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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 4, 1914

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 ™P«"PP
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
falDUSTBIAI. UNITT■:.., .gTBENGTH..
191.
OFFICIAL PAPEB : VANCOUTBB TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
VANCOUVER, B. G, FRIDAY; DECEMBER 4, 1914.
> FOUTICAL. UNITT: TICTOBT1
/ In Vaneoursr \
V   City, M.00 )
$1.60 PER YEAR.
LABOR
0F1IALS IN
I A. Seddon and Albert Bellamy Visited, the City
Last Week
Both Believe the War Was
Forced by German
Military Class
James A. Seddon, president of the
British Trades Union Congress, and Al-
)ert Bellamy, president of the British
National Union of Railwaymen, were
irisitorB to Vancouver last Friday and
Saturday. They had attended tye resent convention of the American Fed-
Bration of Labor in Philadelphia, Their
mission at that gathering was to urge
that the Federation take action to call
convention of representatives of labor
unions of aU countries, to meet in the
[same place at the same time as tho national delegates wbo attend the peace
KWerence, which it is presumed will
) ake place at the end of the war. The
plan has the further object of trying to
Secure direct representation of labor at
that conference by one or more delegates from labor organizations. The
Lbject of that Ib to prevent the machinations and expose the scheming of secret diplomacy which is held to be
largely responsible for the causes which
fed to the war.
During the course of an interview
lth the Federatlonist, both the visitors made it plain that in .their estimation the labor movement of Britain
:ould adopt no other course than that
if supporting the war.
. Mr. Seddon's View.
* Hr. Seddon said: "The British trades
Jmionists are unanimously in support of
Rhe government.   They issued a mani-
Ijesto pointing out that they were up
Against militarism in the worst form
Knd that the struggle waB between de-
*tocrncy and militarism.   The manifesto was not opposed by a single member,
fhe tradea unionists' second manifesto
.ailing on ex-soldiers to   rejoin   the
inks has been largely responded to by
rganized workers.
''' There are between 25,000 and !  ,
EQ0 members of the National Union of
Jailwaymen who have joined the colors.
Ve had nn apeal from the Belgian
rorkers for help, and thought of taking
yer our contributions in hard coin, but
•■lth the scarcity of food there, it is
Irobable we shall adopt the same course
is in the Dublin strike, and purchase
[ood Buplies.
Aid for the Belgians
The British trades unionists have
lade a levy of, two cents per member
') aid Belgian workers, and have raised
early half a million dollara. The tex-
le unionists have voted $10,000 out of
ie international fund and the Miners'
nion aro making a levy of 25 cents a
ember for the same object.
German Junkers.
Continuing, Mr. Seddon said: "No
te regrets .more than I do the terrible
Uastrophe which has fallen upon us.
I'have been an advocate of peace all
}y life, and I think I know as well fca
.out people what jingoism and mill-
iriam mean. But I am firmly con-
inced that there was an element in the
ermnn governing class which had de-
Ifermlned to crush every tendency to
Khnocrncy in its desire to maintain con
I'rol. That element was the military
nker class.   It did not represent the
(ommerclnl class and certainly not tbe
-orking cIubs. It had a proud con-
Impt for both, and scared the German
'orkers into its war policy by preach-
lg tlie danger of Russian conquest."
Situation In Germany.
Speaking of the situation in Germany
t the outbreak of the war, Mr. Seddon
Jaid: "It is my firm opinion that the
nilitnrist party in Germany realized
hat if it ever hoped to strike a blow
:or its own preservation, it had to do
t now. Tbe rapid growth of working
■lass representation in the Reichstag,
where tho social democrats «nd cap*
fcured 111 seats, one of which represented the very division of Potsdam in
which the Kaiser himself lived, coupled
with the exposures of warmongering
made by Leibknccht last summer, convinced tbe militarist party that the moment had come when they had to make
k fight against democracy in their own
bountry, and for which they had been
preparing just as much as they hnd
Keen preparing to fight for increased
territory. They had built up a war
machine of amazing strength and perfection, with the deliberate intention
k making their class masters both in
[heir own country and outside of it. In
Britain the political power and material
[ondition of tho workers is limited and
miserable enough, but I could not see,
Ond cannot now see, that the efforts of
British workers to improve their condi-
jon would be furthered by the success
w. the German militarist clasB in thiB
par That is my firm conviction, and
kht is why I have supported the policy
'jf the workera going into the war."
i The viewa expressed by Mr. Seddon
gere fully.endorsed by his colleague,
irhey left Vancouver last Saturday
ion for Victoria, where thoy wero met
• Alex. Watchman, president of the
C. Federation of Labor. From there
Key nrer going back to England through
Tan Francisco.
P. M. Draper and Others
Chosen to Contest for
Board of Control.
Convention   Selects   Four
Candidates for the
School Board.
Forty labor unions in Ottawa held a
convention last week, at which 100 del-
egates were present. The meeting was
called to consider what should be done
about the coming civic elections.
It was made plain in the course of I
the meeting that organized labor does
not intend to endorse any candidates
outside its own ranks, the opinion
that the convention adhere to its form-'
er policy in this direction being supported unanimously.
A good deal of time was taken up dls-
cuBsing the advisability of running a
candidate for the mayoralty. P. M.
Draper, the well-known secretary-treasurer of the TradeB' and Labov Congress
of Canada, was freely spoken of as a
suitable candidate, but after going over
all the pros add cons of the qufstion,
it was decided not to contest ihe may-
oralty.     *
Four nominees for board of control,
aldermanlc candidates in six wards, and
public school trustee candidates in four
city wards, were named.
For controllers the following were
nominated: P. M. Draper, J. Ussher,
W. Dewar and J. Maloney.
Aldermanic lahor candidates were
nominated for six wards aB follows:
St. George ward—W. J. Devee, Street
Railwaymen.
By ward—J. Seguin, bricklayer; E.
Belair, Carpenters.,
Victoria ward—A. McGuire, Carpenters; C. Stinson, Carpenters.
Wellington ward—i). J. Pearce, Printing Pressmen; W. Fogarty, Plumbers
and Steamfltters.
Dalhousie ward—A. E. Neumann, Machinists.
Capital ward—Alec Campbell, B. of
L. E.
Nominated as school trustees:
Wellington ward—W. L. Beat, Canadian Legislative Representative of B.
of U E. nnd F,
Rideau ward—A, E, Sheppard, Typos.
Victoria word—J. Cameron, Stonemasons.
Dalhousie—J. Patterson, Machinists.
The wisdom of endorsing any candidate outside the ranks of organized
labor was questioned and it was unanimously agreed that the former policy of
the labor movement of tho city as expressed at other conventions should be
upheld and only bona fide members of
labors own ranks be supported.
ROBA  LUXEMBOURG.
Street Carmen's "Model" Union. .
iA "model" union of Btreet carmen
j favored by the Cincinnati Employers'
KBocintion, whose organizers are at-
Imptlng to form the "Independent
■der of Traction Men of Cincinnati."
I is proposed that the street car corn-
Any have a voice in the management
Pl the new institution.
"Jimmy" Haslett to Officiate.
I James Haslett, a popular member of
9 Bricklayers' union and one of the
at known soccer authorities on the
tinland, will again officiate in chain-
mship games in the Vancouver and
Strict League aeries,
Sentence of One Year's Imprisonment
Confirmed.
Rosa Luxembourg's appeal against
the sentence of a year's imprisonment
for urging German workmen not to
shoot on their French comrades has
been dismissed, and she is now in prison The speeches for which the socialist leader was prosecuted were delivered, of courBe, prior to the war. It will
be recalled that the sentence provoked
huge demonstrations throughout Germany. The trial of the appeal was
postponed in consequence of the military scandal which was likely to be
{trovoked by the testimony of the very
arge number of witnesses to be called
by the defence.
Since the war broke out Rosa Luxembourg has been one of the few German socialists who have remained faithful to the professions of the international, and the confirmation of the sentence may be attributed to that fact.
The event, however, cannot fail to
impress the great body of German socialists, among whom Mme. Luxembourg lias enormous influence.
Labor Olub Billiards.
Tho Lnbor Templo club billiard tournament was concluded this week the
winners being: Fred. Sayers, first;
John Patterson, second; and Dave Somerville, high break. The prizes were,
$10 and $5 medals.
A great deal of interest was shown
in the competition, owing to the various trades represented among tho
competitor.
The carpenters, despite the strenuous
efforts of the other trades, carry off all
the prizes, although Sayers is not nt
present working at the trade.
Another tournament is to bo arranged
in the near future.
Ono of tho moat interested features
was the confidence of Mr. David Hood,
of the Pnintors' union, in his ability to
capture the first prize. So enthusiastic
did he become that he sold the medal
for $5 and afterwords had to return
the money because of his inability to
make good hia high estimate of his
powers aB a billiard player.
Building Decreases Heavily.
Building permits in Vancouver for
November numbered 40, valued at $1,-
584,475. Novombor, 1013, they were
101 nt 4300,565. The difference this
yoar ia chiefly due to the new government elevator which is to cost well over
$1,000,000. For the 11 months ending
November 30th, thiB year, 1,201 permits
were issued, valued at $4,444,711. For
the corresponding period last year there
were 1,032 permits at $10,248,802, Tho
decrease for this year compared with
laat is bo far $5,804,001.
Parker Williams to Speak.
Parker Williams, M. P. P., will speak
in the Globe theatre, Granville street,
next Sundny evening, at 8 o'clock. Subject: "What the McBride Government Has Done for Us," Mr. James
Conley will take the chair. Admission
free. *
GOVERNMENT INVESTIGATE
ARMAMENT TRUST IN BRITAIN?
According to now«p»j»r caMoo received lut Tuesday,-* new bill, providing for national defence ln the
face of the war situation, la now before the Brltlih
parliament and will become law. It la known aa tha
Defence of the Realm Consolidation Act. It gives the
Admiralty and the Army Council full power over private property and individuals, if in the opinion of the
authorities national safety retuires such action, Unlimited power of search and arrest is given. This action has probably been deolded upon aa the result of
the authorities besoming aware that certain persona
have betrayed naval and military secrets to Germany. .
From British papers, lt Is evident that fOr some Ume
the search powers of the police and Investigation department have been considerably enlarged. Business
ftrms known to have Ween engaged In trade with Germany before the war, are stated to have had their
books closely scrutinised by expert book-keepers on
behalf of the state, to see if they wen engaged In
any transactions with the enemy whereby the safety
of the state waa endangered.
* If any person or company of persons should be
found to be supplying Germany with munitions of
war they will doubtless be arraigned on a charge of
treason. To those charged with the defence of Britain
this new Act will be a great aid, Now it waa proved
long before the war started, that a gigantic International armament trust consisting of the chief armament manufacturers of Europe was in existence.  Bri
tish money was alleged to be invested in German concerns of that kind, agreements and understandings
were alleged to exist between firms representative of
the two nations, and there seemed to be the very beet
of reasons to suspect that Brltlih Investors were deriving proflt from the sale of arms and ammunition to
Germany, and vice versa. That feeling hat never been
allayed, and this new act la the very thing needed to
give the authorities power to Investigate the Investments of thoie holding financial interest In armament
firms..
By doing so lt could be found ont If any of thoae
people are now actually deriving profit from the sale of
armaments to Germany, It would have the double
effect of serving the state and satisfying the well-
grounded suspicions of thousands of thinking people
who have sot forgotten the ominous statements about
the armament trust made ln both Great Britain and
Germany only a month or two before war broke ont,
As far back as June 12, 1913, the Labor Leader published a list of politicians, clergymen, peers, banks,
financiers, newspaper ownen and others having financial intensts in the shape of shares and holdings ln
armament manufacturing firms. Ths Federatlonist la
republishing the list below does so with the reaueat
that the British government will use its powers under
the new Act to find out If any of thoie mentioned an
now deriving flnanclal benefit from the lale of armaments to Germany or Austria. The list was as follows:
WORK OF WOMEN'S
L
Store Will Be Opened Saturday Near Loew's
Theatre.
