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The British Columbia Federationist Apr 10, 1914

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Array OPttCUL PAPER:  VANCb*C*v*ilR TRAMS AN&iABOR COUNCIL AND B. 0. PBPBRATION OP LABOR.
. POLITICAL DNTTTl   VIOTORTI
VANCOtjVtlR, S. C, MlDAY, APRIL id, 1914.
eight Pages
(*,dSSS*') W-» PtR tfi!AB
fM
Mother Jones Held a Prisoner in Damp Underground Cell
Surrounded By Sewer Rats,
Soldiers and Other
Vermin
To my friends and the public generally: I am being held a prisoner
Incommunicado in a damp underground cell, ln the basement of a military bull pen at Walsenburg, Colo.
Have been here since 5.30 a. m. of the
23rd of March, when I was taken from
the train by armed soldiers, as I was
passing through Walsenburg. I have
discovered what appears to be an opportunity to smuggle a letter out of
prison, and shall attempt to get this
communication by the armed guards
which day and night surround me,
(me, a white-haired old woman,
eighty-two years of age). I want to
eay to the public that I am an American citlsen. I have never broken a
law ln my life, and I claim the right
as a citlsen to go where I please, so
long as I do not violate the law. The
courts of Las Animas and Huerfano
are open and unobstructed in the
transaction of business, yet Governor
Ammons, and his Peabody appointee,
General Chase, refuse to carry me
before any court and refuse to make
any charge against me. I ask tbe
press to let the nation know of my
treatment, and to say to my friends,
whom, thank Ood, I number by tbe
thousands, throughout the United
States and Mexico, that not even my
Incarceration ln a damp underground
dungeon will make me give up the
I fight ln which I am engaged for liberty and for the rights of the working
people. Of course, I long to be out
of prison. To be shut from the sunlight Is not pleasant, but John Bun
yan, John Brown, and others, were
1 kept In Jail quite a while, and I shall
stand firm. To be In prison Is no disgrace. In all my strike experiences
I bave seen no horrors equal to those
perpetrated by General Chase and his
dorps of Baldwin Pelts detectives that
are now enlisted ln the mllltla. My
Ood! when Is tt to stop? I have only
to close my eyes to see the hot tears
of the orphans and widows ot working men, and bear ths mourning of
, the broken hearts, and the walling of
D. u. t. n.
BOWSERIAN PAY
TEN CENTS A DAY
AT OKALLA PARM
Provision has been made In
the provincial' estimates for
what Is called a "good conduct
fund" for prisoners at the
Okalla prison farm at Burnaby. The Bum set aside is
11,500. If a prisoner Is good he
will be allowed 10 cents per day
to be given bim on his release.
A typical Bowserian benefaction. Providing a man does
about $8.00 worth of"clearing or
other work, and never takes a
little "mike" and gives the
warden no "backchat" and does
his hut to assist the authorities to stamp every vestige of
Individuality out of him he will
get his. This Is a touch of real
statesmanship.
BUT 1 INCREASE
Will Spend Five Million
Dollars to Beat the
Strikers
Mounted Cossacks Running
Amuck in Colorado
Strike Zone
  -_    . __ _    . the mllltla and hired assassins of the
the funeral dirge: while the cringing operators to -make * wudeMus «s-
pollticlans, whose sworn duty It Is
to protect the lives and liberty of the
people, crawl subserviently before the
national burglars of Wall street wbo
are to-day plundering and devastating
the Btate of Colorado' economically,
financially, politically and morally.
Let the nation know, and especially
let my friend General Francisco Villa
kabw, that the great United States of
America, which Is demanding of him
that he release the traitors he has
placed under arrest, Is now holding
"Mother" Jones Incommunicado ln an
underground cell surrounded with
sewer rats, tin horn soldiers and other
vermin.
MOTHER JONGS.
Military Bastile, WasenbUrg, Col.,
March 31, 1914.
A Montreal dispatch on Tuesday
announced tbe re-election ot Controller "Joe" Alney, the labor candidate
by a handsome plurality. The results
follow:— Commissioners — Thomas
Cote 28,530, E. N. Hebert 27,632, Jos.
Alney 27,048, D. McDonald 19,691, The.
runners up were Roy, 19,284 and Beau-
dray, 18,687. F. W. St. George, who
was backed by tbe Graham papers for
the English place, was seventh on the
list with 16,799 votes.
B. C. Federatlonist Dlrecton Meet
A meeting of tbe directors of The
British Columbia Federationist limited, was held ln its office, Labor
Temple, on Friday evening last
A large amount of routine business
was disposed of. R. P. Pettipiece,
I managing director, presented his re-
| port, which showed the financial affaire of the paper to be in a very satisfactory condition. The B. C. Federation of Labor applied for Ave additional shares, which were allotted,
H. Glbb, New Westlmnster, was
appointed director, vice C. Slvertz,
Victoria, resigned; also' G. J. Kelly,
Vancouver, vice J. Kavanagh, Vancouver, resigned. They will represent
the Interests of the B. C. Federation
of Labor, having been elected trustees
at the New Westminster convention,
held In January.
(Special to The Federatlonist)
DENVER, Col., April 8—Driven
wild by their exposure before the congressional committee, the Colorado
mounted cossacks are running amuck
in their terrorizing misrule of the
strike tone. Almost every night the
tent colonies are surrounded and the
miners and their families He awake,
In fear of their lives while the ma
chine guns are trained on their homes.
Only last week four militiamen robbed the saloon at Suffleld and then
shot up tbe tent colony. The prostituted press of Trinidad has been
agitating violence against the miners
and tbe strikers are dally anticipating
Company Refuses Prosecution or
Investigation of Alleged Offences
aault upon them. "John D. gives
11,000 000 for aid of beasts," was the
Interesting announcement made to the
country Tuesday, and yet he says
that to give the Colorado coal miners
a wage Increase of ten per cent|
would put him out of business. In
the same connection lt Is well to remember that before the strike waB
called he said he would spend
85,000,000 to prevent tbe Colorado
coal miners from getting this Increase. How long will tbe laboring
people of the country reconcile themselves to these outrageous conditions?
HOFFMAN DROPS
For Those Who Live In Desolate
Pieces Building Railroads
Mr. F. S. Degney, chief hospital and
sanitary Inspector, acting under the
provincial secretary, Hon. Dr. Young,
says:
"At most of the railway camps,
owing to the strict enforcement of
the liquor laws, lt has been extremely difficult to get Intoxicating liquors, but that a beverage
known sb "Hoffman Drops" Is being Bold. It Is most deadly, the
oontents of a bottle being sufficient to cause death, but taken ln
small doses a stupefying intoxication ensues.
"Tbe petition presented by Mr.
Degrey reiterated that something
ought to be done to 'stop this new,
yet fast growing evil, which bids
fair to result ln the flooding of
our Jails and mental hospitals, inflicting a serious burden upon tbe
taxpaying citlsens of British Columbia.' "
Just bo. It wouldn't mater at all lt
tt did hot threaten to be expensive
to the tax payer. The foundations of
"Empire" are laid on the carcases
of railroad workers whose lives are
lived in the most desolate places, ln
the most unsanitary conditions, with
often the vilest of food. The marvel
to those who have had some ts how
men can be expected to do It without
first "doping" every sense of decency
into oblivion.
COMPENSATION AOT NEEDS TESTING
Judge Grant last 'Friday again dismissed the elaim made
under the Workmen's Compensation act on behalf of the
defendants of Stephen Pleeas. It will be remembered that
Plecas met his death whilst engaged with others in blasting
in connection with railroad work which was being done on
a Sunday. When first giving judgment his honor nonsuited
the plaintiffs on the ground that Plecas, although properly
warned of "fire," did not Beek shelter. He also added, at
the tinie he gave his original judgment, that he was of the
'opinick that'the faot that Plteas was working on .Sunday
made his employment illegal in face of the L6rd's Day Observation act, and that such employment, being illegal,
would deprive him of the basis for a compensation claim.
Many people at that time got hold of the wrong end of the
stick by 'assuming that Judge Grant's Judgment was based
upon the question of Sunday employment, whilst such was
not the case. The Fe'dewtionist has recently taken the
trouble to consult one'o'f Me ve*ry highest tejwl authorities in
Vancouver *6n "this qpestibn afid he is of the 0*pinion that
work of 'that kind, dftrie on Sunday, wfoild be illegal employment and a Workman's 'right tt iom'peiiBation tor injuries
would thereby Be tafceh from him.
The Board of Arbitration, appointed by the Department of Labor, under the provisions of the .
Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, at the request of the employees of the B. C. Electric Railway
Co., held its first meeting on Saturday last. The board consists of Judge McDonald, the chairman,
chosen by the Minister of Labor, Jas. H. McVety is acting on behalf of the men, and John Elliott for
the company. The case for the company is being presented by Messrs. F. R. Glover, Wm. G.
Murrin, and Wm. Saville. On behalf of the employees are Messrs. A. Taylor, F. A. Hoover, and
Wm. Yates. Mr. A. Purvis also appeared, but as according to Sec. 39 not more than three representatives are allowed each side, he was retired. The first session took place on Monday evening j
last in the provincial courthouse. It will be remembered that last fall a similar board met and the
majority finding of that board was adopted as the basis of a new wage scale and working agreement
in place of the old one which had expired. The employees made no secret at that time that the new
agreement was far from satisfactory to them, but after mature consideration it was decided by them
to accept the award of the board after a few minor alterations had been agreed to' between themselves and the company. Many who carefully went into the new agreement at that time, had doubts
as to how it would work out, and eventually there arose a wide difference of opinion between the men
and the company as to the correct interpretation of some of die most important clauses. After failing
to settle satisfactorily the men applied to the Department of Labor. Hence this new board which
is called upon to interpret the clauses in dispute with a view to a finding acceptable to each side.
Mr. A. Taylor, in opening the case for the men, went into die practical working of the agreement at considerable length and pointed out that in some cases, such as night car repairers, Wages
were actually reduced by the agreement. This contention the company denied, and it soon became
apparent to anyone not actually engaged in the business that some of the points in dispute could Only
be appreciated by those possessing a thorough, practical knowledge of the working customs and conditions of street railway-men. The members of the Board also realized mat, if one might judge from
the numerous questions asked by them in their effort to clearly grasp die troublesome points.
The Fare-box Trouble
The board adjourned at 11 p.m. Monday night and met again, on Tuesday,evening. Almost
the entire evening was taken up with the question of the company's right to discharge men for what
the company considered sufficient cause without the men being consulted or permitted to have any say
ih the matter. Tlie chief trouble in this connection arose last December. At that time the company
alleged that certain conductors had been guilty of tampering with fare boxes, and dismissed about
twelve men in Vancouver and eight in Victoria. In some of such cases die men are insisting upon
absolute proof of dishonesty before a man is dismissed. The representatives of the men put up a very
vigorous fight on this point, and contended that, if die company discharged a man lor dishonesty and
yet refused to prosecute or permit an inquiry into the Matter, the man suffered a gross injustice by
having to leave the company's employ with the stigma of dishonesty branded upon him. Mr. Glover
stated very emphatically that the company would reserve to itself the right to the final word in ques-'
tions of that kind, as in his Opinion it involved the further question of whether the company should
manage its own business, or allow the employees to manage it.
At this point Mr. Yates and Mr. Glover clashed and the brief flare-up brought forth the remark
from Board-member Elliott that up to that time they had been able to get along without sworn evidence and he hoped they would be able to do so. The clash came up on the question of how Clause
3 came to get into the working conditions. Mr. Yatres stated that it was put (-here .at die instigation
of the company. TTiis Mr. (Sever denied and replied that Mr. Justice Murphy, who wis chairman
of the last board, suggested it himself.
Some interesting statements came out over this fare box trouble. Mr. Glover stated that as far
back as three years ago the company had a special corps of inspectors out to investigate and they
were unable to find one case of dishonesty among the conductors.
Mr. Taylor said that in the case of some of the men accused of dishonesty, the union had asked
the company to prosecute, which the company refused to do yet still insisted on discharging the men.
Mr. Murrin, a young man, who appeared on behalf of the company, said the company objected to
the principle of laying off the men who were taken on last, whenever it became necessary to reduce
the staff. He said there might be older men who had longer service, but who were not so desirable
as workmen.
The whole inquiry presents so many baffling points that Judge McDonald said the more he
heard of it, the more convinced he was that the old board should be dealing with it as they were more
familiar with the details. Mr. Elliott said it was his first experience of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act and he hoped it would be his last.
Inquiry Held Up
Finally, as the B. C. Electric Railway Company representatives refused to recognize the
right of an employee dismissed for dishonesty to an inquiry, the board reached a temporary deadlock. Mr. Glover said that as the offence which the men were considered to have committed was an
indictable offence, the company considered it could not be taken up by any board constituted under
the Act. He based his contention on Clause (e) of Sec. 2 of the Act, which reads: "dispute" or
"industrial dispute" means any dispute or difference between an employer and one or more of his
employees, as to matters or things affecting or relating to work done or to be done by him or them,
or as to the privileges, rights and duties of employers or employees (not involving any such violation
thereof as constitutes an indictable offence)" and so on.
Judge McDonald preferred hot to make any ruling on this point at that time, but said the Board
would consider, the matter among themselves first. The Tuesday session then adjourned, both sides
to be notified of the next session.
With the exception of two or three members of the Street Rallwaymen's Union, no one was
present other than those engaged on the inquiry- More significant still, none of the local newspapers were represented except The Federationist.
VANCOUVER ISLAND
' DERIVING AMUSEMENT
CELEBRATE  MAY-DAY
Advices received during the
week from offlcen of the miners on Vancouver Island are to
tbe effect that everything Is
going on as usual, and the men
are deriving not a little amusement from the pitiful frequency
with which the operators are
assuring the publlo that they
have all the men they can employ. The coming celebration
at Nanalmo Is being eagerly
looked forward to. No secessions from the ranks are reported, and the miners display
the same determination and
solidarity as ever.
IDES AND IM
ATM-M
Reports of the Unions State
All Trades Very
Dull
Unionists Will Participate
in Nanaimo's May-day
Celebration
UNION OF SEAMEN
PLANNED ON
,1
Movement td Unite Every
Man on Pacific Seafaring
Trades
LICENSE COMMISSIONERS WILL DEAL
WITH THE EXCLUSION OF ORIENTALS
BUSINE88 AGENTS MEET
Working Card—Union Laundries—Ten
Hours at Second Narrows Bridge
The rejfular weekly meeting of the
business agents' board was held Monday, W. E. Walker presiding, and
tbere were present Messrs. Sully,
Burkhart, Hamilton, Yule,, ^render-
gast, Train, Dagnall and McEwen.
After routine business was transacted
J. Bully stated that the working card
proposition was held ln , abeyance
until tbe Kext meeting of the Trades
aid LaW 'cohttbil. W. B. WalkW
staled 'the I. X. L. and the flihlth
Coat and Aproh Supply 1a«ndr^ were
union cohoerBs aiid teat the Wonder
laundry was itohuhion, mid alsb that
the Irving hotel cafe bad refused to
sign 'the schedule calling for union
conditions. H. 3. McEwen brought
ih 'this 'q4Wtl6n of the flecorid Mar-
idws bridge,'anfl stated that a..ten-
hour day Was observed for all crafts
Jn accordance.with ,the ipipiJW
hours W&pH Which tad Ueo
Brawn Wi Vak thtt the wages Were
' el<nr, tie, vom. W, i ■ TW« matte*
\Ji\to
Deputation of Trades and
Labor Council Interviews
Commissioners
Commissioner Leek Strongly
In Favor of Chinese
Cheap Labor
; with at the next meet-
'dee tfaxaverxlctoic'l.
At the regular meeting of the license
commissioners held last Wednesday
afternoon Messrs. Jas. H. McVety and
W. B. Walker appeared on behalf ot
the Trades and Labor Council. They
requested that when applications for
a renewal of licenses are made by
hotels next June no license should be
Issued or renewed unless the applicant
would undertake to exclude all Asiatics
from employment In hla botel. Tbe commissioners present were Messrs. Fyke,
Patterson, Leek and Balrd, with Acting
Mayor Hepburn in the chair. They
promised to give the matter consideration. Dr. Patterson expressed himself
is favoring the exclusion of all Asiatics from Canada. Commissioner W.
Leek, who, it will be remembered, was
police commliiloner at the time of the
RESULTS OF VOTING
VICTORIA, B.C., April 8—The Vic
torla Trades and Labor council held Its
Usual meeting with a fair attendance
of delegates. The various committees
are now working at their best In an
endeavour to stimulate the work of
the council. President Dykeman In
the chair reported the return of credentials of Mr. Douglas. Delegate Slverti reported for the hospital oommlttee that the hospital board would
not be In a position to go ahead with
the specifications for the new public
hospital for three months,. The committee will watt upon the board at
this time. Delegate Siverts reported
on tbe day, nursery that he would be
able to give at a later date Information
regarding the management of the
same. 'A letter of thanks for the support and assistance given In her election as school trustee, was received
from Mrs. Justin Gilbert and filed.
