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The British Columbia Federationist Sep 4, 1914

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 SIXTH TEAE. No. 178.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR.
.^ _ _^	
Phillip um
M. U, I
If
He And His Wife On Their
Way Out to New
Zealand
Speaks of Labor Party In
The British House of
Commons
Phillip Snowden, M.P., the labor
member for Blackburn In the British
parliament,- passed through Vancou
ver this week on his way to New
Zealand. He was accompanied by his
wife, Mrs. Ethel Snowden, the well-
known Speaker on adult suffrage and
kindred subjects.
When Interviewed by The Federatlonist, Mr, Snowden was unwell from
a cold which had not dealt kindly with
Ub frail constitution. In his appearance he Is slight of build, but the tremendous mental energy of the man
gives one the Impression of a canoe
fitted with a 100 horse-power engine.
Of the labor group In the British
house ot commons, he is acknowledged to be the most eloquent and
forceful speaker, and at the same
time one of the best Informed on
economic subjects from a labor standpoint.
The mission of his wife and himself
In New Zealand Is connected with the
parliamentary elections which take
place over there a few weeks hence,
and In which they have heen requested to assist. His object In coming by way of Canada and the United
States is to Improve his health, which
is never of the best. For that reason,
he has done practically no speaking
on this continent.
Asked as to his opinion of the work
ot the labor members ln the British
parliament, he said tbat opinion must
necessarily vary according to the
critics. He did not claim that everything the party had done waB of nee-
. esBlty right, but he did believe that
Lthelr Influence tn the house had had
a marked effect on British politics to
the benefit ot the. working class. He
cited old age pensions, payment of
members, state Insurance and other
measures, which owed their existence
largely to the work of the party.
He pointed out that the entry of
labor Into British politics, by direct
representation .from the working class
was, In Itself, a big step, and a big
experiment. Their position ln the
house was a difficult one, and* remembering whence they came, It naturally
'followed that their critics must be
more numerous and louder than those
of the old parties. He did' not expect
them to be perfect, and he was ot
'the opinion that If many of their
critics could experience for themselves the actual conditions which
the party had to face In the house,
'tbey would understand some of the
_ party's difficulties more clearly, Dur-
■ Ing the past session the efforts of the
'party had been devoted to getting
iHome Rule out of the way, as tt was
felt that nothing else could be done
as long as that remained to be dealt
with.
Mr. Snowden, continuing, made tho
definite statement that he believed
the bulk of British trade unionists
were tully satisfied with the work of
the labor party In the house, He wu
also of the opinion that when the
next general election came round, tne
vote of the party would he largely increased. He had eome to that opinion
aa the result ot figures shown at fourteen by-elections, where the labor
vote had polled 20 per cent, with liberal, conservative and labor candidates ln the field.
Labor Party Vote Inereaslng
In some constituencies they had
not gone Into the flght until late, and
after the other two parties had been
ln the constituency for weeks, yet the
labor vote had registered 3000 to
4000 at the election. The labor vote
everywhere, In his opinion, had Increased to an amastng extent. Remembering the cumbersome electoral
machinery and the limited franchise
In Britain, he considered the party had
done remarkably well ln recent years.
He was astounded to note the way tn
which public support had swung
round to the propaganda of the labor
party.
Armament Machinations
Interrogated as to the part which
he had personally played In the house
In exposing the machinations of the
armament trust, he modestly admitted that he believed it had produced a powerful effect upon the
public mind ln Britain, and that the
results of lt would be seen after the
termination of the present war. He
said that previous to the exposure,
the house Itself as a whole did not
realise the extent to which lt was permeated with the various groups and
Jpllques of members and officials, who
Jwere financially Interested In tne
|sale of armaments,
Not the Time for Comment
_ On the question of the war Itself,
lie said he did not feel that the present was the time for public criticism.
■The deplorable fact was that the war
CITY ALDERMAN
AND HIS REMEDY
FOR, UNEMPLOYMENT
VANCOUVER, B;C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,1914
Alderman O. H, Cottrell has
a remedy for the severe unemployment which now prevails
among the laborers ln tne city.
On a visit to the*'Labor Temple
last Wednesday, he made
known his .desire that the
Trades and Labor council
should express Itself as being,
in favor of a reduotlon In the
wages of laborers working for
the city. His idea Is, that If the
laborers who are now working
for the city, and who receive S3
per day of 8 hours, would agree
to a reduction of pay, then the
city could put on more laborers, and the money which Is to
be expended on the work whloh
they are doing would thus be
distributed over a larger number of men. City laborers are
now working two weeks on,
and two weeks off, and making
333 wages each month. After his
interview with the president of
the Trades and Labor council,
Alderman Cottrell seemed
quite discouraged. He represents Ward VI. on the west
side of the city where there
are very working class voters.
MEXICO STILL A
Will Champion the Cause of
Farm  Laborers  With
Force of 60,000
SAY MINERS
Order of War Department
Will Drive the Scabs Out
of the Strike Zone
'Workers Lining Up to Seize
Political Powers of
the State
Oarranza and Constitution
alists Will Be Unable to
Hold Ruling Power ■
DENVER, Colo., Sept. 1.—None ex
cept residents of the state will be allowed to work In the coal mines of
Colorado, according to a new order
Issued by the war department This
ruling sets out that strikebreakers
must apply at the mines for work
without previous solicitation by the
operators and that they must have
lived tn Colorado for one year. Scabs
are also warned that they must have
complied with all the mining laws of
the state. Some discussion has arisen
as to whether all strikebreakers now
working, who did not comply with the
rules will be discharged. It Is known
that only a very small percentage of
the scabs have worked In coal mines
before. Few are residents of the
state. If the war department ruling
Is construed to apply to all miners
now at work, It will mean the discharge of approximately 3,000 scabs,
according to an estimate of the
United Mine Workers, The enforce
ment of the order would therefore
drive from the state practically every
coal miner except those which belong
to the United Mine Workers. The
scabs In the mines continue to demand that they be made membera of
the United Mine Workera and that
they be allowed to come out on strike.
Vice-President Frank J. Hayes of the
Mine Workera Is now in Colorado to
take personal charge of tbe fight and
wage lt with renewed vigor, Hayes
said upon alt arrival In Denver that
a strike of tbe scabs might be called
any time. Although nothing definite
has been given out by the miners'
officials, It Is-believed that the walkout of the scabs will occur within the
next few days. With the primaries
but one week away, the workera are
lining up to go down the line in a
solid plalanx for real friends of labor.
Labor Temple Reading Room
When all the world looks dark and
dreary and tbe prospects of a job go
a-gllmmerlng take a run down to the
Labor Temple pool, billiard and reading room. There you will flnd music,
and a bunch of good fellows to
help you while away the time. If your
thoughts turn to home and mother and
you feel like writing a letter, tell your
troubles to Manager Alexander, He
will flx you up and make you. feel at
home.   Sundays are the busy days.
While the attention of the people Is
concentrated on' tbe tragedy ot collision of Interests In Europe events ln
Mexico have developed with extraordinary speed. The federal government Is In the last moments of Its
life. President Carbajal, who succeeded Huerta as ruler of that country, Is flying before the advance of
the rebel force. The federal generals are evacuating the capital with
the rest of the army, once one of the
strongest powers on the American
continent, the army that had ln subjection during 35 years a country of
17,000,000 people. Financiers, who In
one way or another supported the
federal government are finding their
way to the coast' Politicians who
have rifled the treasury of millions
of dollars ln the last three years are
packing their grips and leaving the
country. The downfall of the powers
which have ruled Mexico since the
Spanish conquest is now .an. accomplished fact. The disappearance of
the feudal system with the break up
of the big estates is another fact
General Obregon, of the constitutional
army Is going to take possession of
tbe capital in a few days.
Zapata, with thousands of his fol
lowers is still entrenched about 20
miles south of the city. There is no
doubt that he will, later on, flght with
the Obregon forces on account of his
stand against the ridiculous reforms
promised by Carranza, leader of the
constitutionalists, ln connection wtth
the solution of the agrarian problem.
If Carranza assumes power there will
be established some kind of reform
tbat will Increase In great number
the land owners. Thousands of men
will become proprietors, yet obligated
to pay tbe government, in annual instalments, the price of their land. The
middle class, will rise and an army of
bourgeois will take, the place of the
old rebjn'of big- ItiioY otnoStt. -^ r '■*
Zapata Has Other Plana
Now, Zapata, as the leader of the
farm workers, is opposed to the "reforming" of the constitutionalists. He
has taken possession of vast tracts
of land in five or six of the southern
states and has been working the
farms during the last three or four
years without paying anything for
taxes or rent. His policy has
been to work tbe land for use, not
for proflt. He objects to the creation of tbe middle classes and stands
for the platform of his party, a platform that has not been accepted by
JOHN h. HAVS
Secretary-treasurer of the International
Typographical union, who waa a very
-busy man at that recent convention ln
Providence, R. Ii
the constitutionalists. One of the
planks of the platform states that the
land should be put Into the hands
ot the farmers wbo live on it and
work lt without paying any compensation to the government or to the
former big owners. He has assumed
this right beoause he says, the farm
workera are descendents of the original owners of all the land ln Mexico
and thousands of them ln the administration of Dlas were driven off their
land In order to make room for the
big monopolists. Peace Is far away
yet in the southern republic. The constitutionalists will have the opposition of all the Zapata followers who
are prepared for the flght as soon as
Carranza tries lo enforce new laws
covering the land. The Zapata forces
number about 60,000 men, mainly
cavalry, and If they have not been
In active servioe during the last three
montbs It Is certain they will go back
to the field and fight for their principles as soon as Carranza takes pos-
sessslon of the presldental chair and
attempt to bring Into effect his reform
laws. '".■-.
Zapata has the love, backing and
confidence of ail the poor classes of
the country whose rights he has
championed In tbe battle fields
against four governments. Although
he has no personal ambition for
power or wealth—he refused the
$2,000,000 Madero offered him for his
surrender and refused the highposl-
tlon of governor that Huerta was giving him—he will lead the forces that
eventually will sweep the whole country and change a land of slaves and
hungry men into a nation where every
man willing to work will get the full
product of his labor.
In view of Zapata's plans and with
the experience of the war in Mexico,
the. new government the constitutionalists hope to e*StaBrrsh,'Mfill ridt 'last
many months.
The trouble In Mexico Ib not a question of parties, political parties or
personalities. It Is purely and simply
an economic flght, In which the dispossessed are willing to flght for wbat
really belongs to them.
Out Shingleweavers From
Sixteen Cents to Thirteen Cents per 1000
General Reduction of Five
Cents Per Hour in Wages
of Ail Employees '
Labor Day Excursion Rates
Labor day rates on the Canadian
Pacific railway between all points
from Port Arthur west, will be ln
effect September 1, with September 9
as the return limit The rate will be
one and one-third fare.
NEW WESMJNSTER, Sept 3.—
About seventy-live shingleweavers
went on strike here two weeks ago, as
a protest against a cut In prices, made
by the Fraser Mills/Burnett Mills and
the Independent Mills, the latter employing both whites and Chinese. The
previous price of 16 cents per thousand was cut'to 13 cents, and to 15
cents upon the heavier class of
shingles.
Up till last Monday the shingle-
mills ot the above planta were idle,
but the Fraser begun- work then with
three Chinese and three whites.
It might be mentioned, too, that a
general reduction of five cents' per
hour was made In the sawmills
named, which, of course, was accepted without a murmur by the unorganised slaves so plentiful during
times like these. *■
On Sunday evening last Clarence
Folsom, American Federation of
Labor organiser for the Timber-
workers' International union, Seattle,
addressed a mass meeting of the
striking shingleweavers and their
friends, and he will render whatever
additional assistance possible during
bis visit up in this neck o' the woods.
STAY AWAY  PROM   ROSSLAND
So Advises the Executive Board of
Local No. 38, W. F. of M.
