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The British Columbia Federationist Apr 3, 1914

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Array TFM BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTF' *   MTY:  STRENGTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
POLITICAL UNITY: VICTORTI
STjf9 £EAE.   No. 156.
ll
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
('"cXrS8') $1.50PER YEAB
TO
ACT
No Enquiry Will Be Made
Into B. C. Prison Conditions
Remarks of J. H. McVety
re Inquest on the Late
Joseph Main
HAS NO RIGHT TO
PI
"Mother"  Jones Illegally
Incarcerated in Vermin-
Bidden Hole
Miners' Homes Destroyed—
Militia Used to Terrorise
Strikers
Regarding the suggestion of organized labor that a royal commission
be appointed to inquire Into the conditions existing In the different
prisons ln this province, also with reference to the recommendation of the
coronerB' jury ln the case of the late
Joseph Mairs, the attorney-general
has Bent the following letter to President Watchman of the B. C. Federation of Labor, and, no doubt, if Mr.
Bowser can take any consolation from
the remarks of Delegate McVety as
an excuse for not moving ln the matter, he will be quite welcome to do
■so:
[•COPY]
"Attorney-General
"Province of British Columbia
"Vlotoria, B. 0,
"31st March, 1914.
"Mr. A. Watchman, president B. C,
Federation ot Labor, P. 0. box
1688, Victoria, B. C:
"Dear Sir,—The honorable the premier has forwarded me your letter of
, the 10th Inst, suggesting that a royal
commission be appointed to Inquire
Into the conditions existing ln the different prisons ln this province. In
reply, I beg to state that from what I
know ot conditions existing ln the
prisons, and from inquiries made, I
do not think that there Is any necessity for us taking any such drastic
movement as you suggest, and I
think that I am justified ln making
. this statement so far as the prison
farm Is concerned, by the remarks
made at your last annual meeting at
New Westminster by Mr. Jamea H,
McVety, whq was foreman of the coroner's jury which took the evidence
at the Inquest on the late Joseph
Mairs. The amount of sickness that
we have there, or at any ot the prls
ons, is not so great as ln many other
places where a large number of men
are congregated together. In fact,
the amount of sickness, I think, Is a
great deal less than what could ordinarily be expected. Yours truly,
"W. J. BOWSER,
"Attorney-general."
Imprisoned Minera
Following stenographlo report Ib
taken from the official proceedings of
the New Westminster convention of
the B. C. Federation of Labor:
Del. KAVANAGH—Re. resolution
No. 71 said: Your special committee
divided the resolution into two portions, and I made the adoption of part
one as previously read.
Del. McVETY—I think there   will
probably be a unanimity of opinion on
the resolution. I just want to say this.
I had the honor to be the foreman of
the coroner'B jury that investigated
the death of Joseph Mairs in Okalla
Prison Farm.  There were on that day
209 prisoners.   Sick prisoners becoming objectionable to their cell-mates,
are removed to a hospital.. There Is
no doctor in connection with the Institute, and the evidence in the case
of Mairs was that the prisoner was
taken sick on Wednesday; on Friday
hlB cell mate made a complaint; asked for medical assistance; on Saturday the head jailer heard about it; on
Sunday the doctor heard about lt, and
on Monday the prescription was filled.
On TueBday the prisoner died.     In
fairness It should be said that that
particular condition of affairs had nothing to do with the death of the prisoner ih question, but It Indicates a lamentable lack of oare on the part of
the state, and   a   disregard   of the
health of citizens who are committed
to those institutions, and a tendency
to return them to freedom In a much
lower physical and mental condition
than when they are incarcerated.   In
that Institution tor seven months the
medical allowance was $203.   The entire medical allowance for all the Jails
of British Columbia—New Westminster,  Okalla  Prison Farm,  Victoria,
Kamloops, and NelBon, waa $2,600 and
some odd dollars for twelve months.
Charges have   been   made that the
food was doped, and that the men are
Intimidated from asking for medioal
assistance on account of expense, and
that statement has been confirmed,
hot only by the evidence In this particular instance, but by the evidence
of public accountB of the province of
MtlBh Columbia.   In the Okalla Prls-
>n Farm a "trustle" Is In charge of
iuch things as mustard, and salts and
lope of that kind.    This man was
roubled with tuberculosis and peri
onitis, and a guard prescribed   hot
nustard for cramps, and then they
save him a lot of pills, and then a lot
if salts.    The man had been prev-
ously operated upon for the same 111-
tess, and nothing could be done for
ilm.     With reference to the state-
nent that the prisoners are drugged,
said the entire amount ln all jails ln
British  Columbia was 12,500, and I
ay now that the amount spent for
rugs by contract from various drug-
lsts throughout   the   province was
1,200 and some odd dollars, that in
amloops the cost of medical attend-
ue was $400, and the cost of drugs
109, so you see these prisoners are
elng doped Instead   of   calling In
tedlcal assistance.   I think, as I said
i the first place, there will be a una
Imlty of opinion on the part of the
invention, but I could not let this op-
irtunlty pbsb without mentioning the
atements that have been made, and
■oof has been furnished under oath
i prison authorities and "trusties."
Del. KELLY—I am   not   as   thor-
ighly oonversant with the causes of
airs' death probably   as   Delegate
cVety but judging from what var-
ub delegates have Bald, and what I
tVe seen ln the publlo press, and
I,re particularly what Delegate Mc-
[Special to The Federatlonist]
DENVER, Colo., March 28.—The
Colorado mllltla reached the climax
in their fiendish was of terrorism on
the striking coal miners when they
kidnapped Mother Jones and placed
her In a damp, filthy cell In the Wai-
senhurg jail. She Is being held there
Incommunicado a military prisoner.
The Colorado militiamen have robbed
snd destroyed miners' homes, have
dragged future mothers through the
snow-covered valleys, have mowed
down and maimed women and children, but these fiendish cruelties are
nothing compared to Mother Jones'
illegal Incarceration ln this vermin-
ridden hole. It waB ln this cold, damp
cell that Gub Martinez, a healthy
young Greek, contracted rheumatism
of the heart and died. The militia
know that It was this cell which made
Martinez HI and cauBed his death. Dr.
Abdun-Nur has advised the mllltla
that the cell Is absolutely unfit for
any person to live in, but the hellhounds refuse to move her, and lt Ib
a grave question aB to how long the
aged woman can survive the confinement. Although the attorney-general
has advised the governor that the
mllltla has no right to hold military
Prisoners Incommunicado
Adjutant General Chase continues to
do so. Attorney-general Farrar has
also told the corporation-owned execu
fives tbat they had no right to tear
down the miners' tents at Forbes. To
show him' they were obeying the orders ot the coal operators and not
following his advice, Ammons and
Chase had the miners' homes destroyed again. Officials of the United
Mine Workers have announced that
"when they again erect theBe homes,
tbey hope to be In a position to protect their property rights against all
trespassers." After robbing Colorado taxpayers or $760,000 to use the
mllltla to terrorize and intimidate
the strikers, Governor Ammons has
announced that he will withdraw all
uniformed scab-herders. This statement has been made before, and resulted ln nothing. About the time the
mllltla are to be withdrawn, the hired
assassin of the operators will start
another reign of terror, blame lt on
the strikers, and the lickspittle gov
ernor will have another excuse to
keep the militia in the Btrike zone.
East vs. West
Vancouver is not the only western
olty with many printers out of work.
In Calgary more than one-third of the
men ln the printing Industry are
minus jobs at the present time. Never
ln the history of the city has trade
been so flat. The Daily Herald has
dispensed with its night staff and Is
experimenting ln an effort to have all
day work ln the offlce. And yet in
New England less than two per cent,
of the typographical union are unemployed.
LARGEST JURY PANEL ON RECORD
Jurora Who Sat in Judgment on Vancouver Island Striking Minera recently tt New Westminster, B.C. Asslsee.
IMMIGRANT "FARM HANDS"
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL IDS
Trades and Labor Couni
Delegation  Intel
Mayor
By-laws Relaxed—Discrimination Agaitut Trades
Unioi
May Day Celebration -
President Brown of Timber Workers Speaks
James Roberts Returning
The many friends of James Roberts
ex-vice-president of the B. C. Federation of Labor and president of District
No. 6 Western Federation of Miners,
will be delighted to hear that he Intends returning to the West. Mr.
Roberts haB benefitted by the radium
treatment and although he may never
enjoy robust health again, yet he
wants to be out In British Columbia
shortly. In an Interesting letter, he
says: "Although far from well, I have
been able to get around a little, and
hear views from a labor standpoint,
and I think that if every man over
twenty-one years of age had the vote,
there would be a far larger number
of labor representatives ln the house
of commons, the younger generation
appear to know the value of political
action but under present conditions
are In the main disfranchised. I was
present at a big labor demonstration
held at Barrow-in-Furness on March
'lth, to welcome Mr. Waterson, one
of the South African deportees. Mr.
Robertson got a great reception when
he rose to address the vast audience
ln the town hall. Someone started to
sing "The Red Flag," and Boon it was
one grand chorus. It was simply
great. Mr. Waterson was deeply
moved by the ovation he received,
and ln a telling speech told us the
workers' side of the story, and expressed his determination to return to
South Africa, and demand his rights
as a British subject. He 1b a flne type
of man, and a born fighter. Tbe Independent Labor party here are doing
good work In educating the masses."
Longshoremen Win
Verdict for $1,100 was returned by
a Supreme court Jury late on Tuesday
in the action of Solby vs. Captain
Stevens and the B. C. Pioneering
Stevedoring company. The plaintiff
was suing tor damages on aocount of
Injuries received while loading a vessel at the Hastings mill. S. S. Taylor,
K. C, appeared tor the plaintiff and
A. J. Kappele for the defendants.
Immigrants Brought to Dominion Don't Want
Parm Work •
Domestic Servants Unemployed and No More
Necessary
A short time ago The Federatlonist
pointed out the faot that the so-called
farm laborers brought out to this
country eventually swelled the ranks
of the unemployed in the big cities.
The following excerpt from the daily
press is significant: '
Toronto, March 31. — Two
special trains arrived in Toronto
to-day with about 800 immigrants
. and the greater number went on
to the weat. Of those who remained In. the city not one expressed a willingness to go on
farms, although several farmers
were on hand ready to engage
help. A good many more Immigrants are expected this week,
some of them having had farming
experience.
The Canadian Northern, the emigration department of the Saivatlon
army and.other proflt-mongerlng corporations are today scattering broadcast through the old world Invitations
to "come to Canada." Lately, owing
to the activities of the Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada and the
various trades councils throughout
the dominion they state ln their paid
advertisements that farm laborers
and domestic servants are especially
required. Yet out of 800 immigrants
not one wanted to go near a farm and
doubtless the same holds true with
domestic servants. In thl; city now
there are hundreds of wonien anxious
MINERS' FUND
Amounts   Acknowledged — Itemized
Account Will Shortly be Published
President Foster, U.M.W. of A. states
with reference to the fund used to
defray the expenses of the Imprisoned
striking miners of Vancouver Island
contributions are herewith acknowledged: Previously received (412.20;
social-democratic locals, 19.20; defence oommlttee, $163; social democratic party provincial executive,
$67.02; Vancouver Printing Pressmen's union, $9—making a total ot
$660.42. Amounts expended to date,
$660. An itemized account will appear In The Federatlonist when the
fund is exhausted.
Settlement le Made
-Settlement has been made by the
Western Canada Power company tn
the case of Mrs. Bertha Wren, whose
husband was recently killed at Stave
Lake by an electric wire. The terms
as announced by D. J. O'Neill, who
Tuesday morning ln Supreme court
Chambers, secured Justice Murphy's
assent to them, are $120 a month for
twelve months, and, In addition,
Cash payment of $1,600.
The secretary of the Bookbinders
reports that tbe entire trade Is looked
out In Nashville, Tenn., over recognition of the union. Also that the
Chicago Shipping anil Receipt Book
company have locked out their union
men ln the bookbinders' trade. This
Arm manufactures loose leaf binders,
which are sold all over the continent.
and willing to earn a livelihood by go
Ing into the ranks of domestic servants, but have no opportunity. Still
these corporations, aided and abetted
by the government, keep adding
to the ranks of the unemployed. Out
ot two train loads of alleged farm-
hands and domestics not one would
accept farm work.- When are the
workera going to call the bluff?
medicines administered to the men, I
think this convention should go
record tbat the jury should have
brought In a verdict of manslaughter,
Instead of the verdict they did bring
ln.
Del. McVETY (continuing)—This is
outside of the subject under consideration, and It is a matter of urgency
that.the convention should vote on this
that the matter may be brought before the authorities. The tacts In connection with the death of Mairs have
not been exploited by me for a number of reasons. My assurance to the
delegates of tbls convention Is that
tbere was no evidence that was produced, or could have been produced
that would have warranted any such
verdict on the part of the jury as Delegate Kelly suggests. Let it be said
here now that no opportunity was
overlooked of securing any evidence
that would incriminate the prison authorities If it was there to secure. A
personal examination was made by
every member of the jury of the body
of the deceased, and an investigation
was made by an outside doctor. The
latter who performed an autopsy,
stated that the cause of death was entirely foreign to any treatment. The
statement that he died ot starvation
Is rot. He was engaged at the time
ot his death ln preparing food for the
wardens and other officers of the jail.
The evidence is that he died of intestinal tuberculosis and peritonitis.
The treatment he reoelved, In the
opinion ot the doctor and In the opinion of the jury, was such that lt did
not make any difference. His own
father testified that he had been operated on by one of the best doctors
in the city of Glasgow some years
ago, and the man's abdomen showed
the marks ot the operation. The doctors found that they were unable to
cure him completely. I didn't want
to have to go Into this, and I don't
want to do anything to help the authorities, but to suggeBt that the Jury
was remiss In Its duty Is far from the
case, and it Is not fair to thoso who
did what they could to assist In giving the exact knowledge of the conditions prevailing.
Preeldent SIVERTZ—In his remarks
Delegate McVety said that Mairs had
been suffering from an incurable disease, and death would have occurred
Irrespective of the particular condition of this case. I trUBt the delegates will not confuse the matter. The
resolution Is to adopt the committee's
report, which is ln favor of the resolution,
WHAT B.C. IS UP AGAINST
"I do not agree with the term
'discrimination' when It le applied
to the hiring or discharging ef
city alectrlclane er Inspectors, because they .may happen te be
members of unions," sold hie wor.
ehlp Mayor Baxter. "However, I
will look Into thie matter. If I
> find that the rule that men must
sever their affiliation with their
unions before accepting official
positions Is not carried- out In
other departments, electrioiene In
future will not be Interfered
with."
For some months past the electrical
workers ln this city bave been disturbed over the way ln which matters connected with the city electrician's department bave been carried
on. On Monday a deputation of the
Trades and Labor council Interviewed
the mayor on the subject, Charles
Fletcher, the chief city electrician,
being present. The committee comprised Messrs. E. L. Estinghausen, R.
P. Pettlplece, W. F. Dunn and Geo.
Bartley. Mr. Estinghausen said that
the city bylaws were not being carried/ out In many cases regarding installation and wiring. Some contractors were given more latitude than
others, especially those who were antagonistic to unions. Several specific
cases were referred to to substantiate
this statement. Mr. Fletcher replied
thlt the bylaw did not cover all
points, but that he always took precautions to have wiring connections
made safe. The bylaw stated that
they must be made close as possible.
Sometimes work had been done by
contractors who did not know the
requirements as
Specified In the Bylsws
It would be a hardship on them to
tear their work down, when It waa
not necessary so far as safety to the
publlo was concerned, but which was
not done to the strict letter of the
law. Quite a lot of explanations regarding trade technicalities were
made and discussed by the city electrician and the committee, when
Mayor Baxter asked If It was the Intention to allow contractors who did
not know the bylaw to be privileged
to break bylaws. "The bylaw must
be strictly lived up to, whether lt
works hardships or not," said the
mayor, "and Inspectors bave no other
option or recourse but to enforce
tbem. All the explanations ln Christendom should not be sufflclent to violate the bylaw." W. F. Dunn said that
the union had nothing to do with the
contractors regarding the bylaws, but
when the city electrician stepped In
and told some 600 or 600 membere of
tbe union that when the city employs
one of tbelr number he
Must Forthwith Resign
his membership to say the least was
rank discrimination. R. P. Pettlplece
held tbat the only disqualification to
an employee of the olty Bhould be incompetency and not membership In
any society. The mayor agreed with
the electrician that he thought there
waa no discrimination against the hiring of a man because he was a member of a union, the only stipulation
being that when he became an inspector he should cease connection with
his union while working for the city.
It did not follow that if a man quit
his union to work for the city he became a scab. The building Inspectors
when appointed were supposed to
withdraw from the union. E. L. Estinghausen did not think so, and believed that plumbers working for the
city carried their cards and that the
old rule did not apply to them. Unionists Btood for strict Inspection and
enforcement of the bylaws and there
,ore No Dlscrlmlnstlon
should be made against anyone carry
Ing a union card. Also It was pointed
out that when a man quit his union
he forfeited all monetary benefits, perhaps after paying dues and assessments for yearB. lt waB further con
tended tbat the civic officials Bhould
not go outside the city to hire men,
which In Borne cases had been the
practice. It was agreed that any further complaints of the electricians
would be taken up with City Electrician Fletoher by Mr. Eastlnghnusen,
His worship Mayor Baxter then closed
the Interview by stating ob abovo
quoted.
TYPOS MET SUNDAY
E. Wilton Will Be Delegate to
Northwest Conference at Portlsnd
The meeting Sunday laat of the
Typographical union waB of Interest
to all who were there, many questions
of far-reaching import coming up for
discussion. .1. E. Wilton was unanimously elected to represent No. 226
at the meeting of the Northwest conference of Typographical unions,
which will meet In Portland, Ore.,
early this month. The examining
committee reported aB having examined twenty-seven apprentices during
the month aB to their proficiency, and
they will be graded accordingly. The
labor representation league delegates
made a detailed report, and a sum
equal to five cents per member waB
voted for political purposes. The anti-
military clause ln the B. C. F. of L.
constitution wae carried by on overwhelming vote after an exciting debate, which kept President Pettlplece
busy. "Sit down everybody!" wns
the final ultimatum. A great deal of
correspondence on various subjects
was rend. The president of the
Caxton Apprentice club, A. E. Lalng,
was obligated as a twothlrder. The
various chapele reported work as very
poor all over the city.
lervice Council-
opining Rooms—
-operation
President W. E. Walker wit In the
chtlr last night nt a fairly well-attended meeting of the Trades tnd
Labor Council. The Mlneworkers of
Nanalmo propose to have a big May-
Day celebration, and asked the council to co-operate. This was agreed to,
and delegates were asked to Invite
members of their unions to participate
In the festivities. .    ~
H. 3. McEwen, secretary Business
Agents Board, asked thtt the question
regarding tbe case of Sleuter versus
Plasterers' union be taken up by the
council. Delegates Sully, Curnock
and McVety were appointed on t committee to deal with'the queatlon.