Has   Tremendous
Number of Women on
Its List
The result of the work' of the Women'a Employment League bo far aB
the manufacture of toys and dolls are
concerned will be soon on Saturday
next, in the store of tho White Sewing
Machine Co., Granville street, neur
Loew's theatre.
Dolls representative of every nation
will be on sale, dolls of every possible
kind, clowns, punches, red cross nurses
in several sizes, military dolls of every
kind, French, Russian, English, Belginn,
Japanese, to say nothing of the Kilties
in several sizes. Black cats or "Hoo-
Hoo" Cats side by side with dainty
fairies in muslin and silver tinsel, Belgian carts drawn by dogs. Little Boy
Blue, side by aide with Little Bo Peep.
Toy cannon and wiggle woggles, all will
be on sale on Saturday next.
All the toys are the work of the women who but for this would be out of
work at the present time. It is the output of three week's labor and it must
be remembered thnt it is unskilled labor. Every women had to be taught
how to work at making dolls, and taking into consideration the difficulties of
unskilled labor and lack of proper material to be obtained in Canada, the result of the last three weeks' work is
very satisfactory.
Tho registration list of the Women's
Employment League shows that during
the laat few weeka some
Ministers of the Crown.
Right Hon. W. Kiincimon, M. P.,
President of the Board of Agriculture.
Shareholder in Cammell, Laird $ Co.
Right Hon. O. E. Hobhouse, M. P., P.
G., Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Shareholder in Armstrong, Whit-
worth & Co., Ltd.
Right Hon. Alex. Ure, M. P., P. C.,|
Lord Advocate of Scotland. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
H. J. Tennant, M. P., Under-Secretary of the War Office. Brother-in-law
of Mr. Asquith. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., and the Nobel Dynamite
Trust.
Right Hon. Baron Sandhurst, Lord
High Chamberlain of England, Under-
Secretary for War, 1886, 1892-1894. Debenture trustee of Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Pirrie, Comptroller of the
Household of the Lord-Lieutenant of
Ireland. Director of the London, City
and Midland Bank. Chairman of Har-
land and Wolf; debenture trustee of
John Brown & Co., Thos. Firth & Sons,
Ltd., and of theCoveritry Ordnance Co.
Col. the Right Hon. Sir C. M. Mac-
British Ambassador at Tokyo, Vice-
President of the Navy League. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Right Hon. J. A. Pease, M. P., President of the Board of Education. Director of Poase & Partners, Ltd.} pig-
iron contractors to the Admiralty. We
have no reaaon to believe that this firm
iB connected with the War Trust.
Ex-Ministers of the Crown.
Earl Grey, late Governor-General of
Canada. Vice-President of the Navy
League. Chairman of the British Bank
of Northern Commerce. Debenture
trustee of Armstrong, Whitworth & Co.,
Ltd.
Lord Balfour of Burleigh,' Secretary
for Scotland, 1895-1903. Chairman of
the Eastern Bank, and Governor of the
Bank of Scotland. Debenture trustee
of Wm. Beardmore & Co., and the Coventry Ordnance Co., Ltd.
Right Hon, A, Lyttleton, M. P., ex-
Colonial Secretary. Director of the London, City and Midland Bank. Debenture trustee of Armstrong, Whitworth
& Co., Ltd. .
Bishops and Arcneeacons,
Bishop of Adelaide—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd.
Bishop of Chester—Member of the
National Service League. Shareholder
in Vickera, Ltd.
Bishop of Hexham—Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Bishop of Kensington—Shareholder
of the Harvey United Steel Co., Ltd.,
ZAPATA IN MEXICO
IN
Candidates Are Endorsed
for Civic Election
Campaign
Council WUl Protest the Cut
in City Workers'
Wages
OF TYPO UNION
Provision Amended for belief of Many Unemployed Members
Nominations of Officers Results in Many Elections
by Acclamation
!Y
Will Oppose Diaz, Villa, Carranza, and All the Old
Regime
Abolished   Justice   Courts
and Told Lawyers to
Go to Work
women .
have registered  as seeking work, outl now being wound up.
of this number 132 married women were |    Bishop of Newcastle—Member of the
passed on to the relief officer; 150 have {National Service League.    Shareholder
been* employed in the doll making; 140 !in Vickers, Ltd.
have been plnced in domestic positions, j    Bishop of Newport—Shareholder in
and others helped in various ways. John Brown & Co., Ltd.
Now comes the question: What is to ' W. R. Inge, Dean of St. Paul's Cathe-
be dono with the other 495 women, all dral—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., and
out of work, all hard up, all equally aa [Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
deserving, all requiring food, clothing I    Ven. Archdeacon Campbell—vior
■Vicar of
St. George's, Bnrrow-in-Furneaa. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Ven. Archdeacon Clarke—Vicar of
Rochdale.   Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Ven. "Archdeacon Wntkins—Archdeacon of Durham.   Shareholder in Arm
and shelter. The' enormous amount of
work dono by the Women's Employment League has only touched the
fringe of the problem. The city council has done its share for the present;
individuals end organizationa have like-.
wise assisted, and the timo hns now ar- .strong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.   .
rived for tho   provincial   nnd   federal j (Continued on Page Four.)
governments to do their part. ■ ~
With more money to pay Wages until
goods manufactured were sold many
more women could bo givon work, without thiB money all thoae unable to obtain work will be dependent on charity,
or starvo. Neither of the above events
will reflect credit on the government, |
thorefore unless something is very
speedily dono besides investigating (aa
proposed by Sir Richard McBride) the
present provincial government will have
to answer a very serioua charge.
Meantime, the toys made by the women whom it has been possible to assist,
will be ready for all to buy, and tho
more bought, tho more women can be
put to work.   Come nnd buy!      H, G.
[Special to The Federationist.]
EL PASO, Texas, Nov. 29.—The Zapata forces have taken Mexico City.
Emiliano Zapata, personally, has made
a atatement repudiating all the capitalist parties and factions of Mexico.
All the churches have been confiscated
nnd closed and nearly five hundred
priests of the capital of the Republic
expelled from the country. The plutocrats all have left the city for the coast
and for the first time in five hundred
years, the workers control Mexico
City.
It is probable that the Villa faction
will attack Zapata in the near future.
The workers are ready to repel tho attack although they are short of artillery. The Carranza bunch of grafters
took away to Vera Cruz all the artillery
and ammunition stored in the arsenals.
Peace is far away yet in Mexico. Zapata and the workers are going to fight
in order to put out of action the three
different factions of the capitalist class
that want the power, viz., Carranza,
Villa and Felix Diaz, Zapata wants
the complete elimination of the politicians, soldiers, priests nnd capitalists.
One of the first acts of Zapata in
Mexico City was to abolish the ao-called
courta of juatice. He said that all the
lawyers should go to work and produce
something useful to the community.
The workers of Mexico City are enjoying the entrance of the peons of
Morelos who are tho real liberators of
the people.
Zapata refused to go to the National
Palace and made headquarters in the
humble house of a workingmnn. He
wants the National Palace and the
great cathedral converted into museums
of science and art.
The news of the capitalist papers
about the union of Zapata with the
murderer Villa, tool of United States
corporations, aro lies, simply lies. Zapata and the workers will have nothing
to do with any faction that ia opposed
to tho abolition of privnto property
in public necessities.
District 28 Elects Officers.
The following have been elected as
officers of District 28, United Mine
Workera of America, Vancouver Island,
for the year 1915: President, Robert
Foster; vice-president, J. J. Taylor;
secretary-treasurer, J. McAllister;
International Board-member, J. Naylor; District auditors, P. McNivon, G.
Gold, W. Head. District executive
board members will be elected from local unions this month.
Building ln Victoria. •
Building permits to the value of only
$2,133,085 were issued in Victoria from
January 1st to November 30th. These
figures explain why nearly all building
tradesmen in Victoria have been unemployed this year.
1889—1914
VANOOUVER TRADES AND
LABOR OOUNOIL
Requests the pleasure of your
company at the
CELEBRATION OF ITS 25th
ANNIVERSARY
■  to be held in
LABOR TEMPLE
Saturday, December 6th, 1914
at 8 p.m.
—:o:—
Jos.  Dixon   (First President)
In the chair
J. H. McVety, President
Geo. Bartley, Secretary
Every union man, every
union man's wife, and all the
friends of organized labor in
Vancouver should attend the
twenty-fifth anniversary celebration of the Trades and Labor Oouncll tomorrow (Saturday) evening.
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE
Three Aldermanlc Candidates Named
on Wednesday Evening.
So far the parliamentary committeo
of the Vancouver Trades and Labor
council have definitely decided to run
three nldermnnic candidates in the
forthcoming municipal campaign. At
last Wednesday night's regular weekly
meeting,. Labor Temple, the following
nominees were endorsed:
Ward Four—B. B. Bailey, Laborers'
union.
Ward Six—Mr. Dnirin, Plasterers'
union.
Ward Seven—A. V. Lofting, Street
Railway Employees' union.
South Vancouver.—Ward Three-—F.
Mnnsel, Bookbinders' union.
Tho closing of nominations wns loft
over till next Wednesday evening.
The central lnbor body will be asked
to head the campaign fund with $100,
and n committee of three—Delegates
Dunn, Wilton and Gibson—wore named
to viait the local uniona in quest of
fiintjs. Delegate Nagle will be authorized to securo receipt booka and receive
monies from friends and sympathizers.
All candidates endorsed have pledged
themselves to be guided, on ull questions affecting the working people, by
the wishes of tho contral labor body.
Arizona Ultra-American.
In Arizona it hns just been made law
that eighty per cent, of tho employes
in any buslneas employing moro than
five persons muat bo American citizens.
Vancouver Trades and Labor council
met at 8 o'clock laat night with President J, H. McVety in the choir and a
good attendance of delegates. Four
new delegates were obligated.
Delegate Dunn reported on the work
of the parliamentary committee, a detailed account of which is presented in
another column. He also stated that
the special committee entrusted with
the preparations for the twenty-fifth
anniversary meeting had made provision for an enjoyable evening for all
who wish to attend the celebration in
Labor Temple, Saturday, December 5th.
Considerable time wae taken up with
discussion as to whether the candidates I
for civic office who had been recommended by the parliamentary committee should be endorsed there and then.
Eventually the names of the candidates
were considered one by one, B. B.
Bailey waa endorsed for ward four,
W. Dnirin for ward six, A. V. Lofting
for ward seven.
When the question of endorsing the
candidature of F. Mansell for ward
three, South Vancouver, came up it wae
announced that F. W. Welsh of the
Plumbers' union was going to run in
that ward also. In view of that, it
was decided to aak Mr. Mansell and
Mr. Welsh to both appear before the
next meeting of the parliamentary
committee in order that the matter
could be adjusted. The council voted
$100 to defray the initial expenses of
the campaign.
It waB reported that the Board- of
Trade was desirous of submitting a
scheme for land settlement to the provincial government. The board wished
to have the assistance of the council in
this matter, and it was decided to comply with that wish.
Secretary - treasurer Miaa Gutteridge
reported on the work of the Women's
Employment League, - which -ie dealt
with at length elsewhere in theBe columns.
It was reported for the general civic
relief committee that more than 600 of
the most necessitous cases in the city
had been given relief. The 21 organizations represented had forwarded a resolution to the provincial government
asking that action be taken to assist
relief work.
Preaident McVety reported having
appeared on behalf of the council before the convention of the Social Service Council, and dealt with the question of unemployment.
Bartenders reported they .were holding  a "smoker"  on Decomber  15th.
Electricnl workers again protested
agninst the reduction of wages of their
members employed in, tho police and
fire department. A committeo of three
consisting of Delegates Dunn, McVety
and Pettipiece were selected to appear
before the city council to protest
against the reduction in wages of electrical workera and others in the employ of the city.
A busy meeting closed at 10:15.