A committee from the Hamilton
Trades council requesting endorsatlon
of resolution calling for the government to take steps to stop Illegal (migration, notice of the same to be published in the papers of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. After some
discussion by Delegates Slvertz,
Watchman, Martin, Perrott and
others, an admendment was adopted
requesting the Trades congress to
have the resolution transposed into
the various languages, and have the
same distributed in the various countries from which this country receives
Immigrants. The council felt that
while conditions might be bad In
Hamilton where they receive many
trom the old country, we on the Pacific who have the Chink, Jap, Hindoo,
Doukhobor and every other nationality under the sun, have ho reason to
discriminate against those who speak
the same tongue and follow the same
custom. When they get here and meet
the ocean they are easier to educate.
J. L. Martin reported for the Legislative committee re fire escapes. The
fire chief gave the Information that
he had always tried to see that all fire
escapes received a coat of paint once
a year.
Reports of Unions
Painter's report—Trade dull, 60 per
cent of the members being Idle.
Plumbers—Trade dull; four nonunion men in town; good prospects
of having all the big shops sign up
as closed shopB.
Typo's—Strike still on ln Sweeney
& McConnell shop.
Sheet metal worker's—One hundred
per cent, organized, 15 per cent. Idle.
Bartenders'—Making good progress
In having the Rltz organised; card
will be ln shortly.
Brotherhood of Carpenters — Trade
very dull; five admitted on clearance
cards last meeting; good attendance.
Amalgamated Section, Brotherhood
of Carpenters and Joiners—Trade
dull; two new members.
Letter Carriers — Ninety-nine per
Will Bring All Workers Between Points Into One
Gigantic Union
A movement Is on foot to unit*
every man In the Paella Coast connected with the seafaring tradei Into
one large union; One ot the effect*
of the opening of the Panama canal
Is that the port of. Vancouver will be
Becond only to San Francisco, and tbat
here large members of men will be
hired and discharged. At the present
time coast shipping Is very, dull, ind
the prospects In the Immediate future
are very discouraging asd large numbers of men are Idle, particularly at
B.C. shipping ports. And it Is believed that, now is the time to get
busy and build up a strong organisation. The movement originated wttl)
the Riggers and Stevedore's union at
San Francisco, which body Is tM
largest local union on tbe continent,
with the exception of Now Tork Typographical union No. 6. A committee ot
ten was appointed recently and a subcommittee from this amalgamation
committee appeared before toe organisation oommlttee of the Mor oouncll and laid the plan before that body.
The riggers and stevedores Inaugurated their amalgamation policy aa
long ago as 1808, aiid now the longshore workeri ih the bay lection who
were previously banded in leven separate unloni are joined In this one
big organisation. The further amalgamation contemplates-bringing all the
workera between the warehouse at the
shipping point and the warehouse at
the receiving point Into 'one glgantlo
union. H thli Is brought about tt will
mean that men now divided Into
eleven different unions will be under
one head.
No Work at Reglna
Reports from Reglna, Sask., received this week are to the.effect that although the weather 1a better, conditions In the building trade are aa bad
as ean possibly be.
On Amendments  to   Constitution of
B. C. Federation of Lsbor
Following are the results of the recent referendum voting on proposed
amendments to the constitution of the
British Columbia Federation of Labor.
Both amendments were carried by
large majorities:
Amendment No. 1.—To reduce the
representation for the first one hundred members from two delegates to
one. In favor, 3,649; against, 347—
majority ln favor, 3,302.
Amendment No, 2.—That no member of a militia corps shall be eligible
for membership in any lbcal afflliated
with the B. C. F. of L. In favor, 3,795;
against, 244—majority In favor, 3,551.
Not Union Made Bread.
The beautiful bakery and still more
beautiful bread baked by Shelly Bros,
were dilated upon to the extent of two
columns ln a recent Issue of the Dally
Province. The main thing for union
men to bear ln mind is, that no union
bakers are employed by the firm.
free speech outrages two yean ago,
said that Asiatics were It much better
class of labor for that Work than white
men.
cent, organised; still have to walk or
pay their own fare; dominion govern-
lent making arrangements with B. O.
. R.
Machlnliti—All those belonging to
the union working; •» number still unorganized.
Laborers' Protective union—Thingi
In a very bad shape. The,olty wttl
only require about 500 men this year:
300 working now; 1,500 registered at
the bureau; organising Work hard;
the common laborer, like all common
"plugs," hard to wake up; but conditions at present are helping to make
them think.
Steam Engineers—Nineteen members ln good standing; B. C. aaioclatlon of Engineers tn town Is a fraternal organisation; wage scale, none;
hours, any-that suit the boss; provincial union, a Canadian bunch, is
highly recommended by the bosses for
the part played In the Island atrlke by
the union men.
Delegate Siverts waa the choice of
the council aa statistician.
Delegate J. L. Martin reported for
B. C. Mlnen' Liberation league that
Rev. W. Oaunton would speak In the
Variety theatre, Sunday
Meeting adjourned 10.45 p.m.
Carpentera Meet
The Amalgamated section of the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters, at
Its meeting held on Thursday, April
2nd, decided to amalgamate the two
locals, Nos. 2661 and 2662. The consolidated unions will meet on the second and fourth Thursdays in each
month, Officers were ejected as follows: President, H. Oarbutt; vice-
president, E. W. Ellis; secretary,
Thos. Shields; treasurer, H. Pope,
auditors, A. S. Wells, J. Ley, T. F.
Mathieson
Efforts are being made to induce
as many as possible to attend the
Mayday celebration at Nanalmo. The
Trades and Labor council and other
organisations are taking the matter
up and although trade is very bad In
tbe building trades, a large contingent
Is expected to make the trip.
In spite of the restrictions placed
on the entry of artisans, men are continually coming into thia district, and
swelling the already largely over
stocked labor market Much distress
already prevails amongst the building
trades mechanics, and tn spite of
press reports there Is no relief In
sight.
A RATHER LATE AND RUDE AWAKENING
' The employment of Chinese as domestic servants haB
been raised to a question of nine days' public interest, A
young Chinese domestic has confessed to killing his mistress
and afterwards chopping up the body and burning it. Last
Monday a well-known local business man called up The Federationist and inquired whether it would not be possible to
start an agitation to prevent the employment of Chinamen
in domestic service. We replied that We did not know any
working men who had Chinese domestics. The organized
labor movement did not have to see a woman murdered
before taking pains to try and secure the exclusion npt only
of Chinese domestics, but of all kinds of Asiatic labor from
Canada. That not necessarily because they arc Asiatic, *b*nt
primarily because they are cheap labor, and as such they
are a menace to the wages of white workers. However, if
this awful tragedy Bhould result in the dismissal of large
numbers of the Chinese domestics now employed hy the
richer residents of this city, it will be easy to replace them
With white girls. More than that, owing to tha large •numbers of unemployed women now seeking jobs in Vancouver,
(hey can be hired cheaper than a Chinaman. The latter fact
hah long been notorious, but never mor% so than now. •''*■■ PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAV APRIL 10, 1814
DINNERWARE
Our Special for tlie Week-end
SEMI-PORCELAIN DINNERWARE
97-PIECE SETS, $17.50
R. G. Buchanan & Co.
VANCOUVER'S 8ELECT CHINA STORE
Telephone Seymour 2021
BUCHANAN BUILDING 1126 ROBSON ST.
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Per Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situate ln the fertile Bella Coola District, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
sos ■olden Bonding
IS Bastings Stmt But
TAXCOUTBB, B. O.
Without obligation,  please mall  me
particulars of your ten-acre farms.
Name   ....
Address
BY GEORGE BARTLEY
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters (or Carpenten' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street
traoe >_y)\ MABK
BraTd's
Best
Coffee
,.***■ HKAIUlt.<-a,.,..
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Garland Stoves and Ranges
V MADE AND USED BY UNION MEN FOR FIFTY
1037 Granville St.
Phone SejamrMM
YEARS
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, Manning Director.)
Carpenters' White Duek Overalls,
with 1t pockets, union label St.It
Men's Heavy Tweed Panto, union
label  00M to SS.S0
We ask for your patronage  In our  Suit  and   Oversea!   Departments, when we give value everytlme.
lyeesaMUoi
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread       .
Wadding and Birthday Cakes.
We Use UaloB now.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Bot Drink* and Lunehee
AU Goods Fresh Dally.
Set ley. TlOs.
Workers and Woodsmen
Take Notice
All interested
in organisation are requested to at
once call at Room 117, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
OEO. HEATHERTON
A. F. of L. General Organiser
ARTIFICIAL  INCUBATION.
Nothing has done more to contribute
to the development of the poultry industry than artificial incubation. The
large poultry growers are rendered independent of the uncertainty of thp
broody hens, and can hatch early or
late in the year, or at any time that
they wish; and the growing demand
for eggs enables the free-laying, non-
sitting breeds to be more largely kept
where Incubators are used and the
broody hen can be dispensed with.
The simplicity and cheapness of the
machines place them within reach ot
all.
Clear directions as to the management and workings are sent out with
each Incubator. There is nothing in
these directions tbat anyone with ordinary Intelligence cannot carry out. It
Is important to place the incubator
where the temperature of the atmosphere is as even as possible and where
there is plenty of ventilation without
draught. This latter should be specially attended to, aa the air will otherwise become vitiated by the fymes
from the oil, and chickens hatched
where the ventilation is defective are
seldom strong.
The machine must stand level and
not touch the wall. There must be no
vibration. It must be run for at least
a couple of days before the eggs are
put ln, to aee that an even temperature
can be maintained. The lamp must not
be Interfered with after the machine is
started. If the temperature is too low
or too high, the regulator should be
moved. The lamp must not be allowed
to smoke. Oreat care must be taken
to keep the lamp and burner clean. It
la advisable to begin each fresh hatch
with a new wick.
The eggs Bhould be tested and un-
fertiles removed after seven days of
incubation. Egg testers are usually
supplied with the machine. It is easy
to make one with a piece of black cardboard by cutting an egg-shaped hole tn
the middle and holding each egg up
before a candle in a dark room. The
unfertileB will be clear, like a fresh
egg. Those that are fertile will show
the germ as a circular spot floating at
the top of the egg when held sideways.
Addled eggs look turgid and darkish.
One great object in testing is that the
live eggs do far better If the others are
removed. There Is more heat ln a live
than ln a dead egg, and any live eggs
that may be surrounded by dead ones
may be insufficiently heated.
Turning the eggs Is done morning and
evening, a mark being made oh one
side ot the egg so that it can be known
when it la turned. Thli operation is
performed by gently rolling the egg
over with the finger, without lifting or
shaking lt. A sudden ]ar may kill the
germ or cauae the chick to be crippled.
The eggs Bhould not be turned after
the eighteenth day. They must be
cooled once a day, the length of time
depending on the weather and the
period for which they have been incubated.
Generally speaking, the eggs should
be cooled for ten minutes during the
iirst week, twenty minutes for the
second, add for about five and twenty
minutes ln the list week; but the atmospheric condition must be considered and less time allowed in very cold
weather. Some rearers, when the eggs
are turned on the nineteenth and twentieth days, place all eggs that are
chipped, with the'chip uppermost, to
allow the chick to break out of the
shell more easily.
MARKET IS
Poultry, Potatoes and Eggs
Were All in Good
Demand
Nice Spring Flowers For
Easter Found Ready
Buyers
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THREE STORES IN VANCOUVER
m Hastings tt,     Phone ley. SSS 401 Ciunffla St.      Phene iey. 1717
Ttt Oranvllle St.    Phone ley. N1S
VICTORIA STORB, 111 VIEW IT.
QMBNHOUBM
tls! Ave, snd Msln It
Phone Fairmont TII.
Victoria, ■. C. Hammond, J. C.
Long Distance Phone II
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
THI8 WEEK'S PRICES:
Apples
Royal Jenette, No. 1,
box
Royal Jenette, No.
box  	
Ben    Davla,    No.
box   	
Ben   Davis,    No.
box
9     2.50
New Zealand and Australia have no
surplus of eggs for export.
Available eggs ln China are chiefly
within three days of Shanghai.
There Is only one cold storage
house at Shaghal.
Chinese exports Include poultry as
well as eggs.
The egg produotton ot China Is
likely to Increase as fast as the outlets Increase,
Chinese poultry 1b mostly of the
Mediterranean breeds and smaller
than ours. The bulk of poultry ex-
ports go to Germany and Oreat
Britain.
The Panama canal (which may be
open In eight months) will probably
out In two rates from Pacific coast
ports to New York. Direct steamers
from Shanghai to New York would
then, If established, probably have a
freight rate not largely ln excess of
that to Paelfle coast ports.
The steamer Makura, which arrived
last week from Australia, landed at
Victoria and Vancouver 688,000 pounds
of butter and 10,000 cases of onions
besides other foodstuffs. This Ib but
a small Instalment of the $20,000,000
worth of food products which the finance minister last month stated were
imported annually Into British Columbia.
Tbe Ledge says that one half ot
the world does not know where the
other half gets fresh eggs.
Chinese eggs are now being sold ln
British Columbia. TheBe eggs cost
eight cents a dosen ln China. These
eggs are not fit for a white man to
eat In China the hens live largely
upon human manure and from maggots that they pick out of dead bodies
ln the crude cemeteries. Several millions of these kind of eggs have recently been brought to Vancouver.—
The Ledge,
Things were very busy at the Vanoouver olty market this week. All
consignments of ranchers' produce
found a ready sale, and the demand
exceeded the supply.
Trade ln potatoes was very brisk.
A good supply of Dakota reds was received from Agassis and found a
ready sale at $ 18 to $20. This variety
of spuds gives great satisfaction to
consumers.
Two oar loads of hay went quickly
at ill a ton.
A better demand met the supply of
apples. Royal Jenettes and Ben Davis
Bold freely at $2 and $2.50 for a box,
45 pounds ot fruit net
Poultry Is ln big demand. Sales
were put through for Barred Rocks at
(15 to $17 a dosenj White Rocks, $15
to $16; White Wyandottes, $16 to $16;
White Leghorns, $12 to $14; week-old
chicks went oft like hot cakes at $2
a
Two ear loads of potatoes of the
Burbank variety of exceptional quality, were reoelved_ and eagerly bought
up.
A large supply of local new laid
eggs went at 28 cents a doien. At
Seattle they were selling for 21 cents.
Spring flowers for Easter found
ready buyers. There were daffodils of
following varieties: Emperor, Empress, Prlnceps, Barrle, which Bold at
25 cents for four bunches, 12 each in
a bunch. Ornatos, narcecls and tulips
were ln aplenty, tulips selling at 16
and 20 cents a bunch.
Cabbage plants sold at 16 cents a
dosen and rhubarb roots brought 10
and 20 cents apiece.
RETAIL PRICES.
Following are cash prices for delivered staple commodities by local
dealers:
Beef, sirloin steak, best,
lb.          •
Beef, medium,  shoulder,
roast, lb. -v 18   •
Veal, roasting pleee from
forequarter, lb. ...    .«    W
Mutton, leg roast, lb. ......  17     9
Fork,     fresh,     roasting
piece from ham, lb.......
Pork,   salt,   short   out
Canadian mesa, lb ...
Breakfast bacon, smoked,
best, not sliced	
Flsh, fresh, good quality,
Salmon, lb ................
Lard, pure leaf, best, lb..
Eggs, strictly fresh, dos.
Eggs, packed, dos. -~
Milk, delivered, quart......
Butter, dairy, ln tubs, lb.
Butter, creamery, prints,
lb :—
Cheese,  local,
old, lb	
Cheese,  local,
new, lb.
Cookers, box   '.  $
Vegetables
Potatoes, sack  $   .80 i
Carrots, sack   i
Turnips, sack  60 !
Parsnips, sack   f
Rhubarb, lb    I
Head Lettuce, dos  i
Cut Flowed
Sweet Peas, bunch—.      f
Carnations, dos      i
Egge
Local new laid, dos      9
Wash., new laid, dos     t
Poultry
Young hens, dos. 110.00     f
Heavy liens, lb      (
Pullets, dos ,    9.00     (
Broilers, dos    6.00     <
Ducks, doz  10.00     (
Feed
Hay, ton  „.|14.00     (
Straw, bale      I
Oats, ton      I
wheat, ton  „      t
Bran, ton      I
Shorts, ton      (
Beef
T-bone    and   Porterhouse steaks, lb     (
Round steak, lb. ....  ...     I
Pot roast, lb        I
Pork
Leg and loins, lb.        <
Shoulder, lb -       I
Chops, lb      (
Lamb
Legs, lb      (
Lome, lb      I
Fore quarters, lb.       (
Chops, loin, lb.     (
Chops, lb «     I
Finest Local Beef.