A letter was received from Rev. R.
F. Stlllman, of the Social Service council of Vancouver, requesting co-operation along the lines of social servile,
particularly regarding immigration
work and the unemployed of the city
and district. After eome' discussion,
Delegates Hamilton, Trotter tnd Estinghausen were appointed to take up
the subject with Mr. Stlllman.
The parliamentary committee re-
ferrui to the fact that a large majority
of the proprietors of hotels' of this
city were not complying with .the
liquor by-law aa regarde dining rooms
attached to hotels, Inasmuch ts they
are renting them to other partlef
Delegatea Dunn, McVety tnd Preeldent Walker will wait on the license
board regarding the matter.
Delegate Dunn reported thlt a
committee Interviewed the Mtyor and
City Electrician Fletcher regarding
discrimination against Union electricians and the breaking of the olty bylaws. The Interview was a satisfactory one.
A Wayles, manager of New Westminster Cooperation Assoclstlon, wu
on motion Invited to address next
meeting of council on question pf cooperation.
Delegate Pettipiece slated tbat he
had been placed on the executive oommlttee of the Vancouver Planning and
Beautifying Association. The body
waa a representative one, tnd t
scheme Or plan was advanced, at far
as It was possible to go for the
present. J. J. Banfield was elected
chairman.
Delegate Burkhart reported for the
Label league, and said that another
entertainment would be held towards
tbe end of the month   -
President Brown, of the International Tlmberworkers' union, spoke
briefly regarding the timber Industry In
this province. About 96 per cent, of
the shingle workers were organized
on the coast. During last year 10,000
wore added to the union membership,
mostly of the logging branch. There
were practically no chinks employed
In the logging camps, and about 60
per cent of shingle weavers In B. C.
were Orientals. There were over 100,-
000 men in the timber industry In
Washington and about 20,000 in B. C.
lt was reported that a union, No.
397, of the Stationary Engineers had
been formed.
Delegate Outterldge said that Cook's
Bhop tn the Loo block and the Pioneer Bteam laundry were unfair to
union labor.
Delegate Mldgley of the Lathers
reported tbat members of the Northwest conference had started organization work ln the different centres,
simultaneously.
Delegate Burkhart reported that the
barbers' trade was dull, and that the
Regent shop had put In a union card.
The Garment Workers' delegate reported all hands working.
Delegate Sully stated thnt over half
of the builders' laborers were idle In
the city.
TO SOLVE BIG PROBLEM
Great Britain Decides to Organize In.
dustrlsl Production
A serious and determined movement is on foot In Groat Britain to
form one of the greatest Industrial
combinations over organized by the
working classes of any nation. It Is
proposed to combino the co-operative
forces of the country, representing
2,760,000 or people, and organized labor, numbering 2,260,000, in a working fusion. Should this scheme come
to fruition scores of millions of dollars Invest by trade unions and other
affiliated organizations would be added to the $186,000,000 share capital of
the co-operators and $90,000,000 loan
and reserve, backed by ever Increasing profits on the turnover. If all the
plans suggested are successful the
alms and Ideals of two groat wings
of the labor movement will be co-ordinated and united action wll be taken
industrially, socially and In legislative matters. The leading bodies In
this vast scheme are the trades union
congress, tho General Federation of
trade unions, the Labor party and Its
allied organizations, women's trade
unions, the Independent tabor party
and the cooperative societies of the
United Kingdom. It Is recognised
that this tremendous venture on the
part of united labor will take years to
organlzo before any definite, practical results can accrue.
Solve Problem
How the organization of each section can be co-ordinated for educational, Industrial and parliamentary
purposes, what practical stops should
be taken to secure control of industry
and commerce, enabling the working
people to solve the problem of labor
unrest for themselves will have to be
considered. This may prove to be t
practical step towards nationalization
of industry. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATiONIST.
FRIDAY APRIL 8, 1914
Closer Trade Relations Be
tween Producers and
Consumers Needed
Better Legislation in Interests of Co-operative
Societies Asked
Recently representative farmers
from every section of the province of
Ontario, numbering about 200, met in
the Labor Temple, Toronto, to found
an organization In the interests of the
agricultural workers of the province,
and from the enthusiasm manifested
throughout the convention, it can be
assumed that the United Farmers' association of Ontario, as the new body
has been named, will become a power
in the near future The new constitution adopted will aim to secure equal
opportunities for all, to further the interests of farmers in all branches of
agriculture, foster a mutual understanding, study farm and household
questions, and work for Increased
Efficiency and Comfort
The keynote of the association will
be cooperation and among other business transacted was the passing of
a resolution calling upon the federal
government to enact better legislation in the interests of co-operative
societies. It was pointed out that the
Interests of the workers upon the farm
and In the factories and workshops
were closely Interwoven. What was
required was closer cooperation between the producers on the land and
the consumers ln the towns and cities, and it was beginning to be recognized all over the continent that the
time had come for closer affiliation
and concerted action for the securing
of equitable legislation in the interests of
The General Public
As has been stated the question of
effective co-operation was very much
to the front, and the lack of a proper
act under which co-operative societies
could take out charters was roundly
denounced. Elmer Lick claimed that
better legislation in the Interests of
co-operative societies was imperatively needed, and it was up to the association to see that the strongest
representations were made to the government on the matter, and that it be
asked to see that better legislation
along these lines was secured. The
western farmers were working along
similar grooves.
Interests of Co-operation
The new executive was delegated
to frame a resolution to be sent to
the government at Ottawa, and lay
the whole question before it. Mr.
Cavan, of Peterboro, said this problem had been before the farmers for
several years past,- but when the
prospects of securing the desired legislation seemed bright, the Retail Merchants' association had got busy and
brought their Influence to bear on the
government. They sent big delegations to the capital and so far had effectively blocked relief along these
lines. It would be a different proposition if the united farmers voiced
their demands, and they should not
hesitate to show the government that
they expected justice and would be
satisfied with nothing less. The following
Officers Were Elected
for the coming year: President, E. C.
Dury, Barrle; first vice-president, G.
A. Brethen, Norwood; second vice-
president, H. Halbert, Dufferln; direc;
tors—J. F. Breen, Dufferln; John Service, Workworth; R. H. Johnson, Victoria county; A. E. Vance, Lambton
county; C. H. Adam, Essex. In addition to the association lt was decided
to form a United Farmers' Co-operative company, and the following were
elected provincial directors to complete the legal business and appoint
permanent directors: Messrs. Gurney,
Whittaker, Powers, Drury, Good, Anderson, Col. Fraser, Carlaw, Vance,
Prltchard, Webster, Grove and Brown-
Bronze, black, buff and white Holland turkeys are the varieties found
in British Columbia. It is predicted
that the Okanagan district will be a
large producer in a few years.
■     FOR
vPROUUCEIS
iMARKET mm
AND     |
CONSUMER
BY GEORGE BARTLEY
CITY GARDENING
Pleasure  and  Profit  Growing  Trees,
Plants and Vegetables
This Ib the season for planting and
pruning and preparation for cultivation of the year's crop. Attention
now turns naturally to plants, trees
and flowers and other growing things.
The soil and climate of British Columbia are peculiarly adapted to agricultural and horticultural development. This is attested by the magnificent record of this province ln nearly
all departments of activity pertaining to the orchard and the farm. But
it Is not necessary to live on a farm
to enjoy the exhilaration of farm work
and to reap the benefits of soil products. The man or woman with a
small city lot can turn that lot into
proflt by devoting lt to gardening.
Spinach
For spring and summer use, sow
either broadcast or in drills one foot
apart and one Inch deep, as early as
the ground can be worked, and every
two weeks in succession.
Radishea
To secure radishes with crisp, tender flesh, grow them quickly in rich,
loose soil, and gather before reaching
full size. Frequent planting should
be made for succession, so that a supply of fresh, tender radishes ln the
finest condition may be had at all
times.
Tomatoes
Sow early ln hotbeds, and as soon
as they have four leaves transplant
Into shallow boxes. Harden off, and
set out as Boon as danger of frost is
past. An ounce of seed will produce
3000 to 4000 plants.
Cucumbers
Cucumbers need a warm, rich soil
and should not be planted in open
ground until the weather is settled, as
otherwise they will not thrive. Plant
In hills four feet apart each way, thinning to three or four of the strongest
plants, after danger from insects ts
past. As fast as the cucumbers attain
suitable  size they  should  be  taken
from 'the vine, whether required for
use or not, aB their ripening soou destroys the vine's usefulness.
Lettuce
Lettuce requires very rioh soil,
plenty of water, a cool growing season and intense culture to produce
the best results. If the earlieBt varieties are planted out in the spring,
and the weather turns dry and hot,
they will run up to seed without heading. The same seed sown in tbe fall
or with cooler growing weather would
develop perfectly. At a temperature
of 40 degrees or lower lettuce will not
thrive, at 65 degrees and upward lt
haB a tendency to run up and not head
properly. For outside planting sow
the seed ln shallow drills from one
to two ounces to the 100 yards.
Onions /
The onion thrives best In a rather
deep, rich, loamy soil, and unlike most
vegetables, succeeds well when cultivated on the same ground for successive years. The best culture requires that the ground should be
deeply dug and heavily manured with
well rotted manure a season or two
previously.
Beets
The beet is hardy and may be planted as soon as the ground can be well
prepared, doing best in rich, sandy
soil, sown in rows 16 inches apart,
covered \y. inches deep. The seed
will sprout better if soaked 24 hours
in warm water before planting. Thin
out by using the largest ones when
they are of sufflclent size, continuing
until they are six or eight inches
apart in the rows. For field crop
the rows should be far enough apart
to permit the use of a horse cultivator.
Lima Beans
Lima beans can be planted ln any
garden soil as early as April or late
as July. Give the same care and
culture as other beans, and they are
ready to use when the pods are filled
and first begin to ripen. It Is not necessary that they should dry on the
vines, except for seed.
The "Big Ditch" That Will Flood the Labor Market and Spell a Revolution
in Pacific Coast Industry During the Next Ten Years
THIS WEEK'S MARKETS
No Change From Last Week's Doings
at City Market
There is practically no change in
market quotations from last week,
Tbere Is good demand.for all kinds
ot poultry. Another large consignment of Chinese eggs during the
week. The fleh market is well supplied with halibut, cod and smelts.
On the other hand soles and flounders
are scarce.   Fresh salmon Ib scarce.
SHIP ONLY FRESH EGG3
Policy Adopted By the Chilllwack
Poultry Association
At the annual meeting of the Chilllwack Poultry association held recently, the matter of the care and
marketing of the highest grade of
guaranteed fresh eggs was fully discussed. The government waB unanimously voted its strongest support of
the movement .inaugurated by the B.
C. Poultry association, and now gen
eral throughout the province, ln favor
of dominion legislation along lines of
the application of the Marks act to
the sale of all storage and imported
eggs. This legislation will help the
local producer ln protecting him from
the competition of cold storage and
Imported eggs, by insisting that these
be branded to show exactly what they
are, 1. e„ cold storage, Chinese, Eastern, etc. Under present conditions
large quantities of these are palmed
off as fresh eggs by unscrupulous
dealers to the great loss and dissatisfaction of both producer and consumer. The pioneers of the Bystem
In co-operative marketing of guaranteed eggs are the members of Cowichan Creamery association. Four
years ago this association marketed
81,000 dozen and this has increased
annually to 179,000 dozen in 1913.
Through guaranteed eggs the association Is able to obtain a premium of
from five to ten cents a dozen over
the prevailing market price.
\ • Via**-*
- «... "*JtSj
XT*-*
Hi I
«*»'     %     /■*/.'■        r
DANGEROUS DISEASES
Now Urgent Problem—Potato Growers Urged to Take Action
More general and concerted efforts
on the part of potato growers    are
needed to combat   certain    diseai
which threaten to impair the vigor of
the seed stock and to cause the deterioration of varieties, according to the
United States department of agriculture's investigator.    To open the way
for more efficient measures of control for potato diseases that have not
always been definitely understood a
new bulletin is now issued, entitled:
i "Potato Wilt, Leaf-Roll and Related
j Diseases." It can be had free on appll-
! cation to the United States depart-
; ment of agriculture, Washington, D.C.
The group of potato diseases treated tn the new bulletin now raises a
problem of increasing Importance to
practical agriculture in different countries throughout the world.   Environment has a most important influence
on crops In the several states and in
foreign countries.      Therefore great
' care is needed to determine exactly
i which method of control is best in
each specific Instance where disease
is present.   The bulletin wishes particularly to emphasize the fact that the
same system of seed  selection  and
crop rotation that will free the potato fields of wilt, leaf-roll and curly
dwarf will not only bring under control black-leg and some other diseases
but will Insure the maintenance of the
strains cultivated in their most vigorous condition and free from objectionable  mixtures    with    other  var-
I letles.
.gbj1
«f»~**£- I . a.*.
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OC'EX.H
Good Milk Supply
About 30,000 pounds of milk is being received dally for condensing at
the B. C. Condensing factory at South
Sumas. This supply within the next
month is expected to be doubled and
it goes to show to what extent the
dairy industry has grown in this valley, It Ib one of the three large milk
depots receiving supplies from the
valley dairymen.
Fattening Poultry
Purdue university conducted a poultry fattening experiment recently In
which 304 cockerels were fed for two
weeks on a fattening ration and sour
buttermilk, At the end of the experiment the 304 cockerels had gained 109
pounds, at a total cost for feed of only
$7.64. In addition to the increased
weight the quality of the birds was
very much better. The fowls cost 12
cents per pound when placed ln the
fattening pen, while the finished produce sold for from 20 cents to 25 cents
per pound dressed. There was a loss
of only 30 pounds in dressing, leaving
a net gain of 79 pounds and an increase of 8 cents to 13 cents per pound
for the entire weight of the flock.
Easter Eggs
The poultry in this country seemingly have gone mad. An Instance of
this is shown ln the production of a
goose owned by B. A. Wells of Eden-
bank Farm, Sardls. This particular
goose lays nothing but pound eggs.
Four of them are on exhibition In
Ashwells' limited, and the combined
weight is four pounds. One of the
eggs measures one way 12'/, inches.
William Topley of Fairfield island,
has a hen that has laid two eggs in
one day, and he has another under
which he placed 12 eggs and she
hatched out 13 chickens.—Chilllwack
Progress,
MINARD'S LINIMENT  FOR SALE
EVERYWHERE
Working model of the Panama Canal to
be exhibited at James Stark ft Sons, 29
Hastings atreet weit, commencing Wednesday, April 1. The model shows accurately the Gatnn, the locks, the great
dam, tho government railroad and
the approaches of the Pacific and Atlantic sides, You will think yourself a bird-
man or blrdwoman, for it is as If you
were gazing down upon the canal "thousands of feet below." You will note how
perfect a cosmos of Its own Ib the canal
zone and Its wonderful threads of roads
and canal channels. Mount Cutebra, cut
ln twain like an old-fashioned pone ot
bread, doesn't look quite so defiant as lt
did when De Lesseps tried to figure out
Us undoing and Goethals came to see how
he eould conquer the giant that barred
the passage of a channel.
Toward the center of the model, which
Is about thirty-six feet long and six feet
wide, the cut Is shown, and near It Is
the long waterway that leads to Oatun
lake. On the other side of the rldge Is the
Pacific entrance and the fortifications.
The model Is made of a composition of
wood and paper mache. It is made to
scale and Is perfect topographically and
otherwise. One sees in it the comparative heights and the comparative distances. It Is exceedingly Instructive In
this regard. For example, the fact that
the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific do
not ■ actually meet, but are lifted by a
series of locks to a considerable height
above sea-level, Is noticeable at a glance.
The Pacific waters are far helow those of
the Culebra out. Tho tunnel for the railroad on the Pacific side is several hundred feet below the channel of the cut
and one can trace the tiny road across
bridges, up and down grades and finally
Into Colon.
At the side of the Inner Colon harbor Is
shown  the  old  canal  that  the  French
started. It Is a tiny looking ditch In the
map, but the "real thing" la many miles
long in Its construction. The French
stockholders lost over $250,000,000. To
this day the remains of the expensive
machinery used In attempting to bultd It
can be seen In Panama, but not on the
relief model as the objects would-be too
amall,
The United Slates system of lights and
lighthoufles are clearly shown In the
model by tiny electric globes aet In miniature stone turrets, Even the railroad signals are there and the lines of telegraphic
communication from one side of the zone
to the other by diminutive polos and
wires.
On the Colon side an Interesting study
can be made of the Oatun dam. It tl
alongside of the great locks of the same
name, and the Immense concrete shoulder
that Is built In the solid rock Is plainly
shown in the reproduction.
The water Is actually raised and
lowered on the model, A series of levers
operates the locks and allows a amall
fleet of tiny steamers to be used to demonstrate the operations of the canal. A
steamer is started from Colon harbor by
the demonstrator and lands safely at
Panama after going through all of the
operations that a large vessel will be
compelled to undertake In the "real canal" when it Is completed.
At the Pacific entrance the steamer
passes under the "frowning guns and the
batteries Into the two Inches of water In
the Paelfle."
For over a year the firm has been trying to Induce the owner of the model to
give this demonstration to the people of
Vancouver and we congratulate the well-
known firm of James Stark & Sons on
their success, Pictures of the model are
now In their windows.
RENNIE'S
SEEDS
FOB
1914
—OUR CATALOGUE—i
Ii larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. For 4ft years the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
and Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs. You
need it before you decide what kinds to
plant.   Send for your copy to-day.
W* RENNIE C°u__
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVER
Alaa al Tiraato, Maalraal aad Wlaaiaal
DONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for beautiful gardens, making home eurroundlnge attractive,
with flowers, ahrubbery, shade and fruit trees, le a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Unlverss.
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate Ittothe fullest, and
make not only your own life better, but also that of your fellow citizen who may not have the opportunities you have.
Now la the time to make your selections, when our prices were
never lower, and our atock never better to meet the demands of the
cultivated aeethetlc tastes.
