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The British Columbia Federationist Oct 2, 1914

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 rOUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH.
XTHYEAR.   No.l8H».>-
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
"=*£*
POLITICAL UNITY:  VIOTOftTl
VANCOUVER, B.C. FRIDAY, OCTOBER,/1914
***.
e Reason  Which Gave
Birth To Technical
Education
tailed   Information   On
Subjects and Class
By Director
O. A. Laing, Director of Technical
Education, Vancouver City, B. C.)
omparatively speaking technical ed*
ion ib a product of modern times,
a result to a great extent of the
easing specialization in industries,
-the middle ages the workman was
master of a mystery, a secret pro*
to which' all were barred except
ie initiated by a long apprentice-
. The modern workman is no long*
;he holder of the key to a secret
ess, he is more generally a cog in
wheel of some production. It is sel-
■ indeed that one man knows the
le of the stages of manufacture in
completed product. Moreover the
tions between employer and em-
red are no longer so intimate as they
» formerly. The guild system meant
the boy going to a trade a complete
ing in that trade. The boy who
such a training nowadays is in a
unate position. Most so-called np-
itices are left to pick up their
ness as well as they can with the
^minimum of teaching.
Tha State Steps tn.
ie state conscience has been gradu*
i aroused to the fact that if the
•entice can get no training through
existing system of employment, it
the duty of the state to provide
training. And the duty was not
sly one to the apprentice; it was a
to the nation. From the purely
ercial point of view it is in the
ist of the state that its workmen
Id fee well trained and well quali-
to pursue their occupations. It is
duty of the state to see that the
ens should be intelligent men and
en, and not merely automata,
her in the matter of politics or of
less,
was some time before even a dim
sption of this duty induced the gov-
tents of the different countries to
ipt some form of technical train-
but at the present time no country
standing In civilization Is with-
technical colleges. It is the
r countries which are hampered in
utablishment of these institutions
y'through lack of funds ahd part-
r other reasons, which, as thoy are
notly applicable to Western Can*
are worth while discussing,
industries SpedaUie Districts
old country the specialisa-
and the localization of industries
been developed to a much greater
it than is possible sn a new coun-
*In England for instance, the cot-
industry Is practically confined to
ashirc and there are towns and
I whose very existence depends on
industry. In Yorkshire the same
es as regards the woollen industry
allele further south to the Indus-
connected with machine making,
lustrate the advantage of this, lo-
.tion, ns it affects technical educa*
one may take as an example the
of Leeds,   Leeds Ib the centre of a
woollen industry and' the keynote
II tbe work in that city is to be
) in the state of the wool trade,
y citizen is to a great extent con-
■d with the woollen manufactures,
r in the textile trades or in tho dis-
ting trades or in the textile ma-
ery construction. In organizing
ileal education in Leeds,'therefore,
arious classes are grouped around
extile industries, and as the facile
for instruction increase more spe-
ztvi trnining is given in the more
cnte of the textile processes. Even
.ft university the laboratories which
city like, let us say, Glasgow, are
[ed in engineering, are in this case
ed to the study of textile pro-
is and machinery, nnd the students
.selves design nnd weave materials
I'Mch sometimes their own clothes
made.
Ai Regards Vancouver *■
a city like Vancouver, tKia special*
on of technical educntion is im-
Ible. Thero is no staple Industry
one may regard as the keynote
idustHos of the district. This, how*
although it mny increase the dif-
ties of organization, is nn reason
neglecting the work. Vancouver Is
eat city in n new eountry and thero
certain industries which aro always
snt in a big city and which are es-
Ini to any new country. And it is
these industries thnt technical ed*
lon in Vancouver must deal,
then, there are the building
allied industries. The board of
ol trustees have provided a very
course in the building trades. The
les are not necessarily for appren-
only. There is a great deal of
which can only be appreciated by
who already have a practical ae-
ntnnce with some branch of the
The scheme of education in
trades is as follows:
o elementary courses are provided,
In workshop arithmetic and one in
building industries. The arithme-
ourse is designed to give a full
ing in the arithmetic processes ne-
ry for all but the most advanced
and the workshop drawing course
_ an introduction to the drawing
bs and the interpretation of bine*
Carpentry and Other Courses
;hree year course in carpentry and
' ig provides the education which
be expected by an apprentice
lesired   to learn   the   carpentry
thoroughly. This three-year
b is followed by a course in
ural engineering. For this course
advisable that the student should
more than a smattering of math*
i, and, whilst the instructor Is
led to do what he can for those
Ave not the necessary mathmatl*
(Portlmied on page fow.J
i-
'ft
a    4
u
')?■■
"a,
THE MODERN ATLAS.
9
J. W. De B. FARRIS ,
Solicitor for Vancouver Trades and Labor council, now retained by Vancouver Typographical union to defend
the suit brought against the officers
and members of No. 226 for $10,000
damages by Robt. Todd.
E
REFUSE ICE
President  Wilson's   Three
Proposals Will Not
Be Accepted
Strike Must Now Continue
Unless United States
Takes Over Mines
DENVER, Col., Sept. 20.—The coal
mining operators have refused to accept 1'rosident Wilson'h proposition for
n three-year truce and the strike, which
resulted in sevonty-five deaths, may
continue indefinitely unless the president takes over the mines or closes
them down, John R. Lawson, executive
board member of the United Mine
Workers to-day issued the following
statement regarding the operators' reply to President Wilson's letter out*,
lining an adjustment of the coal strike:
"Concerning the proposition submitted by the president of the United
States to the miners and operators, it
is unnecessary to say that some of the
clauses were of course objectionable to
the strikers. But tbe miners, after
giving it due consideration, keeping in
mind that it was backed by the influence of President Wilson and in an
effort to show the public they desired
to be fair, accepted it. The operators,
who have taken the public into their
confidence so often with statements
which were not borne out- by facts,
continued this policy in their letter to
tho president when Mr. Welborn said
his company was producing 70 per cent.
of their tonnage. Records in the Colorado Fuel and Iron office show that that
company produced from Jan. 1 to Sept.
1, 1014, but 57.00 per eent. of the
amount of coal mined during the same
period if 1013.. They tell the president
that they 'conscientiously did- everything to prevent the trouble with their
employes and then to heal the breach.'
It is possible they mean they tried to
prevent the trouble by their importation from West Virginia of deadly machine guns and hundreds of vicious and
unscrupulous Baldwin-Felts gunmen or
that at Ludlow they were trying to
html the breacht The operators havo
blundered miserably since the begin-
ing. They have proven to tho world
who the real anarchists are. When
Ethelbert Stewart, representative of
Secretnry of Labor Wilson, was in Denver they treated him with utter contempt. When Secrotnry of Labor Wilson wns here in person his treatment
wns little better than that of his subordinate He had hardly left the state
before they bogan to malign him, casting reflections on his sincerity in trying
to bring about aa amicable settlement.
Deliberate, attempts were also made to
decotvo the congressional committeo by
the introduction of irrelevant and misleading testimony. The federal commission of conciliation. Fairly and
Davles, was, treated with equal discourtesy. And now,* to cap the climax,
comes the- moumontal blunder of them
all—thoy attempt to browbeat and
bully-rag the president of the United
States."
ncssr) $1.50 per yeab
HtPSBUIti *VLABO*W8vaotii'9* BUILT 8Y -A80t1fT#BOft'S FAMIliyi^A8p!tkB^PTfM
Angelo Away Home
Joe Angelo spent a happy and busy
few hours in Vancouver yesterday afternoon, having been released from a
four-year term in the penitentiary after serving thirteen months and two
weeks' time. He was met at the immigration offices at the C P. R. wharf
by several island miners and local unionist friends. He left for his home in
Bridgeport, Conn., last night via Seattle, where an anxious wife and' four
children await him. Angelo's ehief
concern seemed to be the failure of the
miners on Vancouver island to secure
working agreements, which worried him
more than his own experiences as a
result of the big strike.
A Record Week
Powell River local, No. 142, International Brotherhood of Paper Makers,
comes along this week with *51—fifty-
one subs, for The Federatlonist for the
coming year, being the entire membership. Vernon Typographical union renews seventeen subs, for another year,
Hedley Miners' union renews in a body
for another year, No less than thirty
individual subs, and renewals also received during the past week!
A number of Vanoouver island miners sailed for Australia yesterday from
ttyl ppft    •
BARBERS' CONVENTION
Oeo. W. Isaac's Away to Indianapolis
as Vancouver's Representative.
Oeorge W. Isaacs, for thirteen years
associated actively with tlie Vancouver
branch of the International Journeymen
Barbers' union, left for Indianapolis on
Wednesday to attend tho 1015 convention, which opens there on October 6th.
An effort will be made by Del. Isaacs
to have the convention authorize a
change in the present union shop card,
whloh will bear a specific insignia of
Canada, .eoiiplad.-Jvitk the -pr*«t design. Another proposal to be submitted
to the convention by Del. Isaacs is one
that will appeal with favor to every
trade unionist in Canada, namely, that
the international executive board pay
the per capita tax of the membership
in Canada to the Trades and Labor
congress, which will entitle every local
to send representatives to the annual
conventions and thus enlist the support
of organized labor in legislative matters. Inasmuch as it has been the cus-
tom to give the fourth vice-presidency
of the International to a delegate from
Canada, at present held in Ontario,
Local No. 120 will place the name of
Mr. Isaacs in nomination for the position and, along with many local unionists outside tho ranks of the barbers,
The Federationist hopes to see him return honored with the position. -
STREET RAILWAY EMPLOYEES
Company Reduction of Oar Service Baa
Accentuated Unemployment
Members of Division No. 101, Street
Railway Employees, are wrestling with
the problem of how to make 1,000 men
fit Into 800 jobs and the situation had
been further accentuated by the B. C.