To all looal unloni of the Western
Federation of Miners:
We, the undersigned executive
board of Rossland Miners' union, 38,
W. F, of M., desire to warn All men
from outside camps not to come to
Rossland at the present time. The
Consolidated company is the only
company working here at present.
The Le Rol 3 has olosed down,
throwing one hundred and fifty men
out of work. The Consolidated company la not at present Increasing Its
force, so those hundred and fifty men
cannot, find, wprfc jjnd thsre. h> jUw
a large number of outside men here,
making In all over two hundred men
out of work and no prospect at the
present time of getting work. WO
advise all men to keep away from
Rossland while these conditions prevail.
(Signed)
EXECUTIVE BOARD ROSSLAND
MINERS' UNION,
Ben Stout President.
W. S. Bonner, Vice-Pros,
Oeo. Dingwall, Secretary.
E. Campbell
P. Head,
(Seal).
UNEMPLOYED WILL
SEND DELEGATION TO
WAIT ON  PREMIER
(Speolal to The Federatlonist).
NANAIMO, B. C, Sept 3—
Nanalmo unemployed meeting
held today. City councU had
been requested to attend, bnt
failed, Nine hundred men in attendance. Resolution passed
calling on Messrs. Williams and
Plaoe to carry resolution to Vlotoria tomorrow. Sheppard also
requested to accompany deputation. Premier meeta same tomorrow.
ROAD TO WAR AND
PATH TO PEACE
Science Conquers  Disease
and Builds Munitions
Of Warfare
Disgust of  Nations With
the World-War Will
Bring Peace
war, ,—™,.,
from lta own viewpoint, and accord
ing to its readers.    But  out  ot  all
which have come  to  The
ttiontit   none   have    been
ANOTHER LABOR DAY MILESTONE!
The Vancouver Labor
Temple Co. Ltd., has
TWO MODERN OFFICES and TWO
GROUND FLOOR
STORES TO RENT, at
very reasonable rates. If
interested, telephone Sey.
7495, or call at Room 311,
Labor Temple.
was actually ln progress, and until
such time as lt was over, reasoning
as to the merits or demerits of It
could not be of any avail Personally,
he felt that the policy of European
powers, during the past ten years, had
made war Inevitable sooner or later.
The one outstanding feature which
he viewed with regret was that alliance of Russia with France and
Britain, iHe had always been op
posed to Sir, Edward Grey's pro-
Russian policy, and had never at any
time been ln favor of Britain having
understandings or alliances which
committed the country to the support of other nations at a time of
war, unless those alliances or understandings were fully realised by the
publlo.
The labor party had, upon several
occasions, asked the specific question
In the house, whether Britain was
oommltted by any promise to support
France ln caae of war, and Premier
Asquith had always answered "No,"
This war had proved that such was
not the case.
Mr. Snowden congratulated the
unionists of Vancouver upon their
Labor Temple, which he considered
was one of the best example of
working class enterprise which he
seen on his many travels.
from the Scientific American:
'The huge war now raging in Europe Is the Inevitable outcome of the
unsymmetrlcal development of the
mind of man. Perhaps tbe leading
country ln the world ln the sciences
and the arts Is Germany. Certainly
the leading country In the world In
developing an aggressive and militarist policy Is Germany. She Is at once
the most enlightened and the most
reactionary of the greater nations of
the earth.
She is, above all other countries,
the living embodiment of that monstrous paradox we call the advancement of science, Our progress In
the control of nature for the benefit
of mankind has been equalled only by
the splendid Intelligence with which
we have perfected means for slaying
one another. We learn how to
abolish a disease and simultaneously
Invent a dreadnought. As scientific
men, while half of us work for thrf
establishment of heaven upon earth,
the other half strengthens the possibilities of an Increasingly ghastly
hell We approach the millennium
and Armageddon along parallel roads.
This towering paradox will now be
resolved. The destructive half of mankind have beaten their brethern In
the race, Tbe war lords triumph over
the apostles of peace. For the moment the service of the devil takes
precedence over the service of God.
But only for the moment Clever and
energetic as they have been, the destroyers have not been clever and energetic enough.
The foundations of peace are too
firmly laid, The fear that civilization
is now rocking to Its fall Is a fear
without Justification. Tho war will
progress from horror to horror and
with It tho disgust and anger of the
people will doepen. The foolishness
of war! More and more will this
thought permeate the consciousness
of the whole world. Already this view
Is clearly expressed by countless men
throughout Europe. As they suffer
more they will see more clearly, and
when this war ends there will be
no more warn. We aro not witnessing the triumph ot the destroyers.
We are witnessing their vast collective suicide.
As ruthless as they have been In
war, so shall we be ruthless for peace.
At present we play their game: we
flght, because flght we must But after
—there shall be no more war lords.
The paradox will be resolved. Science
shall no longer Ignobly serve the
forces of destruction, but released
from this dire bondage, shall bend all
Its energies to the task of making
this fair world more beautiful and
more secure,
The savage, trained and equipped,
shall no longer preside at our councils. His day Is over. His last and
greatest attempt at dominance shall
result In his utter overthrow and destruction, whatever be his nationality;
and the race of tbe future will be a
race of civilised men, united by the
bonds of mutual Interest and apprecl-
atlon and developing their powers In*
concord In the security accorded by
an agreed and permanent world-
peace."
TRADES COUNCIL
HELD BUSY
W. B. Trotter Will Oo Ta
the Trades Congreaa
Convention
President Made Beport On
Government Conference
Held Last Week
The meeting of the Tradei aad
Labor oounoil was held hut night,
with a very fair number of delegates
present and President J. H. McVety
in the chair. When credentials war*
before the meeting, it was decided to
impress upon the plumbers the need
ot their delegates being present If
they ever expected the council to at
of sny use to their organisation. 4
letter wss received asking the oom»
ell to appoint a member on the civil
committee which would be an
trusted with the administration ot ths
affairs of a volunteer reserve tons
for purposes of home defence. Ths
executive committee ot the council recommended thst a representative bs
appointed on the committee.■ Delegate Walker, who moved the motion
that the recommendation of the oommlttee he concurred In, was ot ths
opinion tbat lt would be a good thins
for the council to be represented on
the oommlttee. Trustee J. Sully vas
also of the opinion that the comet]
should be represented. Vice-president F. Estinghausen considered
that the council should be represented on the civic committee. In his
estimation, the delegate who opposed the idea was a very poor olM-
zen. An amendment was offered that
the counoll would rather encourage
the membership of its afflliated
unions to join the rifle association te
the various cities. Delegate W. Me-
Gllllrray was utterly opposed to ths
counoll taking part in anything connected with militarism. Delegste
Kllpatrlck read the conditions of en-
Practically every newspaper in the
world has dealt with what lt believes
to be the cause, and what It think, „„„«.„,, „, mmm^
may be the result of. the European llstment and pointed out tta? £t
war   Each has handled the question one joining the proposed homTgnsrd
 •'"—-'  -"■ J- could resign whenever he might*?
sire to do so, and he considered the
Federa- council   should   support    the   Idea.
        to   dls- Preeldent McVety said that he did ant
passionate, so analytical and at the expect that the committee's'recom-
same time so human as the following mendatlon would be accented  with
from th« sMonun,. Am=H„.„.         * nnt „-,...._?       accepted without protest.   But we had to face the
fact that  the  Kaiser  bad   plunged
Europe into  war, and  the   speaker
was ot the opinion that until he and
bis brood hsd been cleaned out nothing could be accomplished lo   the
direction of world peace.   He strongly supported tbe Idea of the councU
being   represented on the   civic defence committee.   The council eventually decided that It would send st
delegate to form a part of that oommlttee—and turned down the Ides of
of  recommending  the  affiliated  organizations to join the rifle associations.    President  McVety   left   the
chair to report on the recent governmental conference In Victoria.   In thl
course of a comprehensive speech, hi
stated that In his opinion the  onl)
speaker tbere with any  degree   d
Intelligence  waa  Mayor  Baxter   d
Vancouver,   who   plainly   told   ths
premier thst It wss ridiculous to ad-
vlse men who hsd neither breed aer
job, to   hsve "courage   snd   confidence."  He slso reported on ths work
of ths civil committee which is administering the   funds which   hsve
been subscribed for the purpose of relieving the families of soldiers   sad
others who sre In need.   He psld ■
high tribute to the work of Nurse
Franklin, who, on behalf of the city.
Is   Investigating   necessitous     cases
which are brought to the attention of
the   relief   committee.    The   parliamentary  committee Impressed  upon
all delegates the Importance of getting on the  city voters'   list which
would shortly be closed for the yesr.
Tbe committee which had been   appointed to deal wltb the matter of
securing the 1915 convention of ths
Trades and Labor Congress of Csn.
ada for Vancouver reported that the)
could arrange to defray the transpor
tatlon expenses of a delegate If  tht
council tliought fit to elect one.   TM
Musicians staled that they wished to
draw especial attention to the   nonunion orchestras employed by a Hr.
Franklin.   Under  reports  of unions,
all organizations reported  conditions
as very slack with the exception ot
the machinists employed by the C.
P. R. who are working full time for
the flrst time In two years. The president was elected by acclamation  to
represent the council  on   tho   olvio
committee for home defence.    Dele-
Rates Trotter, Wolfe, Bartley, Estinghausen and Sully were nominated for
tbe position of delegate -to the convention of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada to be held In   St
John, N. B., September 21st     Upon
the   ballot   being   taken,   Delegste
Trotter was elected, the votes being
Trotter 26, Wolfe 6, Bartley 4, Estinghausen 3, Sully 4.   After the best
session which tbe council has held
for some time, the meeting adjourned
at 10.20 p. m.
'No scientist has ever been able to
agitate a vacuum,"
TWO, LADY CANVASSERS wanted, to solicit subscriptions for THE
FEDERATIONIST. Liberal commission. Call
mornings, at Room 217,
Labor Temple,  . PAGE TWO
THE BBITI8H COLUMBIA FEDEBATI0NI8T.
FRIDATi .SEPTEMBER 4, 1914.
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor1?
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light add Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rstes to Permanent
Goests
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
Lrli L. Mills, Proprietor
EUROPEAN PLAN        Frederick A. EnilUh, Manaeer
1 Hot and Cold Water In
Every Room. 1 SO Rooms
Connected with Baths.
HOTEL EMPRESS
RorrslaS"" 235Huti**-*sSi.E.,Vi»coiiY.r,B.C. ffi^SKS
0
PENDER HOTEL >@3*
— ■    ■  — — --— mmmn Retee 61.60 per Car aad Up.
sianssaai
c
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEU'-'-Slg^^.ai"-1
7Bo, upl weekly, M up.    S5» SEYMOUR STREET transients
HOTEL IRVING
European Plan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in every room.
single or en suite. -
Rooms with baths,
r
BRITISH COLUMBIALAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing un-
, der cultivation at least five
acres.  '	
For further information apply to       v    .    '
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Boreal of Provincial Information, Victoria
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
' Ths reaaon our businsss Is Increasing Is due to the (set that our businsss poller Is conwrt. Ws adopted the polio? of tnformrai the nubile
throuih the medium ot the press as ts what our ehuies would be for a
oomplete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Oare of Remains,
Wagon Isrvloe, snd aU our personal servioe for
$66.00
Complete Funeral
$66.00
We are living up to our advertisement to ths letter. This has eetabVeh-
ed conscience with the public In us, and for that reason alone we sre sue-
eeseful, and we Intend to continue as we are doing aew,
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Avs. snd Main Street Phons Fairmont lis
Commodloua Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center A Henna's .ranch
A. C. Millar, Proa.
P. H. Qrota, Manaser
BASEBALLrVancouver vs. Victoria
September 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
WEEK DAYS, 4:00 p.m. SATURDAY, 3:00 p.m.