In our stock of over 1100,000.00, we have choice flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental trees and ahrube In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for hedges, all'sizes; choice
stock of Shade Trees, and an immense stock of all the most approved
varieties of apples, peara, plums, cherries, and small fruit. The latter
(fruit treee) we are offering at special low prices to dear the ground
for additional atock coming In.
Don't forget we can meet your neede better than you can get
from etock grown out of our own province,
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West.
'PHONE;  SEYMOUR  5586.
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayview 1926
Greenhousee and Nuraerles at'Roya, on B. C. E. Ry. Eburne Line,
about two miles aouth of city limits. .Phone: Eburne 43.
We have them for jrour garden-everything that grows. Also a
full line of field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, also grains. We also
have a full line of fruit and ornamental stock, fertilizers, agricultural
imp ements, spray pumps, spraying material, bee supplies and all
garden requisites.     Catalogue for asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
JS. KINGSWAY . VANCOUVER, B. C.
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains and thoroughly
tested ns to quality nnd growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
and THE FINEST LAWNS
CATALOGUE AND GUIDE PKBK ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robson Street Vancouver, B.C.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleaiant headquartera for Carpenten' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street.
Vancouver City Market
 MAIN STREET	
YOUR CO-OPERATION IS INVITED IN MAK
ING KNOWN THE CITY MARKET, WHERE
ALL KINDS OF VEGETABLES, FRUITS, ETC..
ARE SOLD DIRECT FROM THE PRODUCER
TO THE CONSUMER, AT PRICES THAT
CAN'T BE BEAT. AS AN INSTANCE PLEASE
NOTE THE UNDERNOTED PRICES;
Potatoes, good value, per sack 80c
Potatoes, Reds, per sack 90c
Potatoes, Highland, per sack $1.00
Apples freshly packed from the Okanagan:
Ben Davis, No. 1, per box $2.00
Royal Jennette, No. 1, per box $2.25
Royal Jennette, No. 2, per box $2.00
New Laid Eggs, per doz. 30c
Do.,   by the case, per doz. 26c and 28c
Carrots, per sack 75c
Turnips, per sack 65c
Beets, per sack $1.00
Parsnips, per sack 85c
Rhubarb, per lb. 6c
i On Friday at 10 a.m. a Public Auction is held,
when you are able to buy one sack or 100 sacks.
Delivery within the City Limits. Boxes, 10c;
sacks, 15c.
Vancouver City Market
JOHN MCMILLAN, Manager. OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PARR BRTTOH COL.
UMBIA FEDERATION OF LAM*
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 156.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 3,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
Special
Showing
of Suits
for Easter
Wear at
$17*™
WE WANT EVERY UNION MAN IN
VANCOUVER TO SEE OUR $17.50
SUITS-NEVER WAS SUCH VALUE
BEFORE—NEVER SUCH STYLE, FINISH AND FIT—AND NEVER WERE
SUITS BUILT FOR SERVICE AS
THESE $17.50 SUITS ARE.
WE'RE PROUD OF THEM
and would like to see every union man
smartly dressed in one. There's a variety
of materials to choose from, in
BLUE   SERGES,    BLUE   FLANNELS
WITH   HAIRLINE    STRIPE,    GREY
FLANNELS AND TWEEDS
Coats are cut single-breasted sacque style
with two or three botton fronts. Twenty
and twenty-five dollars is what other stores
are asking for suits like these, ftsat-iff.
our price    wll edll
Come in and see them anyway, and tell our
salesman you saw the ad. in The Federationist; he'll give you extra care and attention.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, end specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc.
VANCOUVER   -   -   B.C.
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
('VSTSSr) $1-50 PER YEAR
OF
I
Renowned  "Pacific  Quartette" Got 1,900,000 Acres
and $760,000 Cash
History Regarding Esquimau and Nanaimo Railway and Coal Mines
That coal deposits lay in British
Columbia had been long known, and
near Nanalmo coal had been mined
since 1852. But it waB not until Professor Richardson ot the dominion
geological survey, reported on the
enormous extent and value ot the coal
fields, radiating about 200 square
miles trom Nanalmo, that a certain
group ot capitalists decided that the
time was ripe to transfer the ownership ot a considerable, if not all, of
this area to themselves. This group
was composed of Robert Dunsmuir,
his son, James Dunsmuir, John Bryden and three members of the renowned "Pacific quartet," to wit,
Charles Crocker, Leland Stanford and
Collls P. Huntington, of California.
Robert Dunsmuir was a British Columbia capitalist and politician, becoming a leading member of the government of the province. Crocker,
Stanford and Huntington were the
three chief promoters and beneficiaries of the Southern Pacific and other
railway projects in the United States
of the extensive bribery there that
accompanied the passage of legislation consummated by them, we have
already given some particulars. Such
was the group that at once set about
getting, and did get from the domin
Ion and the British Columbia govern
ments laws granting a charter for the
Esquimau and Nanaimo railway, together with subsidies of 1,900,000
acres ot land, and $750,000 cash. These
donations were authorized for a line
of only 78 miles, running from Victoria to Wellington.
Premier Macdonald Explains
This happened in 1884. One member of the house ot commons, D. W.
Gordon, of Vancouver island, demanded of Premier Sir John A. Macdonald
certain explanations. Had the government published advertisements
either in Canada or Oreat Britain inviting tenders for the construction of
the Esquimau and Nanalmo railway?
It so, had the attention of the capitalists been called to the area of land
subsidy to be given, or to the reported
value of the coal deposits extending
from Nanaimo to Seymour narrows?
And why had the system of alternative sections in aid ot railways been
departed from in the contract entered
into by the government with Messrs.
Dunsmuir, Huntington and associates?
Premier John A. Macdonald dismissed the questions with this brief
reply which we give literally: "No
advertisement has been published by
the government or any department
thereof inviting tenders for construction of the Esquimau and Nanaimo
railway. We are not aware whether
any advertisements were published by
the British Columbia government, un
der the authority of the legislature, or
otherwise for this . purpose, nor
whether they have called the attention of the capitalists to the quantity
of land to be given ln aid of said railway." It was asserted during this debate that so far as the coal lands that
they were then mining were con
cerned, the Dunsmuir family bad re
celved crown grants previous to the
granting of the lands to the Esquimau and Nanaimo railway. Certain
members of the house of commons
Industrial Items of Interest
From All Over the
Dominion
Condensed From the Exchanges and Special
Correspondence
Denounced the Whole Scheme
as one giving to a small clique the
monopoly of the coal deposits of Vancouver island. But opposition was
useless. The advocates of the promoters could plead long-established
precedent, as for instance, the transfer by the Nova Scotia government, in
1868, of one square mile calculated to
contain 10,000,000 tons of coal, as a
subsidy to the Glasgow and Cape Breton Coal and Railway company. That
subsidy, however, was not a gift ln
perpetuity, but was given In the form
of a 78-year lease, the company to pay
the government of Nova Scotia a royalty of eight cents per ton. The subsidy to the Esquimau and Nanaimo
Railway company was a gift without
reservations. The chief government
member vouching for the Esquimau
and Nanalmo railway bill seems to
have been Minister of Railways John
Henry Pope, who, as we have seen,
had been a personal beneficiary of
railway and other charters. He gave
the most solemn assurances that the
bill waB a good one. It was to Pope
that Mr. Mitchell, a member of the
house of commons, referred a few
years later as "the brains of the ad
mlnstration. ... No one has done
more in directing the policy of the
country—I will not even except the
premier—than the honorable minister
of railways. There are few men who
can sit here with a solid countenance
and answer to all attacks and questions that 'there ain't nothing to it'
better than my honorable friend."
Dunsmuir Successful
The Esquimau and Nanalmo Railway bill was shoved through parliament. Two years later—ln April,
1886—discussion over its great gratuities was renewed when a bill was
Introduced in parliament allowing a
deviation of its line.   One member
after another of the house of commons poured forth vehement remarks.
E. C. Baker, member for Victoria,' declared that the Dunsmulrs' owned
three-fifths, and the California stockholders two-fifths of the Esquimau
and Nanaimo Railway company's
stock. "This," he said, with an air
of authority, "I know from Mr. Dunsmuir himself, so that the. control of
the company Is ln the hands of
Messrs. Dunsmuir and son entirely."
The purpose of this statement was to
give assurance tbat Canadian capitalists controlled the project. Mr.
Gordon, of Vancouver Island, said he
opposed the original bill because it
gave an Immense grant of coal lands
on Vancouver Island to a monopoly.
Sir Richard Cartwrlght expressed the
same views. John Charlton charged
that the Southern Pacific coterie bad
reaohed out its hands to plunder British Columbia. They have secured a
grant of 1760,000 cash from the dominion government, and exceedingly
valuable land grants from British Columbia, besides the control of almost
the entire coal Interest of Vancouver
Island."
Valuable Lands
The matter of theBe great grants to
the Dunsmulrs and associates ranked
long ln the minds of those opposing
the subsidy. When, on May 0, 1890,
a debate over the Sourls coal fields
was on ln the house of commons, Mr.
Mitchell, of New Brunswick, and
other members of parliament referred
to the subject. Mitchell estimated
that the territory given to the Duns
mulrs and partners was worth $100,
000,000 or $200,000,000. It was
the only coal mine of any extent, John Charlton said, on the Pacific coast of Canada. "It is a disgrace," he commented, "that such a
contract should have been made.
Fvery man regrets it to-day. That
coal mine is alone worth hundreds of
millions of dollars—Its value no man
can calculate; and lt Is a disgrace
that the Dunsmuir transaction was
passed on just as little Information
as we are asked to pass these votes
tonight." On July 30, 1891, Charlton
styled the grant as "a huge job, _
swindle on the people," and asserted
that Minister of Railways John Henry
Pope had sponsored the original bill
Again, lesB than a year later, Charlton, ln the house of comomns, made
another caustic denunciation. The
government, he said, was engaged in
the business of promoting private
speculation. He Intimated strongly
that ln the great majority of cases
these charters and subsidies had been
characterized by graft on the part of
somebody' or a collection of some-
bodys. Already, he went on, 42,000,000
acres of land in Canada had been
granted. He denounced the giving of
the coal lands on Vancouver island, as
a "bold swindle." "There was, he
said, "a little line of. railway—I passed
over It since—along the sea coast
from Victoria to Nanaimo, a distance
of 78 miles, the construction of which
was scarcely necessary; and to promote the construction of that railway
nearly all of the coal lands of the
Island of Vancouver were granted to
a syndicate, the greater proportion of
the capital being held In San Francisco by the Southern Pacific railway
magnates. I pointed out this fact at
tbe time, but the lobby influences here,
the backing here, were too strong;
the grant was made, the coal lands
have gone; and the other day we
were Informed, in discussing the militia estimates, that the reason coal
was so high when purchased in Vancouver island, was that there waB a
monopoly, and we ourselves created Harmony hall, Victoria B  C   Febru
that monopoly by the grant of the Na-1 »-»'c   ■■"   --•■  ■      '    '■-
nalmo   Railway   company."   At   the
time   that   the  Dunsmulrs   obtained
E
Bartlett In Assinlbola
On Wednesday night W. J. Bartlett,
the labor candidate for suburban Winnipeg, opened his campaign with a
crowded and enthusiastic meeting ln
the Britannia school.
New Labor Hall
The new Trades and Labor hall Is
going along good  at Fort William.
Union men are lending help ln the
work of construction. i
Civic Labor Bureau
A civic employment bureau has been
opened at St. Catherines. About 144
men have registered, a number of
which have been employed in some
way or other.
New Union
A local union haa been formed at
Hamilton, Ont, of cooks, chefs, waiters and waitresses. The new organization is affiliated with the Hotel and
Restaurant Employees' International
Alliance.
Port Arthur Labor
There has been no change In rates
of wages or hours of labor at Port
Arthur and Fort William, .but as
would naturally be the case, some
who are having work done are taking
advantage of the number of men out
of employment, and the bush men
particularly are being offered low
rates.
Cheap Farce
A minute of the Port Arthur Trades
and Labor Council states that "much
discussion arose about fares on the
street railway. Many of the delegates
contended that the extension of time
for the use of working men'a tickets
would materially Increase the finances
of the street railway and would as
well be a great accommodation to the
general public who patronize the street
railway."
Independent Candidate
F. J. Dixon, independent candidate
for Centre Winnipeg, opened the campaign last week, when he confined his
remarks principally to direct legislation and land value taxation. He answered the objections whloh have been
raised against direct legislation, and
then proceeded to point out the evils
of land speculation and the necessity
for a change ln our system of taxation
which would encourage owners of land
to put lt to Its best use.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Union
these land grants and money
subsidies, one of the arguments used
ln favor of the grants was that the
development of the mining and other
resources would give employment to
labor. Subsequently lt turned out
that the labor employed was largely
Chinese coolie labor.
Employ Chinese Labor
Robert Dunsmuir admitted, in 1885,
that he employed from 700 to 800
whites and Chinese ln his Wellington
coal mines, and that the Chinese did
the manual work." The Chinese laborers existed In conditions of squalor, and worked for half or nearly half
the wages that the whites did. Sam
uel M. Robins, superintendent of the
Vancouver Coal Mining and Land
company testified that during the
strike of the white workers "we accepted the Chinese as a weapon to
settle the strike." In his testimony,
David William Gordon, M. P. for Vancouver island, described how the
Chinese companies had the coolies
under their control by a system of
semi-servitude. It was estimated that
there were 18,000 Chinese laborers
then in British Columbia. The
Knights of Labor, L. A. No. 3017, of
Nanalmo, handed ln to the royal commission a memorial declaring that the
Chinese laborer was without tips or
family, and "was able not only to live
but to grow rich on wages far below
the lowest minimum on which we can
possibly exist. They are thus fitted
to become all too dangerous competitors in the labor market, while their
docile servility, the natural outcome
of centuries of grinding poverty and
humble submission to a most oppres
sive system of government, renders
them doubly dangerous as the waiting
tools whereby grasping and tyrannical employers grind down all labor to
the lowest living point. The Chinese
live, generally, In wretched hovels,
dark, Ill-ventilated, filthy and unwholesome, and crowded together ln
Buch numbers as must utterly preclude all ideas of comfort, morality or
even decency."
A Princely Fortune
The memorial proceeded: "All the
Immensely valuable coal mines contained within the vast railway reserve have been handed over to one
company, the principal shareholder
in which commenced but a few years
ago without a dollar. ... So large
have been the profits that he has accumulated a princely fortune, and has
become all-powerful ln the province,
his influence pervading every part of
our provincial government, over
shadowing our provincial legislature,
and threatening Us very existence."
This referred to Robert Dunsmuir.
The memorial estimated that at Duns-
muir's Wellington collieries there
were about 450 Chinese to 300 or 360
whites. "Of tho former quite a number are still employed digging coal ln
spite ot Mr. Dunsmulr's assurance
that they would not be so employed.
In the other collieries only one-fourth
the total number employed are Chinese." Appalling tragedies frequently
happened in the mines causing great
loss of life.   A labor meeting, held at
ary 16, 1888, called upon the government to make enquiries "to prevent,
If possible, terrible coal mining accidents, two of which during the past
year have startled and horrified the
province." It was also resolved, as
the opinion of this meeting that not
another acre of public land should
henceforth be deeded to railways or
for any other purpose except on the
basis of 160 acres to each actual settler, which land, however, should not
be alienated for ever from public
ownership. Also the national ownership of railways, telegraphs, etc., was
demanded, and legislation was called
for dealing with the ChlneBe evil.
Manhood suffrage was demanded as
the "true basis of liberty," and a demand made that the profits derived
trom machinery should be participated in by employees; "the capital utilized In manufactories should never receive more than legal Interest."
Multl-mllllonalres
Rapidly the Dunsmulrs bloomed Into multimillionaires. James Dunsmuir succeeded his father as president and chief stockholder of the
Union and Wellington colliery companies and of the Esquimau and Nanalmo Railway company. In 1900 he
became premier of British Columbia,
and in 1906-1909 lieutenant-governor
of the province. In 1908 he was elected a director of the Canadian Pacific
Railway company. He personally
owned, it was then reckoned, 40,000
acres of the most valuable land; the
wealth of the Dunsmuir family has
been placed at $30,000,000 to $40,000,-
000. In 19101911 the mines operated
by the Wellington Colliery company
were taken over by a new combination, the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, headed by Sir William
Mackenzie as president, and with a
capital of $15,000,000. These mines
now produce nearly 800,000 tons of
coal a year. During the same period
ln which the Nanalmo coal deposits
were given away, a vast aggregation
of other resources were presented by
the dominion government to various
Individuals, many of whom were members of parliament. In 1882 and 1886
resolutions condemning these practices were offered In the dominion
house of commons. These resolutions
were defeated. Although It was well
known In the financial and political
world that many members of porll-
ment were promoters of various coal,
land-colonization and timber land
companies, It was not until 1890 and
1891 that many of the facts wore
brought out formally, ln parliament.
WHENORDERINGASUIT
DAVID 8PENCER, LTD,
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
MEN'S Spring UNDERWEAR
So Carefully and Thoroughly Chosen
Deserves Every Man's Attention
We went to such pains because it rests
with any store with a standing in the community like Spencer's to see that its stock
measures up to what its customers expect
of it. We have sifted the good and worthy
lines, and it is impossible for any man to
"pick a lemon." The immense variety we
present is due to the fact that we are determined that no man shall be justified in saying that we have failed to anticipate his requirements. We can satisfy your last requirement in the matters of style, weight,
kind and price, as these details show. 9
At 35c a Garment—We have a two-ply Balbriggan in natural, blue and pink that is an exceptional value and popular with an immense number of people.
At 60c—A cellular porous knit underwear which is available with and without sleeves; knee length and ankle
length drawers; in natural and white.
Also at 60c a Garment—A special two-ply Balbriggan,
long and half sleeves, ankle and knee length.
Mesh Underwear at 50c a Garment—White only; short
sleeves and knee length. This is a very well finished
garment.
Another Popular Number at 50c a Garment is the Egyptian cotton underwear shown here, in white and* natural,
with long sleeves and ankle length.
At 75c a garment—Fine quality Egyptian cotton mercerized, in pink, blue, white and natural.   The choice also
includes half and long sleeves, knee length and full   '
length drawers.
We carry this garment in extra large sizes—14 to 62.