E, R. reducing the service some 15 per
cent., and by n system of overloading
cars during rush hours, in violation of
the provincial regulations. The union
officers are doing the best they can to
cope with the difficulties and are now
endeavoring to devise ways and means
.of dividing up the work among the
present membership for the coming winter at least.
B. L. P. Publicity Bureau.
The British Labor party intends to
establish a new department—an Intelligence department—for collection and
indexing of information relating to labor and trades unionist matters, politics
and socialism. It is proposed to organize this intelligence bureau under the
control of a political and journalistic
expert, who will be competent to pre
pure election literature for the party.
i m pie
PAID in b: c. for
R
Local Assizes  Testify   To
Frightful Human
Toll
Vicious   System   of   Sub-
Letting Contracts
Still In Vogue
Ab a human slaughter house the Pacific Great Eastern construction camps,
up along north of Vancouver, havo already established an unenviable reputation among thu working class of the
Pacific coast. Every local court assize
bears witness to the above statement,
not to mention the hundreds of cases
which never get that far. This week
nnotber instance of the vicious system
of, sub-letting contracts comes to the
notice of The Fedorationist. Eight
Swedes, employed on tho P. O. E. above
Nowport, under a sub-contract, worked
in the aggregate 2,111. days, und now
find that they havo averaged a daily
wage of $1.84. They figure that they
have boon cheated out of $10,000.
Whon asked why this was they explained that the engineer in charge had tho
last say as to classification und from his
appeal, under the provisions of the contract, there was no appeal. Powdor that
costs 75 cents in Vancouver was sold to
them, under compulsion, at $3,50, and
all other supplies in like ratio. These
eight Swedes had had deducted from
their meagre earnings $80 for medicnl
treatment that wns never provided.
And, last, but hy no means least, they,
ns sub-eontraetcini, were dobarrod from
an action at law under thu provisions of
tho Workmen'h Compensation act, inasmuch as they were not legally wage-
earners, even though broke. Shy clear
of railway construction camps!
BUILDING TRADES
Practically No New Building Permits
Being Issued and None in Sight
All the building trades, without exception, report trade very dull and prospects for the winter nil. The building
permits during the past week amounted
to less than $5,000 and there is little or
no new work In sight. Building
trades unions are busying themselves
figuring out what to do. Owing to the
long stretch of: casual employment most
of the members are broke or nearly so.
Many of them,.have payments which
they are unable to meet on their homes,
and altogether the situation ia one that
taxes the ingenuity of even a wage*
worker, who is usually accustomed to
jumping sideways to make both ends
meet. Some of the buildinig trades
unions are finding it difficult to enforce union conditions on what little
work is going on, the employers being
ever ready to take advantage of the
necessities of workless men to cut
wages and increase working hours. The
unions generally, however, are doing
splendid work in the way of assisting out-of-work members by mutually
agreeing to divide up what work there
is to do.
BOILERMAKERS FAIRLY BUSY
Nine New Members   Initiated at Last
Meeting
Secretary Angus Fraser of the local
Boilermakers' union reports trade fair*
ly good for the boilermakers, practically all of the membership being employed at least for the present. Considerable work is going on at the plant
of the Imperial Oil company, across the
inlet from Port Moody. As the result
of an official visit from International
Organizer Joe Reid, of Portland, where
he wns business agent for some years
prior to his, appointment recently by
President Franklin, nine new members
were initiated at last meeting and there
will be more to follow, A number of
tanks nre to be erected at Newport and
also in this locality and if times were
even normal the boilermakers would
bo able to increase their membership to
200. Meantime they are thriving and
revelling in McBride's "courage and
confidence.'-'
Brewery Workers,
The reports submitted to the convention by delegates at Baltimore show
that during the past two years 15,250
new members were admitted to the United Brewery Workers( and the total
membership at the present time Is 87,-
551.
INCREASED ACTIVITY of the working class movement, both industrial and
political, in Europe during the last ten
years, is believed by many to have been responsible in no small measure for the situation
over there at this time.    In
Germany particularly, where
W1ALL ihe movement   had   assumed
STREET BUC|! practical political shape
WISDOM as to have   more   than  100
members in tbe German par-'
liament. it is believed the ruling class viewed
the movement with alarm, they considered it
too dangerous to be tolerated any longer, and
that war was desirable to break it up and distract attention from it. One often hears such
an opinion expressed from the viewpoint of the
labor movement. But here is an extract from
the "market letter" of the firm of W.W. Erwin
and company, members of the New York
stock exchange, under date of August 12th:
We have predicted many great changes,
but we Kave not predicted, nor would we
dare to predict, a general European war.
Such stupendous folly on the part of our
most enlightened nations was, to us, almost inconceivable. We believe that the
fundamental cause of the pending monstrous wars which are making a slaughterhouse of all Europe is the rising tide of
political discontent, and the uprising in
favor of popular government, and that
this discontent is due to unjust economic
conditions accentuated by the rapidly
rising cost of living.
For us, there is nothing so very remarkable
in the statement itself, but the source from
which it comes is one of the last from which
such an expresion of opinion might be expected.
It is significant of the times that an admission
of that quality should be publicly made from
one of the most conservative centres of modern
capitalism. It is one of those straws which,
ever and anon, show which way the wind is
blowing. Apparently the only difference between the labor movement and the stock exchange is, that the former knows what it knows
and says so, while the latter knows what it
knows and does not say so—or, at least, only
occasionally.
OEO. W. ISAACS
Delegate from Vancouver Journeymen
Barbers' union to the international
convention at Indianapolis, which
opens on Tuesday next.
ROYAL Bit WkM
FEEL PINCH OF
Reduction of Forces Being
Made by Nearly All
Employers
Labor's Civic Representatives Doing A0 They
Can to Help
NEW  WESTMINSTER, Sept. 23.—
Regular meeting of the local Trades
with Pres, H. Knudsen in the chair.
Communications from Westminster
Trust Co., re bill; filed. From W. J.
Bowser; re Truek act at Fraser mills;
received and sections referred to be
looked up by executive committee.
Reports.
Report of executive committee re
Truck aet received. Financial secretary
Stoney called attention of the memben
to the slowness of unions in paying
their per capita tax.
Reports from Unions.
Typos—About same as last report.
Talk of further cut In the Columbian
.staff...   ...,,..
Plumbera—Abbut tne same; going
from bad to worse.
Barbers—Cosmopolitan barber shop
may be unionised soon through it
changing hands.
Bartenders—Slack, one more man
laid off.
Cigarmakers—All working; some of
them on a limit; outlook very dismal
on account of the talk of closing the
saloons early,
Musicians—Very, quiet.
Moulders—Pretty bad, only one man
working; city council had practically
signed their death warrant.
Shingle Weavers—Some gone to work
at reduced wages, but higher than first
offered them; some have gone to the
States and some to the jungles.
Engineers—No improvement.
Electrical Workers—About two or
three men out of work.
Street Railway Employes—A little
worse, more men laid off.
Pres. Knudsen reported that the distillery workers had their wages cut,
and would be cut again, so the union
men were not tbe only ones to suffer.
Unfinished Business.
Letter from editor of News-Advertiser re alleged untruthful account of
a council meeting. Delegate Flynn admitted that he had been mistaken as to
the article appearing in the News-Ad
vertiser and on motion of Dels. Jardlne
and Maiden the secretary was instructed to write to the News-Advertiser acknowledging the mistake, readmitting
their representative to the floor and admonishing delegates to havo their evidence with them In the future
Questions.
Del. Stoney—Can the B. C. E. R. ro-
duco service the way they are doing
without forfeiting their franchise? Del.
Yates, in reply said people do not patronize the cars enough here to have
the law enforced on local tines, but tbe
law is being violated on the interurban
lines between here and Vancouver.
'iho secretnry was instructed to supply
information of the violations to Tramway Inspector Rao of Vancouver.
Del. Paulsen—Has the Small & Buck-
lin Co. a "white" ' clnuso in their
lease, as ho had sen only three whfto
men and one hundred Hindus and
Chinamen leave the property at the
close of the day's work. Municipal
committee instructed to look up clause
of the lease,
Del. Stoney said the board of trade
had appointed four men on their committee to consider Building Inspector
Turnbull's bond proposition, and on his
motion three more dologates were appointed to act with Del. Tates on the
Trades and Labor Council committee.
They are Dels. Hunt, Stoney and
Breacher.
Good and Welfare
Under this heading Delegate Mnidon
brought up the mater of a moratorium
on mortgages similar to that proposed
in Ontario to pdotcct tho small homo-
buyer, On motion of Dels. Jardino and
Smith the secretary was instructed to
convoy the council's request to the provincial government for a moratorium
on mortgage's and agreements of sale
for six months, or    until    tho war is
ended •
Vates-Cropley—That the secretnry
obtain a copy of the Truck act from
the King's printer at Victoria. Carried.
