BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Jan 15, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0344995.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0344995.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0344995-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0344995-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0344995-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0344995-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0344995-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0344995-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0344995-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0344995.ris

Full Text

Array MBBM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
"CNDU8TBIAL TO&3,: STBENOTH. -<^^ 01MCIAL PAPEB : VANCOUVEB TBADE8 AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOB .-^fc POLITICAL UNITY: VI0TOBYI
VANCOUVER, B. C. FBIDAY, JANUARY 15,1915
Brilliant Semite Whom Bismarck Tried Hard to
Organize.
[German Workers Have Not
Yet Learned Lessons
He Taught
[By'L. N. B.]
Fifty yeara ago, one of tbo most wonderful men of Germany, ,'a country
whieh hus produced many wonderful
men, fell before the pistol, bullet of a
Prussian boor, whose intellect waa that
of a dwarf compared to the mental
giant he 'had slain. But the world
Knew, and, beat of all, the German proletariat knew, that Ferdinand Lansalle
was dead.
He was not wise in the love of wo-
iiuen. And he came to hia death thereby. But otherwise the wisdom of the
ages waa enshrined in that light, compact body and magnificent brain. It
was no empty boast of his, before the
judges who tried him, for stirring up
the people, that for every statement he
made he wus armed with all the science
of the times. It waa not for nothing
that the stern, iron Chancellor Bismarck dubbed him the '' wonderchild''
of the age and sought by every means
known to the wily diplomatist to pervert hia activity in the cause of the
working class to despotic uses.
He was a young man at the time of
his death, and had not yet reached 40
years. But into the ten or fifteen
yeara of hia activity as a pioneer agitator he compressed more work than
any other man haa performed in twice
or three timea that period. Hia life
work, though short, waB tremendously
effective, and the German workingmen
have every reason to remember the
powerful, brilliant expositor of their
cause, Ferdinand Lasselle.
For he was among the very first to
(perceive and herald fofth the fact that
the despised proletariat of Germany
and the world, the wage slaves whose
backs, aa he said, were the green tables
on which the capitalist class gambled
tor their* stakes, tho workingmen who
were looked upon as a mere commodity, that they were after all destined
to become the one great power in the
world, the future masters and conserves of society and the controllers of its
destinies.   Constantly he insisted upon
Ei aa their duty to so prepare and edu-
ate themselves that .their class might
assume the dignity of ruling class in a
Eorld   of   masters   and   slaves.   He
rought to the   German   workingmen,
ind through them to the workingmen
it the world, the knowledge that frees
-the knowledge that is power.
It is fifty years since and Lassalle has
fceen lying in his lonely grave in Bres-
uu churchyard all that time. The sword
pe gave, the German proletariat have
Tnot yet learned to wield effectively and
Decisively, but they are, like all other
workmen, constantly learning,
J But in the meantime another sword
ways over Germany, the sword of des-
lotism, autocracy, imperialism, capital-
im, and it will search that land from
,nd to end and purge it as with fire,
egardless aa to what side of the brutal
itruggle victory may incline.   But the
iword of the Masters of the Bread Ib,
tfter all, base metal, and will fly to
ihivers in the last titanic combat that
is waged.
The sword Ferdinand Lassalle gave'
(the working claas of Germany and the
world is the truest steel, tempered in'
the fires of knowledge and experience.
And when at last thoae to whom he bequeathed it shall have, learned to wield
it effectively, the vision of Lassalle
shall have -been fulfilled to the uttermost.
Fifty years have passed, and that
time is not yet. But it is rapidly near-
ing now with every day that passes.
Fifty years from now the sword that
the dead man gave will have dono its
lestined work and will be sheathed for-
sver in a world where all menaces to
freedom have been destroyed.
It is with some sorrow perhaps that
at this time we recall the semi-century
of Ferdinand Lassalle, But when the
full century has passed, the next celebration will bo a joyful one.
A. W. Wright in Dallas, Texas.
Delegates to Vancouver Trades and
■Labor council four years ago, will re-
Imemlier A. W. Wright of the outside
■electrical workers as one of the most
Tictive members. A copy of the the
■Toiler, the official paper of the Dallas,
[Texan, Trades and Labor e unci], just
l.o hand, contains Brother Wright's
photograph as the newly-elected vice-
president of the council, from which it
pi evident he is still in the firing line,
COALIThe Renaissance
MR GET AN
Carpenters Want Building
Trades Organized on
Industrial Basis.
Railwaymen and Laborers
Are Busy Building
Composite Union.
SYDNEY. N. 8. W., Dee. 26.—The
bosses of the coal mines that moved to
have tho Miners' Federation fined for
aiding tho miners on strike over the afternoon shift, are finding out that the
■"iners can use the law just aa well ai
they can. Last week the miners got an
injunction to stop the Mine Employers'
Federation from, proceeding further
with the prosecution against the miners, also to stop the fines being paid,
pending a further enquiry into the matter. * '
I don't know what the miners have
up their sleeves, but by all accounts
they have a trump card to play. At any
rate they have got an injunction, putting off all action against them until
next March, 1915. By that time the afternoon shift will, I hope, be a thing of
the past, and the miners will have won
their ease, and the owners will have, in
a word, "missed the 'bus."
Carpenters Want Industrialism.
A big movement has been started by
the Progressive Carpenters' union in N.
S. Wales to form a Building Trades union. It ia intended to approach other
unions concerned with regard to organizing branches throughout the country
districts. In centres where there are
not enough men to form branches of the
respective unions it is intended to embrace them all under the new body, yet
still have them governed by the-awards
under which they work at present. The
matter of finances has not been fully
discussed, but the movement is being
taken up by the unions with alacrity,.
Railwaymen and Laborers.
The Bailway Workers and General
Laborers!*' Association has been registered under tho Commonwealth Arbitration act. Arrangements are now being made, to link up the various states
and organizers are leaving for Queensland, Victoria, and Tasmania to this
week end. This promises to be a very
formidable union in the near future.
$12,600 Fine Never Will Be Paid."
The secretary of the Labor Federation of Australasia tells me that the
strike with the miners at Newcastle
and Maitland over the afternoon shift
still continues. Both sides are determined to aee the thing out, but fortunately for tbe men, time ia on their
side for every day that passes now
proves that there is no necessity for the
afternoon shift. I think victory is now
within sight.
The miners are quito independent of
tbe five rebel collieries, and what iB
more, the collerles which have acceded
to theh miners' reasonable requests to
abolish the aftornoon shift are working full time, and getting all the orders,
while those who have not fallen in with
the men have lost their contracts and
have not turned a wheel for over 26
weeks.
The very fact that public supplies are
being kept up without the working of
the afternoon shift proves conclusively
that it can be abolished. It is doomed
now, and the efforts of the proprietors
to crush the men by force of law has
miserably failed. The huge flne has
never been paid, and will never be paid,
and the bosses know it. They know
also that they cannot gaol 13,000 miners.
UNION LABOB BAKERY.
Bi-monthly Par-day Adopted,
When Attorney-general Bowser visit
id tho Crow's Nest district recently,
he miners in the employ of the Crow's
•Jest Pass Coal company requested him
o cause bi-monthly pay-days to be-
ome law, in order to do away with the
nonthly pay-day which waa in vogue
ireviously. The company has since then
nnounccd voluntarily it intention to
dopt the bi-monthly system.
B. H. GALE.   ,
Biployer of Union Labor-—Candidate
for Alderman in Ward Six    «
Union Bakers of Galveston, Texas, Start
Business.
A stock company, capitalized at $7,-
600 haB been organized at GalveBton,
Texas, by the various labor bodies for
the purpose of operating a union bakery. The establishment will be under
the control of a union labor directorate.
Tbere haB been a strike on at the Ialand City, for some time, and as somo
of the best bread makers in the city are
members of the local of that trade, the
bosses who have refused to pay fair
wages will soon be confronted with
an establishment backed by organized
labor and turning out a high class product.