Price   |i,00
Another Stout Man's Underwear—In a natural Balbriggan; sizes 44 to 52; at, a garment 75c
"Aertex" Cellular Combinations—Sleeveless, knee length,
"Aertex" Cellular—The famous English underwear, is here
in sleeveless and knee length styles; at, a garment, (1.00
Summer Weight Underwear in Wool is here in white, natural, pink and blue; at, a garment, $1.00, $1.15
and    ,  $1.50
Wc also have a very fine assortment of Silk and Wool
Underwear at higher prices.
COMBINATIONS IN SUMMER WEIGHTS -
At $1.00 a Suit—Fine quality natural Balbriggan, long
sleeves, ankle length, with extra overlap crotch.
Cellular Porous Combinations—Available   in   knee and
ankle lengths, with and without sleeves.   Per suit $1.00
Egyptian Mesh Combinations—In white, available in knee
and ankle lengths, with and without sleeves.   Per suit,
only   $1,00
Superior Balbriggan—Full length sleeve and ankle length.
Per suit  $1.15
Summer   Weight   Wool   Combinations—In natural and
white at, a suit $2.00, $2.75, $3.00, $3.75 arid $400
Navy Serge Suits for Men at $17.50
These suits that have just come to hand from the
makers represent the best efforts of our clothing experts to give our customers service. T*he circumstances of our large buying and disposition to excel
in giving the best values in the vicinity tend to produce suits that cannot be excelled in the ordinary
course of merchandising. For all-round goodness, we
believe that these $17.50 navy serge suits have no equal
at the price, and we cordially invite you to critically
inspect them and judge for yourself of their merits.
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
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Heintzman & Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Cfliindinu labor
SOLO ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hailing! Street Weit
B. C. Electric Irons
The Cheapest
High Standard
Electric Iron
On the Market
By Fat the Best
Electric Iron
On the Market
At Any Price
PRICE (to parties using B. C Electric current)
$3.00
Every Iron li Guaranteed by the Company for TEN YEARS.
Carrall and
Hiitingi Street
B.C. ELECTRIC '%S*
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000 PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY APRIL 8, 1914
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital  and   Reserve,   ..  18,700,000
85 branches In Canada
A general banking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
Eait End Branch
160 HA8TING8 8TREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1869
Paid-up Capital - - • I 11,600,00
Reserve      12,600,000
Total Assets 180,000,000
•
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS  IN  OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
buelnese will be welcome be It large or
email
FOURTEEN     BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
18SS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve 811,176,678
Savings Accounts
Savings accounts are conducive
to provident living. In our
Savings Department they may
be opened ln the name ot one
Individual or ln the names ot
two or more Jointly, with the
privilege tor each ot depositing
or withdrawing money as desired. The Bank o! Toronto accepts Savings Accounts, Irrespective ot the amount ot the
initial deposit
Aaaata (60,000,000
Depoelt $41,000,000
Main Office—
466 HASTINGS ST. WEST
(Near Rlcharde)
Branches—
Cor. Hastings and Carrall (ts.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Herrltt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
HONEY   TO   LOAN   ON   IM-
PROVED    OITT    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company'* Office
SS7 HASTINGS ST.'wEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
328-333 ROGERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER      - B.C.
FIRE, UFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreements For Sale purchased
Safe Depoelt Vaults
$2.60 i year
Guaranteed Investmsnt ef Punde
for Clients
1B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Fabllehed every Friday mornlnr by tta
B. O. raaamttonlat, L«£
R. Parm. Pettlplece •
Manager
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, praaldant;
Christian Siverts, vlce-prealdent; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, aacretary-
treasurer. and R. P. Pettlplece.
ly and consistently serve the ruling
classes and their victims as well. It
cannot serve two masters. Workera
must create their own journals, devoted to principle, not proflt. There is
no other way. If they want the truth
they must build their own temple—a
press of their own. They then will
know the truth and the truth will
make them free.
Offlce: Boom a 17, Labor Cample.
Tel. Exchange Say. 7485.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrader
Subscription • II .60 per year; la Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unlona aubaorlbhig
In a body. 11.00.
"Unity of Labor; tha hope of the world.1*
FRIDAY., APRIL 3, 1914
ECONOMIC AND
POLITICAL ACTION
Until it seeks to lay a profane and
sacrellglous hand upon the ancient
Institution of private property, the
Lahor movement falls to assume a
political character. All demands made
upon employers by the workers,
vendors of labor power, which aim at
the betterment of working conditions
and the relief of onerous Impositions
within the wage system, are essentially industrial ln scope. Even if
these demands be supplemented by
parliamentary representation, even if
organized labor "goes into politics"
and succeeds in becoming a potent
factor in parliament, such representation, confining itself to immediate
needs, does not make organized labor
political ln a true sense. On the other
hand, should the organized workers
definitely declare therdselves as opposed to private property, and openly
work toward its abolition, then their
movement has become political,
whether or not lt Is represented in
parliament or seeks to be so represented. The state is fundamentally
an armed guardian of property rights.
It may be a lenient or rigorous state
according as the demands of those
without property vary ln the vigor of
their presentation. But so long as the
propertyless do not make the substance of their demands the abolition
of this function of the Btate, and consequently the abolition of the state
itself, these demands remain Industrial, no matter ln what form they are
advanced. Whether a movement Is
"political" or "economic" is to be determined solely by ascertaining
whether or not lt is directed against
the Institution of private property.
LABOR   MARKET   REFLEX
The business agent gets more kicks
than ha'pence. Directly he is elected
to ofllce he Is made a target for censure by his own fellow members,
while at the same time the employers
call him an agitator, walking delegate
or any other phrase thek think opprobrious. Actually, of course, their
abuse is complimentary. But the case
Is different with the members of his
own union. They have elected him
and he reflects their judgment. Instead of regarding him as a centre at
which to hurl grouches and all peevishness would not the better plan be
to make him a centre round which the
members of tbe organization gather
to make their work effective? A peculiar perversity appears to possess
many union men that makes them
kick" against the very men they
themselves have elected to office.
They seem to have an idea that because they have selected s. brother to
ofllce they have a right to censure
him to their heart's content. YeB.
They treat him much the same as an
Indian treats a squaw, only worBe.
But the Indian didn't have much to
say while union men too often pile
the work pf the organization on the
business agent's shoulders and then
hurl a heap of abuse at his head as
well.
REFORM
It bas often heen said that there are
too many reformers. This is not so.
There are not enough. There Is a
orylng need for reformers ot moral
reformers. Moral reformers are people who wish to do unto others things
which the others do not wish to have
done. In pursuing his way, the moral
reformer considers exclusively hla
own point of view and bis own desires. He fails to take into account
that the same set of circumstances
which produced his point of view also
produced the points of view of those
whom he seeks to reform. He should
be prevailed upon to retire for a period from the public gaze and study
causes. Desires, be would flnd, arise
and become a part of consciousness
Independently of any will of the individual, their generation being due to
the existence of conditions entirely
beyond the Individual's control. It,
then, any real change Is to be made ln
the effects produced by tbe satisfaction ot desire, lt must be brought about
by a change ln those causal conditions. Is lt possible for the environment which occasions Individual action to be changed by collective
action? This is the question for the
moral reformer. If be cannot flnd an
answer, society does not require his
labors. Indeed, If he cannot find an
affirmative answer, his efforts are
futile, for the desires of the natures
ln which he wishes to work alteration
are as strong as his own. Consequently his activities can only be productive of needless friction.
I
Ten Thousand Men Out of
Work—Able to Stand
Long Siege
Government Will Fix Standard Wage Rate by Act
of Parliament
TOGETHER
Somehow or other there Is an Impression abroad that many trade unions, especially the older ones, are
soaked with sectionalism and are opposed to direct political action. Such
an opinion Is quite erroneous. Members of labor organizations have
reached the conclusion that industrial
unity and political unity, wisely used,
are absolutely necessary, the one to
the other. The Importance of developing the electoral activities of labor
cannot be over-rated. Political action
will weld the workerB Into a solid
phalanx which will shape the govern
ment of the country as nothing else
can. There Is no necessity for un
ions to let up in their successful
efforts to better their own conditions
industrially. They can still continue
their flght to raise wages, force employers to safeguard life and limb and
generally to establish a vast chain of
benefits, but at the same time they
must have a say ln all matters of
large and vital Import. The old political parties are at one regarding a
wasteful armament policy. They are
equally ready to allow police and soldiers to bludgeon the populace during industrial disputes. They are ln
agreement to exploit the workers on
every occasion. Unions must alter
this. They must see that In electoral
action and the resultant habit of looking upon themselves as a united force
lies salvation.
[From our Special Representative]
SYDNEY, N. S. W„ March 14.—The
ironworkers' trouble arose through
low wages. Hitherto the ironworkers'
assistants have been paid from seven
shillings sixpence to eight shillings
a day. As almost every other trade
of unskilled labor In the state Is being
paid from nine shillings sixpence to
eleven shillings a day, the ironworkers' men are asking ten shillings a
day. Of course the bosses refused to
give them this increase and so it was
not very long before there was a
strike, ^n a short time over 5,000 unionists were out of work. At the time
of writing fully 10,000 men are out of
work either directly in the dispute or
indirectly. This strike threatens to
assume great proportions. The men
have tried to have their case heard
before a wages board, but the chairman refused to hear it because their
old award has some months yet to
run before it expires. At present
ironworkers' assistants, boilermakers,
blacksmiths, engineers, moulders,
sheet metal workers and engine drivers and firemen are out of work. Work
has stopped on the government works,
railway carriage works, government
docks, and other government works,
besides many private industries. The
men are well able to stand a seige for
some time aB the ironworkers' union
Is a highly financial Institution. There
Is every sign of the trouble spreading.
It is said the government are taking a
hand in the matter with a view to
bringing about a settlement. What
Is wanted In this matter, as well as
in other strikes that are occurring
from time to time, Is a uniform rate
of minimum wage. It is recognized
now that a man cannot live on less
than ten shillings a day in this coun
try and what is wanted is a law saying that no man will be paid less than
that wage. It is of course rumored
that the government intend to fix a
standard wage by act of parliament,
and it Is to be hoped that the news
is true. It will be the means of putting an end to much of the discontent
that is at present raging In Australia.
Aik for Labor Templo 'Phono Exchange,
Seymour 7495 (unless otherwise stated)*
Hartendere—Room 208: Geo, VV. Curnock.
B.  C.  Federatlonist—Room 1X7;  R. P.
Pettlplece.
Bridge and Structural Iron Worker**-*-W.
L. Yule, Room 208.
Brotherhood   of   Carpenters—Room   200;
Hugh McEwen.
Bricklayers—Room   215;   Wm.  S.   Dag-
n all.
Bakers—Room 220.
Barbers—Room   208;    C.   F.   Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1776.
Mod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Room 220; John Sully.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 201;
W. E. Walker; Tel. Seymour 1414.
Electrical    Workers      (outside)—Room
207;  W.  F.  Dunn.
Electrical  Workers   (Inside)—Room  107;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers     (Steam)—Room    SIC;    Ed.
Prendergaat
Labor  Temple  Co.—Room   811;  J.    H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's    Association  —  Office,
145 Alexander street; — Hannlng; tel.:
Seymour 6359.
Moving Picture Operators—O. R. Hamilton,  Room  100, Loo Bldg.    Tel. Sey.
3045.
Musicians—H. J,  Brasfleld, rooms 29-30,
Williams Building, 413 Granville Street.
Seymour 2D30.
Plasterers—Joe    Hampton;    Tel.    Seymour 1514.
Street    Railway    Employees—Fred.    A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Trades and  Labor  Counoll—Room  210;
Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms  212,    218,    214;
R. H. Neelands.
Every woman and a good many men
feel they must join some society for
the suppression of something. Why
not organize a soolety for the sup-
presBlon of themselves?
Two enemies of the workers—capital and war—are united In close
friendship. This dominion Is slowly
recognizing that the greatness of
people dei end on other things than
Dreadnoughts.
If man was made for industry then
industry should be the master and
man *Ue slave. If, on the other hand,
industry was made for. man then it is
just that man be the master and that
humanity ceases to writhe under an
Industrial task master.
BUSINESS  AGENT   DIRECTORY
TRADE  UNION   DIRECTORY
Conciliation Board Asked For
A Winnipeg dispatch states that the
Canadian Northern railway conductors
will apply to the department of labor
for a board of conciliation in connection with a dispute between the company and the conductors over the dismissal of four or five of the latter several months ago. The men were dismissed as the resul of charges that
they were "knocking down" fares, and
one of them was prosecuted and acquitted by the court. The conductors
as a body then Insisted upon the reinstatement of the dismissed men, and
the refusal of the company to meet
their wishes has resulted ln the proposed application.
Allied   Printing   Trades  Council—F. R.
Flemlns, P. O. Box 66.
Bakers—J.    Black,    Room    220,    lAbor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Geo.    W.    Curaoch,    Room
208, Labor Temple.      ,
Blacksmiths — Malcolm    Porter,     View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 616   Dunlevy
avenue.
Rnllermakerfl—A. Fraser. 1161 Howe St.
Brewery Workers—L. E. Day.
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenters District Coun
ell—Jas.    Bltcon,    Room    209,    Labor
Temple,
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
1 Temple.
Clparmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurti
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street.
Cooks,   Walters,   Waitresses — W.   E.
Walker, Room 2C3, Labor Temple.
Electrical    Workers    (outside)—W.    F.
Dunn, Room 207 Labor Temple.
Electrical   Workers   (Inside)—Room 207;
F. L, Estinghausen.
Engineers—E.   Prendergaat,  Room   216.
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Coluni'
hla Hotel.
Garment  Workers—Miss   McRae,   Labor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles   Roberts,   Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's   Union   (I.   B. E.   W.)—R.
McBaln, care of B. C. E. R.
Horseshoers — A.   C.   MacArthur,   City
Heights. B.C.
Lettercarrlers—Robt. Wight, District 81.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco.   Firemen   and   Engineers—James
Patrick, 1183 Homer street.
Loco.  Engineers—A.  E.  Solloway,  1018
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo.   Thomas, 146  Alexander Street.
Machinists—J. H. McVety,    Room   211,
Labor Temple.
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple.
Musicians—TT.  J. Brasfleld,  Rooms 29-30,
Williams Bldg., 413 Granville street.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West,
Moving Picture Operators—A.  O.  Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo   EngraverB—A.   Kraft,   Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Blopk.
Painters—J.    Train,    Room    B03,   Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John   Jamea   Cornish,   1808
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 843 Broadway west.
Quarry WorkerB—James Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 761
Rpatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvllle,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,   420  Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural   Iron   Workers—W,   L.   Tufe,
Room 208, Labor Temple.
■Stonecutters—Jamea Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
5. Fifteenth Ave. West.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2636 Trinity Street.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H.  Neelands. Box 66.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 603.
Theatrical     Stage     Employeea—Gordon
Martin, 657 Prior street
Tllelayers and Helpers-
Upholsterers—A. Duthie, 1063 Homer St.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meeta flrat and third Thursdaya.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, preaident; J. H. MoVety, vlce-prealdent; Oeo.
Bartley, general aeoretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Hiaa H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Mlaa P, Brlabane, statistician; sergeant-
at-arma, John Sully; G. Curnock, F.
Knowlea, W. R. Trotter, truatees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Dlrectora: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, Jamea Brown, Edward Lothian.
James Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, R. P.
Pettipiece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F, Blumberg;, H. R, Free. Manag-
Ing director. J.  H~ McVety,  Room  211.
ALLIKD  PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL—Meeta 2nd Monday In month.
President, Geo. Mowat; aeeretary, F. R,
Fleming. P.O. Box M.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meeta second and fourth Thuraday of
eaeh month, 8 p. m. Secretary, J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby Btreet; business agent,
H. J. McEwen, room 209. Local 617
meets first and third Monday of each
month, and Local 2647 meets flrst and
third Tuesday of each month.
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
flrst and third Monday of each month, 8
p. m. Executive committee meets every
Friday 8 p. m. Preaident, Ed. Meek, recording aeeretary, Chas. Scott, 806 Labor
Temple; financial secretary and buslneas
agent, J. Sohurroan, 805 Labor Temple.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO-
CAL No. 46—Meeta seeond and fourth Saturdays. 7.30 p.m. President,
H. O. Leeworthy; corresponding secretary, R. J.
Adams; business agent, J.
Black, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meets every aecond
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor
£~l'..PrMileI!kP' s- Cameron; flnanolal
'"""■■etary, H. Glbb; general secretary, W.
B. Maiden. P. O. Box 834.   The publlo la
Invited to attend.	
PLUMBERS' AND STBAMFITTERS LO-
. 9?' <?»—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Han.
J;l2Am4Sre»l*1«>t. »• Webater; aeore-
ITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
«„»^,enSr"% t*,oa! Cnlon "»• "89-Meata
S^.¥ond?5'' ' "•""•■ Lttl1'"' Temple,
rw.?Jj?.°yti 1S"!2U? •""'Seventh street
tK?SiSl"v *£.' C' Sohraendt: secretary, £
3SS, Ble. Temple,  New Weatmln-
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784-MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue
every second Sunday of each month, a{
1.80 p. m. President, F. S. Hunt: aeon'
iWted * W' Ja",e">"'   ™«»« *!££
BARBEHH'.. LOCAL, NO. 120—MBET«
» — "Jf°"Il and fourth Thursdays. 8:80
p.m. President, J, W. Green; recorder, C.
B.  Herrltt: secretary-business agent, C.
Sn,™.rk,l)a.r,',R2°.m,.2M' Lal»1' Temple.
Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
riARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 171.—OF-
s™. Sf 3,mm J°" t'.!',""' Temple. Meets
flrat Sunday of eaeh month. Prealrlcnt;
f. F. Lavlgne: financial secretary, Oeo.
W. Curnock. Room 208. Lahor T.mpi;
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'. Nn*l
.S7 ~SSSi e'lwy. Tue'day. 8 p.m., Room
.107.    President. James Has ett:  corros-
,??"',in„,inX0,™,ary' ,W' B.J>tUtll_t
[S; flnanclal secretary, F. R. Brown'
business  agent,  w,   S.  Dagrall,   Room
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION No
106-Meets third Tuesday In eve™
Kth'»f" ^K,,206' Mbor Temple. Pres?.
nSuL?*..'' M".nB' v^e-presldent, Wm.
Rushman; secretary, George Mowat,  BIB
52.™v?,S,v1!)116i secretary-treasurer, H.
""^-l"0 Tenth avenue east.