Best outs, lb       I
Ribs, lb       I
Pot Roasts, lb       (
Lamb, legs, lb       (
Lamb, loins, lb        f
Lamb, shoulders, lb       I
Pork, legs, lb       f
Pork,  loins,  lb.        (
Pork, shoulders, lb       I
Sausages, lb.       i
Fresh Flsh,
Halibut, lb	
Salmon, two lbB 26
Ling cod, lb	
Fork cod, lb „	
Rod snapper, lb	
Soles, lb ;	
Smelts, two lbs	
Herring, lb	
Whiting, lb	
Skate, Tb	
Smoked Flsh.
Kippers, lb	
Trippers, three lbs, 	
Bloaters, lb  	
Bloaters, three lbs...-	
Halibut, lb	
Filleted cod, lb _	
Black cod, two lbs „ 	
Eastern baddle, 2 lbs..'	
Kippered Salmon, lb...
9    2.00
1.75
1.60
> | 1.00
I .75
II .76
I .86
I .10
» .60
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR SALE
EVERYWHERE
FURNITURE
By all means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Ca
Limited
HASTINGS STREET WUT
.26
.IS
.20
.26
.22    8>    .25
....     @    .18
....      ®    .25
... @ .15
.... O .15
.... @ .30
.... 9 .25
Shell Flsh.
Crabs,  two
Clams, lb. .
A splendid assortment of bedding
plants, Including geraniums, pansies,
violas, polyanthus, daisies, were on
sale,
DONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for beautiful gardens, making home surroundings attractive,
with flowers, shrubbery, ahide and fruit trees, la a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Universe*
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fullest, and
make not only your own life better, but alio that of your fellow citizen who may not have the opportunities you have.
Now Is the time to make your selections, when our prices were
never lower, and our stock never better to meet the demands of the
cultivated aeethetle tastes,
In our stock of over $100,000.00, we hive choice flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental treee and ehrube In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for hedges, ell elxee; choice
stock of Shade Trees, and in Immense stock ef all the most approved
varletlee of apples, pears, plums, cherries, ind small fruit The letter
(fruit treei) we are offering at special low prlcee to clear the ground
for additional stock coming In.
Don't forget we cm meet your neede better than you can gat.
from etock grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West
'PHONE:  SEYMOUR 6550. '
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayview 1926
Greenhouses ind Nurseries it Roys, on B. C. E. Ry. Eburne Line,
about two miles south of olty limits. , Phone: Eburne 4t.
Canadian,
Canadian,
Bread, white, IM lb. loaf
Flour,  ordinary family,
25 lb. bag ..............
Rolled oats, standard, 1
lbs  »...
Rice, good medium "B"
brand
Beans,     common,
dry,
"lb.""
7niin, u visa its vaif
hand picked, lb.
Apples, evaporated,
Prunes, lb ........._._.
Tes, black, Ceylon, Pekoe, Souchongs, lb.......
Tea, green, Japan, good
common   -..»
Coffee, roasted, Rio or
Santos —-
Potatoes, local, sack	
Vinegar, white wine, xxx
qt.    ~~
Starch, laundry, lb..-....:..
Sugar, cane, granulated,
in 18 lb, bags	
Sugar, oane, yellow, ln
17 lb. bags	
Coal, Penn. good anthracite, stove slse, delivered, ton  „ —
Coal, bituminous, delivered,   lump,   ton ....
Coal, bituminous, delivered, nut, ton .........
Coal, bituminous, delivered, pea, ton .... ......
Dry cordwood, cord........
Blocks,   load    ............
Mill ends, load »....i.;,■■■■..
Slabs, short lengths, losd
Slabs, four foot lengths,
cord	
.12 ft
.1214
.40
1.60
9
m
9 1.00
MANAGER'S  ITINERARY
Mr. McMillan, manager Vancouver
city market, bas gone to the country
to call on the growers' assoolatton aB
to coming crops.   He visited:
Hammond  April 7th
Whonnock  8th
and will visit Mission 9th
Hatzlc   1   10th
Dewdney   14th
Agassis   15th
Lytton   16th
Spences Bridge  t...17th
Armstrong   20th
Vernon   21st
Kelowna 21st and 23rd
Summerland  24th and 25th
Penticton 27th and 28th
8MALL FRUITS
Prospects For an Early and Good Crop
Are Excellent
The districts visited this week by
Manager McMillan are as follows:—
Tuesday, Hammond; Wednesday, Pt.
Haney; Thursday, Whonnock; Friday,
Mission; Saturday, Hatzlc. These
are the districts which are mostly
given to the cultivation of small
fruits, Le., strawberries, raspberries,
etc. The proBpeots for an early and
good crop are excellent and barring
frosts, should prove a bumper year.
The disquieting feature for those of
us who are striving for a white BrltlBh Columbia Is the large number of
Orientals who are entering this profitable field. It requires no great foresight to aee what this will mean In a
few years to the white farmers. Today the Chinese have the vegetable
trade entirely In their own hands; tomorrow it will be the same with the
small fruit growing.
HELEN KELLER    ,
Most Remarkable Woman of Thla
Generation visiting The City
Helen Keller, now visiting this city,
is one of the most remarkable women
of the generation, whose triumph over
physical disabilities has furnished the
world with one of its noblest Inspirations, says the Times. Her achievements form an object lesson of unconquerable determination, high courage and unfaltering perseverance.
She has enlarged the scope of human
capacity and her accomplishments, In
our opinion, transcend the more spectacular feats of grim warriors, who
captured cities, and hardy explorers,
who opened unknown regions to civilization. For Helen Keller became
deaf, dumb and blind when an infant
of nineteen months. Think of that,
you faint hearts who magnify your
trivial troubles Into great frowning
pillars of woel But she early peered
through the veil of silence and darkness which secluded her from the
world. She determined to fight her
way through the clouds which encompassed her and enjoy, too, the
glorious sunshine of which a cruel
fate seemed bent upon depriving her,
She learned to talk the silent language and to read. Her other senses
took up the functions of those which
refused to aet. She developed a thirst
for knowledge and a desire for intellectual advancement which through
her indomitable will she succeeded In
gratifying though not satisfying. She
passed through the elementary educational stages; matriculated Into college and there distinguished herself
with a brilliant course capped by a
degree with honors. At the same time
she engaged Ih a new campaign
against the enemy which had so
grievously handicapped her and
forced him to surrender to her the precious power of speech. What a record her's has been! How many men
whom nations have honored with distinctions ln life and noble memorials
in death bave accomplished as much
as this young woman who practically
began her career unable to, see, hear
or speak? Some of the greatest personages of history were not able to
reform the Imperfections of their own
natures and were easy victims of passion, avarice, cruelty, deception and
revenge. They could conquer states,
but could not conquer themselves.
Had they been afflicted with the handicaps which Helen Keller has overcome they probably never would have
been heard ot. She Is a beacon of
hope to the whole world, a message
of good cheer to the discouraged, the
weary and the afflicted and has ennobled the race from which she
sprang.
We have them for jrour garden—everything that grows. Also a
full line of field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, also grains. We also
have a full line of fruit and ornamental stock,', fertilizers, agricultural
implements, spray pumps, spraying material, bee supplies and all
garden requisites.     Catalogue for asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
«««KINOSWAY - . . VANCOUVER, B.C.
RITCHIE'S SEEDS ■■
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains and thoroughly
tested as to quality and growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
and THE FINEST LAWNS
CATAWGU8 AMD OUIDR MBit ON R80UBST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robson Street
Vancouver, B.C.
RENNIE'S
SEEDS m
—OUR CATALOGUE—|
Is larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. For 45 yean the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
and Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs. You
need it before you decide what kinds to
plant.  Send for your copy to-day.
W*1 RENNIE C__,
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVER
Ales il Tnak, Umtml mt WlialM
Vancouver City Market
 MAIN STREET	
YOUR CO-OPERATION IS SOLICITED IN
MAKING THE CITY MARKET A MEANS OF
BRINGING THE PRODUCER AND CONSUMER INTO DIRECT CONTACT. THIS IS
REAL UNIONISM, AND WILL PROVE MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL. FOLLOWING PRICES
WILL PROVE THIS:
Potatoes, Good, per sack .......$0.75
Potatoes, Selected, per sack 90
Potatoes, Highland, per sack  1.00
Apples, No. 1 Royal Jennette, per box.. 2.25
Apples, No. 2 Royal Jennette, per box.. 2.00
Apples, Cooking, per box  1.50 |
Carrots, per sack 75
Turnips, per sack 65
Beets, per sack 90
Parsnips, per sack      .85
NEW LAID EGGS, per dozen 27
All our produce is direot from the farmer and sold
. without any intermediate profits; also, you can rely
on the best possible quality.  Open from 7 a.m. till
6 p.m. Auction sales Friday at 10 a.m.
Please mention The Federationist when buying
Vancouver City Market
JOHN McMILLAN, Mgr.     Phone Fairmont 2178 OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICUL PAPER BRmW COLUMBIA FEDERATION OF LAMK
SIXTH YEAR.    No. 157.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 10,1914.
Special Showing of Suits
for Easter Wear at
WE WANT EVERY UNION MAN IN
VANCOUVER TO SEE OUR $17.50
SUITS-NEVER WAS SUCH VALUE
BEFORE-NEVER SUCH STYLE, FINISH AND FIT—AND NEVER WERE
SUITS BUILT FOR SERVICE AS
THESE $17.50 SUITS ARE.
WE'RE PROUD OF TEEM
and would like to see every union man
smartly dressed in one. There's a variety
of materials to choose from, in
BLUE   SERGES,    BLUE   FLANNELS
WITH   HAIRLINE    STRIPE,    GREY
FLANNELS AND TWEEDS
Coats are cut single-breasted sacque style
with two or three botton fronts. Twenty
and twenty-five dollars is what other stores
are asking for suits like these,
our price	
$17.50
Come in and see them anyway, and tell our
salesman you saw the ad. in The Federationist; he'll give you-extra care and attention.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
j. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or minera, railroad comtruction,
ogging, elc.
VANCOUVER   -   ■   B.C.
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
CE
IN
EIGHT PAGES
CaS^KoT) $1-50 PER YEAR
MINISTER OF LABOR
Industrial Items of Interest
From All Over the
Dominion
Condensed From the Exchanges and Special
Correspondence
Grimsby Carpenters
Orlmsby, Ont, carpenters have
formed a local union. Contractors
state that several buildings in that
town and district will be started
shortly.
Social Service Congress
The Social Service congress at Ottawa gave some of us a most pleasant
surprise, when the delegates unanimously declared for the enfranchisement of women. The Trades and Labor congress of Canada waB the first
body to fly- that flag ln the dominion,
and it appears to us more than ever
that the economic needs of woman
entitle her to the vote at the earliest
possible moment.—A. W. Puttee, ex-
M. P., Winnipeg.
James Lomas Dead
It is wtth regret that we announce
the death of James Lomas, the popu
lar musician and barber. He waB of a
very friendly disposition, ever ready
to do a good turn for anyone with
whom he came ln contact. For years
he played with his brothers In the
opera house orchestra and other
places where good music was required. He was a member ot the Mu
slclans' association, and the Barbers'
union. Jim will be greatly missed —
Hamilton, Ont., Labor News.
Carpenters' Council
The Hamilton carpenters' district
council has been formed. It Is composed of locals 18, 2612 and the newly
organized branch on the mountain
top. The officers of the council are
Oeorge Oooding, president; Oeorge
Rubery, vice-president; W. N. Smith,
secretary-treasurer; John Brlggs,
business agent; John Dawson, warden.
Electrical Workere
It is reported that the Canadian
council of electrical workers has de
cided to appoint five organizers to
work In Ontario, Quebec and the
Maritime provinces, A proposition to
provide a slok and disability benefit
of %t per week for ten weeks Is to be
submitted to the membership tor ratification.
Stonecutters In Canada
i j The International Journeymen Stonecutters have thirty-live local unions
In Canada, divided as follows: Ontario, 14; Alberta, 6; Quebec, 4; British Columbia, 4; Saskatchewan, 3 and
Manitoba 4.
Women's Votee Refused
The Ontario legislature finally disposed of J. C. Elliott's bill to extend
the municipal franchise to married
women having the necessary property
qualifications, by killing lt on a second reading by a vote of 58 to 17.
Wesley Johnson, conservative M. p. P.
for West Hastings, and Allan Stud-
holme, labor member for East Hamilton, voted with the liberal opposition.
"Circus" of Foreigners
Kingston Trades and Labor counoll Is raising a row over Ottawa paving contractors bringing foreign labor
there to lay a pavement this spring.
It is alleged that the contractors' representative announced that he was
bringing a regular "circus" of foreigners to Kingston. A deputation of
labor men waited on the mayor last
week to demand that a clause be In.
serted ln the contract that Kingston
labor be employed wherever possible,
Tailors' Organizer
M. Qulnlan, Ottawa, has received a
commlsison to act as organiser for
the Tailors' Industrial union, In the
Ottawa jurisdiction, which embraces
considerable territory outside the
capital city.
Appeals to Employers to Pay Better
Wages
Speaking to the Canadian club at
Kingston recently, Hon. T. W. Crothers, minister of labor, made an appeal
to the employers to pay the working-
men better wages which would be
sufficient for them to provide for their
families and have something for old
age. The labor unrest, he said, was
due to low wages and failure to recognize the fact that the worklngman
had a heart as well as a mind, and
that he had emotions as well as
muscle. The speaker declared labor
unions had accomplished a great deal
towards remedying this unrest, and
had a great deal more to do. "I feel
strongly on this point," added the
speaker, "See to It that men get a
fair wage. From my own knowledge
and reports given to me, I know there
are thousands of men revelling in the
pride of wealth wltholdlng from the
workingmen sufficient to provide tbem
with a decent livelihood. Such employers should be ashamed of themselveB."
Commenting on the foregoing item
of news the Hamilton Herald has this
to say: Canadian workmen will, no
doubt, be truly grateful for the declaration of Minister ot Labor Crothers.
But he has lt ln his power to Insure
the payment of better wages on government contracts; and if one may
judge by the numerous complaints of
evasions of the "fair wage" clause in
existing contracts, there is a large
field for the minister to put his reported Ideas on the wages question
into practical operation. Montreal
union men declare that government
contractors ln that district are openly
violating the fair wage clause, and
the same complaint comes from the
Welland canal district, it being alleged among other things that ln the
latter district laborers are operating
hoisting machinery at laborers' wages.
The "fair wage" officers seem to have
a faculty of getting things mixed up
In making up schedules, and nearly
every government contract awarded
recently contains errors ln rates
which give the workmen considerable
difficulty in straightening out. It
ought to be easy for these officers to
ascertain the prevailing rates of
wages In the districts affected before
theBe contracts are let, and obviate the
necessity for trouble after the work
has started.
AT
Huge Demonstration First
Anniversary of Miners
Great Strike
All Unionists in Province
Invited to Participate in
Historic Event
AT BRITANNIA
Mine Second Largest Ore Producer In
British Columbia
The Britannia mine on Howe sound
is the second largest ore producer ln
British Columbia. It Is about 30 miles
from Vancouver, and employs over
700 men with a daily payroll of
$2,500. Last year this mine produced gold, silver and copper to the
gross value of $2,000,000. The 800-
ton mill will soon be enlarged to a
capacity ot 2,000 tons dally. The
Britannia waB located in 1897 by
Oliver Flurry. The company pays it
miners $3.50 per day; muckers $3.26;
and laborers, $3.00.
ONE THOUSAND BACHEL0R8
Representative Sent to Old Sod to
! Bring/That Number to Canada
H. R. sends the following cutting
from the Birmingham Post, of March
16th, to the secretary of the Trades
and Labor council of this city, received from his mother: He aptly
states that ln view of the tact that
there are at the present time so many
thousands still out of work, lt would
be rather a good plan to take this
specific Instance up with the minister
of labor and adds that according to
Saturday's Winnipeg Free Press there
are about 4,000 men idle in that flourishing city: "One Thousand Bachelors
—At a meeting of representative farmers ln London, Ontario, Mr. Thomas
Benstead, ot Strathroy, was selected
to go to England at once and secure
1,000 unmarried farm hands to work
on farms ln Western Ontralo. He
will make the contracts and will accompany the party."
Winnipeg Plasterers
The Winnipeg branch of the Operative Plasterers' association is seeking
the co-operation of the other Canadian branches in a request that a
Canadian representative of the International be appointed.
Aak For Arbitration
A Winnipeg despatch states that
Canadian Northern railway conductors will apply to the department ot
labor for a board of conciliation in
connection with a dispute between
the company and the conductors over
the dismissal of four or five of the latter several months ago. The men
were dismissed   as    the   result  of
Room and Board
Neat, clean and attractive. Breakfast only if desired. Handy to
car-barns and suitable for union
street-railway employees. Ratea
very reasonable.