CcSTSg)    $1-60 PER YEAR
Of Nationalism
The war has proved one thing, among many others, of the utmost importance from the standpoint of
the future of the working class, and that Is, that Nationalism Is not dead. On the contrary lt seems to he
more alive than ever, for the war has served to more
sharply define the varloua nations Involved, and to
sweep away at one stroke that appearance of worldwide working class fusion which the blindness of enthusiasts led them to mistake for genuine lnternation-
It is just another of the pleasing spells woven in
piping times of peace, to he broken at the flrst blast
of the breath of the gods of war. Think of the imposing international congresses, and conventions of the
workers, which have been held ln Europe this laat
twenty years. Think of ihe eloquent speeches, the
lofty sentiments of universal brotherhood and working class goodwill, and the diiay altitudes of verbal altruism reached at those gatherings of the fervent
faithful. Labor, the slumbering giant of the ages,
had awakened from his sleep at last, and though the
rumble oi the chariots of Mars was wafted ever aad
I anon to his ears on the shifting winds of International
diplomacy, woe be unto those kings, princes, and rulers
of the people, who would dare to match their ancient
trickery against him ln the day of 'his new-born
strength and wisdom.
National boundaries'* Pooh! They were "imaginary lines"—that was the favorite term—artificial divisions cunningly contrived by princely knavts, but happily bridged by the enlightened minds of the workers,
who would thereby be saved from the disasters which
had paved history with the slain bodies of their forbears. But lt was all a mirage of the mind, conjured
ln the brains of a mere handful of Idealists too exclusively occupied ln thinking about the final excellence of
a new social order, to bother about the material out of
which lt had to be built. Little wonder that with their
eyes in the clouds they found themselves suddenly ln
few notions of any practical value aa to how they are go-
notions of any practical value as to how they are going to get out again. It Is the twentieth century dilemma of Demos.
They thought the workers wanted to be citisens of .
the world, when really they ware as proud as peacocks
to be the natives of Pttddleton-on-Slush, The ancient
lure of the parish pump Is too firmly established as an
Institution, for lt be disturbed by the heresy of those
who dare proclaim that the village boundary does not
mark the edge of the earth. The bump, when lt came,
was most disconcerting. Any really decent Idol would
have mentioned the little matter of Its feet long beforehand. But in this case lt didn't, and clay Is not
the sort of thing a person would be likely to think of,
who was preoccupied with the speculation as to whether the world contained enough blacksmiths to beat all
the swords Into ploughshares. All of which combination of circumstances has confronted the sane student
-of the working class with the fact that the workers
are national first and workers after. There never need
have been any impression otherwise, if common sense
and critical sight had been used, in place of the irresponsible and soaring sentimentality which fondly imagined itself to be the expression of the real attitude
of the working class—as a class—towards the Idea of
internationalism.
We know now that the workers as a class had no
attitude definitely, either one way or the other on the
matter. Down at bottom British were British, and
French were French, Germans were German, Russians
were Russian, and so on.  And after all, looking at lt
plainly, and with the honest desire to get at the truth,
and recognise it as such whether it be pleasant or unpleasant, is there anything really surprising, or unnatural, or Illogical about this nationalism of the
.working class? Is lt not a clear case of determinism—
the logical result of heredity and environment. Fray
what Is there ln the lives of the mass of the working
people of Europe to make them realise the International idea? What percentage of them ever leave the
country they are born in—either bodily or mentally—
or need any other language than that they learned aa
children? From youth up their Uvea are narrow and
circumscribed by the necessity of working dally for the
bare needs of their physical existence,
They have neither money nor leisure to go abroad
and see their kind in other lands. Their surroundings
are not conducive to the development of that imagination which might, ln a measure, take the place of
foreign travel. It is true that for a cent they can read
every morning about what Is going on In the world,,
from the froien fringe of the Arctic Circle to the
burning sands of Arabia. But for lack of personal knowledge and experience of the things they read about,
it all seems Uke a story book, To realise the existence of those things, and to become cosmopolitan and
international In Its outlook on life, it Is necessary that
the working class should actually mix with its kind
of other countries, but lt has no chance to do so. Then
when a test Is put upon it, such as this war has imposed, the fatal weakness of lta position is made apparent. It is but natural that men should have a sentimental regard for the place around which their earliest recollections are centered, and if after-life does
not bring experience of other lands and peoples, lt Is
not to be wondered that the mass of men remain national.
Mere theorising never yet has taught them anything which altered their attitude towards the iniquities of their economic condition. It has always
been practical experience which has moved them to action, and from empirics alone have they ever learned
anything of abiding good to them. And therein lies
the big test of this war. Will the misery and suffering be a lesson practical'and real enough to break
down the nationalism which haa divided the working
class against Itself? Or, will bitterness and desire for
revenge on the part of that element of the ruling class
which is beaten, lead the workers back again Into an
acute nationalism, which will prevent that real International working class understanding ln which alone
lies hope of peace?
If lt is left to the militarists aad diplomats of all
the nations now at war—and who are the real culprits
—then lt means back into the darkness again, and another such war as soon aa the ravages of this one are
repaired. All their talk ta the contrary, Is just so much
callous cajolery to keep the people ln a frame of mind
where they can be controlled. At the back of their
minds is Bullae's epigram that "collectively men have,
no memory"—and they hope lt la true. No hope of
an honest effort to establish permanent peace can be
placed in them.
That work, if lt is ever doms will have to be done
by the working class. The workers are the teeth and
claws with which the ruling class of oae nation fights
the ruling class of another nation. And if war is ever
to cease, the workers have got to make up their
minds that they will not kill each other just because
their common task-masters tell them lt Is the right
thing to do. And from the way things are looking,
that will not be for quite a while yet. 3. W. W.
LABOR DEMANDS PRESENTED
Congress Delegation Interviews Federal
Oovernment
An amendment to the Industrial
Disputes act, old ago pensions, pensions
for mothers, greater safeguard for men
employed ln transportation work and
other important concessions were among the things demanded by the Trades
and Lnbor congress of Canada delegation which interviewed Frontier Borden yesterday. Theso are chiefly formulated from resolutions passed at tho
convention which laat year' was held at
St. John, N. B., and in theh pre'sent in-
St. John, N. B., and in the present in-
portant and far-reaching than ever before. The unemployed problem will be
dealt with and a scheme projected for
its solution.
Reglna Labor Temple Open.
Bcginn Labor Templo was onened
Monday evening, January 4th. The
number which visited the building during tho courso of the evoning was nt
least four hundred and the number who
remained taxed tho floor spaco to the
limit.
The building has been largely erected
by members of tho building trades who
are out of work, nnd who havo exchanged (their labor for shares in the
building.'
O. J. Mengel for South Vancouver.
Mr. 0. J. Mengel, candidate for ward
seven, South Vnncouvor, is holding a
mooting to-day, tho 13th of January, at
Gordon high school, corner Ferris road
and Knight road. Thoro will also be
present sovoral candidates for the
roeveshlp, also othor candidates.
OTTAWA UNEMPLOYED.
Presldeut 3.0. Watters Heads Big Delegation to City Hall.
A large deputation; comprised of re-
presentatives of all the religious denominations in the city and headed by
Mr. J. G. Watters, president of the
Trades and Labor congress of Oanada,
appeared before the Ottawa civic authorities last week, and presented a resolution calling for municipal measures
to be taken to relieve the unemployed.
The resolution said that there were
about 4,000 unemployed in the city and
that the authorities would be well advised in addition to municipal works
already started to make provisions for
the execution of further street and sewer extension and tho quarrying and
crushing of stone for use on the
streets throughout the coming year, the
operation of a municipal wood yard or
any other productive kinds of employment which might be devised.
It Was further suggested that the
city maintain its present minimum
wages, but that tho hours of labor
might bo reduced without the expenditure of any large aum of money,
Finully, the resolution stated that
ns tho city has buildings, beds and
bedding of its own, theso might bo
used to good advantage in establishing a municipal shelter for unmarried unemployed, the city also to
furnish heat, water and supervision.