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large oi
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
Free Sua te and from all Trains and Boats. Electric Elevator
Cor. Columbia Ave. and Haatinee Street
McPHAIL * MACKENZIE, Proprietors
HAS MAN FAILED TO LABOR CONDITIONS
IN
Woman Writes — Roundly
Rebukes "Woman's Natural Protectors"
Oould Woman Have Made
A Worse Mess of the
Affairs of State
[By Miss H. gutteridge]
We are to-day faced with all the
horrors of organised murder on a
huge scale. Thousands of men are
being ordered out to kill each other
without knowing the why and where-
for. Cities are being laid waste and
the crops throughout the country,
where the lighting takes place, will
be destroyed. Thousands of homes
will be broken up; millions of workers, men and women, who are always
perilously near the starvation line,
will perish for lack of food; women,
as always in times of war, will be
violated and abused by that section of
"woman's natural protectors" availing themselves of the conditions
brought on by the war, to do tbat
which ln times of peace would probably cost tbem their lives. We are
faced with that which proves our
modern civilisation is a farce and
rotten at the foundation, and more
than tbat we see ln the present state
of affairs a confession of the failure
of male statecraft.
At tbe first superficial glance lt
would appear as though the war was
beyond human volition, A very little
reflection, however, will show that
the present situation Is the ultimate
and inevitable outcome of a long
series ot causes. Tbe declaration of
war. between Austria and Servla, followed by the aggressive action of
Germany, was merely the culmination, the spark that fired the mine
that bas been laid during the last
ten, twenty, thirty years or so,
through a policy whereby .the health
and wellbelng of the common people
has been lost sight of in a contraction
upon financial exploitation, concessions and accumulations, to the utter
exclusion of the fact that it Is the
people that make the wealth of any
country and not material possessions.
Governments ln aU countries have
been made tools of by those who
prey upon humanity; have been usel
to further the commercial interests
ot a few, the allurement of personal
or party aggrandisement has proven
successful ln blinding party governments to the fact that the human
body and the life of a people Is more
than pawn in tbe game of war.
The present situation is an exhibition of the failure of government by
male monopoly. Many bave In the
past defended this monopoly and protested against the right and need of
women of self-government, saying,
'women are lacking ln practical efficiency, they are unable to think imperially. Women cannot fight, therefore must not vote, and the entrance
ot women Into politics will mean the
downfall of the empire."
Could anything be more pitiful and
fantastic than spectacle with which
modern governments .are furnishing
us With today, as a Sample ot. the
marvelous understanding the male
mind has of International politics and
foreign affairs? Could women have
possibly have made a worst hash of
things? An editorial In a recent
lsBue of the Saturday Evening Post
tells how every European country has
J^een increasing lta armaments day
by day and year by year. In anticipation of what? Peace! Year by
year the male representatives ot a
male electorate have voted huge sums
of the people's money to be expendel
on more armaments. What for? As
a means of bringing about universal
ce! Not a bit of lt. The wool has
been pulled over their eyes by a jingo
section of the press and by those representing the big manufacturing interests, to whom Increased armaments means Increased profits, and
having piled up a powder magazine
ln every country the striking of a
match means an lnternatlonl confla-
bratlon.
If the present conditions are the
best tbat male statecraft can accomplish then surely the time has come
for woman to take her place ln the
councils of the nations. That she
may bring her experience, as a
mother throughout the bygone ages,
and her knowledge of tbe cost of
human life Into the governments of
tbe world, as an antidote to the present false conception of man, that
places property and possessions at a
higher value than human welfare and
life.
Freedom consists not In letting
man alone, for that freedom turns out
to be an illusion, but in Surrounding
him'with facilities and opportunities
for the full play ot his Individuality,
the effeotlve working out Of his llfo
purposes.—London Labor Leader.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER
tes
of the City of Vanoouver, respectfully request
Merchants,   Manufacturers,   Lawyers,   Fraternal   Societies,   CMibs,
Unions, lte., to have the,
UNION LABEL
Put on thtlr Printing suoh as Circulars, Briefs. Records, Books,
Posters. It la'a guarantee of superior workmanship. This label Is
endorsed by all trades and labor
unions In Vancauvar and vlolnlty.
VANCOUVER ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCU.
F. R. Fleming, Secretory,
Room ill Labor Temple
Stern Measures Used  By
Employing Interests to
Stop Workers' Press .
Japanese   Workmen   Tugging at Their Chains
•    Despite Obstacles
Unfortunately, writes an occassional correspondent tn Japan, there Ib no
labor press ln our country. No tradeB
unions exist here, In the European
sense of the word, since the government has stood ln the way of the establishing of same or has brutally
crushed such organizations as might
have sprung up here and there.
Strikes are regarded as conspiracies,
and all those inviting the workers
to strike are punished by heavy penalties or by deprivation of civil rights,
The same course Ib pursued In the
treatment of the lower classes, as was
common In England during the reign
of George III—-doubtless with the
same result In spite of this fresh
strikes are continually breaking out,
which are, however, quickly crushed
out. All wages are exceptionally low.
The young girls in the silk factories
have to work thirteen to fourteen
hours daily, while in the weaving
sheds the working time is no less
tban fourteen to sixteen hours. The
Parliament passed a factory aot two
years ago, lt is true, presumably as
another step ln their "process of civilisation," but the precaution was
taken to make the law first valid ln
1915. It Is questionable whether, having regard to our backward conditions, the law will actually come Into
force upon the stipulated date, although the rapidly Increasing Industry urgently demands that regulations
for the protection ot the workers be
put Into operation. This lies not entirely beyond the interests of the employers themselves. A whole. crowd
of press regulations have been issued
since the time of the last political
plots. When, recently a high official
of the ministry of foreign affairs was
assassinated, the governor prohibited
the publication of any accounts ln
connection with the matter. At the
same time the courts of justice were
authorized, through a new law, to Inflict penalties under the press act. In
a few days eighteen newspapers were
fined. The managements of the news-,
papers concerned held a meeting, at
which protest was raised against the
whole of the proceedings Of the authorities, and those present pledged
themselveB to strive toward a reform
of the press act.
A Slanderous Inspiration
Every once ln a while some cheerful individual remarks: "Well, now
that the paper ts out, I suppose you
can take it easy for three or four
days."
Yes; how delightful lt Is that an
editor has nothing to do between
presB days. Business runs automatically. Wben paper bills come due,
money drops oft the trees with which
to pay. Subscribers vie with each
other to see who can pay the farthest In advance. And the way the
hews hunts up the editor Is also pleasant to contemplate, There Is also
something really strange about the
way hews Items act. When the paper
Is out -tbo editor simply goes to his
desk and leans back In hlB easy chair
and looks flap'and waits for next
week's preBB day. The day before
press day* the people line up In front
of the offloe door and they file past
the desk and tell him all the news of
the week. _ He writes lt up ln iti,or JO
minutes, takes it back and hangs it
on the hook.,. The compositors take
the copy, shake It over the' keyboard, says a few mystic words nnd
after a few passes by the foreman the
forms are ready for the press again.
And the. editor goes down and .deposits some* money In the .bank. It Is
the greatest snap In the catalogue.
Now, If the editor could only do away
with press day his job would be complete.—Madison Labor, News.
Trust's Spies Everywhere
Telegraphers have been discharged
or suspended ln numerous instances,
and then told In plain English that lt
was because they were seen talking
.j some prominent member of the
C. T. II. A. Others were warned
against associating with persons
known to have union cards. Spotters
and stool pigeons mingled with the
men, circulated false stories about
their own experiences with the union,
denounced Its officers, local as well
as international, while others who
had managed to enroll as members,
posed as ardent unionists In their efforts to get something on the men.
The systematic searching of such
clothing as the employees would leave
In their lockers was reported from
time to time as going on in Washington, New York, Chicago; St. Louis
and other points. Chiefs were seen
rifling the men's clothes, searching
for anything that might connect the
owners thereof with the C.T.U.A."
—S. J. Konenkamp, International
president, Commercial Telegraphers'
Union,
Flnanolal Responsibilities
The financial report of the. I, T. U.
as submitted at the Providence convention, dealt in large figures—$618,-
364.38 in old age pension fund, $168,-
669.38 ln mortuary fund,' and $176,-
710.65 In the general fund—with a
total close to 11,000,000. The Union
Printers' home at Colorado Springs
Is set down at an additional $1,000,-
000. It costB about 1100,000 a year to
maintain the home,
There as 398,000 wage workers in
Chicago who are paid an average
dally wage of »1.61—Report of Industrial Department, Chicago Association of Commerce.
TRAD! UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Counoll—P. R
Fleming. P. O. Box 61.
Bakere-J. Blaok, Room B0, Labor
Temple.
Baitare-C. F. Burkhart, Room 101, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Geo. W. Curaooh, Room
108, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Goo. Mowat, 616 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraaer, 1161 Howe Bt
Brewery Workers—Frank Graham, S166
llth Avenue Weat.
Brieklayera—William 8. Darnell, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten Dlstriot Council—Jaa. Bltcon, Room 106, Labor
Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborera—John Sully, Room 210. Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt J. Craig, care Kurts
cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooke, Walters, Waitresses — W, B.
Walker, Room 108, Labor Temple,
Electrical Workers (outside)—W. F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 107;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—L. Dawson, Room 116, Labor
Temple. \
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Miss MoRae, Labor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles Roberto, Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's Union (I, B, E. W.)—R.
McBaln, care of B. C. E. R.
Horseshoers — A. C. MacArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Letteroarrlers-Robt. Wight Dlstriot 11.
Lathers—Victor R. Midgley,'Box 1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick, 1188 Homer etreet.
Loco. Engineers—A. B, Solloway, 1618
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomas, Ml Alexander Street
Machinists—J. H, MoVety, Room 111,
Labor Temple.
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. p. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple,
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 19.80,
Williams Bldg., 418 Granville street.
Marbleworkers—Prank Hall, Janes Road,
B, C.
Molders—D, Brown, 641 Broadway Weat,
Moving Picture Operators—L. B. Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Engravers—A. Kraft, Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Blook.
Painters—J. Train, Room 803, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple,
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1801
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4869 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—James Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty atreet.
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. McCorvllle.
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A.1 Robb, 420 Nelaon
Street  .
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural Iron Workera—W. L. Tule,
Room 308, Labor Temple,
Stonecutters—Jamea Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. c. Dougan, No.
t, Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2686 Trinity Street
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482.
Tradee and Labor Council—aeo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple,
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box 66.
Tailors—C. MoDonald, Box 608.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Gordon
Martin, 687 Prior street
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomu,
Labor Temple.
Upholsterers—A. Duthle. 1068 Homer St.
Olothing that bean thla label Is
made la sanitary work shops, aad
under good working conditions.
This label Is a protection guarantee to you. If It does not .bear
this label your clothing may be
made In sweat shops' amid unsanitary conditions, and you may contract disease by wearing lt.    .
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
OKANAGAN APRICOTS, PEACHES/PLUMS,
TABLE AND COOKING APPLES, NEW LAID
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, DRESSED POULTRY,
DUCKS, NEW POTATOES, VEGETABLES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Friday
OUR SALESMEN ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. T|LL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter whst Itl nuns, unless It bears a
plain tnd readable Impression or this stamp
AU shoes without tha Union Stamp art
alwayi Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKSRS' UNION
146 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   O. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORM IN VANCOUVER
Phono toy. 6M 401 CnariHa St
Tit Oranvllle at.    Phone Sey. Mil
Phene ley. my
Abbotsford  Hotel
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 5860
Fireproof Vancouver, B. 0. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
J. M. McLUCKIE, Proprietor. Flret-claes Drill In connection
EVERY UNION MAN IN VANCOUVER BHOULD PATRONIZE
LA BOR TEMPLE   CLUB   AND   POOL ROOM
Phone Seymour 9288
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CQ.
Lee R. B&rkley, Agent
137 WAtER STREET mmWm
OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH
FEDERATIONIST
OFI1CULPAPO
SIXTH YEAB.  No. 178.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY,'SEPTEMBER 4,1914
SIX PAGES
suits for
Fall Wear
New York styles, made of the season's modish
materials carefully cut, well tailored, properly finished and moderately priced. Nowhere will you find
suit values to equal these.