Last Sunday's meeting of Typographical union, No. 886, wm a record one for
.the year, both in the matter of attend-*
ance and business transacted, the sea*
■ion lasting from S to 8 p. as. Upon the
recommendation of the special committee, Messrs. Benson, Neelands asd Wilton, having in hand the provision for
unemployed members, tne ten per eent.
assessment wae discontinued and another plan adopted by the meeting;
that ''all members holding regular situations, with privilege of working full
time, shall give out one day each alternate week; and all regulars shall be assessed five per eent. on their earnings
for the weens they are not required to
lay off by this regulation. AU substitutes working three days or over per
I week shall be assessed three per eent.
of their total earning!. Members, If
they so desire, in lieu of laying off,
ahall give the day's pay to a substitute." "
Accepts Arbitration
After an extended discussion of the
subject, whieh has been up for consideration off and on for the past three
j years, it was decided to authorize the
1 officers to become parties to the American Newspaper Publishers' Association
arbitration agreement, along with the
local publishers*' association,
Tha New Scale
A proposed new scale of prices and
working conditions was submitted by
the local newspaper publishers' association, to take the place of the present
agreement which expires at the end of
| this month. A draft agreement, prepared by the scale committee, was also
read and, with a few amendments, pro-
vi-inx-ll-** mt.A * U_ At—. - •   -
BOY AND THE GANG.
Professor Says Gregarious Instinct Is
Keynote.
Professor G. Walter Fiske, of Oberlln Theological seminary, has been making a special study of boys, which haB
led him to certain conclusions. One of
tbe most important of these is that tho
boy is naturally a gangster. That is,
that he is to be found with and part
of "the gang." It is not his habit to
travel alone, and, as a member of his
gang, he develops a code of ethics all
his own. In tho case of the average
"gang," Professor Fiske figures that
tho code consists of these nine underlying principles:
Selfish interests are predominant,
practically to the exclusion of all altruistic motives.
Tho boy's only group ethics come
from his relationships in tho "gang."
The boy sincerely believes that might
makea right, and that fighting ia tho
juat way to settle quarrels.
Property rights aro but little respected, and this respect depends largely
upon the boy's experiences as an owner.
Tho boy believes that common ownership exists in nil things not owned by
individuals he knows.
His distinctions between right and
wrong aro based upon tho gang's customs, not on his reasoning.
The boy haa a separate code for thoHo
within the gang and another for outsiders. Thus he is a hero if he lies
to save tho gang, but ho may not lio to
a gang member.
The boy demands fair play, knows
what it is, will fight for it, and will
share it.
The public opinion of the gang, not
of the family or achool, is the source
and censor of his ethics.
Tho subject is one that should greatly interest both parents and teachers,
as should also tho professor's suggestion thnt if the boy is to be reached
at all and influenced for good, it must
bo from hia "gang" side.
. .The report of the Dopartmcnt of La-
bor, for November Bays of general conditions in the dominion:—"Owing to
the fact that a great many of the loading trades havo agreements with employers in which a wngo Bcnlo is specifically sot, out, there waa but little in
tho way of actual cutting of wage rates,
but many industries adopted the short
time policy or laid off a number of their
employeea. In ensoa where employeee
havo not been organized ratea were,
in some instances, reduced.
will be submitted to the local p-jwjuu-
ers shortly. H. C. Benson was selected
ae counsel for the union in case arbitration becomes necessary.
Nomination of Officers.
In accordance   with   local   by-laws,
nomination of officers for tbe ensuing
year were made and resulted as follows:  .-. tf , .. rt    • -.* , —   * -  —*  -
President—R. P. Pettipiece. (Reelected by acclamation.)
Vice-president-—W. C. Metzger. (Reelected by acclamation.)
Secretary-treasurer—R. H. Neelands.
(Re-elected by acclamation for tbe
sixth consecutive year.)
Executive committee—Robt. Fleming,
E. Kirkpntrick, R. G. Marshall, W. R.
Trotter, J. E. Wilton, for re-election;
C. A. Evans, W. H. Jordan, F. Leach,
W. Weatall, C. J. Tullidge. Five to be
elected.
Trustees—Geo. Wilby, W. R. Trotter,
H. C. Benson. (Re-elected by acclamation.)
Reading clerk—J E. Wilton. (Reelected by acclamation.)
Sergeant-nt-arms—C. Proake. (Reelected.
Delegates to the Trades and Labor
council—R. P. Pettipiece, W. R. Trotter, J. E, Wilton, Geo. Bartley, C. Gras*
sie, for re-election; H. L. Corey, E. Odium, C. A. Evans.  Five to be elected.
Delegates to Allied Printing Trades
council—R. H. Neelands, for re-election; Geo. Bartloy, L. E. McDonnell, C.
Uren, It. C. Hnrtson, R, J. Lukey.
Three to be elected.
Sick committee—A. Pelky, for reelection; F. Fowler, W. H. Jordan, H.
Robins, F. Leach, N. Williams, J. M.
Parisicn.   Three to be elected.
Elections to be held at the secretary's
office, Labor Temple, on Wedneaday,
December 16th.
CouncU Delegates* Report
W. R, Trotter, on behalf of the central labor body delegates, submitted a
comprehensive report dealing with tho
part tbe council had played in forcing
civic bodies to take measures to provido
for tho unemployed. He also fittingly
referred to the twenty-fifth anniversary
of tho council, which would bo celebrated in tho largo hall nt Lnbor Temple on Saturday evening, December
5th.
To Manufacture School Books.
J. E. Wilton submitted the following
motion, which wns concurred in:
"Thnt a committee of two be elected
to confor with tho Victoria Typographical uniou, in an endeavor to bring
about immediately tho manufacture of
all school books for the use of the
schools ia this province, with the view
that a number of our members be given employment, and that the idea may
be better inculcated into the minds of
the rising generation of the wisdom of
buying made-in-B, C. goods. That nf-
ter tho joint committee hns conferred a
conference with Sir Richard McBride
be nrrangod for, and thnt he be pressed
to make tho necessary arrangements to
carry this idea to n practical issue."
Committee—President Pcttipieco and
Reading Clerk Wilton.
One initiation nnd othor routine business concluded tho strenuous session.
The executive, acting as tho scale
committee, will at onco take up the negotiation of tho now scale with tho local nowBpapera.
Trade conditions ar6 still very quiot, '
especially in tho jobbing trade.   Thero
aro at least fifty too many printers in
tho city for tho work offering.
Granby WlU Start Furnaces
Official notice has been given by tho
Granby Smelting compnny that they
will immediately blow in two of their
battery of eight furnaces at their
smelting plant in that city and that
two additional furnaces will bo placed
in commission ns soon as possible, Thia
is welcome news for Grand Forks and
district, as tho smelter in thnt city and
the mine nt Phoenix have been out of
commission since shortly after the
commencement of the war PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY  .DECEMBER 4, UU
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reeerve, - $8,800,000
SB oranchea ln Canada
A general banking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rat*
East End Branch
ISO HA8TING8 STREET EAJT
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1HI
Paid-up Capital
Reaerve 	
Tetal
. *» 11,I00,M
12,MO,0Ot
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will open
the account, and your
kualnea* will be
earn*  be  It   large or
BANK OF
TORONTO
Amu...
Dapoaita.
 •51,000,000
.  ..111,000,000
'I
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Saving! Account In the names of
two or more Individuals frequently
possesses element* of considerable
convenience. In an account of this
nature fonds may be deposited or
withdrawn at will by either party
to the account, on hla or her Individual signature. lntereat la added to
balances  half-yearly.
446 HASTINGS STREET WEBT
and
boner Haatlngi and Carrall Bti.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunity in Itiied
Farming, Dairying, Stook and
Poultry. British Columbia
Grants Pre-emptions of 160 acres
to Actual Settlers—
Free
TBBMS—Besldance on the land
tor at leut three years; improvements to tha extent of ot per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at least tve acres.
For furtaer Information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SEOKETABT, BUREAU OF
PROVINOIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published  every  Friday morning  by the
B. C. Federationlit, Ltd.
R, Farm Pettlplece Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Director.-..   Jas.    Campbell,    president;    J.
II. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H,
Glbb; G. J. Kelly; R. F. Pettipiece
Office: Room 217, Labor Tempi*
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: (1.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, (100; to unions subscribing
in a body, (1.00
REPRESENTATVE8
New Westminster., .W. E, Maiden, Box 634,
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 681
Victoria.....:. .... .A. S. Wells, Box 1588
Affiliated with the Western Labor Freai
Association.
"Unity of Labor! the hop* of th* world."
FRIDAY DECEMBER 4, 1914
TBOUBLE 18 BREWING  for  the
Bowser-McBridt! government! if
we read the signs of the times
aright.   It is not coming from the outside of the conservative party so much
as from the inside.
TOSOABB    '      -A   P°™r£ul   influr*
sent   movement   is
THE LITE OUT a
*      ■"***■ v«*    growing    up     and
OT McBEIDE gaining Btreugth every day/ which in
beginning to look decidedly ugly for
the present government. It has for its
objeot the question of land settlement
in British Columbia. Down at the bottom, it really consists of a group of
conservatives and liberals/ who are
business men and investors, and who
are just beginning to realize that, unless the land of the province is put into
cultivation and made productive, they
are in danger of seeing their real estate and other investments reduced to
ruins, and themselves in the bankruptcy court. Their experiences of the past
six months have taught them that, in
the last analysis, any value which attaches to deeds or share script which
they have eome to look up as representing wealth, really depends upon being
able to lay claim to the products of labor from the natural resources of the
province. But the province haB not
been made productive at a rate to keep
pace with the reckless speculation' of
the last few years. And a condition
haB arisen which anyone with a rudiment of knowledge of economics knew
muBt come sooner or later.
•»      *      »      «
The result is, that confronted by the
threat of eommon disaster, liberals and
conservatives alike, have east aside
their make-believe and humbug about
political difference between them, and
have, for the time being, joined hands
-and forces to rescue each other from
the financial cataclysm which threatens
both. So they are going to try to raise
an agitation noisy and strong enough
to force Bowser and McBride either
into action or out of offlce. They say
—and most likely in their muddle-headed way Borne of them really believe—
that they are actuated solely by public
spirit and altruistic motives to take thiB
action for the general benefit of the
whole of the people of British Columbia. That kind of deceit and illusion
seems to be an indispensable part of
such movements everywhere and at all
times. But really and truly, they only
want to get the working people aroused
to a pitch of enthusiasm which will
make their attitude genuinely alarming
to Bowser and McBride, so that the latter will come out with a land policy
which will satisfy the business element.
Then the working-class, having again
performed its time-honored mission on
behalf of the bourgeois, will be silently
told to go to the devil or anywhere else
it choses, so long as it does not make a
nuisance.
PILE IT
ON TO THE
LABOB UNIONS AND LOAFING
are two terms whieh mean the
same thing in the opinion of the
"British Columbian," a New Westminster newspaffcr which spends most
of its editorial time
trying to say nothing in the dullest
possible way in or-
UNION8 der    not    to    em
barrass     the     Mo-
Bride-Bowser government.   It all came
up in an editorial dealing with   the
"Made in Canada" cry, wherein union
workmen were told they, were not so
commercially patriotic as, they ought to
be, and as they would be if they had
the welfare of their employers at heart,
as all good workmen should have.
Unfortunately, many of the labor
unions  aim  not  only to restrict
output, but also to encourage indifference toward the quality    of
manufactured articles   The closed
shop advocates say: "Do not work
too hard or too well; the skilful
workman should not set the pace
for the   unskillful"   The   result,
MUNICIPAL DEBENTURES
OF B.C. NEVER MORE
ATTRACTIVE THAN NOW
The yioldi today are more favorable to the Investor than
at any tlpo during the paat aiz yeara.
Wo odor a wide range of Debentures in 4100, $500, $1,000
or larger denominations at from 84 upwards and paying 6%
to 7%;
Full particulars on requeat.   Send for lateat list.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-OencrcJ Qgftftlg-
too often, is ah enervating quality
of endeavor which reflects itself in
the products.    Individuality  suffers.
There!   Now we know the unsuspected depths of infamy in the labor movement.   And if we were not such hardened unbelievers we might accept this
admonition with becoming humility and
credence.