Del. Paulsen said that, he had asked
what work there was on tho wator-
front thst a white man could not do
and he had been told by Aid. Ooulet, a
professed friend of union men, that nobody would pay a whito mnn 80c on
hour for washing windows and thoy
woulif not do it for lew pesptte1 tho
■ ;J;j •;*.,   •,;„,.,'
I RELIEF
WORK PUS
Once More Ask Government
To Do Its Plain
Dntf
Island Miners' Delegation
Want McBride Agreement Endorsed
VICTORIA, B. O., Sept. SO.—Tk*
various committer appoiatad at laat
meeting of *he unemployed commit***
of the Tradea and Labor council hare
been very active. Tba committee to organize tbe unemployed bava teemed
tbe names and addreaaea of over 1,100
idle men. Vacant atone la tk* centra
of tbe city were secured for rtglatra-
tion parpoaea. Tbe committeo named
to fait upon tbe premier and elty I*'
tborittee baa carried out lta work and
presented wbat waa considered a feasible undertaking for tba relief of tha
unemployed.. Preaident Watchman of,
the B. C. Federation of Labor, accompanied tb* delegation when thty -watted on the premier on Thuraday laat to
urge tha necessity of something Mag
done tbat would be of a provincial nature, in order to relieve th* eitaatlot
in the outlying districts, and strongly
urged tbe government to connect ft*
unemployed with tbe natural rcaourct*,
pointing out that there were thousands
unemployed outride of the cltlea, ait
suggested tbat tbe government go Int*
tbe timber industry. Tbe following
memorandum waa offered by th* delegation:
Tinwly Soggattlon
"This deputation, represent!** t
joint committee of the Tradea and Labor council and other sections of th*
working people of tb* elty, haa, by Instruction, eought this interview with
you for the purpose of drawing your
attention to the very serious condltlona
of unemployment now existing and
threatening to become IntenaUed doing tbe coining winter season, with a
view to enlisting your active eadeavor*
in an effort to deal in some practical
way witn the hardships and sufferings
resulting from such conditions of nuem-
ployment. Aa a meana of accomplishing tbat object tbe deputation submits
for your consideration the following
subjects, wblch, if acted on at oaea or
at as early a date aa possible, would la
tbeir judgment, help meet the problems.   It la suggested that—   ■
1 'No. 1,—That the government undertake) immediately works of Improvement, sucb aa falling, levelling and
grading.
"No. 2—Johnson street bridge: That.
steps bn taken to proceed with thla
work. In the' event of railway companies, oxpected to participate in the
work, refusing to do so, then tbe government, in co-operation with tho elty
of Victoria, to proceed with tbe construction thereof.
"No. 3—That tho government Immediately furnish Its promised quota of
#225.000 towards the Jubilee hospitall,
In order that the hospital board may be
enabled to proceed with construction of
same. ■
"No. 4—That the government tak*
sucb steps to develop the lumbering Industry of the province, by acquiring or
erecting sawmills, etc., and working
timber areas, without depending on private enterprise.
No. 5—That the government eminence and carry out certain improvements affecting the Gorge, along tha
following lines: By the construction of
a dam or lock at or near the reversible
fnlls, thus preventing polluted waters of
the bnrbor to enter above such dam or
lock, and to make an outlet from the
upper waters of the Gorge Into Esquimau harbor, at such point aa will be
found most fensable, thus preserving
the upper waters at tho Gorge pure and
fresh tn the benefit of the community."
Other Committees Busy   >
The committee to organise and secure
relief for the idle workers suoh as domestic , servants, stenographers, rotail
clerks, otc, hns been active and has
secured tho names of a largo number of
these workors and have mndo suggestions to tho authorities for their relief.
J. J. Taylor, noting president of District 28, TJ. M. W. of A., nnd International Board Mehmbor O. Pettigrew
were In the city on ■ Wednosday and
halted on tho government in the inter
ests of the Island minors, who have not
been given the treatment which was
promised under the ngronmont on which
the strike wns cnlled off nnd to protest
against the unfnir treatment which
they nre receiving at the hands of the
operators.
"Charlie" Oeall Killed.
Profound rogrot is expressed on every hnnd nmong local street ■ railway
mon over the tragic death of Motor-
mnn Charles J. Genii, who was killed In
the smnshup whi<h took place on Wednesday afternoon on Main street in
South Vancouver. Ho was nn old-timer,
a good unionist nnd was well liked.
Building Haa Almost Ceased.
During Soptombor 85 building permits were issued to the value of t42,-
858. For Soptcmbcr last yonr 161 permits wore issued for $1,340,096. Tor
tho last nine months of 101.1, tho permits numbered 1,085, valued at »9,-
774,038. During tho flrst nino months
of this year 1,130 permits were issued,
valued nt ♦2,804,480.
Miners' Hall at Phoenix
The Miners' union will build a ♦IO,-
000 hnll in Phoenli, to replace the one
that was burned In August.
waterfront leoso to the N. P. By. he
thought the city should keop the straet
onds.
Del. Stoney said the best way to get
rid ot such men as Aid. Goulet waa to
got on tho rotors' list and vote them
out of ofllce. He announced that the
list for tho city closed on the last day
of October and advised delegates Jo
register. ■. >   j PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT OCTOBBB 2, 1911
r
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
86 branches In Canada
A general baa>klm business trana-
acted.
Savings Department
lntereat allowed at highest
current rat*
East End Branch
IH HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvla, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1Ht
Paid-up Capital
R***rv*
TeUI A***t* • •
.til.
12,M0,*«0
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will ***n
th* account, and your
business will ba welcome be It larg* *r
•mall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
lNCOHPOIlATED
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve 111,171,171
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your savings In the Bank
of Toronto, and watch your d«-
pa.lt* and Interest added by the
bank grow to a moat deelrable
bank balane*. Th* financial
etrength sf thl* longsstab-
llahcd, well-conducted Inatltu-
tlon ensures aafaty for your
mon*y, an* you will recelv*
•v*ry courtesy, and your account careful atttntlon.
Aeaets ..
Deposits
160,000,000
841,000,000
Main OfflM—
4M HASTINGS ST. WEST
(N*ar Rloharde)
' Branch**—
Cer. Halting* and Carrall Sta.
N*w W**tmlnat*r
Vlotoria
Merritt
rTHE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In UU.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In 18*0.
Paid-up Capital    -     (4,816,666.11
Maarva Fund    -    -    8,017,230.00
Bead Offlce In Canada:
ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. S. MACKENZIE . Caa.nl Ma.aa.t
SAVINOS DEPARTMENT AT
ALL aMANCHI*
gpMlal attention given to Savings
Accounts on which Interest Is allowed from date of deposit
Open a Savings Account and add
to It every pay day.
Draft* and Money Orders sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH ,
W. Godfrey, Manager.  <
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
1, R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALE BRANCH
D. Nell, Manager.
BERRY BROS.
Agentl lot
CLEVELAND CYCLES
Th* Bleyel* with th* Rapuutloa
Full   Un*  of  accessories
Rapaira promptly *i*eut*4
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland IH
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federation let, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Managing Editor
J.  W. WllklnBon. ,_.„_. ______*_**_$ JS*^£
Dlrecton:  Jan.   Campbell,  president;   J.
H.  McVety,  secretary-treasurer;  H.
Glbb; O. J. Kelly; R. P. Pettlplece
Offlce: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 749B.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, $1.00
Affiliated with the Western Labor Preu
Association.
•'Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FBIDAT  OCTOBEB 2, 1914
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Mesns
PANTAQM  VAUDEVILLE
THREE, SHOWS DAILV
tM, 7.20, I.1S     Season's  Pries:
Matinee, lie; Evenings, 15c, Ne.
HILLCBEST  MINE  EXPLOSION
took place on June   19th last,
when 189   miners—almost  the
entire male population of Hlllcrest, Alberta—were scut to their lust reckoning
at a moment's no-
THBY KBBD        tic6' "■» *~ *J*
were the   crocodile
TO MAD walllugs     of     the
THE LITANY newspapers at that
time. Numerous
"eminent" persons—from the majesty
of Britain downwards—forwarded
through their secretaries, stereotyped
expressions of condolence and regret.
To the inexperienced or casual observer, it all looked very real. For us—
with the memory of many similar occasions in mind—it had no illusions;
and we prophesied theu that, almost
before the sound of tho explosion, had
died away, it would be forgotten by
the general public, and a great part of
the solicitude expressed for the widows
and orphans left behind, would also
have evaporated, like any other gaa.
.      .      .      .
After the disaster a general relief
fnnd waa opened To tbat the dominion
government contributed $50,000, and
the provincial government of Alberta
gave $20,000. The miners of district
18 of tbe United Mine Workers of America, themselves started a separate
fund out of their meagre earnings of
three-day weeks. That brought in the
sum of $6,739.20. The Alberta government has appointed a commission to
distribute the general fund whloh contains the contribution of the province.
This commission does not contain one
representative of the miners, even
though all the killed were memebers of
tbe union, and despite the fact that
the Alberta government has been asked by the district executive board, the
present members of Hillcrest union,
and the dependents of the dead miners, to put a miner on that body. The
result is, that up to the present the
only relief given out by the commission ts $25 to every dependent resident in the province of Alberta. Those
outside, for any reason whatever, are
refused relief. To meet the dire needs
of these people, the miners have given
$25 to each of them out of the miners'
fund.
...      t      .
' As things are at this moment, the
situation is nothing short of a deadlock,
due to the callous stupidity of the Alberta government. There is not a shred
pf reason—either on grounds of economy or otherwise—for snch a decision.
With the bread-winner gone forever,
many of these poor families have had
to scatter to the four wind*, and ln
some cases leave the province, in pursuit of bread. Borne have gone to
friends or relatives ia other parts, under the impression that the money
which was contributed foV their relief
would at least prevent them becoming
a tax upon the slender resources of
those who have befriended them in
their bereavement. The miners were
desirous of having one central fund distributed by a relief commission containing at least one of their representatives, and were trilling to hand over
the money collected by them to that
'fund. But they can see that to do so
aa matters nre, would practically mean
that they abandon thoae dependents
who live outside Alberta to the uncharitable decision of the relief committee.
• • . .
So they intend to hold on to their
money, and relieve outside dependents
as long as It will last, or until the provincial government takes a more comprehensive and human view of the
question by extending the benefits of
the general fund to.all those left unprovided for by the dead, miners. Wo
heartily support the miners In the
breadth of sympathy and common-
senso displayed by them in fnce of such
petty and narrow-minded .officialism as
they have to contend with, and we feel
thnt will be the view of evory man and
woman who has a spark of humane feel-
ing in their nature. This is no case
whore the quality of mercy would be
strained by men with minds bigger
that thoae of gnats.