NAVY SUIT made of fine French serge. Coat is 38 inches long
with cutaway front, three button fastening and set-in sleeves.
Skirt is plain style with front fastening. _tmA CA
All sizes.   Price  ejMeaW
NAVY SUIT of best quality, all-wool whipcord, full 36 inches
long, with loose fitting back, cutaway square in front to give
vest effect, nicely trimmed with black military braid and buttons. Skirt is two-piece style, with braid eight inches from the
bottom, giving tunic effect. d>00 CA
Very special value.   Price   !|>Z«7aOU
KING'S BLUE SUIT of the fine frieze cloth. Coat is 36 inches
long, with pleated tunic effect, cutaway in front with two button
fastening, set-in sleeves with cuffs of self materials and buttons.
Skirt finished at waistline with long, rippling tunic. ^«g e\f\
Lining of Skinner's satin.   Price tySD.UU
ROMAN STRIPE CHEVIOT SUITS in colors of black with
dark red and purple tinge. Coat is 45 inches long, fastening up
tight to neck (if desired) and has pleated tunic back and front,
and collar of chenille velvet. Skirt is made in Mam /\/v
double tunic forming three-tier effect.   Price ^IDaUU
WfiudsonsBaB Company, fig
-'ia'ti, rrt.i
GEORGIA AND, GRANVILLE STREETS
LV/hereiMTvliltli
SUSPENDERS
I wonts who you
VseelMt 6mspea«on •aaeuteea.
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
VANCOUVER
B.C
PHONE SEYMOUR 134
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wt manufacture every kind ef
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
egging, etc
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS oan be bought at BRUMMITT'S (rom
$10.00 up to $30.00        And they are worth more
HAT8, bearing tbe union label, at 12.00, 12.90,13.00.
SHOES, all makes and prices, bearing tbe label, at "live and let live
prices, 12,00 up to 16.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at $7.00, $8.00 and $10.00
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA ST. W.
MLHNF
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE,
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS, CORBIN
LOCKS, SETS.
40  HASTINGS ST. EAST
Labor Day Theme of Coast
Workers as Expressed
by Pres. Marsh
Grim Tragedy of War Gives
Hosts of Organized Labor
Food For Thought
[By B. P. Marsh, Pres, Wasblngton
State Federation ot Labor]
Is tbe resistless march ot events ln
the industrial world driving home to
the consciousness o( the mass of the
people the fact that organized labor
Is the bulwark standing between tbe
rights of mankind and the assumed
rights of property? Are they realising that organized labor constitutes
both outer and Inner line of defense
to protect the fireside, the altars, the
health, ths very lives of all workers?
Whatever lt be, you must realise this
Labor Day, my fellow unionists, a
growing atmosphere of sympathy and
kindliness for your movement. Tours
Is a solemn trust. You are the mouthpiece of all labor. You are the organised expression of the hopes and
dreams, ambitions and aspirations, of
the organised and unorganised alike,
Transltlonary Period
We are ln a transition period from
Industrial strife to Industrial peace.
It has been continual war between the
forces of labor fighting for enjoyment
of the material things their labor of
hand or brain created, and the forces
of organized capital fighting for the
lion's share ot that product. You aro
out on the battle line ot Industry. You
have grown used to the heavy artillery fire of strikes and boycotts.
Can you meet the more subtle attack
of capital? The kind of attack that
masks Itself behind tbe "respectable"
columns of the press? That sits behind the legislative desks or stalks
boldly down the aisle of legislative
chamber, or wears the judicial ermine? That leers at you from behind accasional pulpit, ostensibly
dedicated to the Most High?
A Live Query
Can you and will you elect your
own people to make your laws, use
thoughtful judgment in selection of
men to Interpret them and enforce
them?» For this is the constructive
period of labor's struggle. The people
are convinced of the justice of labor's
demands. Labor must yet demonstrate Its ability to work out those
demands of our system of government. So our problem Is one of education of the masses, for ln education lies our salvation.
The Grim Tragedy of War
While the last drum not ot our
labor army Is dying away ln the distance, there comes to our ears the
echoes of other marching feet, part of
the grim tragedy of war. While the
bells of a million churches throughout
Christendom ring out the message of
the angels, "Peace on earth, good will
to men," at a period when the arts
and sciences ot civilization have
reached the zenith of their greatness,
the old world is at war. The trampled
vlnewards of the Rhine ne'er stained
the earth a deeper crimson than the
life blood of Germany's soldier sons.
Beneath the stars lie the cold, upturned faces of those who but a
month ago clasped wives and children
In a fond embrace upon retiring from
the fields at close of day. The factories of Europe are silent save where
the Implements of war are being hur
rledly fashioned. Old men and children tend the flocks while brokenhearted women till the soil tbat
those at home may live. W|hat Is lt all
about, this tragedy of war which
claims as its victims the flower of
Europe's manhood? What did the
Russian peasant' do that the wood-
chopper of the German forest must
exchange his axe for a Mauser rifle?
Did the Austrian worklngman have
any grievance against the French
countryman that both must peer
across the trenches with the lust of
battle In their eyes? Workingmen
must fight and die while their loved
ones keep awful vigil in their humble
homes, but It Is not their war. Bewildered, confused, they wonder what
lt Is all about, why they should be
torn from the pursuits of peace.
Though the map of Europe be completely altered, though Germany or
France or Russia be the territorial
(alrSST)  *!.» PER YEAB
E. P. MARSH
President of the Washington State Federation of Labor,, who mattes a Labor
• Day contribution to Federatlonist
readers this week.
gainer, not one foot more of land will
come Into ownership of the "men behind the guns." They will pay in
blood and tears and heartaches the
cost of war and their children's children will Inherit the war tax levied
by the mad monarchs of Europe In
tbls year of our Lord, 1914. Will all
tbe glory and power and added commerce accruing to the -few ln the nation that shall win be worth the blood
of Europe's sons and daughters?
lAfter two thousand year's of Christ's
teachings must the quarrels of tbe
ambitious rulers bf Europe be settled
by the methods of the barbaric age?
Is our civilization but a thin veneer
and the savagery of men still untamed after all these centuries of progress? Is lt the last great trial of
brute force applied to world problems and will lt be superceded by* a
golden era of perpetual peace among
nations?
The Problem at Home
And while our eyes are turned towards Europe watching with bated
breath the life struggles of nations,
we must not forget that we have problems ln our own country that If not
solved have all the potentialities of
the same struggle by force of arms
that Is convulsing Europe. Almost
to a man the employers have chosen
to Ignore the suffering, the misery of
the poor of this country, pr If tbey do
admit it, offered no remedy. The
composite attitude of the employers
is that " the working man should be
tbankful to be allowed to work upon
any terms and tbat his cause of discontent was imaginary rather than
real." That attitude, If long continued,
were ayaw on active war service, four
vest for men will not always stand to
be ground. That tbe revolution In In
dustrlal society that must come may
be by peaceful, sane methods rather
than by brute force la the hope of
every thinker in America and the mission of the trade union movement.
Wo bellove MINARD'S LINIMENT   Is
tbe best:
Mathlas Foley, Oil City, Ont,
Joseph Snow, Norway, Me.
Charles Whooten, Mulgrave, N. S.
Rev. R. O. Armstrong, Mulgrave, N. S.
rierre Landers, senr., rokotnoucho, N.B.
Thomas Wasson, Sheffield, N. B.
UNION
HEAOqUARTEBV
In the heart of ihe retail dishicL Absolutely
fireproof and modem in eveiy respect. Cuisine'
unexcelled. European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS AU. TRAINS. Ond isd
operated by The Provincial Hole's Company, United:
HOWARD I SHfEH/tN, P—*
LOCAL TYPO UNION
IN SESSION LAST
iY
No. 226 WUl "Carry" Cards
of Members in Active
c War Service
Colorado Workers' Troubles
TRINIDAD, Colo., lAug. 31.—Company A of the Colorado National
Guard, the gunmen and mine employers who were largely responsible for
the murder and cremation of nineteen
men, women and children at Ludlow,
April 20th, ts being completely organized and fitted with state equipment. The excuse given by state
officials Is that the TJ. S. government
demands a reorganization of the
mllltla so that Colorado can manage
her own affairs and allow the federal
troops to return to their barracks.
According to Information received
here this reorganization Is not taking place in other sections of the
state. Residents of the strike zone
fear that the state officers will attempt to bave the federal troops removed and then turn loose the gunmen and operators' thugs as "protection of the peace," causing another Incessant reign of terror and possibly
another "Ludlow massacre."-
Report of Pres. Pettipiece,
I. T. U, Delegate to Providence, Well Received
A short business-like meeting of the
local Typographical union took place
in Labor Temple last Sunday afternoon, with President R. P. Pettlplece ln the chair and all offlcen present save Executive Board Member
W. R. Trotter, who la away east as
western organizer for the Trades and
Labor congress ot Canada. A good
deal of routine business was disposed
of ln a very short time. The meeting
was well attended.
President Pettlplece, who had Just
returned a few days previously from
Providence, R. I., as No. 226's delegate to the International Typographical union annual convention, submitted a report which was well received.
Oeorge Bartley reported for the
delegates to the central labor body.
Upon motion the union decided to
"carry" the cards of members who
were away on active war service, four
at least of whom are affected bo far
as the local Typos, are concerned.
The report of the picnic committee
showed a small balance to the good
and that a very enjoyable time had
been the lot of those who Journeyed
to West Vancouver tbe previous Saturday afternoon.
S. Ross and Chas. Tamburlno were
named delegates to tbe central
labor body, vice Delegates England
and Dennlson, resigned.
J. E. Wilton was appointed; as delegate to the parliamentary committee
of the Trades and Labor council.
Trade conditions are still very dull,
especially on the job side. ,
A Lot Angeles Club
President Pettipiece announced
that a suggestion had been made by
Vice-president Metsger looking to
the formation of a Los Angeles club.
The Idea Is to have as many as are In
favor of the proposal register their
names with Secretary Neelands and
agree to pay In »l per week until
August 1st next. This to constitute
a fund with whioh to charter at least
two special sleepers and a diner from
Vancouver to Los Angeles during the
next annual convention ot the I.T.U.
The proposal met with an enthusiastic reception by the big meeting
and already a number of printers have registered for themselves and tbeir wives. If present Indications count for anything and the
war doesn't put everything on the
blink Vancouver's contribution ln visitors to tbe Los Angeles convention
next year will be worth while.
The Tailors' Ambitions
The one big Idea and object of the
Tailors' Industrial union Is to form an
organization of the clothing workers
which will be powerful enough to pro
teot them, which will enable them to
secure higher wages for their labor,
shorten the hours of labor, bring
about better working conditions and
eliminate many evils that prevail In
all branches of the Industry.
DOW   PRA8ER   TRU8T  COMPANY
Moves Into Handsome New Headquarters on Hastings Street-
Proud Record of Progress
The Dow-Fraser Trust company
has moved Into Its handsomely fitted
offices at 122 Hastings street west,
thus making another epoch In the history of a prominent .and esteemed
business Arm. The.record of the
Dow-Fraser Trust company Is one of
singular success. Beginning In a little
office on Cordova street In 1900, lt
has progressed steadily year by year,
enjoying a high reputation amongst
financial institutions in this city. The
company carries on business In accordance with the new Trust.\Com
ponies act, and has the necesary deposit, some $90,000, ln the charge of
the government for the protection of
Its clients. The firm Is empowered
to carry on all the functions allowed
by the act as executors, trustees,
liquidators, etc., as well as general
real estate and brokerage business
and fire Indemnity Insurance. The
new headquarters of the Institution are admirably fitted up to
afford accommodation to all the requirements of the company's activities. The furnishings are serviceable
and also very elegant. A waiting room
has been provided for lady clients,
with all the attendant fittings.
1915 Conventions for the West
Another of the International unions
whloh will meet In the west next year
is the International Longshoremen's
association, which will conveno at
San Francisco.