*       *       »       *
Business is business, and no sentimental considerations can be taken into account nowaday when a matter of
business is in question. That is the
attitude of employers to workmen who
adduce sentimental reasons for a rise
in wages. Alright. The charge here
is that workmen bind themselves together for the purpose of selling labor
for as much money as possible. There
are unions of employers also. Are they
formed for the purpose of giving the
purchasing public as much as possible
for its money, or as little t Do they
try to lower or raise the price of commodities? Are they desirous of Belling
an article of good quality just for the
sake of the moral satisfaction they get
from it? Is it not true that the only
urge they have to sell good quality
goods is the fact that they want to
keep their trade! If they could keep
trade by selling goods of the worst
quality, which would wear out quicker
and thereby create a demand for more,
would they not do so? The more they
can sell the better living they make.
It is just the same with workmen. The
only thing between them and starvation is ability to sell their labor. We
will be frank and honeBt and say that a
man who works his very hardest one
week with the result that he is out of a
job and starving the next, is an ass.
It isn't his fault, nor is it his employers. It is the fault of an industrial system based qn exploitation of man by
man, and whieh turns life into a dog
eat dog affair.
« « ■ *. *
As to labor unions encouraging indifference to the quality of manufactured goods, that is not true. It is not
untrue because labor unionists feel any
personal interest in the product of their
labor. But it is true that a workman
would rather make a good article than
a bad one because it takes more time
to make a good article and gives more
employment. Workmen have every material reason for doing good work. They
have no moral or ethical reason for doing good work. If the product of their
labor waB theirs when complete, they
would have a personal interest in the
quality of it. The chief reason work'
men have for doing good work, is not
pride in the quality of it, but the desire to hold the job. But the policy of
employers is '' get it done," " get away
from it," "as long as it looks like what
it is meant to be, let it go." Sham,
shoddy, cheap, and make believe, are
the keynote of industry carried to the
point where custom is endangered but
not actually sacrificed. Concrete minus
cement, paint minus lead, adulteration,
graft, fraud and corruption in every
branch of commerce and industry. All
for the sake of profit. Workmen have
nothing to do with it. Their business
is to do work in the way which those
who employ them order it to be done.
That means the cheapest way which
can be devised without loss of trade.
thoritieu would have hesitated one mo-
obey, even though a few thousand
might have been slaughtered that jway!
The argument would have been between armed iron discipline, and unarmed moral protest. The only result
would have been instant death to the
latter. There is not the slightest reason to believe that the military authorities of Germany would have hesitated
one moment to take the bull by the
hornB and drown any incipient revolt
in its own blood. It may be depended
upon that all that had been carefully
thought out long before, like many
more things, and a line of action decided upon. The academic reasoner, miles
away from the factual circumstances
will probably say thnt the social democrats might just as well have taken a
chance of being shut at home as go
and run a similar risk on the battlefield, Such reasoning might seem very
plausible to a group of experts sitting
round a stove, but it wouldn't work out
in tho highly charged atmosphere which
must have attended the mobilization of
the German army. Moreover the love
of life is very deep, and mon in the
mass do not, and never will, voluntarily surrender a chance of retaining it.
How mnny of their critics would or
could have done differently from these
social democrats if they had been in
their position. Any blatant hair-split:
ter can be a heroe and a martyr by
proxy, a thousand miles away from any
danger of having to become one in reality. It does not cost such people anything to advise the other fellow to
stand against a wall and be shot. But
it will take more than mere blaming
and criticism to shew him how to avoid
such a dilemma in circumstances like
those which confronted the social democrats in Germany when war broke out.
WHAT
WOULD TOU
LONG DISTANCE PBITICS of the
German Bocial democrats, almost
all seem to be of the opinion
that they, in responding to the call to
armB shewed a particularly contemptible weakness.
Some say they were
merely fools, while
others go the whole
HAVE DONE hog and say that
they Bhould have allowed themselveB to be shot rather than
go to the war. Very little of thiB. criticism shews any charity, and most of it
is lacking in imagination. The position of the social democrats when war
broke wae, that some of them were already on the active list, and others
were on the reserve. As far as those
actually in the ranks at the time are
concerned, it seems more than reasonable to assume that the same military
system which has since then given such
amazing proof of organization and perfection in detail, knew almost to a man
which were the social democrats in the
army, The position of those not in active service was that they were in ordinary civil Ufe. Thus some were in
the ranks, some in the reserves, and
others in the Landsturm which is composed of the older men, The only ones
of these who had arms—and most likely no ammunition—were the men in the
ranks who would be scattered and
sprinkled among the various regiments.
*      «      *      »
The first thing that would have been
neceBBary to a mutiny or revolt, would
have been to organize it by simultaneous communication with each unit.
With all the Btate services—including
the postal and telegraph systems—in
the hands of the military junkers, how
was that communication to be secured?
Perhaps some critics will say that no
such action should have been necessary,
but that every social democrat should
have refused individually to respond.
If men were mathematics Instead of human that might have been the case. But
they are not, and in circumstance like
that there would have to be some central point of direction in perfect and
speedy touch with every man in the
scheme, otherwise nothing but muddle
and failure could be expected. But even
suppose they had acted spontaneously.
The majority of them would have been
without arms, and the balance probably
without ammunition. What would have
happened? Docs anyone suppose for a
moment, after what we have learned of
German military discipline during the
last few months, that the military au-
ment to shoot those   who   refused to
ZAPATA   THE   LEADEB   of   the
peons of Mexico is, in the opinion
of the   Daily   Province,   everything that is vile from a human standpoint.   We are told he is "a notorious
murderer whose
ZAPATA cruelty iB a by-word
from one end of
THB BEAIi Mexico to the oth-
PBOBLEM.  ,        er."   And that the
"things he has done
to some of his captives are un
speakable. He and his brother for a
long time have been the terror of the
state of Morelos and the mountains lying between Mexico City and the west
coast."
Finally, we are assured that his idea
of liberty is summed up in "a cigarette
and no work.'' Comment of that kind,
as a rule, is the flippant impudence
which does duty as a substitute for
truth with those newspapers which dare
not tell the truth even if they knew it.
This example is no exception. It is only
part and parcel of a steady and studied
policy which the ordinary press of this
continent has adopted in dealing with
all matters affecting the activities of
the forces behind, Zapata. •
*, * # «
These people well know the difference
between the revolution led by Zapata
and the machinations of men like Huerta, Carranza, Villa et al. One represents the uprising of soil slaves held in
economic bondage for centuries'by the
great landed proprietors whose ancestors took the land, from the peons by
force. The other represents the personal plottings and schemings of astute
mea bent upon using the present condition of Mexico for their personal advantage and ambition. The peons behind Zapata stand for the abolition of
private property in land. They have realized their object insofar as the state
of Morelos is concerned, and they are'
prepared to hold what they have by
risking their lives if need be. And
they will be a desperate quantity for
anyone to conquer, now that they have
once tasted the joy of their release
from bond-slavery, and the full fruits
of the land which they have bought
with their blood and tilled with their
hands. As to murderers, anyone that
sets out to champion the' Diaz, Madero,
Huortn, Villa, Carranza movements,
and their methods during the past three
years, should be quite an authority on
murderers. The soil of Mexico for centuries has been stained by the blood of
the common people deluded by such as
these. And now that the peons have
awakened to the realization that thu
only friends they have are themselves,
it is, little wonder that we see their agelong enemies striving with all the influence of venom nnd misrepresentation
to bring discredit upon their efforts.
old-fashioned and fumbling habits
which prevailed in earlier days.
* * * «
Then came the war, and with its coming the capacity for keen and balanced
judgment seemed to collapse Altogether,'
or at least to become suspended for the
time being.. Men of the keenest and
most critical typos of mind, who formerly could see at first glance right into
the heart of any big and complicated
question, all at once became one-eyed
and could not see straight even With
that one. They seemed to stop thinking, to stop weighing facts/and to surrender their, judgment body, boots and
breeches, to the absolutely unreasoning
and prejudiced attitude of mind which
war requires of men if they intend to
follow its ways. Up to the beginning
of war it was not so.' But after that,
with a few rare and isolated exceptions,
there has been no attempt' to scrutinize
the issue with that analytical impartiality which iB necessary to separate
facts and fiction, which the prejudice
of all parties to the dispute must necessarily give rise to. This almost complete paralysis of the critical faculty is
not by any means confined' to \ those
whose opportunities of acquiring education and trained judgment have been
limited. It pervades every strata of society, and in the minds of those who
are hoping that out of the savagerey
are hoping that out of the savagery
sanity of the future, it bodes no good.
When kings fall out   common men
fall in.
Don't forget that twenty-fifth anniversary celebration to-morrow (Saturday) night.
Joseph Messiah Martin is very busy
these days searching the wilderness for
the lost tribes of Liberalism.
The Liberal party "unity" Bmoklng
concert last Saturday consisted chiefly
of a programme of pipe dreams.
When the working class of British
Columbia get enough sense to ignore
Bowser and McBride as much as they
ignore the workers there will be a different story to tell.
It must surely have been some wag
that called the present provincial government "conservative." That is about
the last thing it is On the other hand
it is one of the most liberal and prodigal aggregations any man might wish
to see in action. It has given away
the lands, the mines, the fisheries and
the credit of the province as fast as it
could do it. Nothing but the mania
of men for names and symbols instead
of facts and realities, could explain
such a joke as calling the Bowsor-Mc-
Bride combination "conservative."
BEFORE THE WAB started, there
was growing evidence that the
world   was   gradually becoming
filling to adopt the scientific spirit in
matters   of judgment, as against the
old bat-blind preju-
WAB AND diced way in which
TJTT1WAW ***   D6W   thin*   Wft8
human treated by the folk
JUDGEMENT of a few generations
ago. Intelligence
and reason, in many departments of social and industrial life, had forced
mere views and opinions with nothing
more than personal feeling to back
them, to the wall by sheer force of efficiency. Sanitation superseded incantation as a means of riddance from infectious disease. Steam and electrical
power have been universally adopted,
in spite of the woeful predictions of
early Victorian ancients, that such
things were devices of the devil and
would bring disaster to all who used
tbem. Common-sense, had laid fast hold
on the fact that ignorance was destructive and wasteful. The material evolution of Bociety during the past fifty
years, as expressed in the industrial development of that period, was forcing
men to substitute intelligence for the
Last Monday one hundred clerks employed in the provincial government offices in Victoria were fired. As they
practically all got their jobs by "pull"
for good and faithful service valiantly
performed at election time, it means
that their dismissal will be bad business
for the Bowser-McBride machine.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention In January. Exeouttve officers, 1914-15: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, O. H. Fraser,
J, W. Oray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria, B. C.
NBW WESTMINSTER,  B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Oounoil—Meeta every seeond aad
fourth Wednesday at S p. ra. in Labor hall.
Preaident, H. Knudson; flnanolal aeeretary.
R. A. Stoney; general seoretary, W. E.
Maiden. P. O. Box 981. The public la Invited to attend.     -
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL J
Meets flrst and third Thursdays. Exen
cutlve board: Jas. H. McVety, president:
Frank Esttnghauser, vice-president; Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H, Gutteridge, treasurer}
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arma, John Sully; Q. Curnook* F.
Knowles, W, R. Trotter,, trustees,
PLUMBERS AND 6TEAMFITTERS' LOOAL
No, 496—Meeti every second and fourth
Friday of month in Laoor nail, 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webster; aeoretary, A. Me*
Uren. P. O. Box 966, New Westminster,
B. O..
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR OOUNOIL—MeeU flrat and third Wedneaday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnaton atreet, at $ p. m.
Preaident A. S. Wells; aeeretary, Thoi. F.
Mathlaon, Box 802, Victoria. 3. O.
KIMBERLETJ MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Minora—Meeta
Sunday evenings In Union hall. Preaident,
Alex. Wilson; secretary-treaaurer, J, W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B, 0.
City Solicitor J. G. Hay gets (0,000
a year. He does not want to be reduced
to, $4,200, but he is willing to go into
private practice again and do tbe city
job as a side line at $3,600 a year.