BRWlKiU!nS °5 5Pn'"« MAKERS
nf fm.H,J.on,?l"p """"ers and Helpers
or America, Vancouver Lodge No. 181—
Meets flrat and third Mondays. 8 p m
Preaident, F. Barclay, SBS Cordova last'
secretary, A. Fraser, 11B1 Howe street
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 867-Meets
flrst Tuesday each month,, 8 p.tn.
President, Walter Hosklns; vice-president, F. J. Brandt; secretary, Robert  J
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
n,Jn!lVm"tt' ."l1 rrll,,V ln each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E
Walker busfnes repressntatlve. Offlce:
.2?.?".' Lab<"' Temple. Houra: I a.m.
to 10.80; 1 p.m. to 2.80 and 6 p.m. to 6.00
P'1V Competent help furnlahed on ahort
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
218—Meeta Room 301 every Monday
8 p. m. President, Dave Fink: vice-president, M. Sander; recording secretary.
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple: flnanclal secretary and business agent, W. F. Dunn.
Room 207, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.... !'!. (tj-Ua Men)—Meeta flrat and
third Mondaya of eaeh month. Room 205,
8 p.m. President, H. P. McCoy; recording aeeretary, Geo. Albera: business
agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 807
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
R C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meeta In annual convention in January. Executive officers, 1814-15: President, A, Watchman; vloe-prealdenta, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. MoBwen, Geo. Hardy, J.
W. Gray, H. Kundaon, J. J. Taylor, B.
Slmmona. Secretary-treasurer, A. S,
Wells, Box 1538, Victoria, B. C.
New WESTMINSTER, B.C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA     TRADES     AND      LABOR
n..^,unTC"rMc.'l,s..,,n" ■">* thW Wednesday, Labor Hall, 731 Johnston street,
at 8 p. m.   President. George Dykeman:
y\_%-£________***&
BROTHERHOOD "OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners—Meeta every Tuesday,
Pi&Mi.f'i'lS0? !}"'■ m J°l-*»ton St
uE5"n1i! *V "Win-en; recording secre-
£7'<i ,h fy'eman: business agent
Ei SPSS "8°ro,ary' W'  A' *■*»■
MINERS' UNION8
K1MHERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. 100,
qi.nJYS""™ Fer>er,a'lon of Miners-Meets
u- VS""! In Unl°n «»"• Presl-
MP ™irPlemln&, "eeretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley. B. C.
IAOTSMITH MINERS' UNION. LOCAL
nesd^: 2K- W'^m-^al
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
, .£'*~*.M.e?ts every Monday at 7.30 n. m
W?% *]•"•"£ Club' CI»P=! "reel **£
IburjIordan^Box 410. Nanalmo, B.C.
c™™RLANp local union, no.
2299. U. M. W. of A.-Meets every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. half
KM!?6!}' JS!' "wl"*': secretary, Jamea
Smith. Box 84. Cumberland. B.C.
rRA,',h mhh AND SMELTERMEN'S
every Monday at 7.30 p.m. President,
f'ii i .r'li, "eeretary, Frank Camp-
bell, Box 26, Trail, B.C.
SANlJUN    MINERS'    UNION,    No.    81.
Western Federation of Miners-Meets
hvnry ii!Kl"'clay„ln the Mlne™' ™->n
ball. Address all communications to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOOAL,   VANCOUVER     OF     SOCIAL:
DEMOCRATIC PARTY-Publlc meetings In Colonial Theatre, corner Granville
Si..*?.".""1''*}'' ?Srae"' Sunc,,y evenlnga.
Secretary,   J.  Adams,  Room  804  Labor
LONGSHOREMENS'   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    38 x 68—Meela
e!'WJ'. ,£,',''!, evening, 146 Alexander
atreet. Preaident, P. Peel; aeeretary,
Geo. Thomas.
MACHINISTS, NO. 188-MEETS 8EC-
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. m.
Preaident. A. R. Towler: recording secretary, J. Brookes: flnanclal secretary, J. H.
McVety.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVF
Union. Loesl No. 14B. A. F. of M —
Meeta seeond Sunday of each month,
rooms 29-30, Williams Bldg., 418 Qmn-
vllie atreet. President, J. Bowyer:
vice-president. F English: aeeretary,
H. J. Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTER-
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. No. 81-
Meets flrst and third Wedneaday, O'Brlo
Hall, 8 p.m. President, O. Dean; cor
responding aeeretary. F. Sumpter; ftnan-
Hal secretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Jos Hampton. Phon,
Sey. 1614
SPLENDID SOLIDARITY
THE DAILY PRESS
The world today Is looking for light
on the shortcomings of the dally
press. Recent events In South Africa have shown that the reports of
the various press agencies are not reliable, The suppression of truth re
garding the deportation of the nine is
now history. In the mining district
of Virginia where a most deplorable
situation exists, ln Michigan where
common law Is set at naught, in Colorado where an employers' Malta direct! a so-called government, these
press agencies show an eager silence. In this city "special correspon
ilcntu"' lurid stories of going-to-be
bloodshed ln Ulster, direful tales of
an empire's decline and fall for lack
of Dreadnoughts have become stale.
No one believes them. Everyone now
understands the workings of the armament gangs. Everyone, except the
beneficiaries, detests war and all Its
works. Dut still newspapers, representing capitalism, support all these
things—for proflt. They are entirely
governed by business principles and
business policies. Anything that
stands in the way of profit Is to them
bad business and consequently poor
journalism. They can be properly
classed with adulterated food products and all frauds practised for the
sake of proflt. They may at times
attack minor evils, but they dare not
attack the Bource of the evil Itself.
"Business" will not permit them, no
matter to what shade of capitalist Interest they owe allegiance.
Surely tt should be realised that
Journalism for profit cannot, In the nature of things as they are, permanent-
B, C. Federatlonltt Waging a Vigorous
Campaign
One of the most bitter and cruel
fights ever fought by labor bas been
going on for weary months on Vancouver island. Labor men, socialists,
religionists, have all protested against
the Inhumanity that has been perpetrated In the name of law. Labor has
been crucified literally. Insulted and
Imprisoned, men who deserved well of
their country, have succeeded ln raising the anger of that privileged section of society who fancy they own
the earth. The minister of labor has
been helpless as a little child in the
crisis, even if he has not been Informed what he should do to break the
spirit of the men, by tbe Mackenzie
and Mann interests. The British Columbia Federationist, the labor paper
of that province, has been waging a
vigorous campaign against tremendous odds, on behalf of the striking
coal miners. The one glorious feature of an otherwise distressingly sordid and Inhuman flght has been the
splendid solidarity of the striking
members of the U. M. W. of A. At
last it looks as though the miners
would win out.—'Port Arthur' Wage-
Earner.
Trouble Settled
A satisfactory settlement has been
reached concerning trouble caused by
the contractors who are repairing the
Lachlne canal at Montreal paying less
than union wages. The matter was
taken up by the Building Trades council with the government and the contractors have since agreed to pay the
minimum union wage according to the
fair wage clause. There are about
400 men working on the canal.
TO LABOR UNIONS
Will you assist us by appointing some one ln your union to
furnish the OFFICIAL NEWS?
The. B. C. Federatlonist wants
to publish the OFFICIAL
NEWS of each local, and
ln order to do so must have
your assistance. It Is the aim
ot The Federationist to give its
readers official labor news. By
helping ln this way you not only
make this paper more valuable
and complete, but your knowledge of what Is going on officially ln the labor movement Is
better and the good feeling
among the various crafts will
be more strongly cemented.
When this fellowship Idea is
Instilled thoroughly among the
members ot its different unions
there is less likelihood of a
break ln the ranks, and It Is
certainly needed at all times.
Bring this up at your next meeting.
MINARD'S  LINIMENT  RELIEVES
NEURALGIA
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver aad
vicinity. Branch maeta lat and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer at, room 205. Robert C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ava.; Joaeph 0
Lyon, Fin. Sec. 1781 Grant st.; Tom
Smith. Rec.  Sec.,  848  Broadway west
BUY ONLY
BREAD  BEARING THI8 LABEL
■aHMGisTmm
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decoratora', Local 188—Meet every
Thuraday, 7.80 p.m. Preaident Skene
Thomaon; financial aeoretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour atreet; recording aeoretary, George Powell, 1660 Fourth ave
west. Business agent, James Train,
room 803, Labor Temple.
Three Months' Trial
Subscription Free
With a view to increasing the
usefulness and scope of The
Fed. any paid-up reader is entitled to send in the names and
addresses of not more than
three persons whom they believe might become interested.
These will be placed on the
mailing list for three months
each, tree.   Rush in the names.
Boom and Board
Neat, clean and attractive. Breakfast only If desired. Handy to
car-barns and suitable for union
street-railway employees. Rates
very reasonable.
Apply MRS. E. A. TUBMAN,
40   Fourteenth   Avenue  West
Telephone Fairmont 336 L
•paolaltlsai
Whole Wheat Bread       ,
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakaa.
We Via Union flout,
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink* and Lunchea
All Gooda Fresh Dally.
•ta murniLB st.
Tai. aty- not.
Workers ant) Woodsmen
once call at Room 217, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
GEO. HEATHERTON
A. F. of h. General Organiser
MOVING PICTURR OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 233, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, g p. m. President, A. O. Hansen;
secretary-treasurer, O. R. Hamilton; business agent, H. I. Hugff. Offlce, Room 100.
Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 8045,
SYNOP8I8   OF   COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
.-C*?.al ,?,Lnl,*„ rl«ht8 of th«» Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
". «5B.a.ndJn a Portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
Wat" ot " an acre- N°t more than
2,660 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or
Bub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unBurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application muat be accompanied
by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shalt
furnish the Agent with Bworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre. >
For full Information'application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—30600.
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday. t'M
p.m. President, J Marshall; correspond-
tnir secretary, Wm, Rowan, Box 1047'
innnrtffi «epretary. K. McKensle.
HTRROTVPKnS' AND ELECTROTYP
ers' Union.' No. 88, of Vancouver
and Victoria—Meets second Wednesda-r
nf each month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple
President. Chas. Bayley; rprording sec'
retary, Chris Homewood, 241 ISth Ave
East.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAT
Employees, Pioneer Division No, 101
—Meets Labor Temple, second and
fourth Wednesdays at t p.m., and flrst
and third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President
Adam Taylor; recording secretary
Albert V. Lofting, 2136 Trinity Street
phone Highland 1878: flnanclal secretary
Fred. A. Hoover, 240* Cleric Drive.
RTEAM ENGINEERS. INTERNATTON-
al Local 887—Meets every Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204, Labor Temple
Financial secretary, E. Prendergaat.
Room 216.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal), Local No. 178—Meetings
held first Tuesday ln each month, 8 p. m.
Prenldent, H. Nordlund; recording secretary, C. McDonald, Box S03; financial
secretary, K. Paterson. P. O. Box ROS.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO, l!«—
M#ets last Sunday each month, f
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlplece: vice-
president, W. S. Metsger, secretary-
treasurer. R. H. Neelands, P. O. Box 66.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets second Sunday
of each month at Room 294, Labor Temple, President, H. Spears; recording secretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver,
ROOMS-LIGHT, WARM, COMFORT-
abie, with breakfast. Apply 40 Fourteenth avenue west.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. Federationist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
' and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
fhone ■symour ITM
DIXON & MURRAY
OAsravnnu*, tto.
onoa aad Stat* ntUf.   OenaraJ
Jobbing
Offloa aad •hop.
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper In
Canada. Price 60 centa per
year; In clubs of four, 26 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSV1LLE, P.Q.
FURNITURE
By all means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auotlon arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR  K.  BETCHLEY
Smythe and Qranvllle Streets
Auctioneer Sey 2973
Offices that can not supply this
label are not strictly union offices
•—believe nothing to the contrary.
A CUSTOMER
Respectfully requests that when
you havs printing done you patronise union offices using
THE UNION LABEL
Of which these cuts are facsimiles.
As a favor to union, ask for the
label on your printed matter,
VANCOUVER    ALLIED    PRINTING  TRADES   COUNCIL
Union
MADE
Beer i	
Of America ^<r
___________Wi___j FRIDAY APRIL S, 1114
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGEFTVE
These Separate Skirts
TO SELL AT $9.50
These are offered in a very fine range of serges and novelty
materials, in navy, black, and black and white checks. The
styles are attractive, featuring the new ripple flounces, tier and
pegtop effects.
Stylish Umbrellas
Low Priced at $3.00 and $5.00
a
The umbrella at $3 is a fine gloria covering with long handle
mounted in gilt or silver. The taped edge is a feature deserving of special note, as it adds greatly to the appearance. The
value represented in this line is especially attractive.
Silk umbrellas in the new long handle style with knob ends;
also with plain handle shown in navy, black, green, purple or
brown at $5.00.
Trade unionists and their friends should remember that this store closes at six
o'clock every day—Saturday included, a fact very much appreciated by our employees and an example worthy of emulation by others. Try and do your shopping in the forenoon.
LIMITED
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B, C.
Store Hours 6.30 to 6 p.m.
Saturdays Included
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT   SALE  OF   BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON .
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $5.00, for  .$3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for $2.95
SEE THE WINDOWS
FRANK NEWTON
We keep the largest and most
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices which cannot be duplicated.
Everything la to be found here.
HENRY D. RAE
Canada'! Snap Specialist
104 and IM CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN 8H0E 8T0RE IS THE SPOT FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
This ia a gift that will be appreciated In any part of the world.
Tastefully bound in three bindings.    Cloth, 11.(0; Ooie Calf, 11.10;
Burnt Leather, Sa.75.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
325 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Q V Q T P M Q We *** «■*&*
J1J1 mm--l_mJ        for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAP SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunamuir Straet Phone Exchange Sey. 3526-3527
Dressing Robes and House Coats
Wa are showing a beautiful line,pf House Coata ln Wool, Silk and Velvet;
also Dressing Robes In Wool.   All aliea from 14 to 41.
PRICES OF HOUSE COATS RANGE FROM 18.00 to 122.50
DRESSINO ROBES FROM 17 to HS
Thaaa make handaome Chrlatmas glfta for Husband, Son or Friends.
Call and Inapeot our stook.   By paying a deposit wa will lay'one aalda for
you for a reasonable length ef time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tal. Say. 70S
300-816 HASTINOS STREET W.
"Self Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Grin-rills St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
LEST THEY FORGET!
At Next Election to Elect
Men From Their Own
Banks
And Clean Up Glaringly
Abnormal Conditions at
the Capital
[By R. w. Northey]
Of course nearly every working-
man ln the province has formed his
own opinions on the Vancouver Island
strike, its causes and Its effects, and
also of course the concensus of such
opinion Is, without doubt, that the
miners have not received anything
like Justice or fair treatment from
either the coal barons, the provincial
government, the militia department,
or the courts of law In which they
were tried. The tardy action of the
minister of justice at Ottawa will, no
doubt, be helpful ln retaining some of
the votes endangered bv the stupidity
at Victoria. Of course, again, lt Is
a well known tradition that a tory
government can do no wrong ln the
eyes of a tory supporter, nor a liberal
government In the eyes of a liberal
supporter. Generally this is true. But
in this case the harsh and unwise
methods of the tory government were
so
Raw and Crude
that large numbers of working men
who have always voted the conservative ticket declare that they will do
so no longer. But will they remember? Will their memory of the government's harsh treatment of their
fellow workers be as strong and clear
by the time the next election comes
around as lt is now? Will they be
able to understand that had the government been liberal Instead of conservative, Its actions would have been
on similar lines; although, perhaps,
a little less crude, a little more diplomatic? Liberal governments are distinguished for hiding the Iron hand
under a velvet glove. The torles belong to the old school, which never
made any bones about crushing the
workers by force. The liberals, bland,
sauve and hypocritical, attain the
same ends by blandishments and unfulfilled promises. Neither of them as
a political party ever did or ever will
do any really beneficial thing for the
working class until forced to. Of
course the miners
Did Not Get Justice
not even that British brand of fair
play we see so much belauded in the
sycophantic party newspapers. They
must have been simpletons to expect
such a thing. Under the present wage
system, it is impossible for the working class aB a whole to get justice at
the hands of their economic masters,
Do the little chicks get justice when
the chicken hawk Is on the lookout
for a meal? To get fair play the
mother hen would need to transform
herself into a fighting gamecock. The
fight would then be on more even
terms. But the fight between mighty
capital and lowly labor Is never on
equal terms. The masters have all
the forces of modern civilisation behind tbem—the government, law
courts, police, army, navy, mllltla and
the wealth to hire degenerate specimens of the human race. The workers
have nothing to back them up, but
their numbers and tbe great
Force of Cohesion
Tbey do not seem to understand that
cohesion is a mighty power. Glibly
tbey repeat the formula: "United we
stand, divided we fall," but somehow
the vast majority of them do not
"catch on" to the meaning of that
slogan—they do not "unite" a cent's
worth. And it Ib this knowledge, the
knowledge that only a small portion
of the workers ure really "united,"
that places the trump card in the
hands of the masters every time the
game is played ln a rough house. The
real place for tbo workers to unite Is
at the polls. Let us hope that tho
workers of this province at least are
at last learning tbelr lesson. Let ub
hope and trust that they will vote as
they strike, and that nt the next election they will elect men from their
own ranks to tho legislature, so as
To Clear Up
the present glaringly abnormal and
unhealthy financial conditions prevailing at the capital und all over the
province. Will they do It? Will they
send three or four more working men
to help tbe two who have bo manfully shown up the exploiting crowd
ln charge of the treasury? Will each
proletarian voter remember that very
truthful saying: "He who would be
free must first strike the blow?" Will
they remember and do lt? Will thoy?
wonder!
Wages Increaeed
The maintenance of way omployocB
of the Grand Trunk railway havo
■eached an agreement with the olficlalB
nt Montreal of that company on Wednesday by which the award of tho
board of commissioners which dealt
with tbe case last fall has been accepted by both Bides. The now
schedule of wages makes the
C. P. R. Btandnrd rates, which woro
the highest in Canada if not also In
the United Slates, the rates also for
the Grand Trunk wherever tho letter's
were lower thsn tho C. P. R. while
maintaining the rate for yards and
snow plows In caBes where thoy wore
higher than for the corresponding service on tho Canadian Pacific. The
Increased pay becomes effective dating
from March 1st.
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
THE DAUNTLESS THREE.