Never Truer That Now
The labor press' shows great progress and Is capable of ever greater
advances. The responsibility rests
with the individual unton man In the
last analysis, who should subscribe
for his local paper and see that his
union subscribes in a body, patronize
the advertisers In the local labor
paper and tell them why, and take an
active Interest ln the management of
the paper and see that It reflects and
represents the true spirit of the labor
movement In his respective locality.
In that way we can build up a string
of great papers across the country
which will make Impossible the dissemination of the lies about labor now
being spread broadcast by vicious
and perverted .news agencies.—Union
Record.
The true authors of war are the
people who create the cause for war,
not the nations of individuals who
make the declarations of war.
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders of the Blue Amberol
played on an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let us show you
what you are mining. We've
been in business a long lime, Mr.
Reader. No one knows the
talking machine line better than
we do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day we
unhesitatingly claim it to be Ihe
most perfect on th'! market today. You'll not lose anything
by hearing it. We'll arrange
terms to suit
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
Made in B.C.
for Men
Our Overall Olothing is produced in
British Columbia and bears the United
Garment Workers' label. There is fit and
comfort in every garment.
BIB OVERALLS AT 11.00-Made in blue and black
denim, also in engineers' blue stripe drill. Four
pockets, full bibs, good suspenders. Per pair.. 11.00
OVERALL JACKETS to match above colors at....11.00
MOGUL BIB OVERALLS-Mac's Mogul is equal in
every detail to any high class overall on the market.
Made of fast dyed cloths, seven pockets; full and
easy fitting. Black, blue, and enginers' tide
S"*'P«   fill
OVERALL JACKETS to match above colors at....S1JI
OVERALL PANTS-In 8 ounce black or blue denim;
five pockets; double stitched.    Price $1,00
WHIPCORD TROUSERS-Made   of   a   heavy cotton
dark whipcord.    Swing pockets, belt loops and self
/belt.     Made with welt side seams,, cuffed bottoms.
Price    , taM
PAINTERS' OVERALLS-Made of a white drill, with
pockets, bibs and suspenders.      Price  He
WHITE JACKETS -..; ", Uc
PLASTERERS' OVERALLS-An overall for plasterers
and paper hangers; seven pockets, full bibs.'...tl.il
CARPENTERS' APRONS-
Small nail aprons     jjc
Long 3-pocket aprons  , 7fe
Long 7-pocket aprons fl.00
WAREHOUSE COATS-Heavy brown drill, three-
quarter length; slash pockets, detachable buttons •  «S.W
REDUCTION IN COAL
To induce householders to lay In at least a portion of tbelr
winter's supply of coal during August and September
Macdonald Marpole Co., Ltd.
WILL REDUCE THE
PRICE OF
Wellington and Comox Coal
as follows;
Lump Coal, sacked, per ton  17.00
No. 1 Nut Coal, saoked; per ton  tt.to
No. 2 Nut Coal, sacked; per ton  15.75
Pea Coal, Backed; per ton  H25
Comox Briquettes, saoked; per ton   $5,60
Comox Coke, saoked; per ton  18.50
delivered within the usual cartage limits.  Speolal prices for bulk
coal In wagon loads.  All orders strictly C. O. D„ or prepaid.
427 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE SET. 210
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenten' Tools ud all
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phon. Fair. 447. 23J7 Mail Stmt
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastinis Stmt Wast
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scieab'tc aid painless methods
Specialist io Crown, Bridie, Plate aid Cold Inlay Work
HOURS 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
75 Per Cent, oi your Summer Cooking can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and conven-
ience.
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an instant's attention to connecting tha cord with tha household
socket
Thoy oan do everything In the line of light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing egga, frying chops, eto. Ton don't
want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances Juat
most this demand and make It unnecessary to have a hot fire going.
Blectric Household Appliances cost only a few centa per hour of continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a fraction
of an hour.  They are guaranteed by tha manufacturers.
SEE OUR PULL LINE OP ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Csrrtll ud
Huliflga Stmt
B.C. ELECTRIC
IISSGnarikSt.
Near Davie PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
II branches In Canada
A general baoklnf business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rat* j:
East End Branch
160 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED IMS
Paid-up Capital -••% 11.MM*
Reaerve     12,ISMSI
Total Assets 1M,0O0,SS»
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On*   Dollar will   open
.  tha account, and your
business  will   be welcome  be  It   large ar
■mall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
115$
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital aiid Reserve 111,171,671
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your savings In th* Bank
erf Toronto, and watoh your deposit* and interest added by the
bank grow to * moat desirable
bank balane*. Th* flnanolal
strength of thl* long-established, well-conducted Inititutlon enaur** safety fsr your
money, ind you will receive
every courtesy, and your account careful atttntlon.
Asset* ..     ..     .
Deposits      ..     ..   »41,000,000
Main Offlee-
4M HASTINOS ST. WEST
(Near Rlshard*)
Branches—
Car. Hastings and Carrall St*.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In Ull.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In 1110.
Paid-up Capital    •    14,111,111.11
Reserve Fund     -     -    »,017,H0.M
Head Offlee In Canada:
BT. JAMBS ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE - Gtastsl Msasesr
SAVINGS  DEPARTMENT AT
.   ALL BRANCH!*
Special attention given to savings
Accounts on which Interest la allowed from date ot deposit
Op*n a Savings Account and add
te It every pay day.
Drafts and Money Orders sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
j. R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALB BRANCH
D. Nell, Manager.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Means
PANTAOI*  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOW* DAILY
1.45, 7.20, *.1t     Season's Prlcesi
Matinee, IBc.; Evenings, 11c, He.
BERRY BROS.
Ag.sU lei
CLEVELAND CYCLES
The Blajrel* with th* Reputation
mil   Uaa  ot  aouHOri**
Repair* promptly snouts*
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
'     Phone Highland eat
Cake that watoh to Appleby, so*
Vender West, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for ftlfh-class watoh,
dock and Jewellery repairs. All
oleanlnff and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 11 months.
Sell
NJOJtfLS
tohyjobacco.
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Published .vary Friday morning by the
B. C. Federatlonist, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettipiece
J. W. Wilkinson
Managing Editor
Associate Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, president; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Glbb; G. J. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlplece
Office: Room 817, Labor Temple.
Tel. Exchange 8ey. 7498.
Advertising Manager    -    •    -    - M. C. flhrader
" SUBSCRIPTION
11.50 per year; ln Vancouver olty, 12.00; to anions
subscribing ln a body. jLOO ■
REPRESENTATIVES
New Westminster -    -    -    -    H. Glbb, Boi 934
Prince Rupert    -    -    - W. B. Denning, Box 531
Victoria A. S. Wells, Box 1538
Afflliated   with Western Labor Press Association
"Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY ■.. SEPTEMBER i, 1914.
THE EUROPEAN WAR which is now
being waged, is one of the most unique
propositions which the labor movement
has ever had to consider.   The reason for that
is, that the war contains three
quantities, instead of two as
miiijt ™ u,ua"y iae ca,e'     T*-ere
MU are the common   people   of
CHOOSE Germany   forming one   ele
ment; the common people of
Belgium, France and England form another;
and the common enemy of everything democratic in all those countries, is the military caste
or bureaucracy as represented by the Kaiser
and his party in Germany. Practically speaking, the labor, movement the world over is
agreed that, until the domination exercised by
the mailed fist of militarism over the social life
of the German people—coupled with the
threat of war which will hang over Europe as
long ai that domination remains—it broken
forever, no further step can be taken along the
path of human progress with any degree of
assurance that it will be permanent. As long
as the threat of the Kaiser's military madness
remains, the feeling will alwayi be abroad in
tbe world that at any lime it may break out,
and in a moment destroy the patient work of
those who labor for peace. There is no question that that feeling is. very general, even among thoie who look upon militarism and war
ai the crowning disgrace of the twentieth century. It ii a practical fact which confronts us
all in such real fashion that, even the most unpractical feel that it cannot be demolished or
removed from the sphere of actualities by mere
thoughts or theories. And disagreeable as the
conclusion may be, we are obliged to admit
that the only force capable of destroying the
menace of German military bureaucracy is
military force.
The labor movement has grown to accustomed to thinking ahead of the rut of the
world with regard to this question, that it ii a
rude ihock to have to retrace its itepi to deal
with an enemy which human intelligence ihould
have wiped out of existence long ago. For
the last ten yean, the movement has lived, in
thought, about two generations ahead of its
time, and now, in a trice, the raw facts of the
world ai it actually it, have matched ui back
into the realm of reality. Even the opportunity
of exercising the moral force of protest is now
of no avail. The wont has happened. The
war ii on, and at men who lay claim to intelligence and the ability to exercise thoughtful
judgment we have to decide into which tide
of the scale our sympathy ihall be thrown. We
may not like war or the people who are the
cause of it, but likes and dislikes do not alter,
in the slightest respect, the fact that war ii
here. And now that conditions have reached
that stage, the only question which is left for
ui to aik ii: "Do thoie movements which are
trying tol ead the world to belter and saner
things, stand to gain more by the success of one
side than the other in this conflict*1" If the
aniwer to that question ii "Yes," then the labor
movement muit, for the time being at least,
give iti sympathy and influence to that tide of
the conflict—which it believei to contain moit
promise of ultimately realizing those things
which the labor movement deiires to iee.
a * * *
Now that thingi have reached the stage
they have, there is no half-way house or place
for compromise. To lit on the fence in face of
iuch a plain proposition as it seen in Europe
to-day*, either meant that we have not the
mental equipment capable of forming an opinion or, that we are afraid to itate what opinion
we have formed. Of coune we can ihirk the
whole question, and retire into a corner, babbling theories like a religious fanatic telling his
beadi. But we could not do even that if we
were workmen in northern France to-day instead of in British Columbia. The facts of the
case would be too practical and real. While we
are not actually where the trouble is, yet potentially we are there, but at the tame time wc
have the advantage of forming an opinion,
haied on judgment not subject to the force
which might be exercised upon us by Ihe circumstances which would lurround ui there. We
can iee that the military party in Germany has,
by a iteady and consistent policy covering the
last forty yean, made itself the most formidable
foe of democracy in Germany. And that it ii
now using its power to crush the democracy of
adjacent countries, with a ruthlessness which is
disgusting even to thoie who accept the ordinary
horrors of war as part of the game. If, after
what we know has happened, the German military machine should issue triumphant from its
present adventure, would it be to the advantage
of the labor movement of Europe both in Germany and out of it) We do not believe that
it would. Moreover, we believe that it will be
'? "wantage of the workers of Germany
that, the Germany which is composed of the
Kaiser and his military bureaucracy ihould
suffer iuch complete defeat in this war that it
will be wiped from off the face of human
affairs for ever. And in laying that, we believe
our opinion ii shared by the majority of working people—including some who find the situation so novel or puzzling that they have not yet
accumulated the necessary wits or nerve to say
what in their minds they believe to be true,
a a a a
Wilh the common people of Germany, we
can have no quarrel. Those who rail against
them for what they term their insolence, their
arrogance, and their pretensions to world-
supremacy,, are only mixing up the common
people of Germany with the nucleus of
bludgeoning bullies who control the armed
power of the state. The proper place to lay
the blame is at the door of the Kaiser and the
military caste from which he derives his power,
but that does not mean, and cannot justify a
general indictment of the German people. We
hear much from the ordinary press about a
struggle between the people of Germany and the
people of Britain for ihe mastery of the world.
If that were true it would imply that the workers of the two countries hated each other with
an intensity that could only be measured in
terms of blood. No such feeling exists, and
there is no justification for tuch an inference.
It only arises in the wish which ii father to the
thought in the minds of competing capitalists in
both countries. The workeri do not need, and
cannot afford to lend an ear to iuch an argument And they will do well to remember that,
when the military monitor which now overshadows the whole question is got out of the
way, those who wax fat by systematically
breeding racial hatred will stall be there ready
and waiting to ply their ancient trade.