G.
GILBERT
KEITH
OHESTEETON.
What Borne Soldiers Think.
What some soldiers think of the war
is shown in an exceedingly interesting
letter from a member of the post office
signnl service with the British expeditionary force, printed in a recent number of the Buskin Collegian. He has
had many talks with the soldiers, he
says, and he has been surprised at the
number who regard -with something approaching horror the fact that they are
required to resort to the methods of
warfare to aettle differences on which
administrators cannot agree. Certain of
the aoldiera are quite awestruck at the
notion that they have to kill, or be
killed by, other men with whom thoy
havo no quarrel whatever, but probably groat sympathy. The soldiers, unlike diplomats, realize tho awful realities of the position, and no wonder thoy
begin to feel that the ways of diplomacy are stupid and barbarous.
Would Reduce Wages.
More than 14,000 employees of tho
0. T. P. and thousands of other men
employed by the G. T. P. have refused
to accept reductions in pay, and have
notified officials of tho two companies
that thoy will oppose any attempt to
cut wages. .   •
A proposed reduction on tho G. T. B.
iB to date'from April 1st next, on the
G. T. P. effectivo January 1st. Both
aro necessitated, it is claimed^ bocnuso
of decreased business sinco the beginning of tho European war.
K. CHESTEBTON ia reported
to be sick almost unto death.
If bo, the world is in danger of
losing an author it can ill-afford to.
Like most writers whose books Bhould
be widely read by
working men, he is
practically unknown
to the vast majority
of them. Even
among that section of reading public which follows hia work, it is doubtful if more
than half grasp even a hint of hia real
meaning—much less a full realization
of it. With them, Chesterton is
vogue, or cult, more than anything
else—just the same as Shaw is with
the same people. He ticklts their risibility without carrying conviction to
their intelligence—for the very sufficient reaaon that their mental equipment could not perceive or accommodate with comfort the truth as told in
Chesterton's wny. Like most men who
have some very serious things to say,
he realizes that if he were to say them
in a serious way, England would not
listen to him. Ho knows that the
truth, if presented the right side up,
would not be rocognized there. So he
stands it on its head first, with the
result that quite a lot of peoplo take
notice, quite a few grasp Mb meaning,
and he himself gets a reputation for
being the cleverest paradoxist in contemporary English literature. He has
mastered the art of calling the British
a nation of fumbling humbugs, and making them pay him for doing so. While
they laugh he pricks them in their most
sensitive spots, and they don't notice
it until later. At 41 years of age, he
is in the prime of hia uaofulness, and at
a time like the present, particularly, it
would bo nothing short of a tragedy if
his trenchant pen were silenced. Liars
aro too* thick on tho ground of British
journalism for him to be spared. In
the immediate future, thero will bo
work to be done which only he and1 a
small minority of clever writers who
do not appraise thoir ability higher
than their honesty, will be willing
to do.
Elections ln District 18.
Elections of officers in District 18,
United Mine Workera of America, have
resulted aB follows: President, W. L.
Phillips; vice-president, W. Graham;
seerctary-trcnsurer, A. J. Carter; international board member, D. Roes.
HOSE AMALGAMATION.
Garment Workers Join with Journeymen Tailors.
The process of amalgamating unions
of kindred trades has made another
stop forward. At a special convention
of the United Garment Workers of
America held in New York last week,
that organization decided to amalgamate with the Journeymen Tailors, The
keynote of the convention was closer
craft alliance and industrial unionism,
The Canadian delegate to tho gathering said that the standard of living in
Canada among the garment workers was,
lower than it is in New York. Tho
convention decided to initiate a campaign of organizatipn among the workers in the clothing trades in Canada.
The result of this meeting is expoct-
ed to bring into the new organization
the Industrial Tailors union which is
composed of a militant body of tailors
who recently seceded from.the Journeymen Tailors. If such an end can be
achieved it will terminate the discord
which has prevailed among the clothing
trndes unions for some time past, and
givo them a more poworful organization than they have ever hod boforo.
Shoe on the Other Foot Now.
Editor B. C. ederationist; How long
will tho conservative store-keepers keep
up voting his old party ticket! His
stock of gooda is going down, has less
cash in his pocket, has to pay moro for
the goods he buys, has to bo mora
prompt with the payment of his bills,
and the purchasing power of his patrons is gradually becoming less. Ninety per cont. of tho merchants in B. 0.
to-day are not making enough to pay
expenses. As long as it was tho worker
who was getting it in tho neck tho
merchant did not care. But now that
"business" has coased, because the
laboreror is not working and has no
money to buy anything with, tbo merchant is discovering thut thore is something wrong somewhere. When a few
men can mnke paupers of the mnssos in
a province so rich with natural wonlth
as B. C, it must be conceded they aro
artists in their line. But their days nro
numbered. An empty pocket is a good
oyo-openor, FRED. LARSON.
Union Bay, B. C, B. C, Dec. 29, 1914.
May Ask Government Help,
Cnlgary, Medicine Hot, and Edmonton, are sending a deputation consisting in each case of the mayor nnd a
labor man, to a meeting to bo held in
Calgary on January 14th to discuss
sending a deputation to Ottawa to demand federal government assistance in
dealing with tho unemployed difficulty
in the chief cities nf Alberta*
I COMPENSATION VICTORIA TRADES
ACT OF SOUTH     AND LABOR
AUSMIA
Prindpta Provisions of the
Act Are Here Summarized.
Readers  Should  Compare
Bowser's New Act
with These.
[In view of the prominence which
wlU he given to the subject of workmen's compensation In British Columbia, during .the next year, by reason of
the new act promised hy Attorney-General Bowser, The Federationist is publishing summaries of compensation acts
of various states ud countries which
are supposed to have had considerable
experience of legislation of this kind.
The various acts of Australia and Tasmania will he. summarised, and appear
weekly. Following Is a summary of the
Workmen's Compensation act of South
Australia.] •
The South Australia Aot.
The Workmen's^ Compensation act,
1911, in its definition of employers includes any body of persons, corporate
or unincorporate.
Nature of work to which the act applies.—Manual only.
Workers expressly excluded.—Persons earning over £5 per week, outworkers, members of employers' family, seamen whose injury occurs outside jurisdiction, agricultural, horticultural, viti-
cultural, dairying or pastoral workers
where machinery is not used, Clerks, dev-
meatic servants.
Employer not liable to pay compensation.—For first week of injury if disabled for less than two weeks.
In the event of Insolvency, maximum
amount of compensation admitted as
first charge on assets per individual.—
£150.
Compensation in case of death.—If
dependents left—three years' earnings
or £200, whichever is larger. Maximum £300. If no dependents, maximum amount for medical attendance
and funeral expenses—£20.
Compensation in case of incapacity.—
Weekly payment—half average weekly
earninga, maximum £1. Maximum total
liability £300.
Compensation to workers over 60
years of age who have ..entered into
agreements.—Death (where thero are
dependents), minimum £50, Incapacity]
—minimum weekly payment 5s. Maximum total liability £50.
Compensation for infirm workors who
have entered into an agreement.—On
death, minimum payment £50. Inca
pacity—minimum weekly payment 5s.
Maximum total liability £50.
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s, per
week, — Weekly payments — average
weekly earnings; maximum 10s.
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly- payment.—Six
months.
Tribunal if claim not settled by
agreement.—Arbitrator. If arbitrator
not agreed on within one month, special
magistrate. ,
Regulation for injured worker leaving the state.—If permanent incapacity
likely, quarterly substituted for weekly
payments.
TYPOS. CHOOSE OFFI0EB8.
New Westminster Elections Oo by Acclamation.
At a meeting of the New Weatminster Typographical union, local No. 632,
in the Labor Temple, Sunday, December
27th, the following officers for the ensuing year were nominated, and at
there is no contest, will be elected by
acclamation at the next meeting:
President, W. E. Maiden; viee-presi
dent, H. S. Walsh; secretary-treasurer,
"~   '   Stoney;   sergeant-at-arms, B. A.