THOUGHTS
ABOUT A
Corporate Trustees
Cannot Become
Incapacitated
AVERT URGENT requirement cf • Trust li that ne nn.™....*
contingency un atop Ihe work ot th. Trait,,    ThuVSSm.
a   , i?H**v«£ re«°l"",«' •• »• ladlvldVl'TJSU. vee-r^K
ea_t_a_- °Mm °"h* *^^*-*f&-V__Thi^
Ta 'ikS*!? —& * "■'"•■"nt bMlne.1 Imitation, organlied
«o that It mist complete .very tr.nisetlon entrust,! to la
Onr experience .nd rssouroaa ir, it your ,,rrl™   •
Canadian Financiers Trust Commny
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Mftnajpi?
TECHNICAL EDUCATION,whether it be good ot bad, whether
we like it or not, is like machinery—it has come to stay. Jn an age
of world-wide commercialism, it is part
and parcel of the
modern state. It is
a system of instruction, whose aim is
GIFTHOBSB airectly utilitarian,
especially in respect
to those industries supplying the
world's trade In the practical sense of
the term, it may be said to apply to
instruction which is calculated to make
workmen, foremen, managers, clerks
and others, more competent units of
production in those industries in which
they are engaged In the dayi of handicraft, before the machine played the
important part in industry, which it
does to-day, technical instruction waa
received in the ordinary course of apprenticeship The young workman waa
directly under the eye of his master,
and learned the details of his trade
during actual working hours. Many
causes have combined to change that,
and to practically abolish the institution of apprenticeship as it used to be.
Chief among those is the influence of
machinery, which has, to a great i extent, abolished the old type of craftsman skilled in all branches of his work.
It has divided many trades into specialized parts and small branches, rendering a knowledge of a whole industry
difficult to obtain by a person, engaged
in the work. Also, the modern practice of "speeding up," and the exclusive attention which has to be given to
a single process, leaves but little room
for a boy Who is expected to be both
a learner and a workman at the same
time.
«      • ■■     •      «'
To offset that, and to keep industry
supplied with a certain number of workers having a technical knowledge, the
plan has been adopted of instructing
the would-be workman, in the principles underlying his work, before he actually begins to practice them in the
pursuit of Ms livelihood. It relieves
the owners of industry, who control the
state, from the burden of giving that
instruction, and casts the onus on the
state. In the case of actual workers
desirous of increasing, their productive
efficiency, it provides for instruction in
the evening, after work is over for the
day. The growing complexity of many
industries requires that technical instruction should commence at a fairly
early age, and there is a tendency for
its claims to infringe opon those of general education to the detriment of the
latter. Indeed, it is perhaps considered
more desirable that a man should be a
highly productive workman rather than
a generally well-educated citizen. It Is
more conducive to restricting his mental outlook to that purview in whieh
it has pleased industry to call him.
There is consequently, a marked tendency to force into the public school
curriculum, subjects which are calculated to prepare the pupil in a practical manner for his life-work as an
artisan. Still, the school authorities of
most modern countries seem to have
adopted the view, that up to about the
age of fourteen, the chief aim of all
instruction Bhould be fairly general.
After that age, it is conceded that education may be definitely technical or
may serve the ends of a higher general
education at the option, or according to
the ability of the pupil.
«•      *      *     ' ti
At the age of fourteen in the' life of
the average son of working class parents, their economic status has a very
important bearing upon his future. In
most cases—and especially where there
are several other children growing up
—the strain upon the family income
which has no cash reserve at the back
of it, does not permit of him staying
at school. He has to turn out to work,
and in nine cases out of every ten, probably drifts into the numberless army
of human automata which supplies the
factpries and industries. The minority
of those more fortunately situated can
continue their studies, and in due course
become the directing experts who supervise the productive capacity of that
army. In the provision of technical
instruction, .cortain broad lines are observed by the modern state. It regards
itself as ultimately responsible, bnt the
carrying out of details js usually left to
the decision of local authorities according to their special needs. The higher
branches of instruction, such as those
which concern the future of an industry, rather than Its Immediate practical
needs, are usually administered directly
by tho state itself in centralized Institutions, or through other channels entirely under its control.
*      •      *   ' *
In England, such instruction was
flrst provided for by the Technical Instruction act of 1S89, which empowered
country and borough councils to levy a
rate of not more than two cents in
the pound for the support of the
scheme. By the Education aet of 1902
the control of education in general was
placed in the hands of county and
borough councils The day technical
schools are occupied with the teaching
of the principles - underlying the arts
and crafts, and to a certain extent
provide for the cultivation of dexterity in the use of tools Evening classes
are established for the supplementary
instruction of those already engaged in
industry or commerce The working
class student may pass from the elementary school into the technical or
secondary school in some cases by
means of scholarships, or may leave
school and attend night classes after
after his hours of labor On the continent of Europe, the division of secondary schools, in order to provide various types of professional or trade in*
struction, is carried furthor than in
England, and therff te a marked pen
dency io make continuation classes com*
pulsory up to the age of seventeen.
This is the case in Oermany whieh has
one of the most modern systems of
technical instruction in the world.
»      «      »      »     .
The entire subject is one * fraught
with matter and effects of vital interest to the working class. Viewed from
the standpoint of education pure and
simple it ean be accepted as a desirable
thing. But to those who have made a
fundamental study of the precise economic status of the working class in
modern industry, it appears as a coldblooded business proposition, devised
for the purpose bf making the worker,
as a unit, more highly profitable to the
owners of Industry. The defect in the
scheme is not the technical education
itself, but the private ownership of industry in which it is applied. To talk
of attempting to stem the tide of its
development and application, would be
as short-sighted and ineffective
as the Luddite riots of the early 19th
century; when those who took their
name from the idiot boy Ned Ludd,
thought they could prevent the machine
from breaking into the lace and stocking industry. It is one of the logical
phenomena of capitalism, making its
appearance in the natural course of the
development of the system. The business of the working class is to recognize its economic significance and
meaning, and to devise ways and means
of hastening the day when the advantages accruing from it can be applied to
the improvement and well-being of so*
ciety as a whole, instead of them being used to make fortunes for the few,
at the cost of pauperization for the
many.
MAKE 'EM FIGHT OB STABVE,
iB the way W. E. Home, of
Victoria, would deal with the
army of unemployed in that city, according to a letter of his in the Colonist.   He says relief
HANDY work, making roads
and such things, is
ANDY0N' nothing   short     of
THE JOB eharity,   and   very
expensive charity at
that, when the city has to borrow
money at the present high rate' of interest for the purpose of financing tho
work Moreover, the dominion government is offering work to all willing
comers, bo why should Victoria listen
to the importunities of the. Trades and
Labor council t Hear I Heart Let the
gentleman speak for himself, for he
hath a right lusty ring to him:
At the present time the dominion, as part of the empire, is out in
the -labor market asking for workers, empire builders She can only
take* the young and strong. She
offers them, when they get really to
work, scanty board and the hardest
lodging, and $1 a day, but encourages them to serve her by telling
them they are doing a patriotic service, that without them she will be
ruined ahd may cease to be an empire; that she will be very grateful
to them, and that she hopeB to Bee
them back. In face of this claim
of hers for labor, can the
city or Ihe province go into the
labor market and offer the unemployed more than $1 per day to do
work not urgently required to be
done, merely to keep them here in
this safe place free from want 9
. . . And, in any case, I submit to you no man under the age of
thirty-five should be employed on
city or provincial relief work un-
lesB he has come up for enlistment
and failed to be Bent to Europe on
grounds of character, I hear it
said this should not apply to married men But why not! Is not
the protection of his wife and
family one of the privileges of every married manf And1 if he,
young and strong, is content to let
them be protected by bachelors,
what sort of spirit has het The empire wants all hands she ean get to
help her There is much to be said
for men not leaving work they ,
have, but men under thirty-five,
who have no work, and are physically fit, of course they should go.
Their wives are promised $20 a
month by the dominion; the men
can easily double this by allotment,
and no doubt there will be other
help. So I submit to you that if
and when a relief fund is set up,
no man under the age of thirty-
five shall bo employed from it unless he produces evidence that he
has attempted to enlist and tried
to get to Europe and been found
physically disqualified, and that
the men employed shall not get
more than $7 a week, or (9,66 if
married. I dont tie myself to decimal points,' but I daresay the idea
, is plain
That is point blank candor which we
can be thankful for Mr. Home saya
plainly what a great many of his kind
are thinking, but which, for obvious
reasons they do not say He is the
"terrible infant" in the case, and if
only given a few'more opportunities
liko this, he will give the show away
so completely that no more performances will be possible Comment is almost superfluous. As the gentleman
says, "I daresay the idea is plain.*',
Quito, thank you Mr. Home., Quite.
We looks to you and likewise bowa.
Now that we know the Trades and
Labor Congress is coming next year,
the sooner we start planning ways and
means for the reception, the better.
, A sign of the times: "Mother of
four will do two hours' work for one
hours' pay."—Advt. in the- Daily Pro*
vince last Tuesday-- ft»4 has ty fti}ypt*
tia? for It at fy-ty
ABECBUITING    S E B G E A N T
should get busy amongst the
old   country   employers.     Up
to the present time the sole duty of
those patriotic employers seems to have
been to 'facilitate'
FORWARD the entrance of
— .—..—, -\\_-m workers into
0LABBN0B the army.     Surely,
AND OLAUD they too, are not so
cowardly as to remain outside the ranks. They probably
are much more physically fit than are
their men. They have not had to live
in bad houses on bad food like very
many of their men. Their physique
haB not been undermined by insanitary
conditions and malnutrition. And
moreover, they have got something to
lose—something real to. defend. There
are thousands of young men belonging to
the upper and middle classes with nothing to do except loaf about, play tennis and golf, and generally fool around.