ALDERMAN HEPBURN, of Vancouver city council, ii often spoken of by
his friends at the "itormy petrel" of
that body.   More candid critics, who find no
pleasure in wasting time over indefinite meta-
for,   regard  him  as just  a
A VERY plain grouch.   At the board
CHEAP of works meeting last week,
ALDERMAN the question of clearing the
lite for the new city cemetery
at Burnaby wai comidered. If Alderman,
Hepburn could have had his way, the
job would have been let out to contract for a
figure at which the recognized minimum wage
of $3 per day for city laborers could not possibly have been paid. However, his wishes did
not carry the day, so he became quite annoyed
and laid, "The whole scheme out there at the
cemetery ii to give men jobi and get votes."
That was. in answer to aldermen representing
working clan wards. Well, what about it?
The city aldermen are elected by wards, and
we tee no reaion why an an alderman from a
working class ward should be ashamed to use
his efforts to influence and keep up the wages of
laboring men in his ward. Moreover, the city
laborers are now working under a system
whereby they have two weeks' work, and then
lay off two weeks, so as to spread the available
work over as large a number of men as possible. That means, that city laborers are
drawing $33 every four weeks, which worki
out at $8.25 per week on which to maintain
them and their families. We would like to
know how Alderman Hepburn thinks it could
be done on less.
a   a   a   a
Ai a matter of fact, Alderman Hepburn
himself was out on a vote catching proposition.
And he did not icorn to make an effort to rob
laboren and their children of their very bread—-
because $8.25 does not mean more than bare
bread—in order to attain his object He is
alderman for ward number one, in the wett
end, where the richer people live; where the
houses are in the name of the wife and the
husband occupies the home ai a tenant, so that
they can each have a vote. It is not due to any
mania for senseless economy or political
purity, that we so often find thit civic
worthy protesting; but to the fact that
he represents the ward and the class
which he does. If the city aldermen were
elected at large, instead of by wardi, he might
not have to be iuch a pertittent apostle of
cheapnen at the expense of the poorest class
of workers employed by the city. Why he
makes himtelf the tool of the mean merchant
mind ii not quite plain. He is past member of
organized labor, and was at one time a member of the Amalgamated Society of Carpenters
and Joiners in this city, and if we had not had
to much proof to the contrary, we ihould have
expected bigger and better thingi from him ai
the outcome of hit earlier associations. He has
the mind of a Gradgrind with regard to all
such questions as wagei, and it doei not appear
that he will ever change much in that respect.
AFTER A WAR there usually follows a
period of economic depression, marked
by excessive unemployment with all the
want and misery which  that entails   for  the
workers.   The memory of the dreadful conditions which prevailed at the
THERE C'0M °'  *'*"' "*'"'" war' w'"
MJLV BE *''" '* ' '■* '*■' "^ "*'
U«........       thoie who had reaion to note
NO SLUMP        fa    industrial  ,\umD which
followed that itruggle. The
effect of the Russo-Japanese war wat the tame,
and ii still rampant in Japan to-day. Other
instances could be quoted which will readily
occur to one's mind, and it ii the opinion of
many that similar conditions must be expected
in Europe after the dote of the conflict which
ii now raging. But ii it obliged to be to) Are
there no circumstances in thit caie, different
from ihe othen, which may produce an oppoiite
result? The Boer war wai fought chiefly in
placet where there wai, comparatively speaking, very little actual capital to destroy in the
shape of houses, factories, machinery, and other
requiiitei of a country which ii thickly settled
in its industrial and social life like Belgium,
France and Germany. The Russo-Japanese
war wai fought in similar surroundings.
a   a   a   a
The chief things deitroyed in both theie
wan were the machine! and munitions of war.
But in the case of the war in Europe, the country over which it it being waged, ii very thickly populated, and covered wilh manufacturing
capital in the lhape of building! and machinery,
alio many thouiandi of houtei and other building!, all of which are being deitroyed. When
the war ii over, the chief business of the
people of those countries will be to re-settle
themselves, and resume the occupation! which
they followed hefore the trouble broke out
Houses, factories, and other buildings by ihe
thousand will have to rebuilt, and machinery
will have to be renewed. In a word, the whole
of the capitalized property which thoie countries had before the war will have to be replaced by a new equipment to take the place
of that deitroyed. That will require a vast
amount of labor, spread over several yean, in
Europe. In addition to that, the gigantic
scale of the war even if the slaughter of men
only goes on at the preient rate, promises to remove several millions of workeri from the
iphere of job teeken. The number of men
who will return to civil life at hewen of wood
and draweri of water, when the war is over,
may not be enough to wt about the task of re
building the ruined cities, and letting the wheeli
bf industry and husbandry in motion again.
a   a   a   a
The possibilities likely to come out of
twenty million men seeking to kill each other,
are not to be determined by referring to the
casualties resulting from previoui wan, which
are dwarfed into insignificance by this modern Armageddon. It may reiult in the production of a labor situation, which approachei
nearer to the condition! which prevailed in
England after the great plague of 1664-1665,
than hai been known since that time. At any-
rate the natural resources of coal, iron, agricultural land, etc., in Belgium and France,
must remain where they are. No conquering
army can take them away, even if it kills those
who formerly did the work there. And, after
the war, the development of thoie ruourcei
will have to be carried on again; fint for the
re-establishing of the domestic life of thoie
countries, and afterwards for foreign buyers
whole custom will be returned. The results
which follow a war of this size, may be absolutely unique from the point of view of employment, and instead of the slump we usually expect it may be that Europe will be a veritable
hive of industry and economic activity of all
kinds. It ii not a pleasant thing to speculate
upon the horrible causes which may lead to
such a condition,, but it ii juit a mournful reminder that it ii an ill wind indeed which
blowi nobody any good.
FRIDAY* SEPTEMBER 4, 1914
MIDAS
MORATORIUM for the convenience
of the merchant! and buiineu intereiti
of British Columbia, wai one of the
suggestions put forth at the conference held in
parliament buildings, Victoria, lait week. A
moratorium meant an order
MORATORIUM i".u«1 b\«"» government per-
TO HELP nutting the suspension of pay
ment of all or certain kind* of
debt!, in order to prevent
collapse or deadlock of the
preient day industrial and economic syitem.
Such an order hat been issued in England, but
it is only partial in it! application. Uke the
measurei adopted at the recent union of the
dominion parliament, it only givei relief to the
big banking corporation! and buiineu firmi
operating on a large financial icale. The great
joint itock companies and big buiineu men, are
enabled to postpone the payment of their
debts, and for them a moratorium ii a great
boon. For the imaler people which have had to
depend upon the banks for the carrying on of
their buiineu, it often spells ruin. Small business people, who for yean have received accommodation from their banks, are now told
that iuch auittance muit ceaie. That meam
ruin to thouiandi, which ultimately fall* upon
the workeri they employ.
*   *   ¥   *
Under normal condition!, the credit syitem,
by which modern commerce is operated, worki
this way: A man buys goods from another, and
gives a draft, payable three or sue monthi
hence, as payment for them. The penon receiving the bill lakes it to hit bank and, being
able to ditcount it, then turns it into money.
That it the essence of the credit system. Owing
to condition! now prevailing, bankt are refuting
for the preient to do buiineu in that way, and
for thouiandi of small men it spells ruin. At
far ai the worken are concerned the moratorium
bring! no benefit Rent!, email debts, and hire
purchase debt! under twenty-five dollar!, do
not come under iti proviiiom, and muit be
paid. At a time of criiii iuch u the preient
when condition! are supposed to obliterate clan
linei, if a moratorium ii to be inued at all, it
ihould cover the debit of the working clan
fint, for they are least able to meet the itorm.
Trade and industry are important enough in
their way, but the shelter and other baric needi
of the workeri are more important still. Any
moratorium which doei not include the debit
and obligation! of the poor at well at the rich,
meant that the rich are securing protection for
their interests at the expeme of the poor, who,
in any case, will finally have to bear the brunt
of the cost of this war. In view of the preference shown to the landlord clau by the
moratorium it it not turpriiing to read that rent
strikes are in full swing in eait London and
other parti of big industrial cities in Great Britain where the poor muit needi live.
NEXT Monday ii a public holiday, known
in this country and the United Statu
ai Labor Day. In the eitimation of
many, a great deal of importance attache! to
it ai the one day in the year when organization!
of workmen ihould parade
LABOR DAY C',CU> 'a,'1'on' ant' '" v*r>oul
here and way'1 ""*'" PUD''C exhibition
.. ..Jul.. °' 4* •Toigth or weakneu,
ELSEWHERE     .„,, „ <££* may be. The
whole-hearted way in which
thouiandi of trade-unionists celebrate the day,
leaves no room for doubt at to their sincerity
of purpoie. But to ui, many of the function
which take place are a heavy tax upon one't
lenie of humor. Labor Day wai not ettab-
liihed by labor, but for labor. It ii true that
the idea originated with certain trade unionists
in the United Statei, but before it could take
the definite shape of a public holiday it had to
Le approved and sanctioned by the government
The ruling clau evidently felt there would be
no harm in letting labor think that it had io
much influence in the itate that a day ihould
be let apart specially for it.
*   *   *   *
Moreover, the ieaion of the year which wai
selected, wat suitably distant from the ieaion
which had been chosen by that portion of the
workeri which wai belt informed ai to the pre-
ciie function of the working clau in the indus-
trial world. Thoie workeri in Europe who had
made some itudy of the economic position of
their clau, had a pretty clearly defined idea of
where they stood. They chose a day for
themielvei. They did not wait to have one
let apart for them by their masters. The day
they eelected wai May lit The demonstrations which they held, and the icnlimenti which
were expressed on. thoie oceaiioni, were not
iuch ai might be expected to bring forth the
approval of the authorities of May lit ai Labor
Day. Gradually, in the minds of modem
governments, May lit hai come to be looked
upon ai a kind of danger ipot for them, and it
ii not to. be wondered that they bestow their
approval on a day diitant and diitinct from
that day. Ai long at the Workeri only wilh to
use the day for purpoiei of play and distraction
that approval will continue. No troublei or
oppoiition need be feared while the day ii thui
uied. But if Ihe workeri generally, on this
continent ihould ever come to regard the fint
Monday in September in the tame way that the
worken of continental Europe look upon May
lit, Labor Day will not be io popular, in the
eyei of the authoritiei. Ai a symbol they do
not mind Labor Day at all, but if it should ever
acquire the significance which might be given
to it by a working clau enlightened and well-
informed as to their true position in the economic Syitem Of our time—well, then, that would
be another story.
H. G. Welti, the novelist, says "This war is
not going to end in diplomacy; it ii going to
end diplomacy."
Kaiier Willyum: What, have we not declared war on die Peruvian! yet) Ach! Gott
in Himmel!   Some one ihall die for this j
Jules Gueide and Marcel Lembat, two of the
leaden in the socialist party in France, have
accepted portfolios in the French government
while the war lasts and with the consent of the
socialist party.
Re McBride's "have confidence," one of the
big Vancouver financial corporations which
rents safe deposit boxes, hai let 175 new
boxet during the lait month, and to cope with
the demand hai ordered 5000 more boxei.
When the buiineu of killing people neceni-
tated it, the British government took control bf
the food supply in the interests of Ihe people
in general. Why cannot they do the same thing
in times of peace to ensure keeping people alive)
It it that the buiineu of death is of more importance than the buiineu of life)
Every available man in Britain ii being aiked
to risk hit life in the war. It may perhapi not
be deemed unreasonable if, after the war is
over every man asks and demands the vote for
all adults of both sexes. But, of course, the
occasion will be different and circumstance! do
alter cases—especially where politics and property are concerned.
One city alderman wants to reduce the
wages of the city laborers although they are
only working two weeks out of every four. He
givei ai hii reaion that by so doing more men
could be employed with the available money.
Quite an economist that. But if he wanted
converts to hit views, he ihould not have come
to the Labor Temple.