R. A. .,  _,	
Brown; executive, W. Burnett and P.
S. Smith; Trades and Labor council
delegates, B. A. Stoney, W. E. Maiden,
W. Burnett and H. S. Walsh j label
committee, G. S. Vickers, L. Netherby,
W. T. Jackman (Chilliwack), 0. P.
Schmidt (Mission City), B. Whitting-
ton (Coquitlam); delegate to the
Northwestern Typographical Conference, B. A. Stoney; correspondent to
Typographical Journal, W. E. Maidon,
auditors, J. J. Randolph, L. Netherby,
and G. S. Vickers.
After tho war is over, after tho
slaughter is done, nfter the people are
ruined, after tho vict'ry's won, labor
will go on drudging, wondering what it
wns for.—Toronto Lnnco.
Oreenwood Tunnel Strike,
Among metalliferous miners and others familiar with tho mining camps of
the Boundary country, the famous tunnel at Greenwood, B. C, has become a
landmark. Old mining mon havo always held that soaper or Inter gold
bearing oro would bo struck, nnd according to advices just received that
came true last week.
Tho tunnel is known as tho Argo tunnel, and starts within the city limits
and has boon driven 1,200 feet. Tlie vein
wns struck nt a depth of 900 feet. The
lend is snid to be nt least oight feet
wide and to assay #40 in gold. Mining
men from Greenwood and tho camps
surrounding Greenwood hnve inspected
the vein and pronounco it tho biggest
lead of gold oro they havo seen in tho
country.
The mouth of tho tunnel is about .100
feet from tho Cnnadinh Pacific railway
track nnd about 000 feet from the
smelter. Arrangements nro now being
made to continue development on a
larger scale, with compressor and mn-;
chino drills, all tho work up to tho|
present having boen dono by hand
drills.
Much   Business   Done at
First Meeting of the
*;       New Year.
Delegates Wells and Day
Elected to Attend
Federation.
The regular meeting of the above
was held on January 6th, Credentials
were received from the Longshoremen,
U. B. of Carpenters, Bartenders' local.
Delegates were duly'seated.
Reports of Committees.
Delegate Day reported on the meet-' .
ing called by the mayor on the unemployment question. He stated Delegates
Wells and Day attended and found a
large number of delegates from various organizations. The meeting eventually resolved itself into forming *
committee of one. from each organise-
tidn, but the question arose as to what
would be considered' an organization.
Delegate Wells stated that if the religious organizations had their way and
sent one from eaeh denomination, then
every separate union would have to do
the same, as they only wished to send
one, then the other bodies must send
one. Tbe point was ruled in order, and
Delegate Wells waa appointed delegate.
Delegate Day to be substituted in ease
of hia failure to attend. Financial re*
port accepted.
Reports of Unions.  ■"
Barbers' delegate reported that their
local's intention was to join the B. C.
Federation and send delegates to Nanaimo.
Street Bailway delegates reported
that a number of cara were being laid
up, and some men Would be qut of employment. The council was pleased
that their men would be found work,
arrangements being made to distribute
the work. The men having arranged
to lay off certain days and let the other
men make time.
Trade waa generally reported bad
With few exceptiona.
Convention Delegates Chosen.
The call for the convention of the B.
C. Federation of Labor was next taken
up. The following names were submitted: Delegates Wells, Day, Becker, and
Papt. The ballot waa spread and nfter counting was found to be Delegatea.
Wells and Day were eleoted; Delegates
Bccket and Papt, alternates.
.. Loiig»hm-«mcn V -••4rt«j-ctes - Stated
they would Uke to take rooms at Labor Hall.   The offer waa accepted.
Cook* Walters and Waitresses.
Tbe weekly meeting of Cooks, Waiters and Waitresses local union. No. 88,
took place in room No. 206, Labcir Temple, Friday evening, January 8th. A
fairly good attendance of members being present despite the inclement
weather. Outside of routine matters
the session was taken up principally
with several important Items which
were dealt with under the report of the
executive board. Brother Barton was
elected by acclamation a delegate to
the Trades and Labor council, vice K.
H. Howurd, resigned. Trade conditions in our line continue very quiet
with little or no prospect of any immediate improvement. In this connection I wish to advise union men that
the Creamery cafe, corner of Main and
Cordova streets, has signed our agree*
ment, displays our union card and U
worthy tbo support of organized labor.
JOHN CUMMINO,
Vice-president.
Increase of Workless Women.
Official figures just issued in London,
England, shew great increase of unemployed women as the result of the war.
In London alone 10,406 registered
with the central body in the last four
months as needing employment. In the
same period last yoar only 586 were registered. Among dressmaker, milliners, laundresses and charwomen distress is keenest.
For the rolief of unemployed workwomen 22 rooms have been opened In
as many London boroughs, and they aro
under the control of the central unemployed body It is estimated that the
cost of running them will bo $500,000
a year.
John M. O'Neill Moves.
John M, O'Neill who ably editod the
Miners' Magazine for many years, is
now editor of the Trinidad, Colorado,
Free Press.
The Miners' Magazine was tho official organ of the Western Federation
of Miners, being owned and controlled
by that progressive lnbor union.
Danbury Hatters' Case Lost.
Tho notorious Danbury ImfterH' ease
which has been before the United
States courts for years, was decided
against tho hnttors in the federal supremo court last week, nnd unless n mir-
nolo happens they will have to pay damages amounting to $252,180.1)0.* The
bank accounts and homes of ninny nf
the men nro already tinder attachment
to pay tho judgment, nnd it iH expected
that the next step will be foreclosure.
BBOOKROUSE
Candidate for School Trustee in Burnaby Municipality.
A lifelong trade unionist; membor
of Vancouver Typographical union;
former president of Allied Printing
Trades council; ex-delegate to Trades
and Labor council; ex-mombcr of Typographical union oxecutive. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAY....;....JANUARY IIS,
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital  and  Reserve,    •    88,800,000
SS Branches In Canada
A  general  banking  business  transacted
Savings Department
Interest  allowed at  highest
Current Bate
EAST END BRANCH
150 HaBtings Street East
A. W. Jarvia. Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1111
Paid-up Capital - - • I 11,100,00
RtMrvt      12,600,000
Total Aaaata 100,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ona Dollar will opal)
tha account, and your
bualneaa will ba wai-
oomo bo It largo or
amall
r
FOURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER,
THE
INCORPORATED
1SSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Dtpoiltf..
...IM.OOO.OOO
..141,000,000
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Birlngi Account In th. name, ot
two or mon Individual, frequently
puieaiu element, of. comlder.bl.
convenience, la U tecount of thli
nature fundi may bo deposited or
withdrawn at will hy either party
to tho aeeonnt, on hla or her Individual aignaturt. lntereat la aided-to
balances  half-yearly.
MS HASTINOS BTREET WEBT
and
Oornor Haitlngi ud Oarrall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportnnltiea is Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stook and
Poultry. Britlah Columbia
Grants Pra-emptlona of 160 aerei
to Actual Settlera—
Free
TERMS—Residence on tho land
for at leaat three yeara; Improvement! to tho extent of ti per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at leut Ave anei.
For further Information apply to
DEPUTY MIKIBTEB OF
LANDS, VIOTOBIA, B.O.
BEOBETABT, BUREAU OF
PBOVINOIAL UOrOBMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
mm
[j
I FUNERAL DIRECTORS
I      ,       aal EMBALMERS
|  USRkfcarfcSt.   .   Vaacaarer, I. C
PhaaaSay. 221 OajorNiflit
Nm,ThmmtCltK
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlihed every  Friday morning by the
B. C. Federationlit, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Directors:   Jas.    Campbell,    president;    J.
H. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Gibb; 0. J, Kelly; It. P. Pettlpleoe
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription:'$1.60 per year; in Vancouver
City, {2.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, $1.00
"""""" "^^RE^RESENTATvST^^^^^
New Westminster..  . W. B. Maiden, Box 034
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 581
Victoria A. S. Wells, Box 1538
Affiliated with the Western Labor Press
Association.
"Unity of Labor; Ihe hope of the world.1
FRIDAY JANUARY 16, 1915
AMENITIES
OF THE
JUDICIARY
ATTORNEY-GENERAL BOWSER
and Chief Justice Hunter have
recontly furnished a most edifying spectacle. The latter, while presiding in the Supreme Court in Vancouver two or throe
weeks ago was reported to have made
a statement to the
effect that the administration of justice in British Columbia was tainted at
its fountain head—meaning thereby Attorney-general Bowser. Thereupon Mr.
Bowser retaliates by saying that Chief
Justice Hunter is annoyed with him
because, to use Mr. Bowser's reported
words—,
"In   1908 as minister   of   the
crown in charge of the administration of justice I felt it my duty to
report officially to the honorable
tho minister of justice at Ottawa
the conduct of Chief Justice Hunter in presiding in   the   Supreme
Court on several occasions while in
an intoxieated condition.   The case
which finally forced this action on
my part was in a trial of a negro
named Jenkins for the murder of
Mrs. Morrison in Surrey."
Very charming.   Very charming indeed-.   We   hope the "lower   orders"
will take particular notice, and sign
the pledge as early as possible.
a      a      a      a
We cannot let the occasion pass
without expressing one or two
thoughts which arise after contemplating thiB little episode. First, this
question of intoxication. As a purely
relative and imaginary case, it seems
to us that a judge drunk with booze
while on the bench, would be likely to
do far less injustice than an attorney-
general drunk with power while in offlce. One might do injustice to one or
two. The other, to one or two thousand. But just by the way, it is not
a question of justice, but of law-
something very different especially in
British Columbia. As to some of the
laws, they may be administered by the
judiciary in perfect sobriety, but they
bear every evidence of having been conceived by mental processes whioh that
term would not describe. Mr. Bowser's
whole trouble arises from the fact that
while holding the offlee of attorney-
general, he Ib still a partner in a -leading Arm of lawyers who, from time to
time may flnd themselveB opposing
counsel for the attorney-general's department. He may not take private advantage of his public office. But the
point is that he Bhould not be allowed
to be in a position where anyone could
say he might do because he could do if
he wished. He either ought to leave
his private firm or Ub public office. As
long as he sticks to both he will be
open to Buspicion. A lot of people whom
he haB never reported for being intoxicated while on duty are of that opinion.
tional, this economic war has raged between nations in a way that the great
mass of the common people of every
land are quite unaware of. Desire for
exclusive markets has begotten natipnal
jealousies and hatreds. Governments,
swayed by these competing capitalistic
groups, have drawn the sword upon
each other, and the common people who
had no part in making the quarrels,
have, time and again, been called on to
march forward to the slaughter of eaeh
other. We know this has all been said
before, but owing to the fact that it
is truth and not lies, it has to be repeated many times before it soaks in.
A local jeweler advertises himself as
the only ono of his kind in town who
does not put up his wares in German-
made boxes. It's rather nice of him
to mention it. We hope all local trade
unionists thinking of buying diamonds will look the gontleman up.
With banks going "bust"; trust
companies liquidating; business firms
by the score going bankrupt; children
going hungry to school; families starving; relief work for bare bread and
board; men by the thousand unable to
obtain work; the Chief Justice and the
Attorney-general swapping billingsgate, British Columbia is indeed a happy, happy land.
Poverty is a political disease. The
poor as a class cannot escape from poverty. It is inherent in the nature of
the social system. Wealth accumulates
in the hands of a few, because the laws
endow the few with the legal power to
draw to them the wealth that the
masses produce. Poverty, is no longer
due to.the paucity of wealth. It is due
to the inequitable distribution of
wealth. Society makes and enforces
the laws which make millionaires and
paupers. It can abolish these laws
and free itself from, the disease of
poverty.
City of
North
Vancouver
INDUSTRY AND OOMMEBOE nowaday are built on the individual*
istio conception that unlimited
competition makes for the highest welfare of men. Thus we have alwaya going on an economic
HOW IT war   '"   our "~at%,
and aome of the
moat heartless and
ABOUT croei     things    are
done in the name
of what is called competition. Thia war
waa, at one time largely between individuals, but in more recent times, since
the introduction of machinery and the
concentration of industry, it has been
betweon groups of men who have joined together in order to more success*
fully out-acheme and over-reach other
groupa, of whioh there are thouaanda,
and all equally unscrupulous in their
ruthlesa war on each other.
«...
Not content with thia, groupa have
linked up, rings and syndicates have
been formed, for the purpose of extorting from the rest of the community a
greater share, of the necessaries and
luxuries of life than otherwise they
could get.    Commerce, being interna-
the New Year
ft^m^    IMf your Family's Sake
t--C        * 'o
-y.^tgiai-.V
Do not let your family suffer hurt beoause you have failed
to comply with the forms of the law.
Tou'cannot be sure that the legal outcome will be as you
wish unless you do the right thing now.
Now is the time to provide for proper distribution of your
estate by making your will.
CANADIAN FINANCIERS TRUST C0MIW
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER, B.C
Patrick Dor\f\el|y-OenemjJ1ttiw|er!	
Wm. 1 MAY
Solicits your influence
and vote for
Mayor
A good record of
20 years in public
life, who always
supports in every
form
Homelndustry
and
Home Labor
SB. MOODT FOB »
LICENSE COMMISSIONER.
In Dr. T. Glendon Moody the electors have the choice for licenser commissioner of one of the best known of
the younger men of Vancouver. Dr.
Moody is a native son whose family
were pioneers of Moodyville and Port
Moody before him. He has known
Vancouver from the beginning, and it
may be said that Vancouver knows him
both well and favorably. Dr. Moody
has a full appreciation of the possibilities of the licensing board. No department of the civic government comes
ns closely in touch with the moral welfare of the city as does that board, and
upon no other board is public morality so dependent. Dr. Moody regards
the position as a serious trust not to be
undertaken lightly, and this attitude is
reflected in his platform. In that statement he has set forth clearly the salient
duties of a license commissioner and
hus pledged himself to perform them
diligently nnd faithfully. Dr. Moody
should head the poll on Thursday night
if fitness for ofllce alone influences the
electorate on that day.
Nanalmo Socialists Nominate.
Nanaimo local of tho Social Democratic party of Canada haB nominated
three candidates for the city council
elections which take place January
14th. They are: South ward, William
Newton; Mlddlo wnrd, Joseph Thomson; North ward, Joseph Hodgkinson.
VOTE FOR
G. S. Hanes
Mayor
for the
CITY OF
NORTH VANCOUVER
Printers and
Labor Temple
Building
Ph.n. Sey. 4410
Printers of The Fan.
Tak. that Watoli to Appleby, IM
Fender Weat, Cor. Pender and
Richards.' for filgh-clasa watch,
dock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Joba
guaranteed for 12 months.
Our January
Sale is
On!
Everything
in the Store
is Reduced
Buyers
Now
Save
Hudson's Bay
Company
Granville and Georgia Streets
MR. W.O. BUCK ENDORSED
Central Ratepayers' Executive Favor Him as Candidate for
Licence Board
The Central Ratepayers' Association held a mooting lost night at
City HaU. Mr. 0. H. Gordon, the
president, was in the chair. Mr.
Kidd, secretary and many ratepayers also attended. Mr. Bailey addressed the meeting strongly in favor of Mr. W. 0. Black, who is a candidate for the position of Licence
Commissioner.
Mr. Qordon, Mr. Kidd and Mr. 0.
tS. Miller and several others warmly
recommended Mr. Black, Who has
been elected president of Ward VII
Association. Mr, Black said he bad
bad considerable experience in.licensing matters in Ontario. The
"McCarthy Act," tbe "Soott
Act," the "CrookeB Aot" nnd the
Federal Acts had aU engaged bis
attention. In districts where local
option had been adopted be bad
worked at putting down Illicit trade.