Why are they not fighting! Many a
poor worker has been dragged from his
home, leaving his wife and children
practically destitute, in order to fight.
Why should these useless middle class
"nuts" escape f Nothing that has
ever happened in English history is -so
mean and contemptible as the manner
in whieh young workers, many of them
the sole supports of their families, have
been economically forced into the army
by having the choice thrust upon them
of joining the army or losing their jobs.
It is to be hoped that these facts will
burn deep into the memory of the working class.
The boasted credit system of capitalism collapsed in the most miserable
fashion when war was declared. This
should never be forgoten.
Says Vancouver Sun :—"The French
revolution worked marvelous changes
among the aristocracy." This must
surely refer to the pretty little ways
of the "Bed Widow." As M. Paris
would say : My dear Marquis, kindly
oblige the lady by taking your, collar off.
It is not often that such a frank
admission as the following comes from
such an ultra-jingo paper as the Daily
Mirror, It is part of an editorial recently published in that journal, and
is as follows: "To young men of the
middle classes, above all, who have
homes worth saving, we appeal. To the
impoverished who dares to appeal f Our
consciences must warn us that to those
who have nothing to fight for the call
comes with a diminished force."
The'labor movement has pointed out
long since that unemployment was rife
everywhere in the dominion but the
authorities denied it. Now comes our
local contemporary, the Sun, thus: "The
problem of the unemployed is giving
civic, provincial and Dominion authorities much concern at present. Many
schemes have been advanced to allev'
iate the situation which have 'afforded
considerable relief, but as yet no plan
has been formulated which deals with
the question   as   a   nation-wide   prob-
Modern machinery has made a new
business of war. It has taken the pomp
and pride and circumstance out of it;
has banished the blaze of crimson and
gilt, has abolished the fanfare and martial array, has set a seal of silence and
secrecy over the whole business, and
converted battles into wholesale homi
uide carried out in the grimmest stealth
and with the most diabolical efficiency
and certitude. In the face of this
change in the matter of war it Is alto
gether improbable that it will "ever have
quite the same kind of clutch upon the
public imagination that it once had.
The war spirit Is strangled by secrecy,
as the flower dwindles from want of
light.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
'_ DIPHTHERIA
New Conditions Call
for New Methods
FRED PERRY
The Labor Temple Tailor
Completes plans to produce
Custom Grade Suits of British Woolens at
LOWER PRICES
The only thing cheapened in
the Suits will he the price.
I have installed in my larger
premises ln the Lahor Temple,
power machinery. I have also
organized a specialized ayetem
ln which all operations at an
stages will be conducted and
supervised by skilled
Membera cf the Local Tailor*'
, Union.
I expect hy these methods to
produce Suits at $30, $32.60 and
$35 that will compare favorably
with the very best grades of
Suits secured under the old hand
craft system previously adhered
to.
The quality of the fabrics employed will be the very best that
money can buy—the only hind
that a man of limited means can
afford to buy—The Best British
Woolen*.
I respectfully solicit your business.
New Fall Suitings and Overcoat-
Inga now ready for your
Inspection
UNION LABEL
on all Perry Clothes
FRED PERRY
LABOR TEMPLE
ess
5?SF»s*g*ss
"Everything But
'the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prices Md term, to salt
your  pocket-book.
Oar Stook of
. FURNITURE
must   be   seen   to   be   appreciated.
Gall In and look lt onr.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTING* BTREET WEfT
Whole Whest Bread
Choice Family Bre.d
Wedding end Birthday Oakes
W. On, Union Flour
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
OAKES, PASTRY AHD
OONFEOTIOHEBY
Hot Drinks and Lunches
All Goods Fresh Dally
952 Granville Street
Telephone Seymour 7104
CHy Auction and Connisifion Co.
Cash paid Cor houses and suites
of furnlturs or Auction arrangod.
Satiifactton guaranteed, prompt
Mttlomtnti.
ARTHUR  I.  BETCHLIY
■myth* and Qranvlllo streets
Auction-Mi*   .. Sty M7S
SYNOPSIS OP  COAL   MINING  RCQU
LATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of fl an acre. Not more than
1,6(0 acres will be leased to one appll
cant.
Applications for lease must bs mads bj
ths applicant In person to the Agent ot
Bub-Agent of the district In which th*
rights applied for are situated.
, In surveyed territory the land must bt
described by sections, or legal subdlvls
ions of sections, and In unsurveyed ter
rltory the tract applied for shall U
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fas of $6, which will be refund*) it
ths rights applied for are not available
but not otherwise. A royalty shall b»
paid on the merchantable output of th*
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shal
furnish the Agent with sworn return-
accounting for the full quantity of mer
ohantabls coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghti
are not being operated, such return*
should be furnished at least once a year
The lease will include the coal mintnt
rights only, but Ihe lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine st th*
rate of 110 an sere.
For full Information application shimM
he made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to an;
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion (And*
w. h. cony.
Deputy Minister of- the Interior
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thl-
advert Isemw' will not he paid fnr—■WM'ffl
STOVES and
RANGES
Everything For the Kitchen
Mount Pleasant headquarters for
Carpenters' Tools and all kinds
of   Builders'   and   Contractors'
Supplies
W. R. OWEN
& MORRISON
Phona Fail. 447.    2337 Main St
_—'
PRE5IDENT
SUSPENDER
I
HONE   SO  EA-iY
DnconoltlonallyGuranteed
Don't manly say aiupaadoia
President Suspenders
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe'and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
. Branoh Offloe: 40th ft Fraser Ave*,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
BBS
^K
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 7I4-MEETS1
 Labor   Tempi*,   N*w   Westmlnet.
corner Seventh str.t and Royal avend
•wry seeond Sunday of eaoh month, ^
1.10 p.m. Preaident. r. 8. Hunt; em
tary, ft W. Jameson. Visiting broth*
Invited. ^
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. ML
Western Federation of SJhiers—Meed
Hun-Jay evenings In Unton Hall.    Presf
dsnt,  Ale*.  Wilson;  seorstary-treaaur
M. 1'. Villeneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
TRAIL    MILL   AND * SMELTERMENf
Union, No. 106, W. F. of M.—Meal
every Monday at 7.30 p. m.     President
James Delgarns; secretary, P. J. Bolai
Box 26, Trail, B. C.	
SANDON -MINERS' UNION, No. tl
Western Federation of Miners—Meef
every Saturday in the Miners' UnloT
hall. Address all communications to tbl
Secretary, Drawer "K.," Sandon.  B.C.J
PROVINCIAL UNIONS!
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABORj
Meets In annual convention ln Janil
ary. Exeouttve officers, 1914-16: Presl
dent, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, VT
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, O. H. Freed
J. W. Oray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, f
Simmons. Secrotary-treasurer, A.
Welle, Box 1638, Victoria,  B, Q,s
NIW WISTMINSTIR, B.C.
NBW   WESTMINSTER   TRADES   „,
Labor Counoll—Meets every aeooS
and fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labr
Hall, i President, H. Knudson; flnanol
Secretary, H; Olbb; general seoretary, r
E. Maiden. P. O. Box U4. The pufilM
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND 8TEAMFITTBRS1
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hai
T.M p.m. President, D. Webster; seer]
tary, A. MoLann. p. o. Box IM, N*T
Weatmlnstw, B, C. '
VICTORIA, 0. O.
VICTORIA     TRADES     AND '  LABol
Council-Meets flrat and third WeT
needay, Ubor Hall, 711 Johnston sure
at 8 p. m.   President A. 8. Wells; secrete,
Thoi. P. Mathlson, Box 802, Victoria, B?:
Vlotoria, B. C.
VANCOUVER UNIOI
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Meeta flrat and third Thursdays. Exl
cutlve board: Jas. H. McVety, preside J
Frank Bstlnghauser, vice-president; Qe~
Bartley, general secretary, 210 LabL
Temple; Mies H. Outterldge, treasurl
Fred A, Hoover, statistician: aergean
at-arms, John Sully: O. Curnook, p
Knowles, W. B. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover. J. L
McVety, James Brown,*-Edward Lothlq
James Campbell. J. w. Wilkinson. R.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdoch
Kenzie. F. Blumberg, H. H. F,
Managing Director, J. H. McVety, Rc|
ALLIED   PRINTING" TRADES    COUi
CIL.—Meets  second  Monday  In
month.    President,  Oeo.  Mowat;  se<
tary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 68.
BAKKUS' AND CONFECTIONER* ,
-■   - - CAL   No.   4«—Meeta b,
as B\Zm t """    a"11    'ourth    Sell
MnUMaVS days. 7 SO nm.  Presld.l
-TtJvtVf? '1- °- I'«**orthy; corrf
HjUHt ponding secretary.  R.I
DSHK* Adams,  bualneaa agenll
iBJJSaL.   """*'•• ft"""! «».  ui
Temple.
BARBERS'   LOCAL   NO.    120.—ME
second Tuesday In each month
p. m.   President, J. Bruce; reeoorder.t
E. Herrltt; secretary-business agent, I
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Ubor   TeniJ
Houra: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m. "
BARTENbdltS' LOCAL No. 171—u
i flee, Room 208 Ubor Temple. Hi
first Sunday of each month. Preside]
F. F. Uvlgne; flnanclal secretary, d
W. Curnock, Room 208, Ubor Temple!
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', Nt
—Meets every 1st and 3rd Tuesi
8  p.m.,  Room  307.    President,   Jal
Haslett: corresponding Secretarv, wS
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal eecretary
ll.  Brown; business agent, W.  S.
nail. Room 216.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAK_
and Iron Hlnp Builders and H.lfl
of America, Vancouver Lodge No.