Editor B. C. Federationist—The
A. E. Planta, Magistrate Simpson and
J. Shaw of our city, ln an article published in the columns of the Free Press
above Is the designation applied by
the special reporter of the Province, to
of the 19th Inst, and purporting to
contain - their opinion on tbe mllltla
question. We care little about the
subject tbat seems to concern tbem
so much. However, to hear their vociferous plaints, one would be easily
led.to believe that it the militia goes,
the whole countryside would go up in
smoke. Not so; all this ado is but
so much hypocritical cant. Tbe miners
of this district are just as honorable
characters, and equally as much interested ln seeing justice done as any one
of these three called dauntless. Our
amiable magistrate gives expression to
some remarkable statements. He declares how desirous he has been to
treat everybody alike In his official
capacity, saying: "I have not been influenced ln my actions by any one."
Examine this statement as it stands
associated with the case of tbe special
policeman now under arrest, and that
ot the miners' cases, also under arrest.
ThlB case of the special policeman Is
one of shooting the young son of a
business man in town, u is alleged
by a number of men in the court room
that on appearing before Mr. Simpson,
hospitality and kindness were shown
him, and that Mr. Simpson told him
not to be discouraged, or to worry,
also that he advised he be taken out
In company wltb another of his comrades ln a stroll around the place.
This special may be seen ln company
with another person parading the city
streets quite frequently during the
day. The striking miner received no
Buch marks of consideration at his
worship's hands. In appearing before
the court for his preliminary hearing,
and as soon as the charge bad been
read, the striker was immediately ordered remanded for a period of eight
days, and then hurried by all speeds-
despatch back again to his prison cell,
and no ball allowed.
Conduct of Court.
As to bow the court was conducted,
one can learn from tbe following incident connected with the three cases
ot Rublnowitz, Moore and Pride:
These three men, two miners and a
lawyer, were arrested off the street of
our city, and charged with picketlm
On appearing before Mr. Simpson, Mr.
Rublnowitz Bald, "I object to your
worship hearing this charge against
me, as I apprehend tbat your worship
cannot give me a fair and Impartial
trial. In refusing me bail, on a charge
which is for a misdemeanor, and in
respect of which I am entitled to bail
by right, you have acted In violation
to the fundamental principles of British law, that an accused man must be
assumed Innocent until proved guilty.
Further, I object to Mr. Shoebotham
acting as crown prosecutor. I do so
on the ground that he has not, and
ought not to have any status In this
or any other court." Another assertion contained In the reporter's statements quotes Mr. Simpson as saying:
"There are men not now ln Jail who
ought to be behind the burs." If this
man knows of such cases and can
make theBe statements good, why does
he not do so? It Ib at least stretching
matters when statements like this one
are put in print. Does British law
condemn a man before proven guilty?
The next point In the article credits
htm with Baying: "Tbere Is an element
In Nanalmo, and other places, who sre
just waiting a good chance to strike a
final ruinous blow." This statement
Is singularly stupid, and blatantly unfair to tbe union men of this district.
If this person is stating even what he
believes to be true, then he should
point out who these parties are, and
If he does not do so, then he simply
stultifies himself, and perpetrated a
wrong against the lienor and integrity
of the union men of this district.
The Mayor.
Tho second party of the trinity
formed "dauntless" is our present Albert Edward, the mayor of our city.
Of course it Ib understood that this
gentleman was absent from the city ns
asserted by himself, when the military
forces came In, nnd it Is alleged that
nt that time he bitterly denied any
knowledge as to who signed the papers asking for I hem here, but having
kept secrecy to the present, nnd finding how Impossible It Is to longer conceal facts, be now suddenly has
thought It wise to attempt a clean
sheet and own up, So complacently
our suave mayor nverB his acute understanding nf the attitude of the operators on Vancouver Island with regard
to tho U, M. W. nf A. that he soys
there Is not the slightest chance of
tile II. M. W. of A, being recognized
Ills underlying puriinso Is to stimulate
and encourage Ihe non-recognition of
tho II. M. W. of A by these companies
and at tho same time encourage the
perpetuation nf n system of strike-
broaklng attempts sucb as Is presently
being tried by Ihe Western Fuel company. Again be states: "The operators believe thnt the real cause of tho
strike Hob In the denim of the II. M. W.
of A. to organize Vancouver iBlnnd,
nnd having obtained control of the sit.
notion horn, to piny off the Inland ennl
mines against these In Washington,
probably at tho expenao of tho Cnnn-
(linn mines, which at present compete
with thoae In Washington, No sane
mnn of common rnnson would think
of committing himself to nny such belief. Who controls Ihe situation nnw?
lines the government, or tho people?
We reply, neither; hut tho coal barons
control tho government, the pooplo,
nnd tho whole Island from Its grass
roots down. Are Ihey not also dictating at this limn (m- attempting In do
so) to the men who work tho Industries, dig Iho ennl ami mnnngo the Industry to an extent nf (II) per eont.,
shall have nn say an to what the con-
dltlnns of such work shnll bo? The
next point of this would-be logician In
Mint of thn competition of tbo Island
ennl with thnt 'if Washington, as a re
suit nf the nrganlzntlnn of this Islnnd.
Hero ngnin be Is nt sea. Tho Inland
eoal has nothing to lono In competing
In nny market with thnt of Washington rnnl, because there is simply no
compnrlHon In tho two grades nf cool.
The Island ennl cannot he driven out
of any market by the Washington ennl
beeauso of lln superiority, either for
stonm or household purposes. A short
time ago a reference tn the poor quality of the Washington coat was msdo
by one of the Island papera. It stated
that In Vancouver there could Btlll bo
seen a largo heap nf thla so-called coal
brought Into Vancouver some months
ngo, whloh Is practically unusoablo,
and which tho writer stated could not
be distinguished from dirt.
Will Nationalise the Industry and Carry It on for
the People
Will Confiscate Leases —
Time Is Up for Settling
the Strike
(From our Special Representative]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., March 14.—At
the opening of the state parliament
the other day the labor premier Intimated that unless the meat combine did their work of supplying the
public with meat the government contemplated seizing the employers' killing establishments and carrying on
the Industry themselves. In other
circles lt Is freely asserted that the
government is thinking of nationalizing the meat Industry as a whole. In
cases of which I have personal knowledge several butchers ln a small way
broke away from the association and
began to sell on tbelr own, employing
union labor and paying the union demands. Within the space of a few,
hours a representative of the meat
ring called on them and told them
that unless they stopped selling meat
the ring would crush them out of the
business altogether, intimating the
fact that they had £3,000,000 behind
them to do lt with. The consequence
was that they had to give up the sale
of meat and their stock was taken
away to the ring's headquarters. This
shows that the meat ring is at work In
N.S.W. in all its Intensity. It la
needless to Bay that the government
is collecting information with a means
to prosecuting the meat ring's members. This Is shown by the answer
the premier gave officials when they
Interviewed him last. They asked
•that he should put the law ln action
against the men for striking. He
replied that the law would certainly
be put In action but not against those
whom the meat ring suggested. Meanwhile the people of the city are without meat, and lt is up to the government to see that the people get meat,
and as far as the supporters of the
government are concerned, It must be
union meat. The labor paper, The
Worker, Bays the government must
move and move quickly. Up to the
present time the government bas
been content to Bee the matter fixed
up between the men and their masters. But the time of fixing up between these two parties Ib past and
the government must now move ln
the matter. It Is well within the
bounds of possibility that the leases
of the masters will be confiscated by
the government, who will then take
over the killing once and for all.
Salaries Increased
At Toronto, Ont, the salaries of
female assistant teachere haB been
Increased, tbe maximum being fixed
at gl,200 in place of gl.OOO. The
schedule has been rearranged so that
there will be a regular increase of
$60 per year starting with the minimum of $600 until the maximum Is
reached. Male assistants will receive
an Increase of $100, and the maximum
has been fixed at $1,600.
Electrical Workers
During this month the Electrical
Workers' Union, No. 166, of Winnipeg,
will take up at its meetings questions
the underwriters' rules and the
local examination which all journeymen are expected to pasB. Instructor.-,
havo been appointed to deal with the
subjects, and it is the intention to
review a series of about 100 questions
which will be on the examination
papers.
Withdrawal of Mllltla.
The next superb Idea given in support of his flimsy utterances Ib what
may result from withdrawing the mllltla. He saj-B the business element
wsnt them to stay. Ot course, and if
they do stay, then the government
should compel these people to pay for
the same. The strike breakers, it is
alleged, are already paying through
the Western Fuel company offlce for
the maintenance of specials, and Planta knows that although they are absolutely unnecessary from a standpoint
of maintaining peace, yet their work
has consisted ln simply showing
themselves when tho strike-breakers
go to nnd from work, and dancing in
the evening. The last of the three is
ex-mayor Shaw, who It Ib stated also
denied any knowledge of who sent for
the mllltla, and who like the rest of
tho trio Is offering a lament at any attempt to take out the mllltla. He
agrees with all the government has
done respecting tbo dispute. He approves the lsbor department's report
and action. The position these three
prominent citizens Is directly in conflict, with tho present attempt of tho
union men of this district getting recognition. It equally approves of all
effortB possible that may assist the
WeBtern Fuol company ln the present
effort of operating Its mines with strike
breakers. In certain cases lt is alleged tbat thoy have advised men to
go Mi strike-breaking against the union,
also It Is alleged that the Hood of bills
recently Bent ln to tho union men on
strike from the hospital nnd ordered
to bo Immediately paid, In due to their
Influence.
Let these enemies of tho common
good harp on. nothing will finally with-
stand tho power of truth, and effort
fur Boclnl betterment,
, PRESS COMMITTEE.
Nanalmo, March 25, 1014.
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNA,Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,
one block west of Court House.
UteolModcrnChnpelnndPuneral
Parlors free to all patrons
JAMES STARK UJH
Men seas, iMum Mui
attuletj M ul k Ml M,
TUB STORE TBjlT SERVES TOU WlU,
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASURE-
MENTS AT 33* OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
TOR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE WINDOW SHADE
/ DEPARTMENT
We purpose nuking window shades to yonr own measurement*,
and guarantee the work to be first-class In every particular.
OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH ON HARTSHORN'S SPRINO ROLLERS
Patterns of materials displayed In department, aecond floor. Tbe whole
continent knows ths quality of HARTSHORN'S SPRINO ROLLERS.
It's necessary to bring your measurements. We do no fitting. We only
guarantee correctness In executing your orders.
This Is an exceptional offer and will prove a saving to all householdere
with window shades to buy—Don't let this opportunity pass by any means!
miiiuri up the window wltb the broken shade now.
CHOOSE YOUR MATERIALS FROM DEPARTMENT PATTERNS^-
Hollands, Imported Lancaster, Daly and Koran's Peerlese Shade Cloth*.
Opaque Window Shades  Rwur iso. for *.<:«£
on Hartshorn Spring     fig; £ %„"«?;&
BOllen Reg. $1.85 for. toe.
WEBSTER'S aoSSS
MILK, B. C, 80 oz. cans, each
10 cents, per dozen .$1.10
TOMATOES, large cans, each
iS*4c., per dozen SL35
PORK AND BEANS, largi> 8-
1b. cans, each 10c, doz...11,10
PLUMS, G. G., in heavy syrup,
2-lb. cans, 2 for    .85
PINEAPPLE, large cans, 2 for
 95
WEEKLY PRICE LIST
BUTTER, finest New Zealand,
8 lbs |l.W
FLOUR, in 49 lb. sacks... 11.(0
FLOUR,   pastry, 10-lb.   sacks,
each     JO
ROLLED OATS, fresh milled,
8 pounds for II
FREIGHT PREPAID ON GOODS WITHIN 100 MILES
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: 8EY. 8301, 8302 1275 ORANVILLE STREET
HOMEOPATH1STS
We carry a lull eteek ef
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US 8UPPLY YOU
MARETT & REID
157 HASTINQS ST. W.
WHITE STAR SERVICE-LARGEST!
5CANADA
ROTAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New S.S. "Laurentlc" (16,000 tons), new S.S. "Mogsntlc."
First Class, 102.10 Second Claas, 153.75 Third Class, 132.60
ONE CLASS (It.) CABIN SERVICE
Express S.S. "Teutonic" (Twin Screw Steamers) S.S. "Canada"
682 feet long ($60.00 and up). 614 feet low (3rd class 531.25 and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
BOSTON QUEENSTOWN
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE
(Splendid Twin Screw Stealers) S.S. "Cymric"
,75)     13,000 tons, 600 ft. low (Rats 568.60)
LIVERPOOL
S.S. "Arabic"
16,000 tons, 600 feet long (Rate
619-2nd AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Haitingi Street Weit
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, moit icientinc and painleu methodi
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
LET IT RAIN
LET IT HAIL
Let it Snow if it will,
Royal Crown is Supreme
And is easily still
The Best Soap in the West
for the Laundry, and
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
CLEANSES-PURIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY  .APRIL 3, 191*
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP S
Attractive Rates to Permanent
Gneits
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
G0 WITH the B U NCH T°THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
PENDER HOTEL
New, Modern, First-Clue
Steam Heated, Electric Lighted
Telephone Seymour lass.
Rates 11.60 per Day and Up.
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our business la Increasing is due to the fact that our business policy is correct. We adopted the policy of informing the public
through the medium of the press as to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This has established confidence with the public ln us, and fop that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue as we ar^ doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Canter A. Hanna'a Branch
A. C. Miller, Pras.
P. H. Qrote, Manager
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FETHERSTONHAUOH   A  CO.
The Old Established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
toto Rogers Bldg., Qranvllle Street
City.  Phone Seymour 37M.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3411.
North Vanoouver —Offlce and
chapel, 111 Second St. E. Phone
184.
Diseases of Men
We lasue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from til other remedies.
Price S3.00, Poet Paid,
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
1S2 Cordova 8t W.
Vancouver, B. C.
PaoaeSey. 221
Dsy or Nif lit
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Ridurdl St.        Veacoavir, B. C.
D.»4NlihlC.IU
Phone Bey. 943
Potion A Chapel
2398 Granville St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
PATRONIZE LABOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
A UN
Clean and Well-Ventilated
Work-Rooms—Use the
Union Label
McMaster & Sons Always
Welcome Suggestion from
Interested Employees
"Quality flrst" Is the Blogan at the
factory of W. J. McMaster & Sons,
limited, 1176 Homer street, Vancouver, which Is the home of the justly
famous "Buck Brand" working
clothes for men. A representative of
The Federationist was shown over
the premises by Miss A. J. MacRae,
president of the local Garment Workers' union, and Mr. M. Thomas, manager of the company, and was much
Impressed by the cleanliness and well
ventilated condition of the work
rooms, as well as the air and well-
ordered activity displayed. This firm
started in a small way in August,
1905, at 313 Cordova street west, later
moving to more commodious quarters
across the street. In December, 1910,
they moved into their own building,
where they occupy the two top floors,
50x120 feet. The business has steadily grown, the business of March, 1914,
being more than double that of
March, 191b. They sell on consignment, also, gloves, hosiery, suspenders, blankets, hats and caps, and their
territory embraces British Columbia,
the Yukon and Alberta. Everything
that Is manufactured by this Arm carries
The Union Label
and the firm impresses the fact upon
everyone in their employ that the
union label stands for both quality of
material as well as quality of workmanship. The famous "Buck Brand"
overalls and shirts for engineers In
stifle, blue and black denim, with
double seams, generous width and
fully guaranteed; the white denim
suits for painters are cut along similar lines; surveyors' suits, shirts,
pants with cuffs, well made, generous
width;   the black Jeans overall, with
Minard's Liniment Co., Limited.
Dear Sirs,—Your MINARD'S LINIMENT is our remedy for sore throat,
colds and all ordinary ailments.
It never fails to relieve and cure
promptly.
CHARLES WHOOTEN.
Port Mulgrave.
five pockets, single-needle stitched—
better than the ordinary; blue, black
and khaki denim pants overall, double
seams; carpenters' bib overalls, riveted, two front pockets, one rule, flap
with five combination pockets, double
knees, two hammer straps, all double
stitched; boiler suits—union—in blue
denim; boys' overalls, blue denim,
double knee, double seats, high waist
line, Ave pockets, well stayed, all
double stitched; "Klondtke" khaki
pants, two hip, one notch, two long
front pockets, patched seat, four
flaps, double stitched, lined bond, four
rows of stitching, heavy weight, for
miners and prospectors; work shirts,
black sateen, grey denim and black
and white striped, flannel and flannelette, all cut on generous lines, in different weights, with and without detachable collars, all carry the label.
The company will also uniform butchers. The making of flne shirts has
been added to the activities of this
concern, and one can see shirts of
percales all colors and stripes, sols-
ettes, silk striped and green cheviots',
with detachable collars, double cuffs
and with pockets, full length and
width, in every process of manufacture.   The
Method of Manufacture
from the bolt of cloth to the finished
article Is an Interesting one. The
pattern for a shirt of a certain
size Is marked on one end ot a bolt
of goods, the bolt is then folded ln
successive layers until some 20 dozens are ready, then the electric cutter follows the lines laid out in the
pattern and the order Is ready for the
stitcher. There are some 10 machines
who sew the seams, the shirt is then
passed to the buttonhole machine,
which cuts and works the buttonhole
at one operation; then the finished article is laundered and is ready for
the packing room. All the working
clothes are filled and edges turned ln
and double sewed at one operation.
All the machinery, some 36 sewing
machines, two patent button-hole ma'
chines, one riveting machine, sadirons, etc., are electrically driven,
There Is a large sample roo mon the
fourth floor, where travelers make up
their stocks for the trade.
Employees Interested
Everything is done by the management to encourage an interest in the
business by employees. They want to
procure a good article and suggestions
are always welcome; they feel that all
are Interdependent—each upon the
other—a good article, substantial materials, full cut and well-made with
the union label Is a combination hard
to beat, and they want the customer
to feel that when he gets, an article
from W. 3. McMaster & Sons, that he
gets his money's worth in every particular; they want the public to feel
that the union label stands for honesty of material and good measure
from both the manufacturers' end of
lt as well as from the workman's.
3
—
I!!1
__i
Western Federation Officials
Declare For "One Miners' Union"
Will Insure Living Wages
and Right to Work as
Free Men
Strike of Ironworkers
The structural ironworkers employed by the Westlnghouse, Church &
Kerr Company, of Winnipeg, who have
the contract for the enlarging of the
Alexandra hotel, went on strike recently, owing to differences arising
out of the employment of non-union
men in the building of the steel stairways. The strike has been amicably
settled this week and all the men are
back at work again.
Consolidation of the Western Federation of Miners and the United
Mine' Workers of America, totaling
more than half a million men, with a
yearly revenue ln excess of (6,000,000,
Is a possibility. The executive committee of the Western Federation, in
a semi-annual session, agreed to appoint a subcommittee to confer on
the consolidation with a sub-committee from the United Mine Workers.