Apply MRS. E. A. TUBMAN,
40   Fourteenth   Avenue  West
Telephone Fairmont 336 L
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
■THE strike is still on at the
1 Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Minen' Union
charges that they were "knocking
down" fares, and one ot them was
prosecuted, and acquitted by the
court. The conductors as a body then
Insisted upon the reinstatement of the
dismissed men and the refusal of the
company to meet their wishes has re-
Hamilton Plasterers
The plasterers of Hamilton, Ont,
report things as being very dull at
this particular time, and some of the
members have left the olty to work
ln other places, where It is understood good pay is to be had as well
aB quite a lot ot work. The officers
expect things to pick up shortly, when
the men will return.
Lecturer Lucy E. Parsons
This renowned lecturer will deliver
a discourse in this city very shortly.
She Is the respected widow of the late
A. R. Parsons, the Chicago martyred
anarchist, and will likely appear before a Vancouver audience in the
Globe theatre. Harry Slbble Informs
The Federatlonist that the authorities
have been pleased to have her admitted into Canada on a lecturing tour.
This will be her Initial appearance in
this country, and no doubt she will
be greeted with large audiences.
Sixteenth Anniversary
The Hamilton, Ontario, Typographical unton held a banquet Saturday,
March 28th, to celebrate its sixtieth
birthday. Three charter members
were present. The head of the table
was occupied by the "venerables," J.
P. McLeod, toastmaster, a thirty-year
and over International Typographical
union card man; "Dick" Butler, U. S.
vice-consul; A. T.Freed, "the daddy of
them all;" and Reese Evans, charter
member of the Hamilton Typographical society, organized March, 1854. To
the right were Mayor John Allan, Allan Studholme, M. L. A., Frank Kinder,
Dave Hastings, Oeorge Bagwell and
a host of the other prints and "near
prints."
A Publication Innovation
Edmonton, Alberta, city council has
gone Into the newspaper business on
Its own account In the shape of the
"Edmonton Official Gazette." The
publication contains official Information relative to the city, and bears the
label of the Typographical union.
Practically everything is given concerning Edmonton—except the number of unemployed there.
The membership of the Tailors' Industrial union (International) will
vote on a proposition to Issue a
weekly paper instead of the present
monthly journal, the Tailor.
May-day promises to be aa hlstorl.
cal event at Nanaimo, B. C. The United Mine Workers of Vancouver
island have decided to celebrate Friday, May 1st, by a huge labor demonstration. Already two meetings have
been held at which every organization
in the black diamond city, with the
exception of one, have been represented, Including the United Mine Workers ot America, Typographical unton,
Carpenters' union, Brewers' association, etc. The support of President
Watchman and Secretary Wells of the
British Columbia Federation of Labor
has been assured. They will be present and do all ln their power to make
the affair the success as lt should be.
In addition to the usual features that
are always attached to this Labor day
and ln which organized labor has a
lasting Interest, lt also will be the
first anniversary of the calling of the
strike hy the U. M. W. of A., at Nanalmo, a struggle that
Will Be Chronicled
in the annals of labor as a memorable
one in the dominion of Canada. The
miners figure on making the demonstration one worthy of a live wester.
city. The International president,
vice-president and secretary at Indianapolis, Ind., have been Invited
to address the proposed great out-of-
doors mass meeting to be held on the
green. Permission of the city authorities has been secured to parade the
streeta on that date and also to declare a civio holiday, .when all places
of business will be closed, and the
city will take on a gala holiday appearance. The town will be decorated with evergreens, flags and bunting. The services of several bands
have been arranged for. A special
committee has been appointed to prepare a large and Interesting programme of sports, and have secured
the largest athletic grounds In the
city for a grand field-day of sports.
The committee are also arranging for
Extra Transportation
facilities, and will have a speolal train
on the run from Victoria and a boat
from Vancouver. Negotiations are ln
progress with the officials of the B. C.
Federation of Labor and the Trades
and Labor councils of Vancouver, Victoria and New Westminster, -to press
the proposition very prominently before all their afflliated unions. Ih this
regard no stone will be left unturned
to asBure their enthusiastic assistance and wholehearted support, which
Is so urgently needed at this particular time. The committee strongly
point out that they need the presence
ot all unionists and others In British
Columbia, and The Federatlonist bespeaks a hearty and prompt response
to the generous Invitation of the hosts
at Nanalmo to accept their hospitalities and attend their
Labor Demonstration
Each organization must do its share.
All must realize that a chain is no
Btronger than Its weakest part One
of the first things that the committee
requests to do is to secure a list of
names of those unions whloh are
likely to participate in a body. This
is really Important and most essential. For until an approximate idea
of the members that will go over to
the island town the committee cannot very well make final arrangements with the transportation companies. All Intending participants
Bhould Bend word as soon as possible
to W. Watson, secretary May-day
celebration, P. O. box 738, Nanalmo,
B.C.
Piece-work System
Negotiations between M. C. R. machinists at St. Thomas and the company have resulted ln an agreement
being made that no machinists ln the
employ of the company will be forced
to work under the new piece-work
system being Introduced In the local
shops. Piecework will apply only to
men who elect to work under the
piece-work system; others will continue to work by the hour.
Watters a Delegate
President J. C. Walters of the
Trades congress of Canada was appointed by the Ottawa Allied Trades
and Labor association recently as
their representative at the convention on technical education to be held
In Toronto.
Berry Bros.
Agents (or
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full   line  of  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
WHENORDERINGASUIT
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
n
MEN'S Spring UNDERWEAR
So Carefully aad Thoroughly Chosen
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We went to such pains because it rests
with any store with a standing in the community like Spencer's to see that its stock
measures up to what its customers expect
of it. We have sifted the good and worthy
lines, and it is impossible for any man to
"pick a lemon." The immense variety we
present is due to the fact that we are determined that no man shall be justified in saying that we have failed to anticipate his requirements. We can satisfy your last requirement in the matters of style, weight,
kind and price, as these details show.
At 35c a Garment—We have a two-ply Balbriggan in natural, blue and pink that is an exceptional value and, popular with an immense number of people.
At 50c.—A cellular porous knit underwear which is available with and without sleeves; knee length and ankle
length drawers; in natural and white.
Also at 50c a Garment—A special two-ply Balbriggan,
long and half sleeves, ankle and knee length.
Mesh Underwear at 50c a Garment—White only; short
sleeves and knee length. This is a very well finished
garment
Another Popular Number at 50c a Garment is the Egyptian cotton underwear shown here, in white and natural,
with long sleeves and ankle length.
At 75c a garment—Fine quality Egyptian cotton mercerized, in pink, blue, white and natural. The choice also
includes half and long sleeves, knee length and full
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We carry this garment in extra large sizes—14 to 52.
Price   |1.00
Another Stout Man's Underwear—In a natural Balbriggan; sizes 44 to 52; at, a garment 71c
"Aertex" Cellular Combinations—Sleeveless, knee length,
"Aertex" Cellular—The famous English underwear, is here
in sleeveless snd knee length styles; at, a garment, 11.00
Summer Weight Underwear in Wool is here in white, natural, pink and blue; at, a garment 11.00,11.15
and  |1.50
We also have a very fine assortment of Silk and Wool
Underwear at higher prices.
COMBINATIONS IN SUMMER WEIGHTS
At $1.00 a Suit—Fine quality natural Balbriggan, long
sleeves, ankle length, with extra overlap crotch.
Cellular Porous Combinations—Available in knee and
ankle lengths, with and without sleeves.   Per suit $1.00
Egyptian Mesh Combinations—In white, available in knee
and ankle lengths, with and without sleeves. Per suit,
only   $1.00
Superior Balbriggan—Full length sleeve and ankle length.
Per suit  $1.15
Summer Weight Wool Combinations—In natural and
white at, a,suit $1.00, $1.75, $3.00, $1.75 and $400
Navy Serge Suits for Men at $17.50
These suits that have just come to hand from the
makers represent the best efforts of our clothing experts to give our customers service. The circumstances of our large buying and disposition to excel
in giving the best values in the vicinity tend to produce suits that cannot be excelled in the ordinary
course of merchandising. For all-round goodness, we
believe that these $17.50 navy serge suits have no equal
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David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
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J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
B. C. Electric Irons
The Cheapest
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PRICE (to parties using B. C. Electric current)
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Every Iron Is Guaranteed by the Company for TEN VEAR8,
«£,   B.C. ELECTRIC "fe±*
PHONE, SEYMOUK 5000 PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY .APRIL 10, 1914
THE
M0LS0NS
BANK
Capital  and   Reaerve,   ..   $8,700,000
85 branches In Canada
A general banking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
1M HASTINGS STREET EA8T
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 180*
Paid-up Capital ■ ■ ■ t 11,600,00
Reserve •    12,«00,000
Total Assets 180,000^)00
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
* DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
business' will be welcome be It large or
amall
FOURTEEN BRANCHE8 IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
18SS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reaerve 111,170,578
Savings Accounts
Saving! accounts are conducive
to provident living. In our
Savings Department they may
be opened ln the name ot one
Individual or In the names ot
two or more Jointly, with the
privilege tor eaoh ot depositing
or withdrawing money as de-
'aired. The Bank o! Toronto accepts Savings Accounts, Irree-
pecttve ot the amount ot the
Initial depoelt /
Assets 860,000^100
Deposits       ..     ..   841i000,000
Main Office—
466 HASTINGS ST. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinge and Carrall tta.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONEY   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
837 HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
328-833 ROGERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER      -      -       B.C.
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INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreement* For Sale purchased
Safe Depoelt Vaults
82.60 a year
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THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every rrlday monitor by She
B. C. Federattonlst, IM.
R. Parm. Pettlplece .
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, president;
.1. II. McVety, secretary-treasurer; H.
Glbb; G. J. Kelly; and R. P. Pettlplece.
Offlce: Boom 217, labor Temple.
Tol. Exchange atr. net.
Advertising Manager   -     M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.60 per year; ln Vaneouvar
City. $2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, tl.OO.
'Unity of Labor; tba hops of tba world."
FRIDAY APRIL 10, 1914
80UTH AFRICA AND.MAGNA
CHARTA
It Is an old saying that the thing
which Is closest to the eye Is the
hardest to see; and that in any case,
of those who do see it, nine out ot ten
will look at lt crosseyed.
In these days of highly productive
machinery, rapidity of transportation
and speeding up of every kind, the
world wide drama of Industry Ib unfolding itself at a pace much quicker
than Ib realized by all but close oh
servers and students. The result Is
that unless the utmost vigilance Is
maintained by those who can separate
realities from appearances, certain
fundamental institutions which have
long been regarded as the blood-
bought liberties of the British people
will be snatched away from them by
bullies In power, backed by spineless
politicians who, ln their shortsighted
Ignorance and class greediness, would
barter anything ln return for a parliamentary majority to keep their
wretched party on its tottering feet
for a further spell ot office.
This Is precisely what Is happening
to-day in the British House of Commons with respect to the South African situation, created by the action of
the Botha Smuts administration. The
two outstanding features ot the case
are, that before the proposed general
strike had really started, and certainly before any acts of violence or
lawlessness had taken,place, the entire military force available—both
burgher and regular—was called out
to crush the movement In its earliest
stages by threat of bullet and bayonet, backed all the restrictions of
personal liberty imposed by martial
law.
To those who have marked the Increasing tendency of modern governments to use the military against the
workers In • times ot industrial disturbances, and remembering the incidents ln Johannesburg last summer,
and the action of the present Liberal
government ln Oreat Britain when the
military were moved into the coal
mining areas several days before the
recent general strike of miners over
there, the taet that Botha and Smuts
■hould emulate Asquith and hla gang
—and perhaps even go one better-
did not come as an overwhelming surprise.
But tbe crowning Indignity ln this,
one of the most ruthless outrages
which has ever been perpetrated upon
the working class, was the forcible
deportation of nine of the most prominent men ln the trade union movement of South Africa, accompanied
by the parting kick from Botha that
he would show South Africa and the
world at large, how tb handle a strike
in such fashion as would prevent the
recurrence of such a thing tor a generation.
Shades ot Joe Chamberlain and
1899! Do we not remember how he
used his Brummagem bombast to lash
the bawling mobs Into war frenzy,, to
obtain what he denned as "equal
rights for all white men In the Transvaal?" At that time this same Botha
and Smuts ranked In the contempt
of the masB of BrltlBh workers seoond only to poor old Kruger himself. Yet within practically one decade, the irony of Time's whirligig
has made Botha the tool of hts ancient enemies and has demonstrated
to the workers that the Semltto
masters of South Africa are the arbiters of proletarian destiny ln that
country today, just as they were be
fore. The situation thus put up to
the British workers by Botha and his
gang Ib that men can be arrested
without warrant, Imprisoned without
charge, punished without trial and
banished without redress. Why, even
our own Bowser Is a little less raw
than that. He arrested miners by
warrant, then charged them, but lln.
ally secured his ends by detaining
them without option of ball.
Botha's action is particularly interesting ln view of the boasted protection given to all citlsens by Magna
Charta which has always been quoted
as the great charter securing certain
fundamental rights and liberties to
the BrltlBh people ot all classes for
all time. This precious document
was extorted from King John at
Runnlmede in June, 1215, and chapter
39 Bays: "No freeman shall be arrested, or detained in prison, or deprived of his freehold, or outlawed or
banished, or ln any way molested;
and we will not set forth against him,
nor send against him unless by the
lawful judgment of his peers,,and by
the law of the land."
Apparently, If left to Botha, the law
of the land ln South Africa would be
the law of the Rand. Which, in other
words, is the law of the 'landlords,
that aggregation of cosmopolitan
"sheentes" for whom 22,000 men gave
up their lives twelve years ago, in order
that white labor might be kicked out
of South Africa to make way for the
teeming hordes of silt-eyed celestials
which were brought Into that country
as Boon as the war was over.
But now, as ever, the onus of the
fight for freedom falls upon the workerB, and the trade unionists of Oreat
Britain have apparently risen to the
gravity of the occasion, if one may
judge from the recent demonstration
when 500,000 workers marched in procession to Hyde Park, to a meeting
which lasted four hours, and at the
termination was still pouring Into the
park. It will be necessary to keep the
agitation up too, in face of the jelly-
backed attitude of the present Liberal
government over there. With the
spirit of compromise and makeshift
which have always been the guiding
principles of their party, they shelve
the thing by the piffling platitude
that "the rights of British citizens
set forth in the Magna Charta the
Petition of Rights and the Habeas
Cdrpus Act, are those which this house
desires to Bee applied to British subjects throughout the empire." All of
which, If it means anything at all,
means that the Liberals are already
Beared that if the present Boer administration in South Africa are capable of action against the workers as
drastic as that under protest, they
may be capable of kicking British in-
fluence out of not only the Transvaal
but Cape Colony too. Those who have
lived a lifetime there know that the
old enmity is not dead, and that the
most cherished hope of the burghers,
who hurried forth at the call of Botha
to bludgeon the workers, is that the
day will come when they will avenge
the peace of Vereenlging.
The action of the British Labor
party ln withdrawing their resolution
ln favor ot the Liberal amendment as
quoted above, has not cleared the air
at all, and all labor will watch with
keen interest to see what befalls Tom
Mann when he reaches Cape Town on
his mission of challenge.
The veteran apostle of working
class freedom is putting lt up to
Botha Smutz & Co., ln such a fashion
aB will "get them coming or going.'
If he Is refused landing it will make
them show their hands In very decisive fashion after due time for deliberation and second judgment, whilst
If he Is permitted to go ahead without molestation it will mean a climb
down which will mark an epoch in the
history of the working class in South
Afrioa.
THE ARMY AND THE WORKER8
The Lethbrldge Daily Herald of
April 1st, deserves a vote of thanks
from organized labor for the cartoon
published on Its front page. A string
of militiamen Is shown filing past the
Hon.-Sam Hughes, minister of militia.
Sam is holding his cap upside down
whilst the militiamen are dropping
ballot papers therein containing votes
as to whether or not they are willing
to go out and quell a strike. All the
ballot papers are plainly marked
"No." Beneath the picture Is the following: "Here la depicted Honorable
Sam Hughes, minister of mllltla, polling a regiment to see whether lt
wants to turn out to quell a "strike"
riot The cartoonist shows what
might happen ln Canada If the action
of the British officers at the Curragh
camp Is taken as a precedent."
In face of our experience ln connection with the coal miners' trouble on
Vancouver Island, we know that any
auch vote taken from the mllltla
would not be "against," although aome
of them would not be bo willing to go
as they were last August now that
they have, learned by actual experience the dirty work they may be
called upon to do. That Is also the
opinion of the military correspondent
of the Vancouver "Dally Provinoe,"
who says in last Saturday's Issue:
The mllltla corps in Vancouver
bave been and are suffering from the
effects ot the troubles on Vancouver
Island, where many men were sent
against their own wishes and Inclinations." If The Federatlonist had published the cartoon, the "Herald", and
other capitalist papers would most
likely have pooh-poohed the Idea contained ln lt, as being prejudiced and
Illogical. But coming from whence lt
does, we can only express appreciation of the service rendered, and congratulate the "Herald" upon the keenness of its discernment.
However, that Is only by the way.