If it were not that the governmental oppres-
lion in Germany it at preient io powerful and
complete, and the minds of so many of its
people 'are abject respecting law and authority,
the Kaiser would need all his military forces to
protect hit own throne and the intereiti of the
rich clau around him from deitruction by revolution at home.
The "eminent" politician! who find jthe
bovine stupidity of the mob so extremely convenient when they—the aforeiaid eminent
politicians—are out soliciting the "vote and
influence" of the intelligent electorate, are
evidently experiencing a difficulty from the
lame lource now that they are asking for something which requirei no little personal pluck,
initiative and imagination. He that loweth the
wind may reap the whirlwind.
The Tohoku University, Japan, opened iti
doon for women itudenti for the fint time last
year and matriculated four of them. The departure occaiioned, at the time, no little criticism at unnecessarily encouraging Japanese
women to become rivals of men in the higher
counei of itudy. This year the univenity hai
had no feminine candidate for matriculation.
The fact ii regarded here ai evidence that
women are no rivali of men in scientific studies,
but pouibly only the men put the contraction
on it
Some of the workleu in England have found
temporary employment by filling the placet of
soldiers who have gone to the front, but that
by no means absorbs the ranks of the unemployed. And apart from that the fint effect of
war ii a slpwing-down, if not an actual itop-
page, of the current industrial tendencies of civilization. War, by cauiing unemployment, at
once checki the rile of wagei. It ii well known
that strikes were being planned in several trade!
for this autumn, with the expressed object of
raising wages. Theie have now been abandoned, because the trade unioni at once recog-
niied the impossibility of raising wages in war
time. The working man knows that he will be
lucky if he keepi hii job.
"In a recent appeal made in the pro-cathedral
for a ipecial collection for $4000 for city taxei,
Rev. Dr. O'Boyle, O.M.I., the rector, de-
icribed the taxation of churchei at 'blood
money.'" We have not noticed any of the
other churchei grumbling about having to pay
their taxei the tame ai other institutions in the
city. Nor can we see that the body which the
reverend doctor belongs to, ii doing any more
practical good than they are, which would entitle him to expect that hii church ihould be relieved at the expeme of the citizen! ai a body.
What would he lay to the Labor Temple company making iuch a requeit) We alio teem to
have * recoleclion that, upon one occasion,
when this matter wai brought before the city
authoritiei, the repreientativei of the Baptist denomination oppoied the exemption of churchei
from taxation, on the ground that if thoie who
wanted any particular kind of religion were
not prepared to pay it, then it evidently did not
amount to much, and wat not worth tupport
It ii plain from the newipapen that the
workeri in Britain are not responding to the call
for recruits for the army at readily ai the authoritiei with them to. Lord Roberti, in ad-
dreuing a meeting lait Saturday laid that defeat
in the war would mean ruin, ihame, and
•lavery. This is perhapi not the time to apply
the bitter criticism to tuch wordi ai memory
givei rite to. That will take no harm by waiting a while till the trouble ii over. But juit
in pairing, it ii well to point out that if the
preient Liberal government had not uied the
army to readily against the workers at timet of
induitrial troublei which are still freth in their
memory, they might not have had to make the
complaint of apathy agaimt them now. They
uied the army for purpoiei which the rank and
file of it never wanted to be uied for, and for
work which they never expected to be called
upon to do when they enlisted. When the
word "shame" is uied in conneclionwith this
word "ihame" is uied in connection with this
matter, there are other shoulders upon which it
ipeaker sought to place it
PHONE   SEYMOUR  •
<(*___&*
Interest on Deposits
Subject to Cheque
Credited
12 Times a Year
We give special atten-
tion to Naturalizations.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay station,
Burnaby, B. O.
Clou at 1 o'clock Saturday.
City Auction asd Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction arrantad.
Satisfaction guaranteed, proaspt
settlements.
ARTHUR  I.  BITCHL1Y
Smyths and Qranvllle Streets
Auctioneer Sey ItrS
Phone Yonr Printing Order
 to	
SEYMOUR 4490
BUY ONLY
BREAD  BUR.        ,
INQ THIS LABEL
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
"THE strike is still on at tho
1 Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollar, st Sheep Creek, B. 0.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike Is settled
Order Ymir Misers' Union
Pkn.Ssr.2Zl
Da; or Witt
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
520 lickaris St        Viacoinr, I. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Ofllce anil Cltapot,'
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3186.
North Vancouver — Ofllce and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. West, Phono
134.
FURNITURE
n
By all means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture.    "Everything  but   the '
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Go.1
Limited
(1 HASTINGS STREET WEST
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd. ^
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 QEOROIA STRSET
One Blook west of Court House.
Use of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Tamil? Bread
Wedding aad Blrthdar Cake*,
we Vis trains near.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks asd Lunches
All (feeds Freel Dally.
ess eaunuisi,
N. Sey. T104.
Wheat Senstai SMS
DIXON & MURRAY
Res aM Store Fltttn*.   Oeaen
JobMnr
pan and Skepi
iees DossMum stbut
D.7 ANIihtC.il.
PlfsM Bsr.eu
Parian A Chspi
UaSGruYllls-
Si
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbi AHI SEPTEMBER 4, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
New Petticoats
Inexpensively Priced
Fashioned along the most correct lines, carefully
made and finished. Some splendid values at very
modest prices.  See these;
At $2.95—Petticoat^ of soft silk, in. emerald, sky, brown, prune,
mustard, ivory, national blue, saxe, iron grey, naVy or black.
French styles with deep accordeon pleated flounces.
At $3.50—Attractive Satin Petticoats, in stripe effects, made with
deep pleated flounce and shown in such shades as saxe, dark
brown, purple, grey, navy or black.   Specially good value.
At $3:95—Petticoats of fine messaline silk, in shades of navy,
saxe blue, pink, prune, emerald, royal, brown, mustard, white
or black.   This is a particularly good style, and much better
'    than ordinary value at the price quoted.
575 Granville St.   Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
Store Hours I.S0 to • p.m,
Saturdays Included
Keep the Children Healthy
by lending them out in the fr-ssb alrthwe flne dart. There'i nothing better for keeping them exercised than wheeled goods.
Our itock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAGONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, ia eaaily the finest and moit comprehensive in tha
city and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
ttt HASTINOS STREET WIST
BIST IN THI WEST
VANCOUVER, S.O.
■STASLISHID 1IM
'"ADC  . tl. J J MAN"
BraTd's
Best
Coffee
,**1 BRAID'!'-0   ,
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Next to the Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves.  Furniture moving and ship-
* ping.   Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIOOAN UNDERWEAR
At BOc. end Tie. per garment.
BRITANNIA
: . Light Woollen Underwear-Just right for this warm weather
'■    '   •    -,    LIOHT WEIGHT UNION SUITS '•'
From 1140 per Suit up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 75c. per garment..
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel, Sey. TM SM-IM HASTINGS STRUT W.
LIST CLOSES ON
SEPUO
Large Number of Qualified
Tenant Voters Still Not
Registered
A Personal Visit to Oity
Hall Is Surest Method
of Registering
REWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
During times like these many workmen have both the time and Inclination to study the relationship between their meal tickets and their
vote. There may be room tor argument as to the value of participation
ln municipal politics, hemmed in as lt
is by so many limitations, but every
unionist and workman must agree
that as a training school for bigger
things municipal activities offer a
splendid schooling. If the workers
were organized for a municipal campaign they would And little difficulty
In enlarging the scope ot the organization to Include a provincial campaign. And if ready for a provincial
campaign why not tackle the federal?
For the year 1914 the municipal
voters' list closes on Sept. 30, only
some three weeks away. Every worker ln Vancouver who Is entitled to a
vote should immediately go ti the
olty hall and see that his name is registered. Never mind waiting for
some one to come along and do the
job for you. Do lt yourself and do lt
now. The easiest way is to go to the
city hall ln person. If a property
owner be sure and have a description
of the property, so that tbe necessary
blanks can be filled out with no delay.
Qualification for Tenant Voters
If you are not a property owner and
desire to register here are the qualifications necessary:
1 (name ln full) of the city of Vanoouver, (occupation), do solemnly declare:
1. That I am a British subject
2. That on or before the 30th day
of September, 191 ,1 made application to be placed on the voters' list of
the city of Vancouver for the ensuing
year.
3. That I reside at No. street, ln
the city of Vancouver.
4. That I am a tenant (and not
merely a lodger, boarder, or temporary occupant of rooms) of the following real property, of the assessed
value of three hundred dollars and
over:
Lot , Block , District Lot ,
Ward No.    .
5. That I am ln good faith qualified
to be a voter at said municipal elections.
6. That I am now registered as a
voter In respect of any property In
said Ward for which I am now applying to be added as such voter.
Property Owner Qualifications
In the case of property owners the
following declaration Is necessary:
I (name in full) of the city of Vancouver, (occupation), do solemnly declare:
1. That I am a British subject
2. That on or before the 30th day
of September, 191 , I made application to be placed on the voters' list of
the city of Vancouver for the ensuing
year.
3. That I reside at No. (name ot
street), In the city of Vancouver.
4. That I am owner of the following real property in the city of
Vancouver:
Lot     , Block     , District Lot
Ward No.    .
6. That I purchased said property
from and become the owner thereof on or about the day
Of '      I., A.D. 191     .
' 0. That I am ln good faith qualified
to be a voter at said municipal elections.
7. That I am now registered as a
voter In respect of any property in
said ward for which I am now applying to be added as such voter.
It is more than likely that city hall
authorities will make some arrangement for the registration of those
who are unable to get away during
working hours.
Now Ib the time to do the kicking
about your name not being on the
municipal voters' list, not election
day.
<Mjarrled workmen whose wives own
property and do the voting should
remember that they can also register
as tenants, as Is already done by
many residents of the west end.
page mi
8tar Joins Growing Graveyard
Local prlntBhop talk says that the
Coquitlam Star is to close up house
during the week, which will let out
another couple or three New Westminster typos.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
GARGET IN COWS
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
VAHOOUVBt UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
™..,'e?.,* OMtnt third Thursdays. Eie-
551% S>W,!vJ,JI- H.JfoVetrTipMeldenti
Frank Eatinghaiuer, vice-president; Oeo.
£™"!ir' &V"£ ***"*&> W. Labor
Temple; Hiss H. Outterldge, treaeurer)
!?".?_>• Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; o. Curnock, P.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR   TBMPLB   COUP ANT,
Directors:    Fted A. Hoovi
LTD.—
:oor«r, J. H.
-«>.i,,.»ii«i Brews, anwara liftthlsSi
Jam,, Campbell. J. W. Wllklasoe. O
PMtlpiMk Jolna'Stasraiew. «Sd!ek MV
Ksnsls, F. Blumhwg, H. H. Free.
ins dlraotor. j! a MoVety. R<
ALLIED PMNTINO TRADES COUNCIL—Meets lad Monday la month.
President, q«o. Mowat! weretCy^T It
Fleming, P.O. Box M. *' „ ' ■
AND CONFECTIONERS LO
CAL No. M-Meets second and fourth Saturday!, 7.» p.m. Prasldsnt,
H. O. 'Leeworthy; corresponding aeeretary, a J.
Adams; business agent J.
Black, Room IM, Labor
Temple.
BARBERS' _LOCAL No. 180.—MEETS
n m"ec?>1? ,Iuefdl1/ in •"» month 8.80
ft u J?.e."lde"''' i- Bru0«; reeoorder, C.
§' SfJEL'^. "ecretary-bUBlneTO agent, C.
-' ,5?.rk,S*T'' .R<S"? J0!' I*bor Temple.
t to 7 p.m.	
Hours: 11 to 1;
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. MI.-OF-
«_."£>• ?°°m ,M L»bor Temple. MeeU
«tit Suntoy of each month. *Preilden™
Sr £' Lmjs*mi flnanolal seoretary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room Ml. Ubor Tsropfo
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
a „""**•""I" "•K.'WJ""1 lri Tuesday,
H.JiS'.' Rmm "'j. '"'■'esldent, Jamea
K?;L",V """'•Mending secretary, w. 8
Dagnall, Box II; flnanolal sscretary. F.