Even at that he says he will be making
a sacrifice. There are all kinds of briefless lawyers in Vancouver just now and
this is a good place to work off .that
"current rate of wages" clause.
Dr. Fraser laBt Sunday night, speaking on the problem of unemployment,
said:
"I have not the faintest idea of
a solution to this problem, not the
remotest idea."
Well, what about it? Did anyone expect he had? Why even Bill Taft when
asked for a solution of the question
said "God knows." He was only a
politician, but if those who are supposed to be closer to the information
bureau can't find out, then it seems a
pretty bad outlook.
When the News-Advertiser will*admit, as it did a week ago, that "every
man who haB an office in the city is
visited frequently by strangers asking
for the price of a meal or a bed," it
means that conservative slow-coach is
at last beginning to suspect what other
people have known for months. It is
characteristic of the conservative disposition that it should not have any
knowledge of something being wrong in
its social surroundings until apprised of
it through the medium of a "touch."
It Bhould be called the "Snooze-Advertiser."
Three boys, working as drivers in No.
1 shaft of the Western Fuel company,
Nanaimo, appeared last' Saturday
morning in the provincial court before
Magistrate Simpson, charged by Provincial Mine Inspector Newton with
having on November 18th committed an
infraction of special rule 83, by riding
on the trucks without permission. They
were fined $10 each. If the inspectors
would only be as strict with the mine
owners as they are with these boys, the
iniquitous conditions which led to the
strike would not be tolerated. But it's
another story altogether when it comes
to getting after the owners. They have
the protection of Bowser. The boys
have not.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURBS
DIPHTHERIA
COLUMBIA
OPTICAL PARLORS
Lorne P. Mtlnloah
Eyesight Specialist
est oeanviixb siurr
teymearloit
City Auction ud Commiiiion Co.
Cah paid for houaea and aultta
of furniture or Auction urtngod.
Satlafaotlon ..annteod, prompt
aettlement,.
ABTBUB I. BEIOH1BT
Smyth, ud Onnvllle Street,
AnctloMor Phon. B.jf. a«73
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prloea and termi to nit
yonr pocket-book,
Onr Stook of
FURNITURE
mut  be  seen  to  be  appreciated.
Call In and look It over.
[s Furniture Co.
Limited
♦1 HA4TING8 STREET WEST
SOUTH wbllinoton
SCREENED LUMP
GOAL
$6.50'
In TON LOTS, USUAL LIMITS
Phone Sejmonr 8930.
SOS PENDER STREET
DOMINION FUEL CO.
We are now prepared to accept
orders for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
This ooal, because of ita price,
Ib by no means a small siie, inferior nut coal, but high grade,
largo sized WASHED NUT
COAL for kitohen use
We inow what this coal will
do, having sold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to stand behind it and guarantee that it will
give you as good a kitchen Sre as
any high-priced coal you are now
using. If you use wood, wo
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitohen Sre than either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for it,
but try it on our money back
guarantee. »'
KIRK & CO.
929 MAIN BTREET
"26 Tears In Victoria.**
Seymour 1441
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.-4
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P;
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdoch Mo-!
Kenzle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.1
Managing Director, J. H, McVety, Room
211.
ALLIED   PRINTING   TRADES    COUN
CIL.—Meets  second  Monday  ln   thi
month.    President, - Geo.  Mowat;  secretary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
;n.
th<
:re-
BAKERS'  AND CONFECTIONERS'  LOOAU
»..._..:_..        u0i 46—Meeti aeoond anl
fourth   Saturdays  at  7:8fl
p. in.   President, H. a. had
worthy; corresponding eeci
reUry, R. J. Adami; buil-j
nets agent, J. Blaok, r—
320 Lsbor Temple.
laPEsfr
BARBERS'    LOCAL   No.    120.—MEBtI
second  Tuesday In each  month  8.30
p, m.   President, J. Bruce; reecorder. CI
E. Herrltt; secretary-business agent,  CJ
F. Burkhart, Room 208,' Labor   Temple]
Houra: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 676.—OFH
flee, Room 208 Labor Temple. MeeU
flrst Sunday of each month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanolal seeratary, Geo
W. Curnook, Room 208, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1|
—Meets every 1st and 3rd Tuesday.
8 p.m., Room 307. President, Jameq
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W,
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal secretary, 1*1
R. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dag-
nail. Room 216.
Bait;
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERfl|
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers'
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. 191—i
Meets first and third Mondays, 81 p.
.President, F. Barclay, 863 Cordova Eai
secretary, A. Fraser, 1151 How* street.
COOKS' WA1TER3 AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets first Friday la eaeh months
8:80 p. ra., Labor Temple. W, E. Walker]
business representative. Offlce: Room 2083
Labor Temple.   Hours:  B a. m> to 10:80; ll
, to 3:80 and 5 p. m. to 6:00 p. m. Conw
pentent   help   furnished   on   short    notice.'
I Phone Sey. 3414. ' j
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets Jn room 308, Labor Temple, iiel
ond and fourth Thursday of eaeh month, i
p. ra. President, O, H. Hardy; secretary J
F. L. Barratt; treasurer, W. T. Taylor. Ltd
eal No. 317 meets first and third Mono]
day of eaeh month, and Local 3047 i
first and third Tuesday of eaeh moath.
ELECTRICAL WORKERB, LOCAL NO. Sll
—Meets room 801, Labor Temple, ever*
Monday, 8 p. m. President, Dave Fink a
vice-pres Ideht, M. Sander; recording aee]
retary, Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; financial
aeoretary and business cgent, B. H. HorrlsonJ
room 307, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO
621 (Inaldo Men)—Meets flrst an<
third Mondaya of each month. Room 206
8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; recording aeeretary, J. M. Campbell; bus!*
rieas agent, F. L. Eatlnghauaen, Room IQT.
HODCARRIERS, BUILDING AND COMMOM
Laborers' union. No. 65—Meets flrst and
third Friday of each month, Labor Temple]
President, George Gibson; aeerstary, Georgf
Harrison, room 280, Labor Temple. All labl
orera Invited to meeting.
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING   REGU
LATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territorial and In a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of fl an acre. Not more than
2,660 aeres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease muat be made by
the applicant In person to tht Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In whieh th*
rlghta applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unaurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of 15, which will be refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall br
paid on the merchantable output of thi
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for .the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining right*
are not being operated, such returni
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Bub-Agent of Dominion Lands
. W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thlt
advartlaemen' will not be paid for—80680
MACHINISTS, NO. 183—MEETS SHOOK]
and fourth Frldys at 8 p. m. President
A. R. Towler; recording secretary, J
Brookes;_ flnanclal seoretary, J. H. MeVat|
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS. Lo
cal 848 I. A. T. 6. E.—Meets flnt Sun
day of eaeh month, Labor Ten
pie, 8 p.m. President H, C. Roddan; sec
retary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; re
cording'secretary, A. O. Hansen; bus)
ness agent, O. R, Hamilton. Ofllce
Room 100. Loo Bldg. Tel. Sey. 8045. ,
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.-
Meets second Sunday of each montli
rooms 28-30, Williams Building, 418 Gran
villa atreet,    Preildent, J. Bowyer; vice
Bresident,  F.  English:  aeeretary,- H.  I
iraaflcld; treaaurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNi]
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 80 -1
I Meets every first and third Wednesday
In the month la room 801, Labor Templd
President, A. Hurry; coiresponding secretary!
F. Sumpter, 1880 Twenty-third avenue eutfl
flnanolal seoretary, D. Scott, 677 Richard!
street;  treasurer,   L.   Tyson.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. ANfl
Decorators', Local 138—Meets evera
Thursday, 7,80 p.m. President, H. Grand
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, 1021
Comox street; recording secretary, n
Dowding, 622 Howe street. BuslnnM
agent, James Train, Room 203, LatxS
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .ol
, NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver anfa
I vicinity. Branch meeta 1st and Srd Frfl
days at Labor Temple, room 205. Robetf
C. Sampson, Pros., 747 Dunlevy Aval
Jos, G. Lyon, flnanolal secretary, 17fl
Grant street; J. Campbell, leeordlng seel
retary, 4868 Argyle street.
STEREOTYPERS1 AND ELBCTROTTPj
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver anl
Vlotoria—Meeta second Wednesday ol
each month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple, PresiJ
dent, Chaa. Bayley; recording secretanl
A. Birnle, co, "News Advertfter."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employeea, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple second end fourtfl
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., And flrst ana
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President!
W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary!
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity street-!
financial secretary and business agent!
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clar)t Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEER8,   INTBRNATION-1
al Local 887—Meets every Wednesday!
I p. m„ room 204, Labor Temple. FlnanT
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 216."
TAILORS* INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal). Local Wo. 178—Meeting!
held flrat Tuesday in each month, 8 p. m.
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording
seoretary, C. McDonald. Box 808; finan«
clal sec., K. Fa^eraon, P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES. LO.I
CAL No. 118—Meets second Sunday oil
eaeh month at room 204, Labor TemplaJ
President, H. Spears; recording secretary,!
Geo. W. AlHn, P. O. Box 711, Vancouver.    |
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    838 —I
Meets last Sunday of each moath at Si
p. m.   President, U. P. Pettlplece; «1m prett-l
dent, W. 8. Metsiort secretary* treaaurer,
H. Neelanda, P. O. Box 60.
Phone Your Printing Order
 -TO	
SEYMOUR 4490
FREE!   FREE!   FREE I
Sixty Watt
Tungsten Lamps
A Sixty Watt Tungsten Lamp of the highest grade (mch aa Is regularly sold oyer our counters at 40 cents) will be given any lighting customer of the B. O. Electric who purchases at regular sale aa Electric
Household Appliance, valued a< $3.00 or over at any B. O, Electric sales
room during the month of December.
THIB SPECIAL OFFEB IS MADE TO CALL TOTO ATTENTION
TO ELEOTBIO HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AS HANDSOME, USEFUL, DUBABLE AND SENSIBLE CHRISTMAS SIFTS.
VISIT OVB SALESEOOMB-OUB LINE INCLUDES GIFTS
SUITED TO EVERY NEED AND WITHIN THE BEACH OF ALL.
CumII tad
Hutinj. Slntt
B.C ELECTRIC
H38C.a-JI.Si.
NanDnia llWDAY.,
. .DECEMBER i, 10H
THBl BRITISH GOLUMBIA PBDifiRATIONIST.
DAVID SPENCER. LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Uuderwear and
Spencer's Prices
STANFIELD'S NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—Hedlua  weight,
elaatio rib; a Tery popular lis.— '
111., to ti...,       ....  S1.S9
Slaea 44 to 60  11.75
Comblnatlona, tiaaa to 42 $8.50
STANFIELD'S LOB8ER UNDERWEAR—Heavy grey.    Slaea to 44
' *   ;......i. .... 11.15
STANFIELD'S HEAVT WEIOHT NATURAL LLAMA WOOL UNDERWEAR—Per Garment. 11.75
STANFIELD'S  CREAM  LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC BIB UNDERWEAR—Heavy weight.   Ctr garment.. ■'•».',. 15.00
Comblnatlona ' 16.00
STANFIELD'S FULL WEIOHT NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—
..' i  .. tl.60
Combination, t ,,.... 15.00
STANFIELD'S    HEAVT    LOGGER    UNDERWEAR—Bine    Labal
 > 1X75
STANFIELD'S BLACK LABEL—Heavy weight, pun wool underwear    ,- ,  ...18.00
STANFIELD'S SILK AND WOOL UNDERWEAR—Cream, medium
weight.   Per garment.....' .' $1.00
Comblnatlona   ...... .., * $4.00
STANFIELD'S HEAVT WEIGHT WOOL UNDERWEAR—Sad label
 '... ....*. $1.50
Comblnatlona......  $4,00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
APPLES
Are now at their best and cheapest. .Your choice pf
No. 1 Apples at $1.00 per Box. Cooking Apples all
varieties very low prices.
POTATOES
Potatoes are now at their best for winter storing. Highland, well graded, 85 cents per Sack.