Meets flrat and third Momiaya, s
President, F. Barclay, 363 Cordova L_
eecretary. A. Fraser, 1161 Howe OlrSS
1'UOKB, WAITERS AND WAITUKS
Union—Meets flrst Friday in
nwnth, 1:8* p.m., Ubor Temple, w,.,
walker, buatnes representative. tM
Room 301. Ubor Temple. Hours: t a
io It.N; 1 p.m. to !.8<l and I p.m. to 1
p.m.   Competent help rurnlahed un >i
notice.   Phone Sey, 8«H. 1
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTB
meeta second and fourth Thuradaf
each month, I p. m. Seoretary; J,
con, ITI Hornby street; business a
H. J. MoEwen. room 209. Local 817 r.r,
flrat and third Monday nf eaoh mOL
and   Local   2647 .meets   flrat   and   tl
Tuesday of eaoh month.       P
BLBCTB1CAL WORKERS, LOCAL _
311—Meete Room 301 every MnnS
I p. m. President, Dave Fink; vlee-prf
dent, M. Sander; recording secrelaT
(toy Elgar, Ubor Temple; nnanclal I
relary and business agent, W. F. 1)1
Room 807, Ubor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKRRS,  LOCAL <
821   (Inside   Men)—Meets   flrst   ,
third Mondaya of each month.   Room
8 p.m.    Preeldent, H. R, Van Sickle;L
cording secretary, J. M. Campbell; hJ
nesa agent. F. L. EatlnghauBen, Room f
MACHINISTS,   NO.   183—MEETS  BE
ond  and  fourth  Fridays,   8  p.
President, A. R. Towler; recording aeoL
tary, J. Brookes; flnanclal secretary, ]_
McVety. "
MOVING   PICTURE   OPERATORS.
ut 848 I. A. T. 8. E.—Menu flrst 1_
day of eaeh month, Labor T|
pie, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; i
retary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman:
.cording seoretary, A, O. Hansen; h_
ness agent, O. R. Hamilton. Oflf
100, Loo Bldg,   Tel. Sey. 3046.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECfq
' Union, Ucal No. 146, A. F. of M
Meeta seoond Sunday of each mon
rooms 29-30, Williams Building, 418 ateL
vllle street.. President, J. Bowyer; vll
presldsnt, F. English; Seoretary, H.r
Brasfleld: treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTH
. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 8L
Meeta flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brl
Hall, 8 p.m. President A. Hurry; corri
ponding secretary, F. Sumpter, 18aT
23rd avenue east; flnanclal secretary, I
Soott, 677 Richards street; treasurer,,
Tyson. Meets every 1st and 3rd Wednf
day ln the  month ln Room   301
Temple. '
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. .-,
Decorators', Local 138—Meets evl
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. On
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton,
Comox street: recording secretary,!
Dowding, 622 Howe street. Buslsj
agent, James Train, Room 303, '--'
Temple.
PATTERN'   MAKERS'    .LEAGUE
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver L
vlolnlty.   Branoh meets 1st and 3rd A
days at Ubor Temple, room 206, F
C.   Sampson,  Pres.,  747  Dunlevy  .
Jos.  G.  Lyon,   flnanolal  secretary,
Grant street; J. Campbell, secordlng i
retary, 4869 Argyle street..
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROT.
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver!!
Victoria—Meets second Wednesday
eaoh month, 4 p. m., Ubor Temple. Pq
dent, Chaa. Bayley; recording secretl
A. Birnle. co. "News Advertiser."    ■
STREET AND ELECTRIC SAIL\l
Employees, Pioneer Division No.l
—Meets Labor Temple second and fol
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and flrst'J
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m, Presll
W. H. Cottrell; recording secre!
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity at]
flnanclal seoretary and business A
Fred. A. Hoover. 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNAL,
al Looal 897—Meets every Wednel
I p. m„ room 204, Ubor Temple. Fll
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room |
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION 1
ternatlonal). Local No. 1,8—Mea
held flrst Tuesday ln each month, 81
President, Miss H. Gutteridge: recol
secretary, C. MoDonald, Box .101; af
clal sec, K. Paterson. P. O. Box 6031
THEATRICAL STAGE IMPLtH
Local No. Ill—Meeta seeond St
of eaoh month at Room 894. Labor I
pis. President, H. Spears; recording
retary, Geo. W. AllInT P.p. Box .111,7
TYPOGRAPHICAL   UNION   NO.
Meeta last Sunday eaoh sua
p.m. Preildant, R. S. Pettlpleoe; J
president, _W, SV M»tu*r, __
treaaurer, ft, H, WMlatrta, t.O, T' mWmwmm
FBIDAT OCTOBER 8, IBM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PAGE THREE
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Underwear at
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- STANFIELD'S         NATURAL
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Slse. to 49 11.26
Slse. 44 to 60..   ....
Combinations,   sises
42	
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STANFIELD'S LOOSER   UN-
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STANFIELD'S FULL
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UNDERWEAR.. .. 11.90
Combinations..   ..   ...13.00
STANFIELD'S   CREAM   LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC    RIB
UNDERWEAR -7- Heavy weight. Fer garment
..  ..  ..  ......  ...18.00
Combination, 18.00
STANFIELD'S    HEAVT
WEIOHT     NATURAL
LLAMA    WOOL    UNDERWEAR.    Per    (ar
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Combination,..   ...... 15.80
STANFI'BLD'S    HEAVT
LOGGER      UNDERWEAR—Blue Label  ..11.75
STAUFILD'B       BLACK
' LABEL—Heavy  weight
pure wool pnderweer.. 12.00
STANFIELD'S    SILK     ANU
WOOL    UNDERWEAR
Cream, medium  weight
Per garment ...12.00
Combinations .1  ..   ..14.00
STANFIELD'S    HEAVY
WEIOHT  WOOL   UNDERWEAR. Red label. 11.50
Combination,..   13.00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
Private sales are held daily when you can
purchase in any quantity.
OUR SALESMEN ABE ALWATS AT
YOUR SERVIOE. GOOD DELIVERY
AT    LOWEST    POSSIBLE    BATES
Saturday Is Our SpeeCal Day for Snaps,
See the Producers' Stalls ia Front of the Market as Well as the
Inside Displays.
Everything sold in the Market is produced
in British Columbia.
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES.
John McMillan, Manager.
T«RDE;   <''a5ry,  MAI-*"
- ^"*i*- -
Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
906 Granville St
Next lo lh*  Market
i$M. TURNER
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
NEW ENGLAND HOTEL     Klr8«""0*,r 8trMtr
Rooms elegantly furnished, classed with the best.   Low rates.
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
J. E. BROWN & CO.
SIS COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER,*;B.C.
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
USE TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
« This Is advised ■• the Tungsten Limp gives three timet the
■mount of tight of a carbon lamp' on the tame consumption of
gurrent   ' . • '  •' ' i 1.3
USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thli type la the only claaa of Tungeten Lamp you should use. Don't
fall to aak for It when you buy Tungetena. It beara the aame relation te other types of Tungstens as does the best grade of steel to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOMS A FULL LINE OF THE
BEST TYPE OF TUNGSTEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIGH STANDARD OF OUR LAMPS 18 CONSIDERED.
Aek our clerk to demonstrate for you the difference between a
Tungeten and Carbon Lamp utlng tht tame amount of current.
Ceirall sod
Hsatiafi Street
\
Bp     pi Cr-TDir-       IIMGrsnrilleSl.
.1*.   tLLCi-L-1 HIV* N.»D«i.
*mm—
CLASH PREDICTED
i
Carranza Delegates and Zapata Unable to Make
Terms
Armed Forces Will Have to
Settle the Land Policy
for Mexico
According to the last reports from
the south the new government of Carranza sent a speolal commission to the
Zapata encampment in the state of Morelos, with the objeot of discussing
terms of peace. The interview took
place on September 6th in the oity of
Cuernavaca, there being present the
leader, Zapata, his seoretary and other
members of the staff. Asked for the
conditions on, which the Zapata followers would sigh for peace, there was a
general discussion and some of the
propositions of the government were
rejected, beoause among other reasons,
the conditions named by Zapata thai-
such agreement could only be completed in his own headquarters or in
the city of Cuernavaca. The delegates
of Carranza made the suggestion that
the conference take place in the capital
or in another point between both cities,
neutralizing the plaoe between the out-,
posts of both armies. The proposition
was refused by Zapata, who stated that
the only city that had his conidence
for a meeting was Cuernavaca. Another condition of Zapata's was the submission of Carranza and Mb generals to
the plan of Ayala, which contains the
platform of the farmers''party. The
conditions follow:
Zapata's Conditions
First—The provisional president and
all the generals that obey his orders
must sign a document, submitting to
the plan of Ayala not only in its es*
sence but in all its parts.
Second—An armistice suspending all
hostilities under the baBes of the delivery of tho fortlled town of Xochimil-
co to the Zapata forces.
Third—The provisional president,
Carranza, to resign immediately.
Fourth—A representative of Zapata
will take charge of the Btate affairs,
jointly with the representatives of the
constitutional party.
Fifth—After fulfilment of the" foregoing clauses a conforence, in whioh
both sides nre represented, will take
place in the Zapata headquarters and
will have for its object the discussion
of the proceedings tp carry on the realization of the plan of Ayala.