He was in favor of a vigorous in*
spection of the quality of liquors.
He would like to see a more careful
selection of licensed bartenders. He
would mako licensed houses live up
to a good standard, keeping tbelr
liquors and houses as pure as possible—and be would rigorously suppress all illicit trading.
Tbe candidature of Mr. Black was
unanimously   and     enthusiastically
I BBSPEOTFULLY SOLICIT
YOUB VOTE
YOUB VOTE AND' PERSONAL  INFLUENCE ABE RESPECTFULLY
SOLICITED FOR
A.P.BLACK
FOB
Alderman
for Ward V, 1915
Election Day:
THURSDAY   JANUARY   14th,
1916
Polling Station:
ODDFELLOWS'   HALL,   MAIN   ST.
Hours of Polling: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
South Vancouver
Should be of interest to
many of our readers
Below is the platform of Mr. Edward
Oold, a candidate for tbe Reeveshlp.
It is well worth perusal and consideration.
PLATFORM OF
Edward Gold
Candidate for Reeve of
South Vancouver
STANDS FOR A STRICT. JUST AND
BUSINESS. ADMINISTRATION,
WHICH MEANS AN END TO
JOBBERY, GRAFT AND
INEFFICIENCY.
1. All Municipal Work wherever
possible to be done by Day Labor,
2. Preference given to Resident
White Labor. The up-keeping of the
Standard Bate of Wages, and a Maximum Eight-hour Day.
3. fendeavor to put our Finances in
sucb shape so that there would be sufficient money from our sources of income to give employment to our men
all year round, instead of wasting'it,
on useless contracts to favorites, extravagant purchases and pleasure trips.
4. Specific By-law Monies be not
kept in General Fund but in separate
accounts at the Bank so as to prevent
diversion or misappropriation.
5. Wherever it is necessary to let
Contracts, same to be open to competition by Tender.
6. To further tbe principle of Annexation to the City in every way, on
a just and equitable basis.
7. Municipal Ownership of Public
Utilities in a Greater Vancouver.
8. Equitable Assessment and Taxation.
. Strictly opposed to the holding of
'Tax Sale" during the present unsettled conditions, nor until such times
as conditions are normal, and in view
of the disastrous effect same would
have on our financial standing.
10. That immediate endeavors be
made to start work on the Construction
of lateral sewers, in harmony with tbe
Greater Vancouver Sewerage Scheme,
11. That All Work on Boads be of
Permanent Nature, so tbat tbe Municipality may have some asset for money
expended. All Main and Through
Bonds and Streets to be Paved.
12. Efficiency fa ail Municipal Departments.
IF THE ABOVE PLATFORM MEETS
WITH YOUB APPROVAL, AOT
ACCORDINGLY, AND
Vote for Edward Gold
ELECTION:
January 16th, 1915
Baxter for Mayoi
Candidate for Re-election
MAYOR
T. S  BAXTER
Election Day, Thur., Jan. U
TO THE WOBKINOMEN OF THE OITY OF VANCOUVEB:
In coming forward as.a candidate for re-election there are some fe
things I would say to you. The past year has been one of the most dii
cult that Vancouver has ever had to face. During that time I have e;
deavored to do Justice to all reasonable claims made to me aa Mayor c
behalf of the working class electors. I am prepared to stand or fall wll
regard to this matter by the reports of the various labor delegatioi
which have appeared before me from time to time, If any workmi
will carefully and conscientiously examine the record of my term of offic
with regard to labor matters, I shall not fear comparison with the r
cords of any of my predecessors. They occupied the mayoral offlce wh(
times were very good compared with what they are to-day, and man
of the difficulties which have confronted me during my term were cr
ated by their lack of foresight and wanton extravagance. My view i
the working claas situation is that it is without precedent ln the city* )
order to cope with it as much as possible I have had to take specli
measures and create special civic machinery. To assist me in this woi
I have gathered together a small body of representative citlsens fro:
whom I have received the most loyal co-operation and support. I ai
convinced that it is to the best interests of the working class voters thl
this special provision to deal with the distress which prvails should ni
be interrupted or Interfered with, as would be the case if any one of m
opponents were elected. That ia. one of the chief reasoi
why I have agreed to stand for re-election. Finally I woul
appeal to you to carefully weigh and consider the account of m
stewardship, which I Intend to make public from the platform betwee
now and January llth, upon which date I believe I can legitimately hoi
that I ahall again be honored with the support of the working claaa elei
torate of Vancouver. T. 8. BAXTER.
Electors of Ward Five:
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE ARE
SOLICITED FOR
C.E.
AS ALDERMAN FOR 1915 IN WARD FIVI
Third Term
AS
ALDERMAN FOR WARD 1
YOUR VOTE AND INTEREST ARE
REQUESTED FOR
JAMES D.BYRNE
AND
Business methods in administration of civic affairs
ELECTRIC
HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
CONVENIENT TO USE
are AND
CHEAP TO OPERATE
Cost of Current for Most Popular Appliances
,      COFFEE PERCOLATOR
1 Cent for sufficient coffee for an
ordinary family.
ELEOTBIO TOASTER
1 to 2 Cents provides toast for
the family breakfast.
ELECTRIC GRILLS
1 to 2 Cents according to amount
of cooking.
ELECTRIC IRON
A to 5 Cents per hour.
Cost out of all proportion to convenience afforded.
ELECTRIC WASHER
3 Cents per hour. Actual cost
varies- according to amount oi
washing.   .
CHAFING DISH
1 to 2 Cents covers cost for social evening calls.
Cattail sad
Hutiafi Stnet
B.C. ELECTRIC
IIM G.«inU.St.
NtsiD.m FBIDAY JANUARY 15, 191S
THE BRITJSH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
/
, DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Underwear at
Reduced Prices at Spencer's
Stonfleld's Blue Label—Heavy -weight,  cream ribbed,    ty*.  $1.75
garment.    Sale..    $1.20
Stanfield's "Natural Wool—Light -weight, elastic rib.   Beg. $1.25 a
garment.    Sale price.  96c
Oomblnatlono....  $1.90
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Medium weight and soft'finish.   Begular
$1.50 a garment.   Sale price $1.10
Combinations.   $2.20
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Heavy weight, double breasted.  Beg. $1.75
a garment for  $1.29
Combinations, a suit  $2.68
Stanfield's Silk and Wool—Cream, medium weight, single breasted.
Begular $2.00 a garment.   Sale price  $1.49
Combinations, a suit  $2.98
Stanfield's Cream Wool—Heavy elastic rib, double breasted.   Beg.
$3.00 a garment   Sale price  $2.20
Comblnatlona, a suit.  $4,40
All Stanfield's lines in this sale carry the unshrinkable guarantee
and are offered in all sites from 34 to 44,
David Spencer Limited
DAVID.SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
APPLES—Large variety of winter stock at $1.00
and $1.26 per Box.
POTATOES—At Market Prices; these are the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition.
NEW LAID EGGS—Are now arriving in larger
quantities. You can always rely on Eggs which
are sold as new laid at the City Market
VEGETABLES—All kinds at most reasonable
prices; in quantities to suit all buyers.
AUCTION SALES are held every Tuesday and
Friday at 10 A. M. If you really wish to reduce
the cost of living, you can do so by attending the
AUCTION SALES.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET     '
T«ADE  f__l\  MAR*
Braid's
Best
Coffee
:„,W"1 HHAIORt-0'.,.
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
HftTITT   PFAVWT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Distance
nUH-Li -\-_iXt___il   Phone ln Every RoonuCafe in Connection. Rates
11.00 per day
Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests.