The executive board of the United
Mine Workers was authorized at the
recent Indianapolis convention to appoint such a committee. Charles H.
Moyer, president of the Western Fed.
eratlon, has expressed himself again
in favor of the consolidation. In connection with the Michigan copper field
the executive board of the Western
Federation of Miners Issued the following statement: "The membership
of the Western Federation of Miners
and organized labor generally are responding generously to our appeals
ln behalf of the striking copper miners of Michigan. We find ourselves
as well able to continue this strike at
this time us at any time. The strike
will continue until the Michigan miners win and their just demands are
granted. The congressional Investigation should result ln the settlement
that will Insure an eight-hour workday, living wages and tho right to
work as freemen."
Winnipeg Plasterers
The  plasterers of Winnipeg have
elected   J.   Allen  president  and   W.
Miller business agent.
Re Merritt news item in last week's
Issue: There were only two men who
dug coal for 55 cents a ton, the balance of the miners receiving 65 cents.
Berry Bros.
Agenti (or
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full   line   of   accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room.      :■:      European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.   L.   WALLINGFOED,   Manager
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKING THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU   HELP YOUR   FELLOW  UNION   MEN  AND   BESIDES,  YOU   GET
THE  VERY  BEST  VALUE  FOR  YOUR   MONEY
::   HOTEL ::
C0NNAUGHT
HAY A DEPTFORD, Props.
PHONE SEYMOUR 70J7-70M.
Bnropaan Blaa, Sl.00 Tm Bay Up.
Up-to-Date     FIrst-Claaa     Dining
Room and Cafe ln Connection
120   ROOMS:   (0   ROOMS   WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone ln Brery
Room—Elevator  Services;    Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
43* pebdbb iisiit wist.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Roomi $3 per week
Up.
D. F. Peaaebero, Pro.
33-36 HASTINGS STREET WE8T
Good Service Throughout
Tetepaoie,  Hot ui
Cold Wtttr ia each
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Richly Famished Throughout. Hot and Cold Water In Brerr Room
rineit Cafe and Orlu Boom on She BaoiSo Ooaat la Ooueottan
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager.
Bates! Sl.00 and nr—SpeolaJ Weekly Bates.
BOBOBBAB BLAB 147-140 SASIIBM KBBBT
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL &™_3gjj___
Baadaomoly Burnished        656 Seymour St. Centrally Looated
CLARENCE HOTEL
Conor PENDER end SEYMOUR STREETS
SKABOLD & McBLOKOY
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
rAMAhA  MILLIONS OF ACRES
V./\ I 1 f\ \Jr\ OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
Six months' residence upon and cultivation of the land in each of three years. A homesteader may live within nine miles of his homestead on a farm of
at least 80 acres solely owned and occupied by him or his father, mother, son, daughter, brother or sister,
In certain districts a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside his homestead.   Price $3.00 per acre.   Duties—Must
reside six months in each of six years from date of homestead entry (including the time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra,
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA FRIDAY APRIL 3, 1914
THE BRITISH C0LUMH1A FKDKRATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
FEDERATIONIST WESTMINSTER ADVERTISERS
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, »l,ooo,ooo.oo.
■abiorlbed, St01,000.00
Booerre Tnat, OeoOflOOM
We hsve MONEY TO LOAN on improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients; Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and aale ot real estate.
Deposits accepted and interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
8AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia snd Begbie Street, New Weatminster, B. C.
3. 3. (ones, Haaagft Dlieotor
t. A. Beanie, Seoretuy-Trewuer.
AT THE GAME-
IN BUSINESS-
IN SOCIETY-
EVERYWHERE-
Call and See the New Spring
Models 18.00—and More
A. S. MILLS y CO.
COLUMBIA ST., nt SIXTH
NBW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
■nooeaaors to Center A Banna, Sts.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS
UNION MADE
Howie Filled
TRAQE  (:©■, MARK
BraTds
Best
Coffee
.(.^m. braid a.'0;..,,
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAIDS
BEST
COFFEE
Garland Stoves and Ranges ffiSsaa
-MADE AND USED BY UNION MEN FOR FIFTY YEARS-
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, Managing Director.)
Two Stores—
S0-S4 OOBDOTA STBBBT WBSI     TT lUmOS STBBBT BAR
Carpenten' White  Duck  Overall!,
with is pockets, union label 11.71
Men's Heavy Tweed Pants, union
label  M.00 to W.SO
Wt ask for your patronage  In our   Suit   and   Overcoat   Departments, when we give value everyllme.
NEW WESTMINSTER UNIONS
EDITED BY H. OIBB, BOX M4, NEW WESTMIN8TEB
PRINTERS MEET
Change Night of Meeting—Council's
Replies re Union Labal
NEW WESTMINSTER, March 31.—
That printers—New Westminster kind
anyway—are averse to taking any opportunity to enjoy what little sunshine
they oan was proven at the regular
meeting of Typographical Union No.
held last Sunday. A notice of
motion had heen introduced at a previous meeting to change the meeting
time from the last' Sunday ln the
month to the lest Saturday evening.
On the matter coming up for aotlon
an amendment to the effect that the
day remain aB it was and that the
regular meetings be suspended during
May, June, July and September carried without a dissentient voice, and
so our large number of Isaac Waltons
will be able to fully enjoy themselves
the coming summer.
A matter whioh should prove of Interest to all the artists of type and
stick was that part of the report of
the executive committee which dealt
with their efforts In extending the UBe
of the label on all printed matter used
by municipalities ln this part of the
province. Vice-president Tyler re
ported that letters had been sent to
the various municipal boards of councillors, also the olty council of New
Westminster, and that favorable re.
piles had been received so far from
nearly all. The councils who sent favorable answers were the city councils
of New Westminster, Coquitlam and
Maillardville, and the municipal councils of Matsqui, Surrey and Burnaby,
which are all under New Westminster's jurisdiction.
The reports from the various chapels ln regard to business conditions
were far from encouraging, more members being reported as unemployed
than for several years past.    >
NEW SECRETARY
Plumbers and Steamfltters' Local Held
Successful Meeting
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 1.
The meeting of the Plumbers and
Steamfltters' Local on Friday evening
last was well attended. The principal
matter on the order paper was the
election of Bro. Arthur E. Warren as
secretary in place of A. McLaren, who
has resigned and left for Valdez,
Alaska, where he will be employed for
some time. Brother McLaren's departure was sincerely regretted by his
brother members of the union as well
as by a number of others in the athletic world of this city. Ever since his
arrival ln New Westminster Bro. McLaren has been an active participant
in the various field sports and his
cheery voice will be sadly missed
from the line-ups on the athletic field.
He was always a willing worker ln
the ranks of organized labor and his
efforts on behalf of the local organization were much appreciated by his
fellow members.
W. Cheal was elected as treasurer
in place of Alfred Battles, resigned.
Bro. Thos. Ball was reported as being
in the hospital, where he had undergone an operation for appendicitis.
Bro. Ball Is now on the way to a complete recovory and it is expected he
will return to duty ln the course of
another week. Bro. J. Chockley, a
former pillar and energetic worker in
the trade union movement in New
Westminster, and who is now engaged in accumulating a fortune dealing
in Vancouver real estate, was a visitor. Bro. Moore made an interesting
report in regard to the Trades and
Labor council, and especially the sec
tlons of the new constitution relating
to the building trades unions.
The present officers of the Plumbers
are: President, J. S. Townsend; vice-
president, J. Main; secretary, A. E.
Warner; treasurer, -T. Cheal; Bhop
steward, W. Follis; past president, D.
Webster.
Winnipeg Typographical union is
out for a new scale, the old one being
about to expire. Printers' wages in
Winnipeg have been too low for years
and there is Uttle doubt that the new
agreement will show a substantial increase.
Still More Reasons
Why You Should Use
The WATER we use in brewing
CASCADE is the famous CAPILANO WATER—brought from
the glaciers six miles north of
Vancouver.
It's the PUREST, CLEAREST
WATER IN AMERICA-and
that's saying a great deal. Not
even a trace of impurity can be
found in it. It's ideal for brewing good beer.
And then CASCADE is "MADE
IN B. C."—and every dozen bottles you buy helps to make British Columbia grow.
CASCADE BEER costs you $1
for a dozen Pints—$2 for a dozen
Quarts. ASK ANY LIQUOR
DEALER for
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
Y
LOST TO IHE
To Locate a Big Colony of
Jap Fishermen Near
Whonnock
Method of Operating Boats
Prevented White Men
Competing
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 1,—
A matter of vital Interest to the white
workmen and especially the fishermen
of this province, was brought to the
attention of the board of trade of this
city on Friday last, and unless the
warning then given is heeded and
drastic steps are taken lt will mean
the wiping out of a great industry of
this province, at least as far as the
white portion is concerned. The
charge was made and in no uncertain
terms, by Chairman Monk of the fisheries committee, who had well authenticated reports of the intention of
a lower river cannery to locate a bjg
colony of Jap fishermen near Whonnock, taking advantage of the regulations which permit land owners above
the New Westminster bridge to engage ln fishing above that point and
thus secure control of that part of
the river and drive the white fishermen out in the same manner as tney
did the Fraser below Woodward's
slough.
Encroachment of Japs
In his report Mr. Monk referred to
the gradual advance of the Japs up-
river, and to the fact that several
were taking advantage of the regulations by living in scow-houses above
the bridge, when this regulation was
made to aid ln agricultural develop
ment in the valley, so small ranchers
could Improve their holdings and
make homes while securing ready
money for living expenses by fishing.
It was stated that at the present time
lt was conservatively estimated that
three-fourths of the fishermen on the
river approximately 3,500 were Japanese, with less than 1,000 white people engaged ln the industry. At this
rate it will not be long before the
river fisheries will be entirely dominated by this alien race the same
way they have obtained control of
the herring and codfisheries. Very
Uttle of the money received from the
sale of the flsh finds its way into the
ordinary channels of trade as they
deal almost exclusively amongst themselves. Last season the Japa caught
all the dog-salmon, salted them,
brought out their own ships from
Japan, loaded them by the aid of their
own countrymen and sent them back
to their own country. They are of
absolutely no benefit to anyone but
themselves.
Immediate Action Necessary
Mr. Monk stated that a solution of
this question, if Its retention by the
white people of this province Is desired, must be secured at once. Their
methods of operating their boats were
such that white men could not compete with them, no more than they
could in their way of living. They
would secure a license for a boat, and
then work ln relays, one crew taking
it out while tbe others slept, fishing
on all tides and ln ail weathers, and
it would soon destroy the fishing on
the upper reaches of the river. Mr.
Monk proposed that the government
limit the number of licenses to be
granted for the Fraser, and issue no
licenses to Japs until white fishermen
had been supplied, and It enough
white fishermen secured licenses, to
shut out the Orientals entirely. In
fact he said the sooner the Orientals
were excluded from the province the
better tt would be for all branches of
workers and trades. President Mc-
Quarrle, Dr. Holmes, and W. R. Gllley
admitted that tbe industry was practically lost to the whites and something should be done to regain it.
President McQuarrie said the fishermen's business was once the biggest
thing New Westminster had. It was
so no longer, and so long as Japs are
fishing, whites cannot be secured in
sufficient numbers. Tbe Japs appear
to have corralled the whole industry.
Industry Lost to Whites
Dr. Holmes believed the trouble
was with the cannerymen, whose Influence with the two governments had
been growing, until suddenly it was
realized that the industry was lost to
the whites. "We have been asleep,
and-now awake to flnd the cannery-
men have been running things to suit
themselves for the benefit of tho Japs,
which Is also for the benefit of the
cannerymen." Mr. A. -P. Macdonald
said that tbere Is no trade with the
Jap fishermen; they are of no use to
the merchants. Trade with the white
and Indian fishermen was considerable. As a result of bringing this
question to the public's attention It
has been decided to hold a mass meeting of flBhermen In this city on the
flrst Saturday afternoon after the return of Col. J. D. Taylor, M. P., which
will be in about two weeks.
ONTARIO IN LINE
Both Political Parties Help New Compensation Act
At the very latest date the Ontario
Workmen's Compensation act becomes operative on January 1, 1915.
Indications however, point to the machinery of the new court getting into
motion as early as November and if
tbe government finds lt possible to
have all things in working Bhape by
this latter date there will be no delay
in the proclamation. This was the
nature of an announcement by Hon. I.
B. Lucas, provincial treasurer, In the
house on TueBday, when the bill appeared upon tbe order paper for the
second reading. Befbre the day was
over the measure got away to a flying
start with both government and opposition members joining In the support
and mutually rejoicing that such a
stroke of social legislation should take
Its place upon the statutes of the
province.
President Frank Milne of the
Bookies, who has been suffering from
a badly jammed hand, Is getting along
all right.
LOCALS
C. L. Irwin, of the Typographical
union, Is laid up with a case of the
mumps.
"Jerry" Mitchell, a Butte, Mont,
blacksmith, paid a visit to The Federationist on Wednesday.
Chas. Maddock, a well known looal
clgarmaker, is suffering from sciatic
rheumatism.
James Halllwell, a Vancouver boy,
has gone to Prince Rupert, where he
will follow his trade as clgarmaker.
William Wlllimott, a member of the
Bricklayers' union, accompanied by
his family, has left for Windsor, Ont.
The sheetmetal men met Thursday
night and elected Carl Houdenschlelds
as warden, vice A. G. Gibhart, transferred out.
W. A. Reynolds, member of clgarmakers' bowling team, bowled the
full score of 300 at the Reliance alley
on Thursday night.
Tbe strike is still on at the Sam
Davis & Sons' cigar factory, Montreal.
The Nobleman brand of cigars Is unfair to union labor.
Tbe Miners' Liberation league has
wound up Its affairs, and a detailed
statement of its affairs will be given
to the press next week.
Tbe many friends of W. H. Mllby, a
member of the Cigarmakers' union,
will regret to learn that he is at the
general hospital with a serious attack
of typhoid fever.
R. Rlchter, of the Bookbinders, has
gone back to the simple life for the
summer. He is at present on bis
ranch ln Oregon, "laying out" a spud
patoh and raising "limp" chickens.
The pressmen of the city will give
a whist drive and dance on Friday
evening, April 17. Strong committees
have been struck, and the affair promises to be an excellent entertainment.
Nearly all the local cigar factories
are closed down temporarily owing to
the government's annual stock taking
which started April 1st. These trade
conditions also apply to New Westminster.
A local of stationary engineers will
be Installed on Tuesday evening, April
17, by E. Prendergaat, of the Steam
and Operating engineers. The new
local starts off with a membership of
twenty-seven.
Robert Marson, wife and six cbll
dren, left yesterday for Stratford,
Ont. Mr. Marson will have charge of
the brickwork on a new church building In that city. He was a member of
the local Bricklayers' union.
Percy Moore, for three successive
years president of the local press
men's union, will be tbe flrst delegate
to tbe twenty-sixth annual convention
of the organization, to be held at Hot
Springs, Tenn., early in June.
' E. Prendergaat, business agent of
tbe Steam and Operating engineers,
who bas just returned from a trip to
Lytton In the interests of organization, reports things in his line as progressing favorably in the upper
country.
Funeral
The funeral of the late James Woodcock took place at Victoria on Tuesday afternoon at 2.30 o'clock from the
parlors of the Sands Funeral Furnishing company. Rev. J. H. S. Sweet officiated. The members of the Longshoremen's union attended ln a body,
and marched to the graveside. Inter-
ment was at Ross Bay cemetery.
Electrical Workers
NBW WESTMINSTER, March 31,
The meeting of the Electrical Workers' local on Friday evening was devoid of anything of particular interest. The resignation of A. J. Evans
as financial secretary was accepted,
he having decided to migrate southwards. Bro. A. McGregor was elected
to fill the vacancy.
The result of the vote on the amalgamation of the two divisions of electricians was reported and it having
resulted favorably, the local will now
be numbered in the ranks of the Mc-
Nulty faction.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC
SANDS
Funeral Furnishing Co.
LIMITED
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
LADY ATTENDANT
TELEPHONE 3306
15)5 QUADRA STREET
Near Pandora Avenue
VICTORIA,  B, C.
To the Citizens of New
Westminster and
District:
Co-operation is making splendid progress and by your patronage you can help forward the
cause which stands for Equality.
OUR PRICES
Salmon, per tin, 1 lb 10c.
Herrings, in Tomato Sauce
3 for   25c.
B. C. Milk, per tin 10c.
Peas, per tin   10c.
Corn, per tin   10c.
Eggo Baking Powder 25c.
Eggo Bak. Powder, S</, lbs. 50c.
Tea, 3 lbs. for $1.00
This movement is a safeguard
against   trusts   and   combines.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
K. of P. Block
Eighth St. Phone 458
Branch—
1007 Sixth Ave. Phone 42S
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISERS
THE POPULAE PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.60, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MGR. FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
Enlarged and  Remodelled MO ROOMS IN BATHS
Comfort    without    Extravagance
American Plan   •   SIM Up European man   -  IMS Up
STIPHIN JONSS, Proprietor.
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA, B.C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
T&fcMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.	
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
WORKERS UNION/
UNIOJ^STAMP
Factory
Named Shoes are frequently made in Noa-
Union Factories—Do Not Bay Any Shoe
no matter what lti name, unleu lt bears s
plain and readable Impreesien or this stamp.
All Bhoea without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
3. F. Tobln, Prei.   C. L. Blaine, See.-Treaa.
Prudential
WALL
FINISH
The only real Washable Wall Finish on
the market. You can strike matches on it.
Yes, then you can wash off the mark.
That's some test, eh?
IT IS MADE IN B.C.
BY B.C. WORKMEN
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria      Vancouver      Oalgary      Edmonton PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY... ARPIL 3, 191
Half Price
SATURDAY AND MONDAY closes our ten
days' sale which has been very successful. In order
to clear a number of broken lines that have accumulated, we will sell for the two days only any suit or
overcoat, including a great number of new spring
lines, at exactly half price.
COME EARLY AND GET THE BEST CHOICE
Sale Starts Saturday, 9 a.m.
Closes Monday, 6 p.m.
ODD TROUSERS  $1.65
$15.00 SUITS  $7.50
$20.00 SUITS  $10.00
$25.00 SUITS  $12.50
$30.00 SUITS   15.00
$35.00 SUITS   17.50
A SPECIAL LINE OF NEW SPRING OVERCOATS, REGULAR $30 QUALITIES, ONLY A
PEW LEFT, SILK LINED THEOUGHOUT, TO
CLEAR, $15.00.