The Answer of Carranza
"Constitutional Army, First Commander: I have received the report
sent me, as the result of your interview
with General Emlllano Zapata. Taking
into consideration that in that report
General Zapata thinks it.necessary to
reach an agreement that I make declaration of subjection to the plan of
Ayala, I beg you transmit my answer
to General Zapata as follows: 'Having
received the charge of tho first command of the constitutional army, in
Guadalupe, by delegation of the several military officers that worked with
me for the overthrow of the government of General Huerta, I could not
reBign that commission in order to submit myself to the leadership of General
Zapata, or accept the plan of Ayala. I
do not consider necessary that submission because I am in the beat position
to carry on and legalize the agrarian
reforms thnt the plan of Ayala intends
not only in the state of Morelos, but in
nil the states in need of similar measure. If Goneral Zapata and his followers really intend to implant the reform demanded for the welfare of the
southern people they have the means to
realizo it, joining their efforts to those
of my government, recognizing my authority, and personally coming to the
conference of leaders I have called for
tho first day of October of the present
year, with the objoct pf discussing here
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS
F* Guaranteed
ffg-g American
We Want You to Know
These Hoie
They stood the test when alt
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pressed In. Thoy are GUARANTEED, for fineness, for style, for
superiority of material and workmanship, absolutely stainless, and
to wear six months without holes
or replaced by new pairs free.
OUR   FREE   OFFER
To every one sending us 50 cents
to cover shipping charges, we will
Bend, subject to duty, absolutely
free:
Three pairs of our famous men's
AMERICAN SILK HOSE wtth
written guarantee, any color, or
Three pairs of our Ladles' Hose
In Black, Tan or White colors,
with written guarantee.
DON'T DELAY—Offer expires
when dealer ln your locality Is selected.   Olve color and size desired.
INTERNATIONAL  H08IERY CO.,
21  Blttner Street
DAYTON, OHIO, U. S. A.
Phone Yonr Printing Order
—, T0	
SEYMOUR 4490
D»yANIfhtC.U.
Phoo.B.T.t-43
Partem * Chapel
23M Granville St
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS mid
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
the great programme df reforms that
this country demands. Thanking you
for the efforts 6n behalf of peace, I remain, yours faithfully' '
'   "V. CABANZA,
"The Provisional President.
"National Palace, City   of   Mexico,
September 7, 1914.
"To Attorney Luis Cabrera anl General I. VillMreal."
■   -    #     . •      *      #
This first failure for a peace agreement in the sonth shows how the Zapata movement Is strongly entrenched and
determined on the plan of Ayala. According to the prevailing opinion in the
south the plan of Ayala is so deeply engraved in the conscience of the farmers
that any change will not be accepted
by the communities. The Zapata followers declare that, in the state of Morelos and other regions dominated by
the troops, the agrarian reforms have
already been implanted, or in other
words, the lands divided up and the
property of many landowners confiscated, and that the only thing necessary
now is to repeat the operation in the
other states. The attitude of the Zapata followers toward the constitutionalists is a complete lack of confidence.
The common people in the southern
states look with suspicion upon Carranza, who has refused to make a frank
declaration of hit political and agrarian
plans and they point out that the commander of the constitutionalists' army
has taken oharge of the executive
power of the nation without the sane*
tion of the south. It will only be a
question of weeks before the army of
Zapata must invado the territory in
control of Carranza, who never will
grant proper terms with reference to
the land question, for the simple reason
that he himself is a big landowner and
the great number of the constitutionalist leaders are proprietors of extensive
tracts of land throughout the republic;
AN INSIGNIA OF MEN
Wage-workers Should Stick to Tbeir
Union.
If ever there was a time when union
men should stick to their union that
time is now. A union man owes his
first obligation to his family. His family owes a great deal to the union, because it cut down the hours of labor
and increased the size of the pay envelop. Only thriough the union can
these conditions be maintained. That
is amply shown at this time, when large
numbers are unemployed, in any quarter where unions thrive. True} the one
limitation of the union is tnat lt cannot
arbitrarily provide jobs. But it does
divide up what jobs there are by reducing the hours and days per week
worked. It also cares for the sick,
buries tbe dead, and in many cases, provides out-of-work funds. A union card
is an insignia of honor and manhood.
It is evidence that the bearers have
collectively agreed and are obligated
by their word of honor to do the right
thing by each other. It means also
that collectively the possessors are in
a large measure responsible for most of
the legislation at present enacted in
the interests of all wage-workers. Conditions may not be What they should be,
but were it not for the unions they
would be a great deal worse. Stick
with your union and play a Man's part.
SOCIALISTS MUST PAY
German "Beds'.' Deliberately Shoved
into Firing Line
An English , labor paper contains an
account from one of its correspondents
which declares' tbat in (he present war
there is a. fixed policy-on the part of
German imperialists to sacrifice socialist soldiers as much as possible. He
states that for this reason Saxon regiments were selected for the bloody attack on Liege, in which it is said the
storming parties were almost annihilated, and that the great majority of
the victims were socialists, Saxony being notoriously a "red" province. He
further declares that a German government official assured him sneeringly
that after the war there would be no
socialists left; that the authorities had
taken care of that.
The Honor of Labor
Two men I honor, and no third.
First, the toil-worn craftsman, thnt
with earth-mude implement, laboriously conquers the earth and makes her
man's. Venerable to me is the han,
hard and coarse; wherein notwithstanding lies a cunning virtue, indecreasibly
royal, as of this planet. Venerable, too,
is the rugged face,- all weather-tanned,
besoiled, with his rude intelligence; for
it is the face of a man living manlike.
Oh, but the more venerable for thy
rudeness, and oven because we must
pity as well as love theel Hardly entreated brother! Fpr us was thy back
so bent, for us were thy straight limbs
and fingers so deformed; thou wert our
conscript on whom the lot fell, and
fighting our battles wert so marred.
For in thee, too, lay a God-created form,
but it was not so unfolded; encrusted
must it stand with 'tho thick adhesions
and defacements of labor, and thy
body, like thy soul, was not to know
freedom. Yet, toil on; thou art in thy
duty, be out of it who may; thou toil-
cst for the altogether indispensable
daily bread. The second man I honor,
and still moro highly, him who is seen
toiling for the spiritually indispensable
—not daily bread, but the bread of life.
Is not he, too, in bis duty, endeavoring
toward inward hnrmony; revealing this,
by act or by word, through all his outward endeavors, be they high or lowf
Highest of all when his outward and his
inward endeavors are ono; when wo
can numo him artist; not earthly
craftsman only, but inspired thinker,
who with hcavon-mnde implement conquers heaven for ub! If the poor and
bumble toil that we have food, must not
the high nnd glorious toil for him in
return thnt he may have light, guidance, freedom, immortnlityf These,
two, in all their degrees, I honor; all
else is chaff and dust, which let the
wind blow whither it liseth.—Thomas
Carlyle.
Capital Reigns Supreme.
Many a victim of the present industrial system, which condemns the many
to a life of,toil.for the benefit of the
few, has found out, in trying to become
a home owner, that the mortgage worked while he slept. Those who have not
made the actual experience will take it
from the trust company which announces that "neither war nor disturbance of business interrupts the earning
power of our guaranteed mortgages."
Truly, capital is all-powerful!
A Competent Judge
"I confess, without shame, that I am
tired and sick of war. Its glory is all
moonshine. Even success the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies,
the anguish and lamentations of distant
families appealing to me for missing sons, husbands and fathers. It is
only those who have not heard a shot,
the shrieks and groans of the wounded
and lacerated that cry aloud for more
blood, more vengeance, more desolation, "f-r-rPpneral 0toa»0.   'V   vh
PRINTERS HELD BIG
MEETING LAST
I
Wrestled With Unemployed
Problem Among The
Membership .
Union Wage and Working
Conditions Being Maintained by Printers
Last Sunday's two-hour session of
the Typographical onion, No. 226, wu
well attended, with all officers present,
save Executive Board Member W. B.
Trotter, absent aa a delegate to the
St. John, N. B., convention of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada.
Considerable routine business was submitted by the eiecutive committee,
which had held a. number of sessions
during the month, including the questions of unemployment among the
membership, the Todd ease, arbitration
agreement, and the newspaper agreement which expires December 31st of
this year.
In connection with unemployment a
number of plans were discussed, but no
final action taken. A special committee, consisting of Messrs, Benson, Wllby and Armstrong, was named by Pretident Pettipiece to report to the executive committee within two weeks, the
latter having been authorised to put
into effect the recommendations of the
special committee. ,.
Chapel reports showed about 25 per
cent the membership working short
time br not at all. ■
J. E. Wilton wae appointed to 411 a
vacancy as delegate to the Trades and
Labor council.
Reports from delegates to the central
labor body afi Allied Printing Trades
council showed that trade conditions
generally were very dull, the building
trades being practically nil. The live
branches of the printing tradea were
holding their own ih the matter of
wages and working conditions but in
others this ,was not the ease clearly
showing .the advantages of a 100 per
cent, organization.
Resolutions sdbmitted by Seattle,
Wash., and Dallas, Texas, unions, condemning the action of the I. T. U. convention at Providence for voting ♦10,-
000 to ex-President James M. Lynch,
were Hied.
Chicago Typographical union. No. 10,
home, of the I. T. U. technical school,
requires every apprentice to take the
course before being obligated aB a_ journeyman. Eventually this rule will no
doubt prevail throughout the entire
jurisdiction of the I. T. U. The fee
charged students is sufficient only to
cover expense of course. The full thirty-seven lessons can be had for $23 if
paid in advance, or $25 by installments,
*2 down and 01 a week until paid. To
those who finish the full course with average diligence and proficiency the,I.
T, TJ. gives a rebate of tt. The scholarship is perpetual and may be taken
continuously or Intermittently. This
course of instruction is doing a great
work in advancing the art of printing
and has been a factor in securing increased wages to a large number of students. Those interested can gain additional information by addressing the I.
Ti U. Commission, 624-832 Sherman
street, Chicago, 111.
What War Means.
