 211, Labor Temple, for particulars.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE GO., Ltd.
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street
PENDER HOTEL suv*,*ffij3—&\_»*"
611 FENDER STREET WIST        -.-..---
Ratea $1.60 per Day aad Up
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class work-
manihip, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty. ,
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
The 8,000 Members of Organized Labor in Vancou-1
ver, affiliated with 52 Unions, Are Earning and]
Spending $24,000 Every Work Day
Merchants, Manufacturers, Professional Men, Caterers and those who]
desire a share of the above patronage can secure the moat direct results J
by using the columns of The
B.C. Federationisi
Official paper of Vancouver Trades and Labor Council and the B. C. Fed*
eratlon of Lnbor—issued every Friday morning from its offices in Or-
* ganlsed Labor 'a Quarter-of omillion-dollar   Homo,   at   the   corner   oi
Homer and Dunsmuir Streets.
If Interested Telephone Seymour 7495 and Our
Advertising Manager Will Call

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