The main point Is, that the refusal
of certain army officers In Oreat Britain to carry out the orders of parliament, and their subsequent resignation, has raised a constitutional question of considerable Importance to the
workerB. Authorities on army questions have always told us mere laymen that the first duty of a soldier
was to obey, and working on that
basis, have managed, up to the present, to find excuses for using the military forces against the workers.
When any move to upset that dictum
has come from popular sources the
wail ot the aristocracy, and the capitalist press, have combined In,condemnation.
But now we are presented with this
principle by officers of the army who,
in Oreat Britain at any rate, are
chiefly recruited from the flower of
the nation's snobocracy. And following this principle out logically, we
would like to know If an officer Ib allowed to introduce his personal and
political views into his soldiering,
why is not a private allowed similar
privileges? Is lt that he has no right
to think? Certainly he has no chance
to resign. He can only serve out his
term, or desert, or mutiny, or buy
himself free, out ot what he saves
from his 24 or so cents per day.
Supposing another railway strike
breaks out ln England and the government use the regular soldiery to
work the railways, as they did during
the last strike. Or supposing they
order them out to harass the miners
or dock workers.   Why should they
not have a right to say they did not
enlist for that kind of thing, and that
rather than do lt they would prefer
to get out ot the service?
The truth is that the increasing
pressure and intensity of capitalist
administration ot Industry is forcing
issues like this to a sharp point, and
the whole crazy structure is threatening to collapse about the ears of the
old political parties from sheer rottenness of its foundations. The incident has made a rent in the veil which
in normal times disguises the real
attitude of the ruling classes toward
the workers. We have caught a momentary glimpse of a hope held by
those in power that when the time
comes for the final test ot strength
between themselves and the workers,
the army will be on their side. Yet
it is only a hope, and by no means a
certainty. The recruiting system of
the British army is entirely voluntary.
No citizen is obliged to serve, and lt
employment were not at times hard
to get, many who do serve would not
join the army. There is no feeling
in the minds of the masses that a certain part of their lives must, whether
they like it or not, be reserved for the
use of the army, as there is ln countries where conscription is in vogue.
Whilst they may not realize during
the piping times of peace that to wear
the king's uniform may some day
mean that they may be called upon
to force their own kith and kin back
to galling Industrial servitude, yet,
when that becomes general, things
may not map out quite aB they were
Intended. The revolt of Curragh Is
the class consciousness of Eton and
Harrow rebelling against what lt be
lleves to be an attempt to coerce its
proprietary rights. What is sauce for
the gander is sauce for the goose, and
whilst Thomas Atkins has no property, yet maybe some day he will get
enough sense to save himself from
the appalling tragedy ot killing his
own class and kind, at the price of
"one shilling per day and all found."
Nothing of the depth or subtlety of
a statesman will be needed, but rather
the shallow superficialities of a glorified drummer capable of successfully
selling British Columbia timber and
vegetables. As a westerner bred and
born, he will not realize until he has
been in London for some time, that
he will not be regarded as anything
more than an ex-colonial premier, and
as such will be patronized freely, but
not permitted to penetrate into the
inner sanctum of the political oligarchy who regard the ruling of British politics as their birthright and
traditional heritage. To the workers,
his going will cause no grief and be
no loss, whilst Bill and Dan can speed
his way with the parting benediction
"Well done, thou good and faithful
servant, enter thou into the joys of
thy deserts."
THE.RELEASED MINERS
There was much rejoicing ln the
coal camps of Vancouver island last
week-end, at the release and return
of some of the miners who had been
convicted for alleged participation in
the troubles ot last August. Hope
and expectation runs high i that
many more whose sentences were in
vicious disproportion to anything
proved against them will also shortly
regain their freedom. At this stage
it would be scarcely kind to make any
serious attempt to determine exactly
what measure of credit is due to the
various Individuals and organizations,
whose combined effort has undoubtedly gone far towards Influencing the
authorities at Ottawa to exercise clemency. But lt would not be amiss to
say that, whatever the opinions of the
various groups which have been working for the release ot the miners may
have been as to each others' methodB,
all acted ln that way which they believed would be the best ln the end,
and likely to produce the result desired by all ln the quickest time.
That part of the work which has
been done in and around Vancouver
is well-known and familiar to us all,
but one part of the story which Is but
little known Is that-played by the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada ln the efforts to secure the release of the miners. Ottawa Is a long
way off. The work of President Watters and his colleagues' lay directly
with the minister ot justice and the
permanent officials of that department. For that reason lt had necessarily to be of a tactful and not a
spectacular character. But those who
know, realize that tt ever the full account ot these liberation efforts Bhould
be written, a substantial share of the
credit, tor restoring the miners to
their homes and freedom will be due
to Influence of the Trades and Labor
Congress of Canada and the efforts of
its executive officers.
GOOD RIDDANCE McBRIDE
If it is really true that Premier
McBride la to be transferred to England to take the place ot'Stratheona,
BrltlBh Columbia will only lose a polished politician who has sagacity
enough to realize tbat no community
can be "jollied" along Indefinitely by
the well rounded periods which are
his chief stock-in-trade. During his
term of offlce bis experience of many
kinds of "railroading" has made him
a suitable successor to Stratheona.
The history ot Strathcona's connection with the political filth surrounding the early days of the C. P. R. will
be fittingly balanced In McBride's
case by the Inside story of the Canadian Northern railway and the Mackenzie-Mann operations in British Columbia. McBride and his administration have piled up a mountain of economic iniquity in British Columbia
which will eventually betray the olay
feet of this conservative Idol, and, like
the true politician, he has made up
his mind to realize on all his political
stock before the market "bears." As
a showman and advertising agent he
will be placed in a non-political position and one eminently suited to him.
Wherever he goes, one thing will always preserve him ln the minds of
the workers of British Columbia, and
that is hlB absolute failure to make
any effort which would tend towards
the settlement ol the greatest industrial conflict which haB yet been
waged in this province. The Mackenzie-Mann and other coal Interests
on Vancouver island, have apparently
had him by the nose from the start
They never were afraid of him, but
his usetulness made him worth their
toleration. The sphere to whioh he
will transfer his oharming talents is
one which requires a big little man.
CHILDREN'S COURT
The Juvenile Court and Detention
Home report for th'e past year shows
that as Vancouver becomes older,
waits and waywardness among children are Increasing. It complains of
being unable to find employment for
the older boys. That Is no surprise
when tully grown men ln this city
would now be glad to draw down the
SS or 310 which a big boy might earn.
Magistrate Shaw speaks of the need
of producing better types of men by
training these guardlanless ones. Let
Magistrate Shaw look into lt and he
will flnd that one of the last things
thought about Is the sufficient feeding,
olothing and housing of its citizens,
both old and young, by the modern
state. Governments establish farms
tor the production of the Perfect Pig
and the Irreproachable Turnip, but
children are cheap and plentiful, and
lt unfortunate enough to have no parents or poor parents, are left to grow
Into the little human weeds and -wastrels which eventually furnish employment for magistrates, courts and
jailers.
BROTHERHOOD OP" CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
flrst and third Monday of eaoh month, 8
p. m. Executive committee meets every
Friday I p. m. President, Bd. Meek, re-
cording seoretary, Chu. Soott, 101 Labor
Temple; flnanolal eecretary and business
agent, J. Sohurman, HOB Labor Templo.
When the "Canadian Municipal
Journal" speaks of "Jlmmle" Simpson, the Socialist member of the Toronto Board of Control, as a future
mayor of the "good" city, lt begins
to look as though he really may
arrive.
Why was Tom Mann sentenced to
six months in jail for asking soldiers
not to shoot striking workers, and yet
men like Carson are allowed to openly
prepare armed opposition to what our
capitalist friends are so fond of pushing down our throats as "law and
order?"
Another batch of settlers arrived In
Vancouver this week from the old
country. If the conditions they flnd
here at the present time do not "settle
'em," they will have to be a tough
bunch. The past winter has effectually "settled" quite a lot of old timers
who have all the advantage of knowing the ropes.
The city counoll will not buy lumber which has been touched by
Chinks—provided white handled lumber can be got as cheaply. Well, there
are hundreds of white men ln this
city just now who would he glad to
get bread by working at a Chinaman's
Wage.' The city fathers got a passing
touch ot sentiment, hut they are an
Ivory-headed bunch and cannot be
stampeded   from   "business Is bust-
Judge Orant decided that the dependents ot Stephen Plecas were not
entitled to compensation for his death,
Judge Gregory, when the matter
reached him, deolded that Judge
Orant had not deolded what Judge
Orant was decided about. Now Judge
Orant again decides that he was decided when he decided that his decision was a decided one.- Now, if lt had
taken three carpenters to do one bit
of a Job	
Last AuguBt when the trouble broke
out on the Island, Bowser wae glad to
say: "There Is my answer to the Btate:
ment of the strikers that they ean
preserve order if the special police
are removed from the coal camps,
"At dawn 1,000 men wearing His
Majesty's uniform will be on duty,
ready to handle the situation." A retort that smacks of the real Napoleon; but one would have thought he
would have helped his scab herders
to an Increase of wagoB after losing
their Jobs to do such despicable work.
Scurvy politician! How they muBt
love him! Serve 'em right Thank
you, Billy, give 'em some more like
that, and maybe we shall be able to
drive an Idea Into their heads some
day,
Whilst the attention of those Interested In the organization of the coal
miners ln British Columbia Ib now
chiefly centered on Vancouver Island,
reports are continually appearing in
local capitalist papers to the effect
that Mr. D. A. Thomas, the Welsh
coal baron, and head of the Cambrian
Coal company, Ib negotiating for the
coal lands ln the Oround Hog basin
up north. If this be true, and the deal
Bhould be closed, the miners will have
another trouble added to their list,
unless they win out on the island and
thus establish their right to recognition as the United Mine Workers ot
America. Mr. D. A. Thomas Is
well-known to Welsh miners, and signifies that nothing will be got ln the
way of wages and conditions except
auoh as can be secured from him hy
sheer force of organization at the
back of the men. It may safely
conjectured that no one is watching
the outcome of the present miners'
struggle with more interest than this
same D. A. Thomas.
Vancouver unions
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meets first and third Thursdays.
Bxeoutlve board: W. B. Walker, president; J, H. MoVety, vice-president; Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Mlas H. Gutteridge, treasurer;
Mies P. Brisbane, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; G. Curnook, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE! COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. R.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan. Murdock Mc.
KensHL F. Blumberg, H. R. Free. Managing director. J.  H. McVety.  Room  211.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL—Meets 2nd Monday ln month,
Preeldent, Geo. Mowat; saoretary, F. R.
Fleming. P.O. Box II.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. ln Labor
Hall. President, D. S. Cameron; flnanolal
secretary, H. Glbb; general seoretary, W.
B. Maiden. P. O. Box 934. Tho publlo Is
Invited to attend.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets aecond and fourth Thursday of
each month, 8 p. rn. Secretary, J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby street; business agent,
H. J. McEwen, room 209. Local 617
meets flrst and third Monday of eaoh
month, and Looal 2647 meets first and
third Tuesday of eaoh month.
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTBRS LO-
. . ?S' _*?J—Meete every second and
fourth Friday of month In I*bor Halt
7.80 p.m. President, D. Webster; seoretary. A. McLaren, p. o. Box 956. Now
Weatminster, B. O. ' "_
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
penters, Local-Union No. 1689—Meets
every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Temple,
vOZH&JP'il "jyTS "d Seventh street
President, M. C. Bchmendt: secretary, A.
oter"' C trap's. New Weotmln-
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No. 46-Meets see.
ond and fourth Saturdays. 7.30 p.m. Preeldent,
H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding secretary, R. j,
Adams; business agent, J.
"v     S,,oltj   R°*"n  ta,  Labor
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MBBTS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
oorner Seventh stret and Royal avenue
every seoond Sunday of eaoh month, at
lM P-m. President, F. 8. Hunt; store-
ftvTt'ef' w- Jameson.   Visiting brothers
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 110—MBBTS
»m Hitf,™Art!l Thursday*. 8:80
Si   t£Z£m}' •r'.w- ?rm: recorder, C.
HouBr.U:rk1»,?ST. 7"p,n,L,b0r T<"*","!'
^SO?P „no- ««—of:
«... £ »00m J" Labor Temple. Meete
F- F^lt-En^ :Mh !»!•»«•. President
F. F. Lavlgne; financial seoretary. Geo
W. Curnock, Room 208. Labor W™i?°-
**K1!3J;«r.-ll."S' *&»> "ASONtf. NO.-1
307 v%Ml£i"y,T,'m"& ! »•"••• I**"""
n™j, "•"''"nt. James Haslett; Corns"
ponding eecretary. W. 8. Dagnall Boi
58: flnanclal secretary, FRn'roWh*
bualneaa  agent.  W.  8.' dVJii.  RoTni
VICTORIA     TRADES     AND     LABOR
 Council-Meets flrst and third Wed-
nesday, Labor Hall, 781 Johnston street,
at 8 p. m.   President, George Dykeman;
__tfi_ bTc0'* p' ka*h"on' ■*" M,;
105—Meets   third   Tuesday   In   evnrv
month, ,» room 205, Labor T%g ggT,
am^;^&V,v&XeSMo^,Wfl5
____vm_____r_&%
"" e'ndBi™Ira..0E Epn-BR MAKERS
nf aS&fS? -n.*11" """"j™ and Helpere
or America, Vancouver Lodge No 111—
S."'« ":"_»nj third Mondays" 11 "*«7
»•"?»?.*„• r 2t^c,,''• m Cordova feJt'
secretary. A. Fraser. 1151 Howe street'
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 857-Meo"ii
v^S?',TvZlW *""»'  month,.   In tn
ntL^vEP*8. Ar"l WAiTRESSBR
2.™ J«. » "J™   representative.    Offloe
a..oos,n.5e,?4.r,,h'<i - "^
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
I n ™n£ L5<H!m •,')L«VBry Monday
5Jt.    •/•"P4, J>"* Flnk^ vloe-presl-
»E&,«?!T.™mr,"fl'n'.;S,a^
_______%££• W' P' D»™'
ELECTRICAL  WORKERS,  LOCAL NO.
Hilrd Mondaya of each month. Room 80S,
I p.m.   President H. P. McCoy: record-
i2Bf,c5"lT,r?i...0*S'   Alberj;   bnslnais
agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207.
     - •    —    "-""BiHHimii,    iwum   .VI,
LONOSHORFM1JNS' INTERNATIONAT.
.„.,A.m-£SIAT,0N' .No- Mx It-Meets
•hr.7t bH'.^-V'"!?*'.14? AI«»nder
S,**,i«. President P. Peel; secretary,
Geo, Thomas, *
MACHINISTS,   NO.   188-MEBT8  BBC*
ond   and   fourth   Fridays,   8   p.   m
PTMiaentA. R. Towler: recording secre-
MV* t' ^W>       ■weM seoretary, J. H
U°1Sfm.n{!TVf3i. OPERATORS, to-
cal 283, I.A.T.S.E.-Meeta every second Sunday of eaoh month, Labor Temple, 8 p. m. President, A. o. Hansen
seoretary-treaeurer, O. R. Hamilton; bus".
W^M^0** RM*" ,M'
Meets second Sunday of eaoh month
rooms 18-80, Williams Bldg., 418 Onu£
vllle street. Preaident. J Boiryer
vice-president F. English: secretary,
H. J. Brasfleld; treasurer. W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE   PLASTERERS'—INTB1H'
N«ipNALA8S(OTATION.No.ll_
Han, s p.m. President O. Dean: cer-
responding secretary, F. Sumpter: flnan.
clef secretary, D. Soott; treasurer ii Ty-
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
, NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver ud
vicinity. Branoh meata lat and Srd Fridays at Labor Temple. Dunsmuir and
Homer st, room m. Robert C. gamp.
?°Ji.PrS?" 7i7 Dunlevy ava.; Joaeph 5
—Sit F-i"' ■&••• ",1 °™«* st! Tom
Smith. Rao, gee.. 141 Broadway wast
HTONBCUTT EM', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meete second Tuesday, 8:06
Jim. Preaident J Marshall; correspond.
Ing aeeretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1M7
Snanolal secretary. K. McKensle.
PAINTERS',    PAPERHANGERS'    AND
Thursday,   7.86  p.m.    Pres dent   Skene
Thomson; financial eecretary, J. Freek-
SSSSl'U ■""'our street: recording aee.
S^F' t"~ '""•H' aa Founfi ava
SJ.™ •at**?!'!!"' «.**"?'•   tm"   Tnl"
room ml Labor Temple.      *
STRRnTVPF.RS'   AND   ELECTROTYP-
..a '«!\lB!0,,i;N?' •"• °' Vaneouvar
and Victoria—Meets aecond Wednesday
of each month, 4 p.m.. Labor Temple
President Chaa. Bayley: recording see.
retary, Chris Homewood. 241 18th Ava
Eaat.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees. Pioneer Division No. 161
""**M•.S,*—Vl',0! Temple, second and
fourth Wedneadaya at t p.m., and Ural
and third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President
?S?In. JfVior; recording aeoretary.