DRESSED POULTRY
Prices are very low this season, also butter and eggs
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
SPECIALS EVERY SATURDAY
Braids
Best
Coffee
,„ **"* HHAIiWl '" .„
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
UATPI  BI?Pl?ltfT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Distance
nVlluLi nEiUEiHl   phone ln Every Room.cafo In Connection. Bates
11.00 per day up.     Attractive Rates to Permanent Quests,
cotttagbam * Beatty, Propriatora 135 Haatinga Stmt Bart
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Nut te tbt Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUO STORE.
63 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. O.
Further the Borne Induatrj Horement to baring
this labal appear on tow printed matter.. It atanda
fer good workmanship, food citisenshlp, decant
wages and the up-buUding of tha city.
AlilXD PBHJTHJO TRADES
Composed of Tipographical Union, Web Pressmen's Union, Printing Pressmen's Union  Press Assistants' Union. Stereotype"' ttt Electrotypers' Union,
Bookbinders' Union, Photo-engrarera' Onion.
IWEOTT-nVB 1
I CENT. DISOOUNI IO ALL UHIOM
MEN OB THEIB PAMIJJES
I Da Not Practice "Hurry-up" Dentistry
The Month
'   and tho
"Hatnra Teeth"
I Tho MOW
; Bldfa. Blchards
and Kaitlip
Second nocr
Bnttanea
BeemSU
sMm
"The Last Word
in Dentistry"
"HURRY-UP," "oot-rate," and slipshod dentlatry le
dlatsateful, to aay the leaat, to people of refinement. In each
an Important matter aa Betting the month ln proper condition
to prepare the food for the atomaoh, orny the hlgheat eklll,
the moat improved methods and the best msterlsla should bs
considered.
ONLT the moat conaolentlona cere and the moat scientific '
methods are employed In my olllco.. Hy "Nature Teeth" are
worthy aucceaaora to Natnre'e own. My guarantee le plain
and alncere. I oharge nothing for examination and advice. Before I eatabllshed my own offloe I waa in demand at the high-
eat aalary aa a skilled operator.
"TOU SUFF8B HO PAW" OUABABTBBD
I HEREBT GUARANTEE tbat aU dental work
performed by me will be abaolntelr palnleae. If tha
slightest twinge cl pain ia experienesd br tbe patient no money need be paid to me, or If any haa
been nald II will be Inatantly refunded by me.
f forter guarantee that ell erown or bridge work
.llllng will remain lu Irstclsaa condition for a
irlod of TEN YEARS.   If sny of my work beeomee
leotlre daring that time I will reptoee It nbaolutely
MSE OF OHiROE
M
Pr. HALL, "The Mo4cm Pentist"
Municipal Elections To Be
Contested by Local Labor Unionists
Al|  Trades  Report  Most
Members Are Unemployed.
NEW WESTMINSTEB, B. 0., Nov.
25.—Regular meeting of New Westminster Trades and Labor council held this
evening, President H. Knudsen in the
chair.
— Communications: From B. G. F. of lire Compensation act for province;
filed. From city hall; Montreal, asking
for wages paid tb workmen; received
and secretary to comply with request.
From Hon. J. W. Bowser, as to clearing
public lands; -flled. From Col. J. D.
Taylor, M. P., as to the clearing of dominion lands; filed. From J. B. Duncan, vice-president Manufacturers' association of B. C, inviting members of
T. and L. council,to attend a meeting
to promote purchase ofv made-in-B. C.
goods; as the meeting was held the
same evening as the T. and L. council
meeting, the' secretary explained that
he had written to Mr. Duncan stating
that it might not be possible for a. delegation to attend, but extended the
wishes of the couneil for the success
of any movement looking to the prosperity of industries that employ white
labor; received and action of the secretary concurred in.
Reports,
Delegate Stoney, on behalf of the
joint campaign and entertainment committee, reported that at the first meeting 11 out of the 15 members attended.
Various matters were referred to subcommittees, including candidates for aldermen and school trustees. The first
week in December the regular public
meeting would be held'for the nomination of candidates. It was proposed to
hold a concert, not a smoker, which the
ladies could attend. Delegate Jameson
added that former President Cameron
had been considered as an aldermanie
candidate, but had not announced his
decision; received1 and committee given
more time.
Reports of Unions.
Typos.—About the same.
Plumbers—Generally the same; work
slack.
Barbers—Pretty quiet.
Bartenders—About   the   same;   few
men idle, few on half time,
Cigarmakers—Only about seven men
out of 19 working in town.
Carpenters—No improvement.
Musicians—Pretty quiet.
Brewery Workera—Working two days
a week.
Painters—About the same; couple of
men got some work on city barn.
Timber WorkerB—Not much change;
didn 't see anybody loafing, so they must
be working.
Engineers—No improvement.
Electrical Workers—Same as at last
meeting; mostly all working.
Street Bailway Employees—Four men
out of work on Sapperton-Edmonds
line; couldn't be much worse.
New Business.
Statement by H. Knudsen, president,
as to B. C. of Ij,, laid on table for one
month.
Amendment to constitution and bylaws carried by unanimous vote, but
must come up at next meeting when it
will have to be carried by at least two*
thirds majority to become effective.
Delegate Yates reported that baby
bonds committee met, but took no definite action after two .and half hours discussion. A holding company was the
favorite idea. Nothing doing until the
city may use its sinking fund, Beceived
and further time granted.
A letter from an engineer called attention to the proposal to have men
work for their board and bed in Van-'
couver. As the council felt assured that
the Vancouver Trades and Labor coun-:
cil would be on the job and endeavor
to see that a fair day's work received
fair day's pay, on motion of Delegates Yates and Jardine, the secretary
was instructed to convey to the Vancouver TradeB and Labor council assurances of hearty support from the New
Westminster Trades -and Labor council
in this matter.
Delegate Lewis said that Barr & Anderson sent their foreman over from
Vancouver to work on the steam heating plant at the Boyal City hospital,
and there were no local men employed
and it looked as if the foreman intended to do all the work all alone, which
would keep local men out of work. Referred to the municipal committee.
Delegate Yates said the city had reduced one class of men $1 per day, and
might extend that policy unless protest
were made. Teams were reduced from
$7 tq $6 per day about a month ago and
the team owner had to stand it, ns there
was no reduction in the price of feed,
etc. Referred to municipal commttieo
to protest against reductions.
Delegato Stoney brought up the matter of the city council buying electricity
from the B. C. E. R., and then on motion of Aid. Goulet giving it to that
concern free to demonstrate their cooking appliances at a made-in-B, C.
boosters' meeting.   Also that the Y. M.
PAGE TOREK
C. A. was not a charitable institution
and should not get'a grant from the
city. On his motion the council went
on record as opposed to the free electricity idea ana protesting against it
and any grant to the Y. M. C. A.
Delegate Stoney announced that he
had -copies of the report of the royal
commission on labor for the use of the
delegates, and they were quickly disposed of.
Referring back to reports from unions, Delegate Cropley announced that
there was no improvement so far as the
molders were concerned, and the reason
he was late was because of an accident
in the shop, and not ft surplus of work.
Oalgary Starts Relief Work.
Calgary city council has opened np
relief work for the unemployed on sewer- construction. Six hours .will be a
days' work, and the wages will be 25
cents per hour.
Begins, Labor Ticket.
Regina labor unionists are running
three candidates for the oity council at
the coming elections, Bruce Bird, J. S.
Brundige and W. E. Cocks.
eleveiTmen 10
BE
Arizona Voted in Favor of
Retaining the Death
Sentence
Governor  Would  Disgust
But Sight Expected to
.  Bring Business
MINARD'S LnfitMENT OUBElT-
GOLDS, ETO.
BERRY BROS.
Agents for
Cleveland Cycles
The Bicyclt with  tba Btputation.
Poll lln* of Acctiiorlu.
Bipiiri promptly executed.
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Pheae HliUud «•»
sSl^iSSil^a
Union
MADE
Jeer fwvBo
Eleven men are to be hanged in public in the square of the capital city of
Arizona on December 11. This will
mark the revenge of the governor—as
he thinks—upon the majority of Arizona voters, who pronounced against
the abolition of the death penalty in
that state last election. .The governor
is a strenuous advocate of its abolition,
and he expects to shame its opponents
,and bring home a sense of personal
'guilt to them by the exhibition, It may
be tough—in theory—on the voters, but
it wiU be still more so in actual practice for the doom'ed eleven.
The Governor of Arizona is a poor
sociologist if he imagines that the
voters will be shamed by the spectacle,
He doesn 't know it, of course, but the
probabilities are that, on the contrary,
he will please them immensely. For one
thing, it will bring business to the
town, and we have yet to see the moral
tragedy that would offset that consideration,
Many years ago, travelling on an agitation tour through Pennsylvania, we
struck a small town in an out-of-the-
way county, which seemed to be in an
advanced stage, of despondency. On
inquiry at the local newspaper office,
it appeared that a neighboring community which had always been hostile to
the interests of this one had pulled
wires with some Harrisburg politicians
and had thereby secured the hanging
of a condemned murderer which the
saddened community had beep almost
certain of securing.
The rival newspapers were slang-
whanging each other vociferously over
the matter, for it waB recognized that
the ceremony would secure all sorts of
local business to the place where it was,
staged. The local journalistic palladium of liberty immediately started
an extra Fourth of July celebration, In
which there were to he innumerable attractions, one of which was "the reading of the Declaration of Independence
in a loud and impressive voice" by a
rising young lawyer of the community,
who had political aspiration. But it
was universally felt that this was but
a sorry substitute for the original attraction and did little to dispel the
gloom which had settled on the community. Punkville mourned as one who
would not be comforted.
Some years later in the same state
the writer had the misfortune to adversely affect the business interests of
another small city by delivering
the first socialist open-air address which had ever been attempted there. We say "been attempted,"
for the address waB never delivered, the
speaker being mobbed and driven out
of the town by a committee of the most
responsible citizens after—it Ib only
fair t6 admit—they had given him due
warning not to orate. The community
recovered from the attack on local industries some time afterwards by publicly burning a "nigger^' in the market place, and thus restoring prosperity.
This of course, says the New "York
Call, is not possible in the Arizona case,
but there is no reason why the hanging,
as the governor desires to stage it,
should not be utilized as a temporary
reviver of local business. Tho railroads, we have no doubt, would do all
in their power by running cheap special
trains to the spectacle, as they did a
short timo ugo on a similar occasion in
Mississippi, to stimulate the influx of
Btrangers with money to spend after
beholding the great moral spectacle.
• For that is what a hanging is in tho
minds of those who appreciate it, and
the mistake of the governor of Arizona
and those like him consists in persistently denying it and imagining that
the advocates of capital punishment are
merely superficial people wbo delight in
the spectacle of death agoniea without
experiencing any deep moral satisfaction therefrom, though the most casual
examination would show that capital
punishment has the highest possible
moral sanction. There's scripture for
it, galore, while the other view has
nothing but new-fangled humanitarian
clap-trap behind it, in the minds of
those who insist on the old law of an
eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.
The governor of Arizona, if he really
wants to discourage capital punishment,
should go ahead and advertise the hanging widely und attractively as a public
spectacle. Then, at the last moment,
he should countermand it and have the
executions in private. Such a course
would do far more to abolish capital
punishment than his original program.
Let him disappoint the business expectations arising from the contemplated
spectacle and he takes a long stop toward its abolition altogether.
Since most executions become private, the demand for their abolition altogether haB proceeded by leaps and
bounds, but absolutely the best way of
restoring and strengthening the belief
in capital punishment is as the governor proposes, to make the spectacle public and advertise it as such.
Countless Ways in Which
Labor Might Exert Its
Influence
Means of Doing Immediate
Gpoi) and. Cementing
• Base
■ Municipal bodies derive tbeir powers
from legislatures and are always subject to control by the higher authority,
says a writer in the Winnipeg Voice.