•Shlfgffi &'.""" -"<• W' rfi«-
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
„, »nd '""i Ship Builder, and uifiiri
of America, Vaneouvar Lodge No. flights am and third Mondays" i i m.
President. F. Barclay. HI Corton &j|
seewtary, A. Fraaor. Ull Btowe strSr '
Mr. Cope's Theory
Editor B. C. Federationist: Having
noticed in last week's Issue some remarks of Mr. Cope of the B.C. Manufacturers association, that were at
least a revelation to those who have
persistently demanded "made in
B. C." goods, I consider lt needs further explanation from tbat gentleman. The remarks referred to are as
follows: "That high wages were responsible for much of the present
trouble ln the province. ... As
long as manufacturers had to compete with low wages and sweat-shop
prices of the east no progress would
be made." There Is not the least
doubt that the B. C. Manufacturers'
association desires progress and as
we have not heard of Mr. Cope and
bis associates endeavoring to raise
wages ln the east we must oome to
the conclusion that he means what
he says, that although the workers of
Vanoouver are already on the poverty
line we must endeavor to produce the
slum and sweatshop ln order thnt
they may compete. Probably lt has
never occurred to Mr. Cope that It he
and his household's total expenditure
were limited to |2 per day—which Is
more than the average ln the city at
this time—he would have a better opportunity of competing with eastern
goods. We have had considerable
talk of class hatred, but Is not Mr.
Cope, by such remarks, producing the
same faster than any other agency
here? We, however, still prefer to
think that the average man in this
city desires a Greater and Better
Vancouver, and not the sweat shop.
We believe that tbe city fathers desire a higher civilization than the
east, and that Ib the great motive
power of the labor movement. One
point, however, needs emphasizing,
that is the need for a labor paper ln
the city, as only through this medium
can we get remarks that are made
detrimental to human progress, and
it is the undoubted duty of every
right minded and progressive citizen
to support it and its advertisers, who
must at least have some sympathy
with Its motive If not with every detail in its columns.
G. H. HARDY.
Vancouver, B.C., September 2, 1914,
First Demand the Unlpn Label
Don't wait until trouble comes to
do your fighting tor union labor.   It
Ib possible for you to prevent trouble
and advance the cause every day In
the year In a peaceful fashion by de-fMOvma PICTURE operators, Lo-
mandlng the union label on the ar- ""' ■■"•■--- -
tides you purchase. The union man
who needs a fight to stir up his Interest and enthusiasm is only half a
union man. The potentialities of the
union label are always at hand if you
will but use them.
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
■ immn^jSiwSi atw Friday taSeh
wiVSi.*£>.Jm< —*" Temple, m E.
£S!?$»b7£? representative, die.
SfvfJSh —*". **»»>"•• Hours: I a.m.
to 10.80; 1 p.m. to 8.80 and I p.m. to I.N
K&. Clffi!'*,,I,i h,1P astaUhat on short
notice.  Phone Sey. 1414.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets seoond and fourth Thursday of
.eaeh month. .1 p. m. ' Seoretary, J, Blt-
?fnv «» Hornby street; business agent,
H. 3. McEwen, room 800. Looal 117 meets
flnt and third Monday of eaeh month,
and Local 1147 meets flnt and third
Tueaday of each month. .
■LBCTWCAL WOMOSIS, LOCAL NO.
. 'U—Meets Room 801 every Monday
! —*'JnlP*at' Dn* "hk; vtce-prssl-
dent, M. Sander; recording saentary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flnanclal see-
'"»>T .and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 807, Labor Temple.	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.... S2J. (Insldo Men)—Meets llrst and
third Mondays of each month: Room 805,
8 p. m. President, H. B. Van Sickle: recording seoretary, J. M. Cantpbell; business agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 807.
LONOSHOREMBNS'   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    88x11—Meets
•very   Friday   evening,   Ml   Alexander
•treet, President, J. Mahone; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS, NO. Ill—MEETS SEC-
ond and fourth Fridays, I p. m.
President. A. R. Towler; recording saentary, J. Brookes; flnanolal secretary, J. H.
McVety.
cal 348 I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every eeo^
ond Sunday of eaoh month, Labor Temple, I p.m. President H. C. Roddan; secretary-treasurer, L. B. Goodman; recording secretary, A. O. Hansen; business agent, G. R. Hamilton. Offlce,
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Bey. 8045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
.. Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.-
Meets second Sunday of each month,
rooms 88-30, Williams Building, 418 Granville street. Preaident, J. Bcwyer; vice-
president, F. English; secretary, H. J.
Brasfleld; treasurer, w. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTEB-
. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89—
Meets flnt and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President A. Hurry; corresponding aeoretary, F. Sumpter, 1880—
83rd avenue east; flnanclal secretary. D.
Scott, 677 Richards street; treasurer, L.
Tyson. Meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday In the month In Room 301 Labor
Temple.
UNION TAILOR SHOPS
Official Llat Furnished by Local 178,
Tailors' Industrial Union
B. C. Tailoring Company—128
Hastings street east.
Carruthers, George—232 Broadway
east.
Creasey, J.—640 Robson tsreet.
Calder & Farrington—3223 Main
street.
Davust, J. IS—2302 Granville street.
Ferguson,   J.   &   II.—38,14   Main
Flllttl, M.—746 Robson street.
GasB, J.—213 Hastings Btreet east.
Keir & Furneaux—420 ■ Seymour
Btreet.
Lawson, D.—Georgia and Seymour
streets.
Langtry—322 Hastings street west.
Matatal A McDonald—119 Robson
street.
Man, A.—2303 Main street.
McPherson, S.—432 Main street.
Mlnore, J. H.—152 Broadway east.
- Morgan, T.—817 Granville street.'
Perry, F.—Labor Temple.
Rahy & Co.—11 Hastings street
west.
Royal Tailoring Association—303
Hastings street west.
Slowin & McGetrick—136 Hastings
street west.
Stewart, D. & Co.—510 Robson
street
Stewart,, Dan—4S2 Homer street.
Wllllston & Kennedy—726 Robson
Btreet
IWoods, Sam—Lee Building, Broadway.   '
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR-
Meets In annual convention ln January. Executive officers, 1914-16: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, O. H. Fraser,
J. W. Ony, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. ~
Wells, Box 1538, Victoria. B.C.
NIW WISTMINSTIR, B. C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every second
and, fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labor
Halt Prssldent, D. S. Cameron; flnanclal
secretary, H. Glbb; keaenl secretary, W.
E. Maiden. P. O. Box Ml. The public Is
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STBAMFaTTBRS LO-
cal 411—Meets every seoond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7.M p. m. President, D. Webster; seoretary. A. McLaren. P. O. Box III, New
Weatminster, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOOAL 714—MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of eaoh month, at
1.10 p. m. Presldsnt, F. 8. Hunt; seoretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothen
Invited.
VICTORIA,
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets flrat and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 711 Johnston stnet,
at I p.m. Preeldent, George Dykemac;
lecretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box Ml,
Victoria, B.C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. IM,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
Sunday evenings ln Union Hall. President, Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer.
M. P. Vlllsneuvs, KlmMrley, 6. C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
James Delgarns; secretary, P. J, Bolam.
Box 26, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Ftderatlon of Mlnen—Meets
every Baturday In the Mlnen' Union
hall. Addnss all communications to the
Seoretary, Drawsr "K„" Sandon, B.C.
BUSINSSS AOBNT  DIRECTORY
Ask for Lsbor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7498 (unless otherwise ststed).
Bartenders—Room 208: Geo. W. Curnock,
U C. Federatlonist—Room 117: R. P.
Pettlpleoe.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L. Yule, Room 201,
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room 201;
Hugh McEwen.
Bricklayers—Room 111; Wm. S. Dagnall.
Barbers—Room SOI; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1771.
Hod Carriers, Bullden aad Common Laborers—Room 320: John Sully.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 811;
W. E. Walker; Tel. Seymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207: W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Worken (Inside)—Room 117;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers (Steam)-Room 216; L. Dawson.
Labor Tomple Co.—Room 111; J. H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Office,
145 Alexander street; H. Hannlng; tol.:
Seymour 8861,
Moving Pleturo Operators—O. R. Hamilton, Room 108, Loo Bldg.    TeL Sey.
Musicians—H. J. Biasfleld, rooms ll-M,
Williams Building, 413 Granville Stnet
Seymour 3580.
Plastenn—Jos Hamptoa; Tat Seymour 1114.
Street Railway Bmployees-fM. A.
Hoover: Seymour 608.
Tradea and. Labor Counoll—Room SIS;
Gas. Bartley.
Tyoypyr^-Woome  111.     211     IK;
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meets every
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Grand;
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, 1023
Comox street; recording secretary, R.
Dowding, 628 Howe street. Business
agent, James Train, Room 303, Labor
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .OF
' NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meeta 1st and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 105. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 1721
Grant street; J. Campbell, secordlng seo-
retary, 4868 Argyle street.	
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYP-
en' union, No. 88, of Vancouver and
Victoria—Meets second Wednesday of
each month, 4 p. m.,, Labor Temple. Preaident, Chas. Bayley; recording seoretary,
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple second and fourth
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and flrst and
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President,
W. H. Cottrell;. recording secretary.
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity atreet;
financial secretary and' business agent,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive. ■
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 897—Meete every Wednesday
6 p. m„ room 804, Labor Temple. Flnan-
clal secretary, B, Prendergaat, room 816.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meetings
held flrst Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording
secretary, C. McDonald, Box 501; flnanclal sec, K. Paterson, P. O. Box 503.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets seeond Sunday
of eadh month at Room 194, Labor Tem-'
pie. President, H. Spears: recording secretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 381—
Meets last Sunday each month, I
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlplece; vloo-
preijldent, W. S. Metsger, sscretary-
treasurer, R, H. Neelands. p. O. Box II.
SYNOPSIS  OF   COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberts,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
rltorles and In a portion of the Provinoe
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one yean at an annual
rental of |1 an acre. Not mora than
2,660 acres will be leaaed to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant ln person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In whloh the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a foe of 15, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the nte of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating thejfinlne shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for tha full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon. , If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
nte of 110 an acre.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent or Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for-8MM.
Are you a subscriber?   If not, send
In your name now.
Westminster Trust Compcuiy
flaaltoL — ■*■ ■■.** mammm* »i ' s   ^^a^^La
-       *^ ---       ajaSaasOefl. atm^m^^^^^ ■■■*■• ^^^mm
Ws hsvs MONEY TO LOAN os Improved property.
Estates managed tor outottows snd city clients.  Faynsota tet-
Isetsd asd forwarded or Invested.   Ws set ss stents only for the
purchase.end sals of real estate.
Deposits accepted sad Interest st 4% allowed on dally ksisass.
SAFETY DIPOSIT BOXU FOR HINT
Hssd Offloe:
Columbia snd Bessie Stmt, Nsw Westminster, B. a
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Bsesissin le 0—lsi * —ss, SIS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS dt
J. E. BROWN & CO.
618 COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
SY SMOKINO THI OLD MLIASLB
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU   HSLF YOUN  PILLOW  UNION  MSN AND   SISIDIS,  VOU BIT
THI VIRV  BIST VALUI  POR YOUR  MONIY
NO
ROOM FOR
THE HINDU
IN OUR
FACTORY
We Don't Employ Asiatics!
BOYS—When you want any Paint, Stain,
Enamel, Varnish, Wall Finish, White Lead
 r~~7—-" 7 — '	
or anything else in the Paint Line, demand
goods made by us.
WE GUARANTEE THEM
BRITISH AMERICA
PAINT COMPANY, Ltd.
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton
Labor Cartoons Labor News
Special Features
R, V. HOYT
President
Taeoma
Labor
Advocate
R. PARM. PBTTIPIBCB, Vice-President
British Columbia Federationist
Secretary's Officfs: Bpx 874, Seattle, W|shinftp*i
J

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