Albert V. toftlng. 2681 Trinity Straet
phone Highland 1171: financial secreUry
Fred. A. Hoover. 2408 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS; INTERNATION
al Local 8J7-Me»ts every Wednesday. 2 p.m.: Room 304. Labor Temple
Flnanolal aeoretary, E. Prendergaat.
Room lis.
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION  (IN-
k ,J,?n?,te"ali' L?e,l, No- ""-Meetings
held first Tueaday in eaoh month. 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording aeoretary. C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanolal
seoretary, K, Paterson, P. O. Box Ml,
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. III-
"""■last Sunday eaoh month. I
p.m. President, r. p. Pettlpleoe; vice-
president W. 8. Metsger, seoretary-
treasurer, R. H. Neelands, p. O. Box 66.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES;
Local No. 118-Meets second Sunday
of each month at Room 894, libor Tom-
Pie. President, H. Spears: recording aeoretary. Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Van
couver.
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1836.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In 1840.
Paid-up Capital     -     14.866,866.66
Reserve Fund     -     -    3,017,230.00
 Head Offlce In Canada:
ST. JAMBS ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE - General Manager
SAVINdS  DEPARTMENT AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
Accounts on whloh Interest Is allowed from date of deposit.
Open a Savings Account and add
to It every pay day.
Drafts and Money Orders sold
This Bank has Branches In all
the principal cities or Canada, Including Dawson  City  (Y. T.)  and
Agencies at  New  York  and  San
Franclaco In the United States.
Agents   and   Correspondents   In
every part of the world.
Vancouver  Branch 222drd
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
J. R. Chapman, Manager,
KBRRISDALB BRANCH
D, Nell, Manager,
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B, C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention In January. Executive officers, 1914-16: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. McEwen, Geo. Hardy, J.
W. Gray, H. Kundson, J, J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, A. 8.
Wells, Box 1638, Vlotoria, B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
VICTORIA, B. C.
BROTHERHOOD     OF     CARPENTER!
and Joiners—Meete  every Tuesday,
dJJ'm'.'...'-'.1"?^'. Jal1' m J»hnston iK
President, A. Watehman; recording secre-
.J7' «a?>' ,L; rtitmoat business agent
and  flnanolal secretary. W. A. PaSln-
BOFI,   BOX  23d. /
MINER8' UNIONS
K1MBBRLEY MINERS' UNION, No. IM,
a,.,XM"Jr" r*°-*'«Uon of MBnera-Meetj
S"*Vv*S!n81! '" 0nton «•»• Presl-
«5i w,„ ^e"11"?:. seoretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
LAR7S1!f.I?.H..M.1.N15RS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 2388, U. M. W. of A.-MeetsWed-
nesday. Union Hall. 7 p.m.     President,
tX?_aj__V__r'' r*"*c,° MoKen-
NANAIMO LOCAL UNlbN U. M. W. ot
, .b~JJSf'?. mSP. Monday at 7.80 p. m.
In the Athletic Club. Chapel street. Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B C.
CUIJP«?RI',AIJP JflCAIi    UNION,    No.
2299, U. M. W. of A.-Meete   ev»ri
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall.
President, Jo;. Naylor; aeoretary, James
Smith, Box 84, Cumberland, B, C.
TRAIL   MILL   AND   SMBLTERMBN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p.m. President
F„WA pT.r,ni secretary, Frank Camp-
bell, Box 26, Trail, B. C.
SANDON    MINERS'    UNION,    No.    II.
Western Federation of Miners—Meeta
£l'firy »sJai1"''lay,.'" the Wlnere' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
inm.D,EM-°,0R,A7'1^. PARTY-Publlc meet-
Ings In Colonial Theatre, corner Qranvllle
and Dunsmuir Streets, Sunday evenlnga.
Secretary,  J. Adanu,  Room  104  Labor
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING  REGULATIONS
. CJ?1 'PL"1"*- riAts of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
"•'"SS.'J1'1-1? a Portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one years at on annual
rental of 11 an aore. Not more than
2,560 acres will be leased te one applicant. **
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlatrlct In which the
rlghta applied for are situated.
, I"J?rYe]!<!d territory the land muat be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
Btaked by the applicant himself.
Eaoh application muat be accompanied
by a fee of 16,wwhloh will be refunded If
the rlghla applied for ara not available, 1
but not otherwise.   A royalty shall be I
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royal- ]
ty thereon. If the coal mining rlghtii
are not being operated, saeh returns .
should be furnished at least once a year.)
The lease will Include the coal mining.;
rights only, but the lessee may be per- I
mltted to purchase whatever available'
surface rlghta may be considered neoeaaary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application should
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any.
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa.
W. H. CORY,        I
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of th s
advertisement will not be paid for—80190.
COWAN 64 BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. Federationist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
thou Seymour trt*
DIXON & MURRAY
OfBoo aad More rittmr.   Oaural
fobbing
Offloe aat nopi
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper ln
Canada. Price SO cents per
year; In clubs of four, 25 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVILLE, P.Q.
City Auction and Commiiiion Co.
Caah paid for houaea and suites
of furniture or Auotlon arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR  E.  BETCHLEY
Smyths and Qranvllle streets
Auotloneer Sey tm
Offices that can not supply this
label are not strictly union offices
—believe nothing to the contrary.
A CUSTOMER
Respectfully requnti that when
you have printing done you patron-
lie union offlcea ualng
THE UNION LABEL
Of whloh these cute aro facsimiles.
Ab a favor to union, ask for the
label on your printed matter.
VANCOUVER   ALLIED    PRINT-
ING  TRADES   COUNCIL
Of America  tSier
cowsicuT aiMoi MMKammeio isoa FRIDAY APRIL 10, 1014
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDEBATIONI8T.
PAGE FIVE
A WORD Td THE UNION MAN
The Union Label should stand for quality of material, fit and make-up
of garment, as well as the sanitary conditions of a factory,
wages paid, etc.
A oopy of this guarantee «oes with every garment
manufactured by ub.
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturers of    ..
MAO'S MOGAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIBTS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THE MASTER SHIRT
1176 Homer St., Vancouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831~
This garment is guaranteed as to workmanship, quality of material,
fullness of slse, buttons securely fastened, buttonholes well made.
Anyone wearing one of our garments and finding It defective will do
us a favor by either returning it to his dealer or mailing it to ua to be
exchanged for another.
All our garments bear the label of the
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA.
You are Invited to visit our factory.
WM. J. McMASTER ft SONS, LTD.
Per Jas. A. McMaster,
Managing Director.
JAMES STARK &K8
-uarorai llini wan Mete Xours, too am. te liao am.
Between 1IIOR 181 (llttBIT.Ti        latuday (IM an te SHO pja.
THE STORB THAT SERVES TOO WELL
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AT 33i OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
FOR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE WINDOW SHADE
•    DEPARTMENT
We purpose making window shades to your own measurements,
and guarantee the work to be flrstclasB In every particular.
OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH ON HARTSHORN'S 8PRINQ ROLLERS
Patterns of materials displayed In department, aeoond floor. The whole
continent knowe tha quality of HARTSHORN'S SPRING ROLLERS.
It's necessary to bring your measurements.' We do no fitting. We only
guarantee correctness In executing your orders.
This ts an exceptional offer and will prove a saving to all householders
with window shades to buy—Don't let this opportunity paaa by any meana;
measure up the window with the broken shade now.
CHOOSE YOUR MATERIALS FROM DEPARTMENT PATTERNS.—
Hollands, Imported Lancaster, Daly and Moron's Peerless Shade Cloths.
Opaque Window Shades  j^J" J£ {°J J£
on Hartshorn Springi    R^," 90°; Z'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.nD
Rollers Reg. 11.35 for. 90c.
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT SALE OF BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Hen's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00, for $3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for	
We keep the largest and moat
complete line of MEN'S aad
LADIE8', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'8 FOOTWEAR at
prices whloh cannot be duplicated.
Everything Is to be tound here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada's Snap Specialist
104 and 10s CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE  STORE   IS  THE   SPOT  FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
This is a gilt that will be appreciated in any part oi the world.
Tastefully bound In three bindings.   Cloth, 11.10; Ooxe Calf, 11.10;
Burnt Leather, 11.75.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
■      ■  ■     ■ *	
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32S HASTINGS STREET, WEST
QY^TFM^   We carry everything
JI JI i-slYU        for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
311 Dunsmuir Street Phona Exchange Soy. 3526-3527
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
TIMBERWORKERSAN
I
President J. O. Brown of
the New International
Speaks
Power of Organisation Is
Essential to Back Up
Strong Argument
At the last meeting of the Trades
and Labor council, J. O. Brown, of
Seattle, Wash., president ot the International TImberworkers' union, delivered an address - regarding conditions prevailing ln the timber Industry
ln the state of Washington and the
province of British Columbia. He said
that over a year ago the shingle
weavers made strong representations
that the jurisdiction of the union
should be extended to all branches of
the timber Industry. The American
Federation of Labor saw the force of
this argument, so granted the request, and since the first of March the
tlmberworkers became an Industrial
organisation. A year ago 95 per cent
of the total membership belonged to
the shingle weavers' union. Last year
10,000 men—mostly those ln the logging branch—afflliated. The timber-
workers have taken on a pronounced
decision to get more members. Vancouver city Is the centre of the lumber industry In British Columbia, and
here
Oriental Cheap Labor1
Is chiefly employed. There are no
Chinese ln the logging camps, however, but 50 per cent of the shingle
weavers ln this province are Orientals. Timber Is the basic Industry of
this part of the continent. There are
100,000 timber workerB ln Washington and 20,000 in British Columbia.
When the basic Industry becomes
thoroughly organized, it will be an
easy matter to organize other
branches of Industry. The problem
of tbe unemployed Is with ub, and this
can only be solved by and through
careful organization work. There Is
some disturbance ln the timber business now, chiefly on account of the
juggling going on with the tariff,
which adds to the unrest of the labor
world. The Panama canal will further give advantage to the lumbermen
of British Columbia. "I am hot very
much Impressed with the Idea that
tariffs Bhould be put upon Industry
when there is always
"Free Trade In Labor,"
Bald the speaker, amidst applause.
"There is no reason why tariffs should
be placed on commodities for the enrichment of the few. The Interests of
the timber barons on either side of
the line are Identical, as exemplified
In the lumber combines and manufacturers' associations of the United
States and Canada. But lt Is altogether different with the workers.
They are very much divided among
themselves. I have heard socialist
speakers on the street corners openly
advocate scabbing on the Vancouver
island striking miners. Years ago I
decided on two things to stand or fall
by—'Don't ever scab and don't ever
starve.' I hope to get my hands on
enough bo I can live. Anyone who will,
can do that." Amongst the foremost
proposals to labor to-day are those of
the unemployed and Immigration, the
difficulties of which will be greatly
opens. ' To' meet these conditions
The First Step
is to organize. You cannot hope to do
anything without thorough organization. You may have compensation
laws, but there are very few who
know enough to take advantage of
them when they should do so, because
there Is no one to point out the way
to these things. There is.no one to
raise's voice ln single protest to aid
the helpless. Alone you cannot even
get a hearing. If argument counted
for anything and all were right with
civilization, the labor problem would
have been solved long ago. But the
fact of the matter Is, if argument is
not backed up by power lt availeth
nothing. For Instance, did you ever
see a half starved dog with a humped
back and his tall between his legs, on
the run down the street? If you did,
no doubt you wanted to give him a
kick. The cur Invited it. On the other
band, when you saw a sleek,
Robust Bulldog
wide between his forelegs, his under-
jaw protruding in front of his upper
one, with h's tall erect trotting down
the street, you respected him and no
doubt would step aside to allow him
to pass—he had the power to make
you do lt. So lt is with a good labor
organization.- It Is your only protection—a power behind your rightful
demands. The timber workers' union
is formed on industrial lines. New
unions of this kind must be on an in
dustrlal basis. All should be proud
to take their hats off to the miners,
for the heroic struggle they are engaged in on Vancouver island and
elsewhere. They could not keep up
the fight lt this were not an Industrial
organization. The day before yesterday some COO loggers went on strike
at Gray's Harbor for an Increase ln
wages. Last year when they were
poorly organized and the timber market was low the
Timber Barons
took advantage of the situation and
cut the loggers' wages 50 cents a day.
Now they are going to get It back, for
they have the power to do bo. Everybody respects power. In this Industry
there are only three or four per cent,
of the men what you may term as
skilled workmen. The employment
bureaux at Seattle, down on the "skid
"The Kodak House"
KOQAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
INDUSTRIAL ITEMS
Prohibition of night work for children under sixteen years of age is the
law of thirty-three states, the district
of Columbia and Porto Rico,
The International Ladies' Garment
Workers' union was organized in
1900. It claims jurisdiction over all
the membership of 78,000.
A Btate building trade council is being formed to thoroughly organize all
the building crafts in Ohio and to establish uniform wages, hours and
other working coaditions In the small
towns as well as the large cities.
Plumbers ln Switzerland, according
to U. S. Consul Philip Holland are
anything but the plutocratic workmen
newspaper humorists would have us
believe them. The expert plumber
receives 14 cente an hour. Helpers
receive while serving their apprenticeship, 60 cents a week the flrst
year, $1.20 the second year, and 11.80
a week the third year.
In Germany the employers Import
foreign workers to break strikes. The
use of foreign language at a public
meeting is forbidden by law, bo that
prevents the organization of the imported men. If the home men spoke
German to the Imported men they
would not understand. If some one
addressed a group ln their own tongue
the speaker would be arrested.
Through the Influence of Frank
Morrison, secretary of the American
Federation of Labor, an agreement
has been virtually concluded for an
amalgamation of Uie international unions of broommakers and brushmak-
ers. The agreement is subject to ratification of the membership of both
bodies by referendum vote.
At London a committee of seven
managers of the different British rail;
ways has been appointed to meet a
committee of the railway trades unions to discuss a conciliation scheme.
This Ib the flrst time the railways
have recognized the unions or agreed
to negotiate directly with them and
the railway employees regard it as
a great victory for their organization.
San Francisco Is the flrst large city
In the United States, it is believed, to
have a union labor hospital. The Union Labor hospital and training school
asBociatlon closed a lease recently
whereby lt takes over the McNutt
hospital for ten years at a total rental
of $105,000. General patients will be
treated at the hospital, but special arrangements will be made for union
labor men.
Secretary Morrison's report shows
the following as the average per capita tax payments for the past year on
members of the five unions of the
printing Industry: International Typographical union, 56,400; International
Printing Pressmen, 19,000; International Brotherhood of Bookbinders,
9,000; International Stereotypers' and
Electrotypers' union, 4,500; International Photo-Engravers' union, 4,000,
WILL BUILD A HALL
Fort William Trades Hall Rapidly
Nearlng Completion
The current Issue of the-Wage-
Earner contains the following: "When
discussing the advisability of building a tradeB and labor hall for Fort
William in preference to continuing
to pay rent, this effective and Dual
assertion was uttered by one of the
more enterprising members of the
Trades council: "Well, if you never
make a start, you will never do anything, anyway." Everybody at once
saw the point. The Trades and Labor
council, aa was then pointed out, had
been paying rent for several years,
and were now no further ahead—they
were minus the rent money. "The
money spent ln rent would have paid
tor a hall, complete," declared another member.   Thus one thing led to
augmented when the Panama canal another, with the result that the un
animous opinion was that there
should be no more paying of rent.
"We will build a hall." This hall Is
under construction and before the
olose of this week will be well on the
way to completion. At the time of
going to press lt Ib almost ready for
the plasterers. The zeal and wholehearted enthusiasm of the workers In
volunteering their services ln sufficient numbers is solely responsible
for the gratifying development of labor's new rallying centre for Fort
William.
"INDUSTRIAL UNIONISM."
Means Stronger and Better Unions—
I. W. W. Has No Patent
Industrial unionism can be defined
as class unionism. Some so-called
leaders have endeavored to prejudice
their members against the rapidly,
growing sentiment for class unionism
by asserting that the Industrial Workers of the world Is a shining example
of the new unionism. The I. W. W.
has no patent on industrial unionism.
Some of the strongest unions ln the
A. F. of L. are industrially organized,
the tendency ln the American Federation of Labor is towards class unionism. The Brewery Workers, the United Mine Workers and the Western
Federation ot Miners, all ln the A. F.
of L„ are organized on the Industrial
plan. They have found lt good. The
Western Federation of Miners, for Instance, Includes not only the miners,
but the carpenters, machinists, electricians, firemen, engineers and all
who work ln or about the mines.
Don't be afraid of the phrase "industrial unionism." It means stronger
and better unions. Instead of spelling
disruption for organized labor, with
political action it Is the salvation of
all the workers.—Buffalo Socialist.