Because of this some labor men think
the working class should not bother
with municipal politics till they control the superior oodles It is probably
true that the workers will not be able
to revolutionize their condition without
first capturing the full.powers of the
state.. Yet it is a poor imagination
that cannot discern countless ways in
which labor might exert a wholesome
influence on society during the preliminary stages of the struggle. Municipalities control housing, sanitation, public 'health, parka, charity and other departments of public effort. What nonsense it is to say that labor could derive no benefit from participating in
the control of these things. Most labor
men think public ownership a good
thing; it at least tends to raise the
conditions of labor. By controlling
municipal politics labor eould impart
a great impetus to the movement for
public ownership, and could exercise a
useful influence on the management of
municipally-owned utilities, Here, decidedly, advantage could be obtained.
Ab cities grow larger, the municipal corporations tend to become the largest
employers in the country. It would be
a nice thing for labor to control its
largest employers. Moreover, the spending powers of municipalities get greater
every day. New avenues for municipal
enterprise open up constantly; and it
seems probable that some of the most
important community work of the near
future will be done in the municipal
arena. It promises to be the experimental stage for the society of to-morrow. Labor men should therefore not
neglect municipal politics, It is true
they are handicapped by the property
qualifications required for electors; but
this difficulty could be removed by persistent pressure. Workingmen, even as
it is, outnumber all other classes of voters, and could exert an influence that
would surprise them did they oare to
try. It is not for the purposes of the
social revolution that workmen should
enter municipal politics; that task must
be achieved by an attack on the Central law-making bodies, But as a
means of doing immediate good and cementing a base from which to make
further Btrides, the municipal elections
offer unrivalled opportunities.
Begina Carmen Warned,
One day last week Begina street railwaymen found notices posted In the
barns, informing the employees that by
taking an active part in the municipal
campaign they would be in danger of
summary dismissal. The announcement
created quite a stir amongst some of
the employees, who read into the notice
a threat to dismiss any man who voted.
It was believed that the notice wns
poscted because of the labor candidates
being in the field. It has never been
posted in the car barns previous to this
year.
Street Carmen Want Eight Hours.
The Street Car Men 'b union of Cleveland, Ohio, has asked the city council
to authorize appropriations to mako
possible an eight-hour minimum work
day and to instruct the Cleveland Railway company to make tbe change. The
city and company have a working
agreement in the operation of the road.
Ah! great is the nation whose mothers
Have leisure to train and to plan.
Ah! great is a mother's devotion
And sacred the children of man.
Oh God, how long will we watch her
Falter and labor in vain
Before we arise ond defend her
And lighton her burden and pain
- —Rose Henderson,
The only mistake that Carnegie made I
in erecting his peace palace was in not |
having it fortified.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER.
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office ami Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Office: 40th & Fraser Avci.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CENTER &HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1Mt OIOROIA STREET
One Blook weat of Court House.
Use of  Modern  Chapel and
Funeral   Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
ttotettt. 221
Dej er Ni|kt
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
ud EMBALMERS
SH Mete* St.        Vaateafer, 1. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTOR! AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3481.
North Vancouver — Office and
Chapel, 122—sixth St. West, Phone*
134.
— aiaa-n
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating' Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain tbe Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Laborf
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
bas tbe Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled. *
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your.
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
HEALTH la mora to be daslrsd sad li ot mots vital Importance te the
well-being and happiness of tbe Individual tban great ilchss. Poet
teeth sooner or later mean poor health. To be heslthj we most have
tbe power te sssbnilato on food. Beforrf lt csn be srrlirtUrH, tt nut
ho thoroughly dlgeited, before It can he digested lt most ho thoroughly
instigated, and before lt can be msstlgstsd 700 most ban good teeth
with which to mastlgsts.
Owing to the stringency of the money market I am offering to do dental
work at very moderate prices
Silver filling  .$100
Platinite fining ,.    2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    5 00
Bridge-work, per tooth 5 00
Phtee., .. ..    10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phons Seymour 3331 Offlee:  10*. Bank ef Ottawa Mldiag
WHITE STAR
DOMINION
rflxnniAM
SfRVICE-IARGESH^'CMflA
Portland, Me. Halifax LiTerpool
Una Pertland         from Halifax
Dee* llth Dee, llth,, ...SS. VADEBLAND"-—13000 Tone
SS. "VABKBLAND." 18,000 tea., earriee .W, eeeoa-frt*third etaST
Operating under Britlah Flag. .
Canadian Facile Tonrlat Sleeplnf Care ta Halifax.
WHITE STAR LOT
New York ,    Qaeenstown       .       Liverpool
Dee. 19—New SB. "Megaatie" Dee. IS—SS. "Bailie"
Dee. 16—New 88. "Lapland" (19,000 tou)
New York AMERICAN LOT Liverpool
UNDBB THB AIOIIOA* PLAO
FAST BZFBHS OIB CLASS OABOT (II) SBBVtOB 1I.000*M> ST1AMBB*
Dee. lath.—SS.,"St. Paul,"      Dee. l»th.—88. ''New Tork."
COMPACT'S OFFICES:—Mt tat AVBNU1, SEATTLE
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH MAILS
'XMAS OOODS ARRIVING IVIRY DAY
ALL LINES NOW BEING SHOWN
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
MS HASTINOS STRUT WIST "    VANCOU VIA, I. c.
BIST IN THI WMT ISTASLISHIO 1SSS
WORKERS UNION
UNIOIwkrAMP
Named Shoes are frequently made ia No*
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Aay Shot
no matter what lte name, nnlees It bean a
plain and readable Impreielon or thie stamp.
All ehoea without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A 8HOI WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass
J. F. Tobln, Pros.   O. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treae.
=J
PENDER HOTEL *BjS^f»fitf-
SIS PENDER STBBBT WEST
« .   ..       •„ ' Uthli
telephone Sejaoor ISM
Ratea Sl*8» per Par eat Dp
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work iho«. and specialize in lines
'or minen, railroad comtruction,
fogging, elc.
VANCOUVER   -   -   B.C
-ONE THAI TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IK ANT
COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
POB PIPTY CENTS. ~~
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd. PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT. .DECEMBER 4, UU
Great Sale of
, Mens'Boots
FOR WINTER WEAR
Regular. $6.50
Values to Sell
for
Every pair selected from regular stock, every pair
sold with our guarantee to wearing qualities and
general satisfaction.
Made with uppers of box calf, in blucher style, in
heavy and medium weights, with different width
toes.
All sizes in the showing.
Our regular $6.50 values... .SALE PRICE $4.25
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447  3887 Main Street
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD;
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
MASS MEETING and
UBOR RALLY
CELEBRATING THE TWENTY-FIFTH
ANNIVERSARY OF VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
SAT. NIGHT, Dec. 5
Big Hall, Labor Temple
AT 8 P.M.
ALL UNIONISTS INVITED, WITH THEIR WIVES,
FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS
Brief Speeches by tbo First President and First Sec- i
retary of the Council   Too old and now forces will
meet and mingle.
FIRST VOLLEY IN   THE   MUNICIPAL   LABOR
CAMPAIGN TO BE FIRED BT THE CANDIDATES.
A SHORT ADDRESS BV MISS HELEN OUTTRIDOE
ADMISSION FREE
IN
TEN STATES
Twenty - two   States   Give
Limited Franchise to
Women.
Association Believes the Influence of Women Surprised AIL
Amcrit'iui women now have full suffrage in ten states and in tho territory
of Ahukii, according to returna from
the election, which apparently gave tbe
franchise to women in Nevada and
Mont ami.
Lute tabulation of the vote on equal
Buffruge in Nevada and Montana did
not upset the lead previously recorded
in favor of the women. These missing
precincts might overturn the' 300 vote
lead in Montana, but probably not the
lead of ..,500 in Nevada.
lu addition to the ten states now
listed as granting full franchise to women, they have the right to vote for
certain officers in 2 states.
The ten woman suffrage states and
the year of granting the franchise are:
Wyoming, 1890; Colorado, 1893; Utah
1899; Washington, 1910; California,
1912; Arizona, 1912; Kansas, 1912;
Oregon, 1912; Nevada, 1914; Montana, 1914.
The 22 states allowing partial suffrage to women are: Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Indiana, Illinois,
Kentucky, Michigan, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, New
Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico,
New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma,
Ohio, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin.
Despite the claims of woman suffrage
leaders that they won the vote in some
of the other seven stateB which voted
on the subject recently, late returns
bear out early indications that the
franchise wub denied women in Ohio,
Missouri, Nebraska, North and South
Dakota.
Officers of the National Woman Suffrage association contend that the women were instrumental in California in
passing the laws that drive out pugilism and segrated vice quarters and
failed in driving out saloons only because of the too drastic provisions of
the amendment. .
The leaders also declare that women
aided materially in voting prohibition
for Washington, Oregon and Colorado.
The vote on the ousting of Baloons is
still in doubt in Colorado, however.
WILL OOVERNMENT INVESTIGATE ARMAMENT
TRUST IN BRITAIN?
(Continued from page 1)
PIONEER SOCIALIST DEAD.
The secretary of Nanaimo branch of
the Social Democratic Party of Canada
writes as follows:
Owing to the death on the 4th of
October, 1914, of John Hough, the bo-
cialist movement in British Columbia
has lost one of its oldest pioneers and
an active and sincere worker, who despite rebuffs, was never, discouraged.
His strong and hearty voice was a
source of encouragement and strength.
In appearance he was short, stout and
very broad;, with a round red clean
shaved face.
He looked more like a sea-faring man
than a miner. Born in Wigan, England,
63 years ago, he had worked successively in Australia, the United States, and
Canada. "Jackie" was a fearless and
loyal comrade ever ready to help where
he could. No matter the position an
individual might fill, whether it waB
king or president, Jackie could never
be servile. His demise will be keenly
felt in Nanaimo and district.
In Ufe he scorned to act the servile
tool,— ' '
"Salt of the earth," that man whose
mind is free,
Stern foe to all who crave the bended knee,
And curb the soul of man, to stage the
fool,
Nature is all to him, rt is his school.
Whore striving for the Truth, gains
Liberty,
Unmasking Cant, Deceit, Hypocrisy,
Those mind entrenchments of Tyrannic-
rule,
And while the wide earth fight doth
ebb and flow.
Stern Justice Ib his theme, and Might
his plan,
For Freedom  scorns Blind-faith, he
lives to "know"
Truth thrills the soul of all who Will,
and Can,—
He fought for Progress, dealing blow
for blow,
He was our Comrade, better still—'' a
REAPING THE WHIRLWIND
After Orgy of Oil and  Land  Paikirs,
Oalgary Wakes up.
Calgary newspapers are apparently
just beginning to wake up to the fact
that thore is an unemployed problem.
The labor unions thore *have been forecasting it for three years at least. They
were called knockers and blue-devils for
their pains. The Herald of last Saturday says:
"There is melancholy satisfaction to
people of the west ikthe statement of
dominion government labor investigators that so far is unemployment conditions go, the east is just about as
badly off as we are. On the theory that
misery loves company we Bhould, under
the circumstances, feel pretty well satisfied.
"But we don't feol satisfied and will
not until in some' way the evil of unemployment Mn our midst' has been overcome. Whatever the causes may be
for it, the situation is decidedly unhealthy, particularly in this part of the
dominion, where there Ib so much room
for individual effort and whero opportunity is, or Bhould be, waiting for everyone
"Incidentally, although tho government investigators haven't said anything about it, it is a fact that through
the western states in cities and towns
conditions are even worse than here,
and the United States is not at war."
Posterity, condemned to pay the principal and interest on this year's riot
in blood, will have a mighty poor opinion of the people who are now on earth.
Ven. Archdeacon Richardson—Archdeacon of Nottingham. Shareholder in
Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd.
Ven. Archdeacon Seagrave—Archdeacon of Drogheda. Shareholder in John
Brown & Co., Ltd,
Peers of' the Realm.
The Duke of Sutherland—Vice-President of the Navy League.   Shareholder
in Vickers, Ltd.
The Duke of Newcastle—Shareholder
in Cammell, Laird & Co.
Marquis of Ormonde—Member of the
National Service League. Shareholder
in Vickers, Ltd., and Cammell, Laird &
Co., Ltd.