TO THE
CONSUMER
We have a small quantity of semi-anthracite Coal
on hand. This Coal has 29% more efficiency than
any other Coal sold in Vancouver, ahd we do not expect another: supply for some time.  Try a ton. *
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
427 Seymour Street
Phone Sey. 210
TMfflh^
WORKERS UNION,
UNI0
$kPMf\
facr
Named Shoe* are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unlets lt bean a
plain uid readable Impression or thli stamp.
All ahoea without the Union Stamp are
alwayi Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
Ml Bummer Street, Boiton, Mail.
J. P. Tobln, Free.   O. L. Blaine, Sta-Traat.
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUSbut—they
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
BUILT
IN THE
MOUTH
Luxury
Necessity
Efficiency
Ths KjJ
BldJ^BtchMd*
Ud Hsstlnn
Second floor
_.J 818
Phono Sty.
4.6.7.0
JgEWPjGj-
THESE ■'Nature Teeth" of mine (entirely different from
ordinary snd ugly "False Teeth) which are mtde to
match the onei that pew in roar Jaws—In shape and else
and exact tfnt—and to fit like the ones Nature gare you.
TflHBSB "Nature Teeth" are truly luxurious because you
X can bite, chew and mile with them la perfect confidence aad comfort.
BUT ther are alto neceetary to health and efflolency. The
old "Ftlte Teeth" are  truly falie, for ther are  but
makeshifts and do not perform the functions of Nature'• own
teeth,
mastication of the food—-whloh meant stomach health and
NATURE'S owu teeth, then, or their worthy successors
—my  "Nature  Teeth"—are necessary to the proper
general efficiency—and to the luxurious tense of well-being
which makes for that efficiency.   -
"TOU StrmB NO PAW" OVABAXTUD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work
performed by me will be absolutely palnleaa. If tke
slightest twinge of pain la experienced by the patient np money need be paid to me, or If any haa
been paid lt will be Instantly refunded by me.
i farter guarantee that all crown or bridge work
or filling will remain In flrat-olau condition for a
Xerlod of TEN YEARS.   If any of my work becomes
efecthre during that time I will replace It Ubiolutely
FREE OP OHARGE
Dr. HALL, "the Modern Dentist"
HUGH M. FRASER
A HAPPY NEW YEAR to all is the
greeting from tho Reeve of Burnaby.
Ah a people wo are thankful for many
good things enjoyed throughout the
past year. Burnaby stands to-day in
splendid shape financially. Twelve
months of careful work, by a loyal
body of councillors, enables me to Btate
that Burnaby might well be gratified
that she is able to enter the New Year
fearlessly and unafraid to tackle the
problem of Bailing the ship of atate
Bufely through to port during 1915, let
it be fair or stormy weather. Condi*
ttons that exist to-day are extreme.
It will call for careful management,
conserving the resources of the municipality, strict economy in each department and faithful support by each
member of the council and staff. This
has been accorded me during 1014 for
which I am deeply thankful. You will
have the annual Statement to hand
showing what haB been done with your
affairs, for 1914. You, will give thiB
your attention and fairly critize the'
same. On behalf pf the Council I wish
to thank the ratepayers of Burnaby for
the generous support accorded the council during the past year, as Reeve I
wish to say that it will be my endeavor
to warrant the confidence of the ratepayers of Burnaby.
HUGH VL FRASER
Mr. S. A.
McDowell
is well known and highly respected,
both as a worklngman and aa a busl
nesB man. If elected to represent ward
four \\y the city council, his intention is
to work in harmony with all those who
are striving for a return of our former
prosperity, and will use his influence to
encourage and foster home industry.
PAGE THREfc
Municipality of Burnaby
COUNCILLOR JOHN MUBBAT.
Member of the 11)14 Council, municipality of Burnaby, chairman of the
waterworks committee, and one of
tho hardest workers in the interests
of the ratepayers. He seeks re-election on Saturday next.
WARD2
Walter R. Hamilton
Respectfully solicits your vote
and .influence, for re-election
for   _
ALDERMAN
S. J. CROWE
FOR
WARD .2
Your vote and influence is
respectfully solicited
MY
PLATFORM:
THE SAME AS IT ALWAYS HAS BEEN-
Retrenchment
To the Electors of Ward I.:
YOUB VOTE AND INFLUENCE
RESPECTFULLY  SOLICITED
FOB MY BE-ELEOTION AS
ALDERMAN
FOB THE YEAB 1916
Walter Hepburn
Polling Place, Pender HaU, comer of
Homer and Pender Street!
POLLING DAY: JANUARY Utb, 1916
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prices end terms te nit
your  pocket-book. A
Our Stook of
FURNITURE!!
mut - bs  itea to  be tppreeiated,
Call In and took tt om.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
♦1 HA8TINM STREET WUT
e heart of ihe retail dism'tL. AbsoWv
I aad .modem in every respect.   Cuisine I
unexcelled.   European plan, $l to $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS All TRAINS. Owned ud
operated by  The ProfilKtll  Hotel.  Compiny,  Limited.
HOWARD I SHEErtW*. tmim
ALDERMAN JOSEPH HOSKIN
Your Vote and Influence
REQUESTED BY
Joseph Hoskin
... FOR ...
ALDERMAN
Candidate for Re-election in Ward 4
Peoples Independent Candidate
whose platform includes:
The ra-organisatlon of City Markets;
The patronising of local Industries;
Clean Government; Good Wages; Fair
Play to All.
CENTER &HANNA, UA
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
104» GEORGIA STRUT
One Blook west ot Court House.
Ute  of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral' Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offloe: 40th A Fraaer Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Means
PANTAOE8  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
S.45, 7.20, ».1B    Season's  Prices:
Matinee, 15c. j Evenings, 15c, 2Se.
T.B. CUTHBERTSON &Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
NONE  SO EA 5 Y
DnconJitionalljrCuarinteed
PjeridentS
MADE IN
CANADA
LHARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMER8
Vancouver—Offloe   and   Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 348*.
North   Vanoouver — Ofllce   and
Chapel, Ml—sixth St. West, Phone
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Vote for
H. A. URQUHART
a^^mmm^^^r^^^mmmaaa^aa^aamm^mmm^^^aaaaawmmmmr^^mt^^mmmmmmmmmm
in Ward 3
Vote for one who stands for Retrenchment consistent with Efficiency and Elimination of All Waste.
A resident of Vancouver for over 28 years.
Electors of Ward Four and
the City of Vancouver
As Aldermanic Candidate I favor the following:
A Clean City and the complete enforcement of all
Laws.
The Establishing by the City of a Free Labor
Bureau.
The prevention of illegal grants from Public
Funds.
The reduction of Taxation on an equitable basis.
The Adjustment of Over-head Expenses.
Vote tor Boardman
The man who baa already heen Instrumental ln saving the elty thousands of dollars and who sees that the only salvation for the dty la
Sane Economy
PHONE HIGHLAND 782R
Mr. Union Man
• Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house. '. ■ ■ ■
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street
TOU HAVE A OHAHOE TO OBI
YOUB DOLLARS BAOK
When you buy
British Columbia  Made
Goods
Every dollar spent In Easterns or
Foreign Ooods it gone forever
LecWe Boots are Made in
Vancouver
Insist on feting thtm, sad ros git
honest value for yon money tray
time.
| J. LECKIE CO., Limited
Vancouver
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for the Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Ir. 447 3387 Main Street
PENDER
tM PSVDEB 8TBBBT
HOTELS*
IT WMT Hi ]
l«m Hwt<IlBlHtri?'U{ModW
1915 Diaries and Calendar Pads
TRANSFER BINDERS, FILES
LOOSE LEAF BINDERS AND SHEETS
Oomplete Lines of all Offlce Requirement!.
Wa do all kinds of COMMERCIAL PE1NT1NQ
Wt in BLAKE BOOK MANU7AOTUBEBS
Thomson Stationery Co.. Ltd.
US HASTINOS ITREET WMT VANCOUVER, B. O.
BEST IN THE WEST BITABUSHEO IM
•fnttet the Home Intutrp
•.TRAOESII
this label appear oa
fer tood
tmStntt
Printed!