AGAINST CORRUPT
PARTIES AND
I
Most Reforms of the World
Originate with Oommon
People
Manitoba Farmer's Strong
Arraignment of Party
Politics
Charter Lifted .
The charter of the Vancouver Floor
Layers and Finishers local union No.
753, of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, was lifted this
week by Organizer P. Dowler.
road" where there are at present between 8,000 and 10,000 Idle men, the
mill owners were able only to get six
men to scab, and when these arrived
at the harbor on the train tbey were
met by the noble six hundred and persuaded to go back whence they came.
The headquarters of the local timber
workers' union was Cordova street,
where any timber worker Is always
welcome. Mr. Brown paid The Federatlonist a neat compliment when he
said that he did not know of any labor
paper anywhere on the continent that
was doing more for the cause of labor.
The services of the labor press aided
organized labor to gatn power, and he
was pleased to state that lt had been
able to clip the wings ot the high
barons of the United States and
Canada. Mr. Brown resumed his seat
amidst applause.
The following trom the pen of Aral
Svelnsson, Glenboro, Man., urging
upon his fellow-farmers the necessity
for Independent political action, was
sent to The Federatlonist by a Delta
rancher with the request that lt be
published. He adds that Mr. Svelnsson
Ib aa Icelander, and an old-time Bet-
tier. Onoe upon a time he was a liberal, but tor years after recognising
the similarity of "the two great parties," he has acted in political affairs
with splendid Independence, and Is a
strong supporter for co-operation as
advocated by labor unions: If Can:
ada Bhould ever be blessed with good
and honest government lt will be
through the efforts and influence of
the farmers. Most of the reforms ot
the world generally originate with the
common people, and although it is
hard fighting and uphill work to have
them established to give beneficial
effect, the united will ot the people
generally prevails. Why should the
farmers be divided between tbe two
political parties in their warfare for
the treasury benches at Ottawa?
There is no justification for the farmers to tight each other ln the Interest
ot boss-rule and special privilege.
Therefore, it Ib very gratifying to
know bo many farmers in the provinces unite and organize, and I Bin-
oerely hope when the elections come
that they
Will Stand Together
for the good ot the community and to
the destruction of corrpt parties and
boss-rule, which has been for a long
time the curse of the country. It
should be distinctly understood that It
Is not to the advantage of the nation
to have two corrupt political parties
fighting each other and opposing
nearly everything—good or bad—
which the other party does or proposes to do, merely because lt comes
from the opposing side. The whole
nation should be united ln one body,
working heart and soul for the good
of tbe whole community. Members of
parliament and men in office could be
watched—and removed if necessary
—much better than under the corrupt party system. If lt Is wise and
efficient to have two opposing parties
in the administration of publlo affairs,
why does not the same principle
apply to the administration of combines and railway corporations? Why
do they not divide themselves into
two opposing parties, and take the
politicians for an example? For Instance, why do not the leading men
of the C. P. R. company do lt and fight
"tooth and nail" for the treasury
benches of the company, and when ln
offlce use the money and resources of
the company to enable them to hold
the reins of power ln their own hands
and do all work and business on party
lines, enabling them to get a big rake-
off? Why do they not do this? Simply
because tt would In a very short time
ruin the whole company. And the
shareholders would not for a moment
tolerate such a deplorable Btate of
affairs.
Logical and Pertinent
Now, tf such party system is disastrous to a private company, how ln
the name of common sense can it be
to the advantage of the state? And it
shareholders of private companies do
not tolerate the party system, why do
we, subjects and shareholders in the
state, allow such unwise policy to
exist? I believe.it is because we have
not given the matter due consideration. If so, lt is high time for every
farmer to do his duty. Throw off the
party shackles and join hands with
the organizing farmers. We may take
It for granted that the administration
of public affairs will be carried on ln
the near future on the old party lines,
therefore I am In sympathy with those
who advocate the formation of an Independent party. We should know by
this time that we have been deceived
and hoodwinked by nearly all our representatives. It seems to be more
Important to tbem to fall In line with
the crack of the old party whip than
to do their duty and redeem their
election pledges or stand for the good
of the whole community. Of course
the people are partly to blame tor this
state of affairs by electing them in
succession, and thereby shouldering
the the responsibility of their actions
and shortcomings In parliament. They
generally side with the special prlvl-
Fresh Dirt In the Coops
As spring approaches lt Is well to
think about renewing the soil in the
poultry houses. It you use the small
coops it is an easy matter to shovel
out a half dozen palls of the dirt and
put In fresh. That taken out will
make excellent dirt for the garden or
flower bed. If mixed with three or
four times the amount of common dirt
the growing power of the entire lot
will be Improved. While the writer
has used the same ground tor two or
three years without renewing and had
no contamination of the soil, yet lt Is
well to take no chances, when the
work ts bo easily done. You then get
the benefit ot good rich dirt for the
garden or flower bed, and the chickens have fresh clean dirt to work In.
MINARD'S   LINIMENT  RELIEVES
NEURALGIA
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNA,Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, nt 1049 Georgia Street,
one block west of Court House.
Use of Modern ChapelnndFuneral
Parlors free to till patrons
These Separate Skirts
TO SELL AT $9.50
These are offered in a very fine range of serges and novelty
materials, in navy, black, and black aiid white checks. The
styles are attractive, featuring the new ripple flounces, tier and
pegtop effects.
Stylish Umbrellas
Low Priced at $3.00 and $6.00
The umbrella at $3 is a fine gloria covering with long handle
mounted in gilt or silver. The taped edge is a feature deserving of special note, as it adds greatly to the appearance. The
value represented in this line is especially attractive.
Silk umbrellas in the new long handle style with knob ends;
also with plain handle shown in navy, black, green, purple or
brown at (5.00.
Trade unionist* and their frlendi ihould remember that thli itore doles at lis
o'clock every day—Saturday included, a fact very much appreciated by our employees and an example worthy of emulation by othen. Try and do your ihop-
ping in the forenoon.
575 Granville Street
Stora Houra 8.J0 to 6 p.m.
Saturdays Included
W Loo 1 LK O GROCERS
WEEKLY PRICE LIST
MILK, B* C, 20 oz. cans, each
10 cents, per dozen $1.10
TOMATOES, large cans, each
18*4c, per dozen $1.35
PORK AND BEANS, large 8-
- lb. cans, each 10c, doz... 11.10
PLUMS, G. G., in heavy syrup,
8-Ib. cans, 2 for    .15
PINEAPPLE, large cans, 2 {or
    .25
BUTTER, finest New Zealand,
8 lbs.     |1.00
FLOUR, in 49 lb. sacks...11.50
FLOUR,   pastry, 10-lb.   sacks,
each     M
ROLLED OATS, fresh milled,
* pounds for tl
FREIGHT PREPAID ON OOODS WITHIN 100 MILES
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 1801, NOS
1275 GRANVILLE STREET
HOMEOPATH1STS
We carry a full stock of
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US SUPPLY YOU
MARETT & REID
117 HASTINGS ST. W.
WHITE STAR
DOMINION
CANADIAN
SERVICE LARGESTSV^^RSCANADA
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New S.S. "Laurantlc" (15,040 tons), new S.S. "Megantlc."
Flrat Claas, 192.80 Seoond Class, H3.7S Third Claaa, 132.30
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE
ExproBs S.S. "Teutonic" (Twin Screw Steamera) S.S. "Canada**
682 feet long (HO.00 and up). 614 feet long (3rd class 131.25 and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
BOSTON QUEENSTOWN
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE
S.S. "Arabic" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamera) S.S. "Cymric"
10,000 tons, 000 feet long (Rata 353.75)    13,000 tons, 000 ft. long (Rata 152.50)
•10—2nd AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
LIVERPOOL
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA FOR SI
YEARS AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PURE8T MATERIAL8 ARE
U8ED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF
WHITE
SWAN
SOAP
W. J. PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAT APRIL 10, 111'
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hoteli
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Diitance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rites to Permanent
Guests
C0TT1NGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
G0 WITH THE B UNCH T°THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
PENDER HOTEL
ui mm nun wan
Niw, Modern, Flrat-Claaa
Steam Heated, Blectric Lighted
Telephone Seymour ISM.
Ratea 11.10 per Day and Up.
The Quality of Our Service, tbe Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always tbe Best
The reason our business Is Increasing Is due to the faot that our business policy is correct. We adopted the policy of Informing the public
through the medium of the press as to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This has established confidence with the public In us, and for that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue aa we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center A Hanna's Branch
P. H. Qrote, Manager
PATENTS
Trade Marka, Designs, Copyrights.
FBTHIRSTONHAUOH  4 CO.
Tha Old Eetabllahed Firm ef
PATENT ATTORNKYI
1M> Rogera Bldg., Qranvllle Itreet
City.  Phona Seymour VM.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle SL, Phone Sey. 3488.
North Vancouver —Offloa and
chapel, 118 Second SL E. Phone
184.
Diseases of Men
We issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from' all other remedies.
Prlee IMP, Poet Paid.    ••
McDUFFEE BROS.   ,
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
112 Cordova It W.
Vancouver, B. 0.
_z
PkeaeSey. 221
Day er Nifbt
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
SM Uefarii St.        Vaaeeaver, B. C.
DerANIeatC.il.
Phoa.Bay.IM3
PerionACbepel
ISM Grandest.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver BriUih Columbia
PATRONIZE LABOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
JURISDICTIONAL
Almost Every Trade Want
Their Work  S$iys
President
Affiliations Past Year More
of a Hindrance Than
a Help
"Our Jurisdictions! controversies
are becoming more acute every day,"
declared President William H. Johnston ot the International Association
of Machinists the other day at Washington, D.C. "I might say they are
becoming more frequent with the
printers, flint glass workers, plumbers, steamfltters, carpenters and elevator constructors, as well as several
other organizations claiming work
which properly belongs to the machinists, and ln several Instances the
American Federation ot Labor has
aided these organizations in claiming
such work. Almost everyone but the
shoemakers and garment workers
want our work. I seriously question,
with the attitude of the American
Federation of Labor has assumed toward our organization, whether we
can go along with such decisions and
retain our affiliations with that body
and the several departments. Our
affiliations cost us more than (14,000
each year, divided as follows: American Federation of Labor, $6,000;
building trades, $3,000; metal trades,
12,250; railroad department, $2,260;
union label department, $30; Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada, $600
—a total of $14,030. The question is
often asked, and rightly so, 'What do
we get tn return?' And many of our
affiliations during the past year have
been more of a hindrance than a
help."
The cost of living in Canada haB
advanced 61 per cent, since 1900.
Parker Williams, M.L.A., leader of
his majesty's loyal opposition ln the
provincial legislature, will speak Sunday evening in the Colonial theatre.
Everybody welcome.
I cured a horse ot the Mange with
MINARD'S LINIMENT.
CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS.
Dalhousle.
I cured a horse, badly torn by a
pltoh fork,    with    MINARD'S LINIMENT.
St Peter's, C. B.     EDW. LINLIEF.
I cured a horse of a bad swelling by
MINARD'S LINIMENT.    .
THOS. W. PAYNE,
Bathurst, N.B.
The Unmasked Lothario Explaina
("Those keep young longest who love
most."—Sir James Crichton Browne.)
My dear, I admire you Immensely,
And yet, since the truth I must tell,
I love, every bit as intensely,
Some eight or nine others as well.
In fact you are right in asserting
You seem to be one of the crowd—
But to brand my behaviour as flirting
Is stupid and can't be allowed.
Wbat seems to you amorous treason,
Conducted with cynical stealth,
Is but, If you'd listen to reason,
A proper regard for my health.
A share of my heart and affections
At many fair feet bas been flung;
But always by doctor's Instructions—
I do it to keep myself young!
O, nicer than Metchnikoff's potions! ■
O, better than currants or whey!
This plan is the greatest of notions
For keeping one youthful and gay!
To call me a flirt is obscus|tg
The simple and obyious truth-
It's only by way of ensuring
A fund of perennial youth!
—Manchester Guardian.
HOW TO TREAT DOUKHOBORS
Be Tolerant With the Mass and Firm
With the Leaders
Voldemar Kruglak, Russian Journalist, of Nelson, B. C, bas written to
the News of that city, regarding the
treatment of Doukhobors. He says:
"I cannot agree neither with J. C.
Harris, who pleads for toleration of
the Doukhobors, nor with C. Fadley,
who advocates to treat the Doukhobors as lepers. I have studied the
Doukhobors by living among them,
also I come from the same Russian
province as Doukhobors, so I have
some right to explain here my views
upon this subject:
"1. The Doukhobors are a narrow
minded, fanatical sect, which obeys
only the rule and command of their
shrewd leader, whom they consider
as living Jesus Christ.
"2. The Russian government tried
alternatively both toleration and oppression without much success with
the Doukhobors.
"3. The Canadian government was
tolerant with them for the last 16
years. There ts already a young
generation ot Doukhobors, born ln
Canada, who are Ignorant of the Canadian language, laws and usages.
"4. The Doukhobors, by their leader
purposely kept in Ignorance about the
nature of registration laws, also they
were told that in your school is taught
murder and militarism.
"6. It would be good policy to translate into Russian the laws and views
of your government and pamphlets
distributed among the Doukhobors.
"6. Compel the Doukhobor society
to give share of land, etc., to every
member who Is willing to become an
Independent Doukhobor.
"7. Establish government boarding
schools at Nelson and Grand Forks
and send to tt compulsory the children of the Doukhobors of school age.
"8. Be tolerant with the Doukhobor
mass and Arm with their leaders.
Send the boys and girls through your
school and the second generation of
the Doukhobors will be a credit to this
country and among the best citizens."
Sam Atkinson, the local socialist
speaker, will commence a series of
lectures next Sunday In the Globe
theatre, Granville street.,,   ,. ..
CARPENTERS LEAVE
I
Official Organ Says Only
Thing Left for Them
to Do
Dispute With Sheet Metal
Workers Justifies Course
It Takes, It Says
By a vote of 40,792 to 13,328 the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
and Joiners has decided to withdraw
from the Building Trades department
of the American Federation of Labor.
In commenting on the result the Carpenter, the official organ of the United
Brotherhood, has this to say: "With
regard particularly to the withdrawal
from the Building Trades department
we believe that the organization has
done about the only thing left for lt
to do under the circumstances. Regrettable as it is to be forced to take
such an arbitrary step, the treatment
which the organization received at
the hands of the department, especially ln the Jurisdictional dispute
with the sheet metal workers, Justifies it and the overwhelming votei
cast in favor of tbe proposition proves
that the membership has lost patience
with the unsympathetic attitude displayed toward Uie best Interests of
the carpenters. The United Brotherhood has rarely received any encouragement from the department. In
Jurisdictional disputes the latter has
never felt disposed to act reasonably
fair toward us and, consequently lt
is only natural that an organization
such as ours should finally lose patience and take some such decisive
step as It has taken."
A Banner Number
The Industrial Banner, published
weekly at Toronto ln the Interests of
labor, printed a special parliamentary Issue dealing with the problems
ot old age pensions and the proposed
Ontario Workmen's Compensation
act. The many important features of
this bill Is explained in "plain and
blunt language." The eight-page supplement to the regular Issue Is printed on heavy calendered paper, copiously illustrated with portraits of a
large number ot members of parliament and officers of the Trades and
Labor congress, The management of
the paper is certainly to be congratulated upon its unique undertaking.
Independent Farmers' Candidate
Mountain,- Man., farmers have organized the People's Progressive
party, on independent labor lines. A.
D. Craig, of Clearwater, an able man
and a good speaker, has been selected
as the standard-bearer at the coming
provincial elections. . . ,
11 I iln
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room. European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Ratei
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c
Dinner a Ia Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bui
518 Richardi St.
FIREPROOF
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St., Weit Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.  L.   WALLINOPOBD,   Manager    ,
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKINO THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU   HELP YOUR   FELLOW  UNION  MEN  AND   BESIDES,  YOU  GET
THE  VERY  BE8T  VALUE  FOR  YOUR  MONEY
UATTI Basopeen man, n.oo tee Bay Vp.
liUlLL      ll      ll    Up-to-Date     Flret-Claae    Dlnlm
•^" * at__a aa aa X»nnm ami n«#» In  ~mmmmmat^.m.    "
C0NNAUGHT
HAY A DEPTFORD, Praps,
PHONE SEYMOUR 7097-7011.
Room and Cats In Connection
190   ROOMS;   SO   ROOMS  WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone In Every
Room—Elevator  Services;    Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Room $3 per week
Up.
D. F. Peaaebera, Pre.
33-35 HA8TINQ8 STREET WEST
~—, , I Teleeseae, Het eaa
Good Service Throughout      cm w.t« _ .,&
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Richly Furnished Throughout Hot anl Coll Water In Every Room
rin.il Oafs aal OrUl Boom oa the Beetle Ooaat la OoiaoeNaa
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager.
aateai 1140 aal np   Special weekly Bates.
bubopiab mia* i«mw aua—maa i
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL „jgg«**™5EL
manlaomaly _______       686 _______ at. Qenttaily geertsl
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
C A M A n A MILLIOMS OF ACRES
V,/\ll/\l//\ OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
Six monthi' reiidenci upon aad cultivation of the land in eaoh of three yean. A homesteader may live within nine miles of his homestead on a farm of
at least 80 acres solely owned and occupied hy him or his father, mither, son, daughter, brother or sister.