Marquis of Graham—Director of the
Bank of Scotland. Director of Wm.
Beardmore & Co., Ltd.
Earl of Cranbrooke—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd.
Earl of Denbigh and DeBmond—Vice-
President of the Navy League. Vice-
President of the Wnrwick Branch of
the National Service League. Director
of the London Joint Stock Bank. Debenture trustee of the Fairfield Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.
Earl of Durham—Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd,  •
Earl of Fitzwilli am—Vice-President
of the National Service League and of
the Navy League. Director of the National Bank, Ltd. Shareholder in John
Brown & Co., Ltd,
Earl of Hardwicke—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd.
Earl of Jersey—Shareholder in Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd.
Earl of Sandwich—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd., and Cammell, Laird &
Co., Ltd.
Earl of Stair—Director of the Bank
of Scotland. Shareholder in Armstrong,
Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Earl of Winchelsea and Nottingham
—Vice-President of the Navy League
and of the North Wales Branch of the
National Service League. Shareholder
in Vickers, Ltd.
Viscount Churchill—Prince of the
Holy Roman Empire. Order of*Jesus
Christ of Portugal. Member of the National Service League. Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Viscount Maj.-Gen. Downe—Member
of the National Service League. Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Viscount Goschen—Member of the
Council of the Corporation of Foreign
Bondholders. Director of the Imperial
Ottoman Bank. Chairman of the London County and Westminster Bank.
Late Private Secretary to his father
when First Lord of the Admiralty.
Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Viscount. Iveagh — Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Viscount Llnndaff — Shareholder in
Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd.
Viscount Wolverhampton—Son of the
late Bight Hon. H. H. Fowler, Minister.
Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., and Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Aberconway—Created Baron
by present Liberal Ministry, 1911,
Chairman of John Brown, Ltd., director
of Palmer's Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., and
of Thos. Firth & Sons, Ltd. One of the
founders of the Eighty und National
Liberal Clubs.
Baron Airedale—Father created Baron by Liberal Ministry, 1907. Member
of the National Service (League. Member of the Leeds jCommittoe of the
National Peace Council. Director of the
London, City and Midland Bank.
Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Ardilaun — Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Armstrong — Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Buron Barnord!— Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Belper, P.O.—Ex-Liberal M.P.
Director of Crompton and EvanB Union
Bank, Ltd. Shareholder in Vickers,
Ltd., and Cammell, Laird ft Co., Ltd.
Baron Blythswobd—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd., and John Brown & Co.,
Ltd.
Baron Crawshaw—Member of National Service League. Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Clinton—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Emmott^-Ex-Liberal M. P.
Created baron by present Liberal Ministry, 1911. Shareholder in Vickers,
Ltd.
Baron Estcourt—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., and Armstrong, Whitworth &
Co., Ltd.
Baron Fairfax of Cameron—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., and Armstrong,
Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Farrer—-Member of the Notional Liberal Club. Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Glenconner—Brother-in-law of
Mr. Asquith. Created Baron by present
Liberal Ministry, 1911. Chairman of the
Peebles Branch of the National Service
League. Chairman of the Union Bank
of Scotland, Ltd. Shareholder in Nobel
Dynamite Trust. Chairman of tho Thnr-
sis Sulphur Co., Ltd. {connected with
the Nobel Explosives Co., Ltd.
Baron Hnvershata—Member of the
National Liberal Club. Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd., and Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Hii lingd on—Partner of Glyn,
Mills & Currie & Co., Bankers. Directors, Director of the Imperial Ottoman Bank. Debenture trustee of Vickers, Ltd., and Wm. Benrdmore & Co.,
Ltd.
Baron Hylton—Shareholder in Arm
strong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron Kinnnird—President of tht
National Society of tho Young Mon'B
Christina Association. Vice-President
of tho British and Foreign Bible Society. Partner of Barclay & Co., bankers.
Shareholder in VickerB, Ltd.
Baron Kinnear, P. C—Shareholder in
Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Llangnttock — Vice-President
for life of National Service League,
Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Magheramorne—Shareholder in
Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd.
Baron North-—Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd,
Baron Northbourne—Liberal Peer.
Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd., Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., Palmer's
Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.
Baron Ribblesdale—Prominent Liberal peer. Director of the Nobel Dynamite Trust.
Baron Revelstoke, P. C—Director of
the Bank of England. Partner in Baring Bros & Co., Ltd., bankers. Shareholder in Armstrong. Whitw.orth & Co.,
Ltd. *
Baron Sinclair-r-Shareholder in Vickers, Ltd.
Baron Sta nmore—Liberal Peer.
Shareholder in Palmer's Shipbuilding
Co., Ltd.
Baron Wolverton—Partner .in Glyn,
Mills, Currie & Co., bankers. Shareholder in Palmer's Shipbuilding Co.,
Ltd.
The balance of thiB list will be published next week.
E
Companies   Import   More
Guns ahd Rifles into
Colorado.
Strike - breakers    Drilled
Nightly and Many of
Them Quit State.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
OAROET IN OOWS.
DENVER, Col., Nov. 30.—Although
the day on which it is said the federal
troops would be removed has passed and
Colorado seems aBsured of industrial
peace for the near future, citizens of
the state view with alarm the shipment of machine guns and high power
rifles into the Btrike district by the
coal companies.
During the past week, large shipments are reported to have been made
and the coal companies have asked permission to organize 78 imported gunmen into the militia at the Walsen
mine, near Walacnburg, If this is allowed, and it undoubtedly will be,
there will be 607 coal company thugs
members of the militia in the strike
zone, heavily armed with high powered
rifles and twelve rapid-fire machine
guns ready to start another Ludlow
massacre as soon as the federal troops
are taken out of the trouble zone.
The coal operators are said to be
ready to sign a new contract with the
Baldwin-Feltz detective agency, although some citizens believe that the
mine owners may be prevailed upon to
refuse this bunch of hired assassins a
renewal of their present agreement.
This belief is founded on the published
statements of the operators that they
hope to prevent any future trouble although their large shipments of arms
and thugs into the strike zone seems to
prove the hypocrisy of this assertion.
There iB no doubt in the mind of
anyone in Colorado that if the mine
owners were to-refuse this bunch of
murderers a new agreement, it would
do much to prevent future slaughters
of the innocents in Colorado.
Dissatisfaction among the scabs haB
caused the coal companies mueh trouble
in the southern coal fields within the
past several weeks.
Each night all the strike-breakers
are forced to go through military drills
for two hours after they come out of
the mine where most of them are compelled to work ten and twelve hours.
This, together with the fact that the
wages have been reduced at many of
the mines, making it impossible for the
strike-breakers to earn moret han (1.40
to (1.60 a day, has caused many of
them to lenv(? the state while local
strikes of Btrike-breakers are common,
Ahemtr
The Aquitania was nearing port
when a poor woman in the steerage
gave birth to a little cherub boy.
She was extremely indigent, and
the ship's doctor happened to mention
the fact, the saloon passengers collected
a purse of some fifty sovereigns for the
mother. Ana she in turn insisted on
personally thanking her benefactors, on
the day of landing she was carried on
deck in a chair, when the ladies spoke
kind words of comfort to her and she
replied: "I must thank you from the
bottom of my heart. It waB most kind
of you to give me all this money for
me and my baby; it will be a comfort
to my husband, whom I'vo not seen for
three years."
Women's Wages in Washington.
Eleven dollars for waitresses and
nine dollars for other hotel or restaurant help, were the weekly minimum
wage recommendations made last Wednesday by the conference called by the
State Minimum Wage Commission.
These recommendations include a provision that no employer Bhall deduct
more tnan $3.50 a week for meals, two
dollars for a room or five dollars for
both room and board. These recommendations will go before the Industrial Welfare Commission for adoption
or rejection nnd it is considered certain
that they will be adopted.
Agent—I came to deliver your book
i "How to Play the Piano."
Lady—But I didn't order any.
Agent—Haven't you    a  next    door
neighbor named Brown?
Lady—Why yes.   Is it for hert
Agent—No, ahe ordered it for you.
Government Investigator — What
made you burn your books?
Railroad President—Tho motto of
our road is "Safety First."
Tho Nova Scotia "Lumber King" says
"I   consider  MINARD'S  LINIMENT   the
BEST liniment In use.
I   sot  iny   foot  badly  Jammed   lately,
bathed lt well with MINARD'S LINIMENT
and it was as well as evor next day.
Yours very truly,
T. G. McMULLEN
Before asking children questions in
public be sure of their answers.
Take that Watoh to Appleby, 806
Vender Wait, Cor. Pender end
Richards, for nlgh-claiM watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings jobs
guaranteed for 13 months. ■■
lEADqUARTERV
Jn the heart of the retail districts Absolulel]
In the heart ot the retail district,. Absolutely
fireproof and modem in every respect. Cuisine
unexcelled, European plan, $1 to $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS. Owned ind
operated ■ hy The Provincial Hotel* Company Limited.
HOWARD | SHEEJIAN, E-M"
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville   Meana'
PANTAOES  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOW* DAILY
8.48, 7.80, 9.15   £eaaon'a   Prlcea:
Matinee, 18c: Evenlnga, 18c, ase.
$5 Down and $5 per Month
No Interest—No Taxes
Secures You a Choice 10-Acre Farm
Call ot write al one. (or (nil particular, o( (hla choice acreage, iltnate Is
the heart o( the Bella Ooola and Llllooet Diatrlota. Open meadow-like land,
auttable (or mixed (amlnj, chicken ranching or hog railing. Soil a rioh, elltr
loam. Plenty o( good water, the land lying on river and lake. Good roada,
telegraph and telephone oomnnleatlon right to the property,' Will hare railroad communication with Vancouver In a ahort time.   Price only lid per acre.
J. I. EAXIN * 00.
80S Holden Building .
16 Haatinga Street But
Vancourer. B. O.
Phone Seymour 8888
Name..
Andrew;,
BARGAINS
We are giving 20% of all our Men's and Boya' S
Clothing arid Underwear
"      And Begular Prices on Everything ln the Store
CLUBB   &   STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West       Phone Seymotir 702
COAL!!
8-
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Oompany whioh sells
AMERICAN
OOAL
and Employ*
Oriental Labor
Fifteen Years in Vancouver Ooal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
The Company which sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
427 Seymour Street
Phone Sey. 210
ThA Fm-aorarinniat ^'H b* m~*i *° m* »*«•-»■» outside
llie reaeraUOniBI of Vancouver Olty. In Canada, (rom now
*am******a*^*u********      until January 1,1916, for 11.60.
del
Ipmcbtlobc
aceo.
T.B. CUTHBERTSON &Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
OBOANIZED   LABOK   EVERYWHERE
Thia la Our New OHION LABEL
If you believe ln and atand (or Work*
ing Claaa Solidarity and really want to
aaaiat the Clothing Workera organiie,
you will recognlao thia label and demand
it from yonr tailor, merchant and deal*
era.
Aak for It—tniiit on tt
'keep youb monet in b. o.'
bt using
South Wellington Coal
ae auppUed by
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .$6.75
Washed Nut, ton.. $5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Tour Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined in B. O. hy B. O. Lahor for
B. O. People.
MENTION THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
PHONE SETMOUB 9086
DONT DESPISE
The Small Deposit. Persevere and it will grow
to a large one.
L\°1o
INTEREST
Regular—Safe
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Labor Piper as an Advertising
Medium
Printer's Ink, a recognised an*
thorlty on advertising, after a thorough Investigation on this subject
says;
"A Ubor paper Is a far better advertising medium than an ordinary
newspapser ln comparison -with circulation.. A labor paper, /or example, Having 9,000 subscribers. Is of
more value to tbe business man who
advertises in it, than an ordinary
paper with 12,000 subscribers.
PRE5IDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE -SO-EASY
MADE IN CANADA
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
. $46.80
Outfit includes cabinet of Fumed Oak
beautifully finished, hinged cover,
very latest hornless type of phono*
graph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly adjusted and regulated. Removable
front and top. Outfit Includes 12 four-
minute Blue Amberol (indestructible)
records of yonr own selection. Terms
..6.80 oesb, balance at the rate of
95.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.

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