"What does all this waste of wealth
and life meant It means ono thing, and
trMns it with a vengeance: that every
mjnn, woman and child In all the war-
rilig nations must toil harder and sweat
more and die sooner that the losses may
be made good and' the interest** on these
wnr debts paid. It means less food and
poorer food, scantier clothing and colder houses, less schooling and a worse
chancej it meanB, for literally millions
ot* men and women and little children,
n decrease of all comforts and even of
the necessities of life, and an increase
of all hardship and suffering and despair, a widening of tho slum and a
darkening of tho grave."'
Mention The B. C. Federatlonist
when purchasing goods. It plctises tho
advertiser and helps tVt paper.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER
Jn the heart of ihe retail diilricL. Absolutely
fireproof and modem in every respect. Cuutne
unexcelled. Europesn plan, $1 to $3 per day,
FREE AUTO TO MEETS ALL TRAINS.  0™,J a»j
operated  bv   The Provincial  Hotels  Company   Limited.
rioWABO | SHfEHAK Pnofaa
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 QEORQIA  STREET
One Block  west of Court House.
Use  of Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral   Parlors  free   to  all
Patrons
rasas Sty. 221 Day sr Niist
Nubd, Thomson &Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
•»d EMBALMERS
520 Ridssrdi Si.       VaacMvcr, 1. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL .DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Oltlco nnd Chanel,
103* Oranvllle St., Phono Sey. 3486.
_ North Vancouver — ORIce and
Chapel, 122—sixth St. Weat, Phone
What Our Customers Say
BUCK
W. L. OAMEEON
Olothing and Aaott
Men's Furnishings
Hope, B. C, Sept. 16th, 1814.
Messrs. Wm. J. McMaster ft Sons, Ltd.
Vancouver, B, C.:
Gentlemen,—-Replying to your enquiry regarding my opinion of you
goods, I am only too pleased to express my appreciation of the quality,
fit and Inlsh of your production.   I am stocking, as   you   know,   yonr
"Mae's Mogul''' Overalls and Crate; alao several lines of your shirt*—
and in comparison with other lines I have been handling during a lout
period, in business I ean say that your lines are superior to anything I
nave seen and I am sailing them day by day with more profit to myself and satisfaction to my customers.   Tou cu use this testimonial aa
you think fit. | -
Vours truly,      a****. « -» —      %rf&i
(Sgd.) W. L. OAMBROlf
Wm. J. McMaster & Sons, Ltd.
1176 Homer Stoat       '
VANCOUVER, B. O.
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Abbotsford  Hotel
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 5860
Fireproof Vancouver, B. 0. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
J. M. McLUCKIE, Proprietor.
First-class drill In conneotlon
Me L. Mills, Proprietor EUROPEAN PLAN       Frederick A. Easliah, Ifanater
I Hot and Cold Water In
Every Room. 150 Rooms
Connected with Baths.
HOTEL EMPRESS
^SToloVr 23SH«tiVSt.E.,VEKH*wr,B.C. SBffiWSSJS
PENDER HOTEL
Him?!   PPHFNT   Ai*"<*>l*u.|v   Fireproof.    Local   ind   Lonjr-Dlelance
UVlfiUJUiUUni   Phone In  Every  Room,Cafe In Connection. Ratea
11.00 per day up.     Attractive Rates to Permanent OuestB. •
Oottlnihun * Butt/, Proprietor. 186 Bastings Stmt Baft
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BT SMOKINO THE OLD *—.rami.m
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU HELP YOUE FELLOW UNION MEN AND BESIDES,
TOU OET THE VEBT BEST VALUE FOB TOUE MONET
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited PAGE FOUR
THE BRIT
400 PAIRS WOMEN'S
BOOTS for Winter Wear;
American Made-Standard
$5.00 Values for
$3.00
Per Pair
With 10,000 women in this city needing a pair of good boots for
.vinter wear, and each one anxious to make their money go as far as
possible we expect these boots of excellence and standard $5.00 value, to
be sold in quick time They are excellent style, made by one of the most
renowned factories in America, and come in gunmetal calf in button
style with oravenette cloth top and Spanish, Cnban and American heels,
with neat short vamp and plain toes. Widths from B to E, and sises
from 2*4 to 8.   Standard (5.00 values for     S3 00
t      .. _______   ___      *mKT* amtmttat. tnta* cihhimism**, i_Vj^^J
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
'We cany a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEY'S PLANES, LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHON! SEYMOUR IM
46  HASTINGS  ST.  EAST
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE.
Capital  -...»1!,000,000        Rut 111,100,000
Main Office: Comer Hastings and Oranvlll. Street* Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
BASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Haatini. and Cambie Street..
■AST END Cor. Pender and Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
ZUBZBEB—xtss: 0or- Bixtn Avenue and Oranvllle Street.
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street.
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Street.
POWELL STREET - Cor, Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL _ Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road,
Alia North Vanoouver Branoh, cor.   Lonadala • Ave.  and   Eaplanada.
J. L.ECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work'shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
I Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. C.
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter wbat Its name, unless It bears a
plain and readable Impression or thla stamp.
All ahoea without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Btreet, Boston, Mass.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treae.
Keep the Children Healthy
by etndlnff them out ln the fresh air these flne days. There's nothing better Cor keeping them ezerelsed than wheeled goods.
Our Stock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, Is easily the finest and most comprehensive In the
elty and the prices are tight.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
t» HASTINOS STREET WEST VANCOUVER, B.O.
BEST IN THE WEST ESTABLISHED IM
MET LAST
Council Decides to Go into
Municipal Politics
Next Elections
Proposed Cut of City Laborers' Wages Will Be
Opposed.
When the Tradea and Labor council
convened laat night with President McVety in the chair, there waa a fair attendance of delegatea present, which
number was augmented by ten new
delegates from various unions. The
bartenders, along with the cooks and
waiters, again called the attention of
union men to the heed of patronizing
union hotels and restaurants. The annual meeting of the B. C. Federationist)
limited, will be held on October 9th,
when the council will be represented by
the executive board.
M. B. J. Beid, immigration agent notified the council that the order-in-coun-
eil preventing workmen from entering
British Columbia from foreign places
had been extended to March 1, 1915.
Delegate Briabane waB appointed to
represent the council on the new Women'a Unemployment association.
The parliamentary committee came
in with a recommendation whioh may
have the effect of changing the policy
which the council has adopted for some
years toward the question of direct representation on the city council. The
recommendation, which is as follows,
was unanimously adopted: "That the
committee recommend to the central
body the appointment of additional
delegates to the parliamentary committee, to be representative of the various wards, for the purpose of preparing to take part in tne next civic election. " It is likely that unions not affiliated with the council will be invited
to send representatives to this enlarged
committee.
Delegate Gutteridge reported re the
women 'a unemployment' committee.
They had collected $900 in cash with
the promise of $500 extra if they succeed in raising (1,000 by next Monday.
Meal tickets to the value of $275 had
also been received and were badly
needed for urgent case*.
President McVety left the chair to
report on hia work on the civic relief
oommlttee; alao that the efforts to secure the release of J, Angelo, in which
the council has taken an influential
part, had been successful, and he waa
released yesterday on the understanding that he returns to the United
States. He stated that H. H. Stevens,
M. P., had worked hard to secure the
release of Angelo, The Tradea and Labor council now had direct representation on the civic relief committee.
The committee to deal with a proposed reduction in wages of city laborers will oppose the proposal at the special meeting of the board of works
next Monday and also at the city council meeting in the evening.
The musicians announced that a union dance with eight-piece orchestra
was now being held every Wednesday
evening in Pender hall from 8:30 p. m.
to 12 o'clock midnight.
Cigarmakers reported great slackness
Laborers complained that unemployed
tradesmen were taking their places on
city work, through their Influence as
ratepayers.
The question of sending a delegate
to the convention of the American Federation of Labor was reconsidered and
referred to the executive board for recommendation to next meeting of the
council.
WORK OF CITY
INIGHT SCHOOLS
(Continued from page 1)
cal training, opportunity is provided in
another class for receiving instruction
in practical mathematics. This latter
course is designed for the, benefit of
of engineering and building construction and is purposely drafted to exclude all that is not absolutely necessary for practical work. It is not an
academic course.
In addition to the courses outlined
above there are technical courses' in
sheetraetal work, in building construction and in quantity surveying. Instruction in architectural drawing and
in architecture is also provided.
The engineering courses are similarly
designed to benefit students from a city
like Vancouver, that ia, they are not
fixed on a hard and fast basis into
which the student must fit himself.
The instructors recognize that the population is to a large extent fluctuating,
and therefore care is taken to aee that
every student gets as much advantage
out of the course as is possible. Ultimately, of course, the instruction will
be organized into definitely graded
courses, but that is impossible at the
present time.
The engineering courses consist of a
preliminary mathematics course already
referred to, two years training in mechanical and steam engineering, two
years in machine construction and
drawing, and finally a two years course
in electrical engineering. For this latter
course a lecture room and a laboratory ■
have been fitted up at a considerable
expense and an equipment costing some
six or seven thousand dollars Installed.
The course will be thoroughly practical
nnd a man who has passed the examination at the end of the second year
course will have reason to be proud of
hia diploma.
Scope of Instruction
It is obvious from the foregoing that
the instruction provided is as nearly
as possible suited to the needs of a
floating population in a new country.
It is hoped, however, tna* as industries
arise which will give a more permanent-
nature to the population, special facilities for studying the trades and occupations concerned will be afforded.
In the direction of the asthetics and
art the technical school in Vancouver
must do the work of an art school as
well, and a full course consisting of
elementary drawing and painting, advanced drawing and painting from the
antique and from life, and a course in
decorative design have already been established. Nor is commerce neglected.
The coiflpprofai c<mrw fwfode* all that

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