UNION MEN MENTION THIS PAPER WITH
YOUR PURCHASE.
J. J. NEEDHAM & CO.
335 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital 116,000,000        ReiL 112,(00,000
Main Offlee: Corner Hastings and Granville Street., Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES     ' LOCATION
HASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Haatinga and Cambie Streeta.
EAST END —Cor. Pender and Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIBW Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street.
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street.
KIT8ILANO ....- „ Cor, Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road.
Alee North Vanoouver Branoh, cor.   Lonsdale  Ave.   and   Esplanade.
DINNERWARE
Our Special for the Week-end
SEMI-PORCELAIN DINNERWARE
97-PIECE SETS, $17.SO
R. G. Buchanan & Co.
VANCOUVER'S SELECT CHINA STORE
Telephone Seymour 2021
BUCHANAN BUILDING 1126 ROBSON ST.
mm
DEWARS
-White Label'
Whisky
E
Committee Had Arranged
Excellent Programme
of Music
Benefits  of  Union   Label
Shown by President of
Typos
The Union Label league gave its
regular monthly entertainment last
Thursday In the Labor Temple. The
musical programme was excellent and
H Is a pity that so few union men and
women attend these meetings. Not
only are they Instructive, but the
Label league committee spare no pains
to make these evenings attractive. C.
F. Burthart, of the Barbers' union, was
chairman and in a few words urged
workers to demand the label. His
union Is strong on labels—the other
day in Taeoma when three of the craft
were gathered together it was found
that one carried twelve labels on his
clothing, another eleven and another
nine. The musioal programme included selections by Mr. Gillespie,
Miss Montgomery and Miss Viola
Belley, while the Terminus orches
tra gave some   excellent   selections.
R. P. Pettlplece of the Typographical union, briefly addressed the meeting. He pointed out that labor must
not lose sight of small things, while
pursuing big aims, and although the
label was far from being a small matter, yet lt was not spectacular and
consequently often forgotten. "Women," he Bald, "should especially demand the label. In so many cases
they spend the wages and if they only
would Insist on the label the fight for
sane and healthy conditions would
be won." Mr. Pettlplece spoke of a
recent visit to St. Louts, Mo., and
gave a description of women's work
ln that city. In conclusion he offered
the pages of The Federationist to help
the cause of the Label league.
PACIFIC COAST SHIPPING
Weekly Report! Re State of Trade By
Secretarlei of the Sailors' Unions
Vancouver—Shipping and prospects
uncertain. Victoria—Dull. Taeoma—
dull; prospects uncertain. Seattle—
Shipping and prospects poor. Aberdeen—Dull; prospects uncertain. Portland—Dull. Eureka — Shipping and
prospects uncertain. San Pedro-
Dull; prospects uncertain. San Francisco—Shipping medium; quite a few
men arriving from other parts in the
hope of securing employment at
'Frisco.   Honolulu, H. I.—Dull.
J. o. SBOwa
President International Union of Shingle
Weaven, Sawmill Workers ud Wools-
men, with headquarters at SOS .«y-
nsrd Bid., Seattle, who addreesen tie
otntMl Ubor body last evening and la
a weloome visitor »t Labor Temple
today.
EXCLUSION   ORDER
Government Decides to Extend It for
Another Six Months
An Ottawa dispatch on Wednesday
states that the government has decided to extend for another six
months the order-in-councll prohibiting the entrance of all artisans and
laborers Into British Columbia ports.
The present order-in-councll, which
was passed ln December, extended
only until March 31. The order, while
originally designed to prevent an influx of Orientals into British Columbia, affects Immigrants of all nations
and Is applicable to new-comers from
American ports as well as from
abroad.
ABOUT ALASKA
Proposed Railroad Causing Miniature
Boom—Mining, Fishing, eto.
A. D. Cameron, a well and favorably
known marine engineer of Juneau,
Alaska, arrived ln this city the other
day and called at The Federatlonist
office. He stated that business was
good and on a substantial basis there.
The report sent out from Juneau that
there were hundreds of men out of
work was not according to the facts.
There may be a few out of work, as
is the case always, but there was certainly no one In want—like thero is
reported to be on the outside. The
proposed building of a government
railroad Is causing a miniature boom,
and nearly everybody is hopeful of
big doings in the matter ot work and
wages this year. The towns of
Juneau and Douglas have an aggregate population of about 8,000, and if
the railway reaches these points,
which undoubtedly it will, there will
be another seaport of considerable
size on the Northern Pacilic. The
railway will infuse new life Into that
great new land of natural resources
second to none in the world. Building
contractors, Bald Mr. Cameron, have
already enough work in sight to keep
them bUBy the coming season. Men
willing and capable to work can generally get along ln Alaska, and make
a good square living. Regarding the
gypsum mines, they are located at
Gypsum, 64 miles from Juneau towards Sitka, on the northern point of
Admiralty Island. Some 1300 men are
at work there, and work eight hour
shifts at $4 a shift. Competent
laboring men can generally find
work at. the gypsum mines and can
work the year round if they want to.
Another industry that is coming into
its own is the manufacture of fertilizer from flsh at Killlsnoo, where operations will start up in April when
the herring season is on, and 200 men
will go to work there. There Is also
a whaling station at Tyhee, and good
halibut Ashing is to be had in the
icy straits. The miners have a strong
union at Douglas. Electricians receive $9 a day.
CELLS
Governor - General Pardons
Twenty-two Convicted
Men
Expected That Remainder
Will Soon Be Set at
Liberty  .
Favors Chahko Mlka
The Chahko Mlka celebration which
will be held at Nelson, B C, next July
was given the unanimous endorsatlon
of the Trades and Labor council at a
regular meeting of the council ln Miners' Union hall last week. The endorsatlon of the celebration followed
an invitation which was extended to
the council from the Chahko Mlka
fraternal day celebration committee.
Law and Order
NANAIMO, April 2.—There Is a
strong movement on foot in the city
to request the government to remove
Magistrate Simpson from ofllce. For
a long time the whole district has—
to put It mildly—been dissatisfied
with him, and his actions last weet
appear to justify this attitude. , Last
week, when the orown decided to fln-
Ish the New Westminster "farce" and
released on suspended sentence a
crowd of miners, about one thousand
persons gathered on the wharf to welcome the exiles back. Five men were
the next day charged with being
"drunk, disorderly nnd disturbing the
peaoe tumultously," and were fined
Beven and a half dollars and costs or
thirty days in jail. The Nanalmo
police are apparently getting expert
witnesses, one identified accused by
his voice, although he could not recognize him—and this amongst a thousand people! Experience at New
Westminster has evidently taught the
police something about evidence and
Mr. Simpson appears to hack them up.
THE FEDERATIONIST
Merits Credit Re Striking Miners Says
Seattle Union Record
Against tremendous odds the British Columbia Federationist, published
at Vancouver, B. C, has heen waging
a splendid fight on behalf of the striking coal miners of Vancouver Island.
At last it looks as if the trouble is
at the breaking point. The government and Ihe mine owners are beginning to weaken. Already the attorney general's ofllce has announced
that many Impending trials of miners
has been called off, Colonel Hall, who
was tn command of the militiu on the
Island during the strike has been criticised hy the department of mllltla
for over-ofllclouness and has resigned
his command. If straws show which
way the wind blows the light Is near-
ing an end. The solidarity exhibited
hy the striking members of the United
Mine Workers of America during the
long struggle was nothing short of
remarkable. The only organ to back
them up ln their fight in British Columbia was The Federatlonist, and to
that publication credit Is due to for
exposing crimes committed under
guise of the law and continued exposures finally led to an Investigation.
—Seattle Union Record.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS
Arrival of Organizer Fitzgerald Who
Will Tour Western Canada
Advices from Winnipeg state that
Jas. Fitzgerald, president of the International Electrical Workers' Brotherhood (Reld section), arrived in
that city from Springfield, 111., and remained there until Thursday evening
when he left for Calgary. His visit
to Western Canada is due to the
movement in favor of the amalgamation of the two international sections
of electrical workers. A scheme was
recently submitted to the membership of the Reid faction ln favor of
the union ot the two bodies and defeated by a comparatively small majority. Some change of sentiment on
the question has taken place in the
meantime. The Calgary local of electrical workers has already decided to
join the section approved by the A.
F. of L., and other locals have had
the question of taking similar action
under consideration but have decided
to suspend definite action in the hope
that the entire Canadian district council will ser nt to go over in a body.
On Wednesday 21 men convicted of
complicity in the industrial disputes
on Vancouver island were released
from jail by order of the governor-
general. Another who is ln hospital
is also parolled and will be released
from forcible restraint as soon aB he
is convalescent. Most of these men
were sentenced by Judge Howay to a
term of Imprisonment not exceeding
one year and a tine of (100, the fines
being remitted under the conditional
pardon which allows them to be "at
large In the Dominion of Canada.1
There are still five men sentenced by
the same judge to two years' Imprisonment who are not affected by this
order and eleven more who were giv
en terms of Imprisonment by Mr.
Justice Morrison last week. Organized labor has from the beginning
used every effort to obtain freedom
for the prisoners, and the Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada has been
in the forefront The following letter
was received by Mr. Draper, secretary
of the Congress:
P. M. Draper, Esq., Secretary
Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada, Ottawa:
Sir: With reference to your letter
of the 20th Instant to the minister ef
justice renewing your appeal for the
exercise of clemency in the case of
the Nanaimo rioters, I am commanded to Inform you that his royal highness the governor general has been
pleased to direct that George Bom-
bera and others (twenty-two ln all)
now confined In the Okalla prison
farm, British Columbia, be released
from custody under the terms ot a
ticket of leave and that the flne imposed ln each case be remitted. His
royal highness' pleasure was yesterday communicated to the prison farm
authorities. I have the honor to be,
sir, your obedient servant,
(Sgd.) THOMAS MULVEY,
Under Secretary of .State.
The minister of justice ln a letter
to Mr. Draper informing them that he
had submitted the cases to the governor-general for the exercise of his
prerogative, said: "I wish to express
my appreciation of the moderation
wtth which you represented the views
of the body of men you represent, and
to assure you that your representations have received earnest consideration in the disposal of these caBes."
Since twenty-two have been released
It Is now doubtless only a question of
a few days before the remainder will
he out of jail.
Old Age Pensions
It is estimated that there are about
321,000 people in Canada over 65
years of age, and out of this it is safe
to assert that 300,000 have to work or
be supported by friends or relatives
or subsist on charity. Of courBe there
Is a need in this dominion for old age
pensions.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DANDRUFF
Specials in Dinnerware
40 PIECE  SET   $4.80
47 PIECE SET  17.05
40  PIECE   SET    $9.40
40   PIECE   SET $10.05
DISPLAYED IN EAST WIN X W
MILLAR A COE    120 Haitian St. W.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORES IN VANCOUVER
40 Heatings St.      Phone Sey. 001 401 Cimnvlll. St       Phons' Ssy, 1717
701 Qrsnvills St.    Phons Sey. 051$
VICTORIA STORB, $1$ VIEW ST.
GREENHOUSES
Jlet Ave. snd Msln St. Victoria, B. C. Hammond, B. C.
Phone Fairmont 7M. Long Dlstanos Phone IT
Phone Stv. 316
^ Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
MA'TNBE DAILY 2.30
EVE. PERFORMANCE 8.16
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Meana
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.48, 7.20, 9.15
Season's Prloes—
Matinee 15c, Evenings 15c, 26c.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m,
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF APRIL 6th
MON.,    TUES.,    WED.
THE
WANQDOODLE QUARTETTE
Colored Singers and Musicians
DE FAYE AND MOORE
Muslo and  Yodeltng
CARLO CURRELL
Hinging Peddler
OEORGE HOLL
Singing and Talking CumcJIan
THUR8,,    FRI„    SAT.
THE   LOWE   MU8ICAL TRIO
Singing, Dancing and Xylophone
DAVE AND PIERCE MARTIN
Singing and   Saxaphono
DE ME TRIO
Novelty Equilibrist
WILBUR  HARRINGTON AND
COMPANY
Dancing and Novelty Jumping
4-REELS LATEST PICTURES-*
10 Oents-ANY SEAT-10 Cents
AMATEUR NIOHT-WEDNESDAY.
Wood's Sale
IB A CLEAN-CUT SAVING Ol" FROM 25 TO 60%,
SUFFICIENT TO INDUCE YOU TO VISIT THIS SALE.
A COMPARISON OF PRICES WILL CONVINCE YOU
THAT EVERY PRICE AND REDUCTION QUOTED BELOW
IS ABSOLUTELY GENUINE. THE FOLLOWING PRICES
ARE FOR TOMORROW ONLY.   SHOP EARLY!
EXTRA!
20c Snap Hand Cleaner for 10o     10c Ivory Soap, per cake      .. .So
16c   Bon Ami, cut to lOo    lOo.C. & B. Butter Scotch Bo
SOAPS.
He Pears' Soap, 3 for 85o
'-be Packer's 'iur Soap loo
25c Colgate's Pine Tar Soap 16c
20c French Toilet Soapa ...lBo
$1.25 cake Flour d'Azur Soap....50c
50c box Armour's Toilet Soaps..a6c
75c box Armour's Toilet Soaps..35o
25c WllIlamB'    Jersey    Cream
Soapj for        i6o
10c Infanta' Delight; four for... 85c
10c cake Italian Castile   So
Ec cake French Castile; 2 for 5o
-5c Listerlne, now 16c
50c Hydrogen Peroxide 30c
50c Eau de Cologne 86o
7Bc Manicure Scissors 4Sc
2fic Nail Files, cut to 10c
10c Orange Sticks, now 6c
$1.00 Plnaud's Fail de Quinine....80c
iRc Face Powder, now 30o
50c Odol, cut to 30c
2lic Sanltol Mouth Wash ISo
sfic Sanltol Talcum Powder ISo
50c Cream, Rose and Almonds....85c
26c Arthur's Talcum Powder 10c
TOILET ARTICLES.
35c Corylopsls Talcum Powder.-lSo,
50c Talcum Powder, full Ib SOo
60c Arthur's Cold Cream BOO
50c Pond's Extract Cold Croam..30o
25c Ingram's Cold Cream 30c
Jfic Ingram's Camphor Ice 15c
15c Medicated Corn Plasters	
per pktN Bo
$1.00 Herpicide, cut to 76o
35c Rubberset Tooth Brushes....aBc
25c Tooth Brushes, choice ISo
60c Sanltol Liquid Green Soap..30o
COMBS, BRUSHES, MIRRORS.
26u Pocket Combs,  cased lOo
BOo Combs, special  ISc
$1.25 French Dressing Combs....60c
10c Nail Brushes, now So
60c Ebony Nail Brushes 95c
$1.25   Ebony   Nail   Brushes,
handled    65c
$1.00 Hair Brushes, cut to flSo
$2.00 Hair Brushes, cut to 95c
$3.00 Hair Brushes, now 11.65
$-1.00 Hair Brushes, now:. 11,95
$7.60 Military Brushes—
Extra, per pair 98.80
$2.00 Military Brushes, pair 95c
$3.50 Military Brushes In case—
Per pair 11,45
25c Whisk Brooms •      18c
50c Whisk Brooms  30c
$1.00 Clothes Brushes 46c
$1.60 Bath Brushes, long handles
Each    oso
50c Mirrors, round, 6-inch 300
$1.00 Plate Mirrors, round, 6-ln.
Each    460
75c Plate Mirrors, ivorlde backs.
Each    b aso
$4.00 Hand Mirrors 81,95
RUBBER GOODS.
Ht] Sot ^at^r Pligs- for Ii,e?     I    !3-50 Hot Water Bags, for 80.15
3.50 Douche Syringes W.1B IlO Electric Pads....        fifll
!'2?  Sanitary Syringes 45c $1.60 Household Svringes    .      860
1.25   Rubber  Gloves 860     I    $1.50 Fountain SyringlB ^Mo
SHAVING SUPPLIES.
10c Williams' Soap, now     60
25c Shaving Sticks 16c
$1 Ever-Ready Safety Razor....70c
$1 Gem Safety Razor 70o
$1.50 Pocket Knives, I.X.L. and
Bolter's  950
S2.50 Razors, guaranteed 91,35
1 Razor Strops, choice 06c
2.50 Koken'a Razor Strons....91.80
2.00 Rubberset Shaving Brushes,
for           96o
15c Styptic Pencils, cut to 60
PATENT PREPARATIONS
50c Smyrna Syrup of Figs 3So
$1   Perfect Tonic  Bitters 60c
$1 Sarsaparllla and Burdock 68c*
25c Cascara Tablets  ISo
50c Cascarets,   cut   to 36c
60c   Fruit-a-tives,   for 36c
50c Emulsion Cod Liver Oil 36o
$1 Emulsion Cod Liver Oil BOo
50c Pep's Cough Cure ,36o
$1 Syrup of HypophoBphites....60o
$1.25 Beef, Iron and Wine 860
$1  Iron, Quinine and Wine 6So
$1   Scott's  Emulsion 750
75c Pure Cod Liver Oil 60c
WATCH THE WINDOWS
OPEN EVERY EVENING
Wood's Pharmacy
CORNER SEYMOUR STREET
601 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
A WORD TO THE UNION MAN
The Union Label Bhould stand for quality of material, fit and make-up
of garment, as well as the sanitary conditions ot a factory,
wages paid, etc.
A copy of this guarantee goes with every garment
manufactured by us,
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturers of
MAO'S MOOAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIRTS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THE MASTER SHIRT
1176 Homer St,, Vancouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831
This garment Is guaranteed as to -workmanship, quality of material,
fullness of size, buttons securely fastened, buttonholes well made.
Anyone wearing one of our garments and finding It defective will do
us a favor by either returning lt to his dealer or mailing it to us to be
exchanged for another, >*
All our garments bear the label of the
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA.
You are Invited to visit our factory.
WM. J. MoMASTER ft SONS, LTD.
Per Jas. A. McMaster,
Managing Director.
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Fer Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situate in the fertile Bella Coola District, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are Bold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
603 Holden BnUAIsr
16 Sastttff Itreet Ext
VAMOOUVEB, B. O.
Without   obligation,  please   mall  me
particulars of your ten-acre farms.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STALEY'S PLANES, LEVELS, etc., STARRETT'S
FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN LOCKS
SETS. "
PHQNE SEYMOUR 134 7 HASTINGS ST. WEST
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM

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