I tal
.. »■
TorknuuUp.   |Hd  c
the np-bnlldUf of the <
allied FBnmra nUDEI
impossl of TnurstMeal Vnion, Web Pnssmea's Union, Prtatlai
Onion. Prtu Amounts'  Union, eVorootnon' end Blocitotnn?
Bookbinder? Vnlon, PhotMniravers* Onion.    "™ ammtynte
Composed of '
Onion,
WM TURNER B?rt£
-DEALER IN—
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
Ward 6
G. H. COTTRELL
Stands for civic ownership
of electric  light and
economic business government.
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT YOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
OOUNTEY, OET BEEB WITH THIS LABEL ON, PINTS, HZ
FOB WW CENTS. "~
BBE WED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
J PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 15,
Dr. Moody
For Licence
Commissioner
And His Platform
1.  Enforcement of the law impartially and strictly.
2.
Licensing of bartenders, in .which
character and previous records
of new applicants will be consid-
3.
4.
All misdemeanors or in-
fractions of the law to be
promptly and impartially dealt
with.
Strict enforcement of the law in
regard to maintenance and suitability of premises.
Realizing that the duty of a Licence Commissioner is to see to
the enforcement of the statutes
and the by-laws, I pledge myself
to that course if elected to the
Board.
I have been asked what my attitude towards earlier closing
hours for bars will be. My answer is that if the City Council
passes a shorter hour by-law it *
will be my bounden duty, if
elected, to see that the law is enforced.
I am strictly opposed to any in-
increase of licenses in Vancouver, believing there are now
more than enough to carry on
the traffic in this city.
DR. T.GLENDON MOODY
5.
JAS. FERGUSON
Alderman
for Ward 2
Your vote and influence is
respectfully solicited
THOMAS KIRKPATRICK
for re-election as
ALDERMAN for WARD 3
Civic Elections Ward 5
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED FOR
C N. JAMES
FOR ALDERMAN
Phone Fairmont 2416
LEEK
For Licence Commissioner
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED
WALTER LEEK
VOTE FOR
DOUGLAS
FOR MAYOR
1915
You want a Mayor who has made a success of
his own private business, and who is able to handle
the city's business successfully.
You want a Mayor who is not a party to any
Clique, Organization or Corporation.   *
You want a Mayor who will force the Railways
to live up to their agreement with the city, thus producing work for the citizens of Vancouver.
If you want a Mayor with these qualifications,
and a Mayor who will look after the city's interest,
then cast your vote on January, the 14th, for C. S.
DOUGLAS.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS.
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
r* VOTE FOR
A. WILLIAMS
ALDERMAN for Ward 5
To represent you as Alderman ln
Ward Tine, and secure the services
of a competent and active business
man.
HE STANDS FOR: '
No salaries for Mayor or Aldormon.
No reduction in salaries of Polico
and Firemen.
Civic Control of Public Utilities.        *
I am in favor of an Eight-hour Day at tho Standard Unto of t3.00.
Complete revision of Assessment Roll.
Encouragement of Local Industries.
Committee Rooms:  2247 Main Street.      Phone Fairmont 1973.
i= Heat is the only-
test of Fuel
You buy fuel to supply you with
heat.
The coal that supplies you with
the most heat—to the dollar expended is the cheapest.
Diether genuine South Wellington Coal, has been proven by
scientific test to contain the
highest number of heat units to
the ton of all Pacific Coals.     ,
Oet a trlalvton and note carefully, tbe result.
Washed Lamp
Pea $6.50
553
<-w>
'KEEP TOUR MONET Ut B. O.'
BT USING
South Wellington Coal
as supplied by
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton... $6.75
Washed Nut; ton.. $5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Tour Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined ln B, O. by B. 0. Labor for
B. 0. People,
WOOD
BEST 16-inch Fir Cordwood at $3.00 per load. This it ai
exceptionally good lot, and just what you need thit oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money. Quality guaranteed..
This is the only UNION MINED Ooal in British Columbia
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANCOUVER OOAL COMPANY
Phone Seymour 5408
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
OREAT REDUCTIONS on all our Mens' and Boys' SUITS AHD OVER*
COATS, some as low aa HALP-PRIOE.   -
All Winter UNDERWEAR except Penmans' 95 at BARGAIN PRICES
CLUBB   &   STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West      Phone Seymour 702
-tfelb man XsooacGO.
PHONE SEYMOUR 9088
J. J. DOUGAN
Solicits your support for re-election
. 1 have bad a long connection with education
al matten, both as a teaobsr and • school trustee. During my terms ot offlce I have consistent
ly striven for free text books, night schools snd
free medical inspection of school children, 1
have given special attention to ths education ol
those of our unfortunate children who are deal
and dumb, and whom I believe should be educated ln ihe city rather than sent out of the
province. Hy local experience of school al*
ministration has been supplemented by viiitj
paid to a very large number of schools ln Canada
and the United Statea whither I have gone from
to time seeking new ideas and methods whsreb]
our local schools eould be made aecond to none.
My whole effort has been directed to making the
child better physically, mentally, and morally,
tomf believe that lu those things the child li
thRathsr ot the future citlsen. I am strongly
In favor of bringing our recently adopted ayetem
of technical instruction in connection- with oui
public schools, np to the highest degree of en.
clency possible. If re-elected, I shall continue
the policy which haa brought the consistent sup*
port of the electorate of Vancouver to my can*
dldature for many yeara paat. Yours faith-
fully. J. J. DOVOAN,
School Trustee.
AROUE!   ALD. McBEATH
i respectfully solicits your vote and influence for
re-election as Alderman for
WE INVITE
INQUIRY
by thoso contemplating making
changes, opening new accounts,
etc., and anything in our line
generally. Our business is conducted on aound conservative
commercial principles.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vanoouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
A vote for Aid. McBeath is a vote for a clean
civic government and a vote for a square deal
toall.
JAMES A. KERR
The present Reeve of South Vancouver
SOLICITS  YOUR   VOTE   AND  INFLUENCE
AS
REEVE FOR 1915.
THE FOLLOWING MEETINGS WILL BE HELD:
To-night, Friday, Kalenberg HaU, Main Street and
Bodwell Road.
Thursday, Jan. 14, Carlton Hall, Colllngwood.
Friday, Jan. 15, Sexsmith Shool, Ward 6.
Candidates running for Councillors for the Wards, and also School
Trustees, will he given an opportunity to address the meetinga.
Tha Reave will deal with the financial condition of tha Municipality
aa compared with other cities of tha Dominion, also the famous Oold-
Kerr disqualification case.
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
... Outfit Includes cabinet of Famed Oak
beautifully finished, hinged cover,
very latest hornless type of phono*
gnph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful apring motor perfectly adjusted and regulated. Removable
front and top, Outfit includes 12 four-
minute Blue Amberol (Indestructible)
records of your own selection, Terms
..8.80 cash, balance at the rate of
f 0.00 per month,
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
658 GRANVILLE ST.
Alderman for Ward 2
Your Vote and Influence Respectfully Solicited for
W. T. WHITEWAY
AS ALDERMAN FOR 1915
I am for efficiency and economy ln all departments of civic admlnlt-,
tratlon, which is something we have not had In the paat. . .1 am also
strongly ln favor of encouraging local Industries and making every Intelligent effort to secure the estahllshment of others.
W. T. WHITEWAY.
Election of School Trustees
A FACT
The (Uty of Vancouver has paid thla year approximately 1724.499.00
towards maintaining the City Schools.
YET it has no voice or vote in it's management
I am In favor of greater consideration helng given to the opinions
of the Oity Council regarding School Expenditures.
ALSO—FREE LUNCHES, WHEN NECESSARY. FREE MEDICAL ATTENTION. FREE DENTISTRY. AND ELIMINATION OF
ALL UNNECESSARY OFFICIALS.
TOM SYKES     X
I years residence here.
Candidate for SCHOOL TRUSTEE

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0344995/manifest

Comment

Related Items