In certain districts a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside his homestead.   Price $3.00 per aore.   Duties—Must
reside six months in eaoh of ilx years from "date of homestead entry (including the time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra.
i ' s
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA
<
\ I FRIDAY. (APRIL 10, 1914
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAOE SEVEN
FEDERATIONIST WESTMINSTER ADVERTISERS
Westminster Trust, Limited
aaaa, •*-»     ^^ „.1)00M»»m ^ •"■*»«•
We bave MONEY TO LOAN un Improved property.
Estatea managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balanee.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXE8 FOR RENT
Head Ofllce:
Columbia snd Begbie 8tre«t, New Westminster, B. C.
t. t. tenet, Haaaftar Director
I, A. Senate, SeereUry-Treeenwr.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Snooeeeore te Center a Sanaa, tM.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
mi QOOTinxA nam v
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS
UNION MADE
Heveaa FIM
HOME FOLKS
Like to have good things to eat and to
drink. They help make Ufe worth living.
WINEWEISER
Bottled Beer
Is a staple household provision and
something that they feel they cannot
do without
In one sense It Is a luxury, hut ln
others It ts not It is surely a oheer
and a comfort, yet Its low cost places It within the reach of every
family. And lt furnishes much more than passing pleasure, for ln it
there Is both nourishment and tonic.
ASK YOUR DEALER, OR WE DELIVER
Vancouver Distributor: A. E. SUCKLING & CO.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY     NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
THE UNITED MINE WORKERS
OF AMERICA
have secured a working union agreement with the
"JINGLE POT" mine management on Vancouver
Island, and have some 300 members employed.
Demand "Jingle Pot" Coal
and help the men on strike to win the right to
organize.
Named Show arc frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what its name, unless it bears •
plain ind readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without thi Union Stamp art
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE. WORKER*' UNION
141 Summer atreet, Boston, Mass.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   0. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
NEW WESTMINSTER UNIONS
EDITED BY H. OIBB, BOX IM, NEW WEITMINST1R
J
AGAINST THE
Jap Boats Have Actually
Driven Whites Off
River
Will Hold Mass Meeting of
Protest Sometime Next
Week
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 6.—
If talk Is any Indication of the frame
of mind the average person visiting
on the banka of the Fraser in the
vicinity ot this city la In at the present time regarding the Oriental curse,
something will surely come from the
mass meeting to be held in New
Westminster In the course of the next
week. That many Japanese were engaged in the fishing Industry was generally known, but to the extent of al
most entirely eliminating the white
fishermen was never dreamt of until
the matter was ventilated ln the press
of this city. There is not the least
doubt expressed but that when the
matter Is presented to the dominion
government prompt steps will be
taken to prevent the Jape from taking
control of the river.
Up-river farmers, fishermen and merchants Bay that steps will be taken by
the entire community, whether fishermen or not to make suoh representations as will have the Japanese fisher
men kept below the bridge. The seising of the fishing grounds up river by
the Asiatics is regarded as a very
serious matter by all the residents
and the New Westminster board of
trade, according to reports received,
may expect the active support of the
up-river communities.
To understand the situation it Is
necessary to realise the present conditions up-river. It Is a mistake to
suppose that a fisherman can throw
his net Into the stream at any old
place and get flsh. There are certain
recognized "drifts" where fish can be
got and even now there are not
enough of them to go around the licensed up-river fishermen. It Is an
actual fact that these men, each ln
their own locality, draw straws for
their turns at the drifts and so play
fair with each other. Just what will
happen if the Japs are allowed to invade the up-river drifts, as they are
doing, can easily be Imagined. The
white men will be driven oft the drifts
altogether for there Is no chance of
this neighborly arrangements being
reached with the Japs. Such a seising of the up-river fishing by the Japs
would complete their conquest of the
Fraser river fishing.
The fishing regulations on the river
are practically framed with a view to
the sockeye fishing only and there is
a regulation that above the bridge
only a land holder may have a license
to fish for soekeyes. There Is nothing, however, to prevent anybody
from fishing for spring salmon at this
time of the year and twenty Jap boats
have already actually driven the
white fishermen off the drifts lmmed
lately above the bridge. Last sockeye
season a few Japanese boats formed
the vanguard of an Invasion that promises to be formidable this year. They
lived ln a scowhouse and got around
the resident regulation successfully.
The situation Is now serious and
the up-river fishermen are aroused to
a sense of the danger of being robbed
of their livelihood. There are some
200 white boats above the bridge, representing 400 fishermen and a popula-
Still More Reasons
Why You Should Use
The WATER we use in brewing
CASCADE is the famous CAPILANO WATER—brought from
the glaciers six miles north of
Vancouver.
It's the PUREST, CLEAREST
WATER IN AHERICA-and
that's saying a great deal. Not
even a trace of Impurity can be
found in it. It's ideal for brewing good beer.
And then CASCADE is "MADE
IN B. 0."—and every doien bottles you buy helps to make British Columbia grow.
CASCADE BEER costs you $1
for a doien Pints—$2 for a doien
Quarts. ASK ANT LIQUOR
DEALER for
omi
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
-Reer_
tlon at a conservative estimate of
1200 men, women and children. These
fishermen are small land holders and
engage In gardening and agriculture
ln connection with their fishing. Many
are homesteaders who depend on the
fishing to give them money to carry
on while they are bringing their holdings Into a state of cultivation. They
are a permanent and valuable element
of the population, like the small farmer and crofter fishermen of the English and Scottish coasts. Tbe actual
bodily presence of a large number of
Japanese on the drifts above the
bridge, and the constant Increase ln
the number, has roused tbe fishermen
to Buch an extent that they will take
united action to lay the matter before
Col, J. D. Taylor, M. P., at a mass
meeting which he will be Invited to
attend ln this city. An active committee ot fishermen and others are at
work on preparations to make this
meeting representative of the entire
Fraser river valley speaking the sentiments ot all classes of citizens against
the Invading Oriental horde.
ORIENTAL CHEAP LABOR
Hotels and Reatauranta That Have
Employed Japs and Chinese
The Cooks and Walters' union re
quests The Federatlonist to publish
the following partial list of hotels and
restaurants in this elty that have been
employing Japanese and Chinese on
their staffs. Were these replaced
about 400 whites would flnd positions
Allen's cafe, 818 Oranvllle street
Allen's cafe, 29 HaBtings Btreet
n,vel~
Astor grill, 147 Hastings street
west,
Bloomfleld cate, 2517 Main Btreet
Boston lunch, 439 Hastings street
west
Boston lunch, 134 Hastings street
west.
Boston lunch, 762 Oranvllle street.
Boston lunch, 132 Hastings street
east.
Carlton hotel cafe, 170 Cordova
street west.
Cascade cafe, 132 Powell Btreet.
Clifton cafe, 1119 Oranvllle street.
Copp, F. T., 1997 Georgia street
Balkokuya cafe, 365 Powell street
Asahlva cafe, 235 Powell street.
Ellers cafe, 525 Pender Btreet west.
Europe hotel cate, 42 Powell Btreet
Fellers cafe, 860 Seymour atreet.
Georgia cafe, 569 Georgia Btreet.
Great Northern cafe, 844 Main
street
Howe cafe, 826 Howe street.
Knight, J. M., cafe, 528 Seymour
street.
Leonard's cafe, 163 Hastings street
west.
Leonard's cafe, 716 Hastings street
west,
Log Cabin coffee house, 70 Hastings
street east.
Mclntyre's cafe, 556 Seymour Btreet
Manhattan cate, 1164 Robson Btreet
Pender cafe, 727 Pender street west
Princess cafe, 648 Georgia street
Rawene cafe, 625 Granville street,
Rltz cafe, 720 Pender street west
Sorsenson Brothers, 126 Hastings
street west
Orlllla cate, 619 Robson Btreet.
Sorsenson Brothers' cafe, 806 Qranvllle street.
Sorsenson Brothers' cafeteria, 470
Granville street!
Strand hotel cafe, 626 Hastings
street west
Trocadero cafe, 166 Hastings street
west.
Sorsenson's White Lunoh, 126 Hastings street east,
•Sorsenson's White Lunch, 439 Granville street.
Winters cafe, 20 Hastings street
west.
Wonder coffee house, 224 Carrall
street,
Alexandra hotel, 1 Water street.
Alhambra hotel, 203 Carrall street
Atlantic hotel cate, 79 Cordova
street west
Austin's Grandvlew hotel, 618 Cor.
dova street.
Badminton hotel, 603 Howe street.
Balmoral hotel, 159 Hastings street
east.
Blackburn hotel, 318 Main street
Burrard hotel, 400 Cordova street
west,
Sutler hotel, 419 Hastings street
west.
Canada hotel, 514 Richards street.
City hotel, 77 Powell street
Clarence hotel, 600 Pender Btreet
west.
Columbia hotel, 82 Cordova street
east
Commercial hotel, 330 Cambie street
Crown hotel, 22 Cordova Btreet west,
Dufferln hotel, 900 Seymour street.
Dunsmuir hotel, 500 Dunsmuir
street
Eburne hotel, Eburne.
Edward hotel, 205 Cambie street.
Elysium hotel, 1142 Pender street
west
Empress hotel, 215 Hastings street
east.
Fairmont hotel, 828 Hastings street
west
Glencoe Lodge, 1001 Georgia street.
Globe hotel, 1080 Main street.
Grand hotel, 24 Water street.
Grand Union hotel, 32 Hastings
Btreet west.
Granville Palace hotel, 1221 Granville street.
Horseshoe hotel, 83 Hastings street
Hotel Patricia, 403 Hastings street
Imperial hotel, 403 Powell street.
King's hotel, 210 Carrall street
Leland hotel, 925 Granville Btreet.
London hotel, Main street
Manitoba hotel, 50 Cordova street
Melbourne hotel, 203 Main Btreet
Metropolitan   hotel,     321    Abbott
Palace  hotel,   33   Hastings   street
Pender   hotel,   612   Pender   street
Regent hotel, 140 Hastings street
Royal George hotel, 174 Pender east
Stratford hotel, Keefer and Gore
avenue.
Tourist hotel, 1200 Granville Btreet
Stratheona hotel, 53 Hastings street
Travellers' hotel, 320 Abbott street.
Waverly hotel, 701 Seymour street.
Winters hotel, 203 Abbott street.
Woods hotel, Carrall and Hastings
Yale hotel, 1300 Qranvllle street.
Atkinson Expelled From S, D. of C.
Editor B.C. Federationist: By a referendum vote ot the B. C. members of
the S. D. P. of C, Sam Atkinson has
been expelled from the party, the
vote being 359 for and 36 against. A
notice to this effect in your paper will
be appreciated.
B. A. WINCH,
Provincial Seoretary.
IHE FRUIT INDUSTRY
BY JAPANESE
Two-thirds of Total Shipment of Berry Boxes for
Orientals
Amount of Land Tilled By
Japs Increasing Every  ,
Tear
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 6.—
That British Columbia will soon have
ta take a leaf from California's book
is patent to anyone who travels
through the Fraser valley. Where a
short time ago the small fruit industry
was ln the hands of white people, fur
nishing them with a comfortable living, now the Japanese are In possession of many tracts of valuable land
and it will not be long before the Caucasian will be swept away by the Invading yellow horde.
Several years ago Maple Ridge was
as famous for the excellence ot its
berries and small fruits as Is the Delta
as a productive farming centre, but
the prestige so obtained has de-
creased.year by year until the beginning ofThis season sees the majority
of the fruit ln cultivation, owned by
the Japanese.
Out of a shipment of 5 000 berry
boxes from the makers in New Westminster over two-thirds of the entire shipment was consigned to Japanese growers. Five yeara ago the
Oriental, grower was an exception, today his comings and goings are taken
as a matter of course and he la steadily enlarging hts field of activity and
acre after acre of Maple Ridge land is
now either owned or leased by Japs.
Prominent residents who have
watched the trend of events for the
last few years have no hesitation ln
aaytng that tn a comparatively short
space of time, this remunerative industry will be controlled by Asiatics.
These conditions are rapidly becoming general throughout the Fraaer valley and the amount of land under control of Japanese Is Increasing year by
year. Unless measures are taken at
once the Asiatics will secure the same
foothold In the fruit industry ln British Columbia as they did ln California and the whites will have to go.
•MUNICIPAL UNDERTAKERS
"High Cost of Dying" To Be Fought
by People of Cleveland, Ohio
The "high cost of dying" is threatened with extermination, if Cleveland's latest municipal move becomes
a reality, says a dispatch the other
day. It is a municipal undertaker.
Law Director Stockwell Is advocating
the projeot. It Is not the rich he hopes
to aid. He desires to protect the poor
trom excessive funeral charges and
believes a otty undertaker is the only
solution of the problem. "In many
cases funeral expenses are twice the
amount they Bhould be," says Stock-
well. "The persons who need the services of an undertaker, particularly
the poor, are at the mercy of the undertaker. The city should furnish
protection to the public by standing
ready to conduct funerals at figures
approximately the actual cost" If
casket makers and dealers ln un-
dertakers' supply ally themselveB
with the undertakers to balk tbe plan,
Stockwell would have the city make
its own supplies at the Warrensvllle
olty farm.
SOCIAL SERVICE CONGRESS
Proceedings and Addressee Will Be
leaued In a Bound Volume
A full report of the proceedings, including the addresses and papers
given at the Social Service congress
held recently at Ottawa, is to be published almost Immediately by the Social Service council ot Canada. It will
be a large volume bound ln cloth. The
price will be (1, postage prepaid, providing lt Is ordered not later than
April 20th. This volume will be of
unusual value to ministers and social
workers generally, ln view of the fact
that lt is the flrst volume of the kind
published In Canada. Orders, Including the money, may be sent to Dr. J.
O. Shearer, 626 Confederation Life
building, Toronto.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC
The Ntw Westminster Association, Limited
The movement for the people.
Controlled by the CITIZENS of
New Westminster.
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
QUALITY RIGHT
Eggs, per doz., 25c.
Prunes, 80-100, 3 lbs. for 25c.
Oranges, 2 doz. for 25c.
Alberts, large tins, 2 for 25c.
Herrings   in   Tomato   Sauce,
3 for 25c.
Jellies, 3 for 25c.
(Imperial, Nabob, and Monk
ft Glass.)
Patronize the People's Store,
and oppose Trusts and Combines
For the benefit ot the few.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
K. of P. Block
Eighth St. Phone 45S
Branch—
1007 Sixth Ave. Phone US
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISERS
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
BATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, S).C.
■merged and Remodelled IN ROOMS MS BATHS
Comfort    without    Extravagance
AmeHean Plan   •  SS.00 Up                  European Plan   •  SMS Up
 ST1PH1N JON1S, Proprietor.	
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Fanning, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres. _
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Vktoria, BuC
Secretary, Boreal of Provincial Monnatioii, Victoria
H. B. PCRHAM
President the Order of Railroad Telegraphers, with headquarters at St. Louis, Mo.
Prudential
WALL
FINISH
The only real Washable Wall Finish on
the market. You can strike matches on it.
Yes, then you can wash off the mark.
That's some test, eh?.
IT IS MADE IN B.C.
BY B.C. WORKMEN
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria      Vancouver      Oalgary      Edmonton PAGEEJGBT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT. APRIL 10, IS:
ECONOMY IS WEALTH
EASTER WEEK SPECIALS
<I Buy your clothing where your money has
a far-reaching effect. _ We want you tp aee
theae two big money-saving prices we are offering this week in high-class clothing products from the world's best manufacturers in
woollens. _ Get one of theae Suits, as the
number we have is limited.
85 only, Suits in all tbe newest
tweeds and worsteds; browns,
greys, mixed and fancy tweeds,
also bines. Worth up to $20.00.
SPECIAL	
Don't Miss Seeing These Suits in
Our Windows
100 only, Suits in the finest imported Scotch and English tweeds and worsteds, cheviots, BLUES, BLACKS,
BROWNS, fancy and plain greys and individual stripes,
all haiid-tailored, with unbreakable fronts; guaranteed shape-re- ^^
taming. Styles two or three-but- fl*_ a* *\_\
ton, long and roll lapels, Norf oiks ^L. I aW • v V
and two-piece models. Worth up
to $25.00. SPECIAL ..:.-....
$16
BUY EARLY FOR EASTER
J. J. NEEDHAM & CO.
335 HASTINGS STftEET WEST
in die mining camps of Cumberland,
Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, And all
workers are requested to avoid the above
places as a plague.
BOWSER'S SPECIALS AND THE
MILITIA ARE, STILL ON
THE GROUND
at the expense of the government, to
do the scab-herding for Mackenzie &
Mann, who seem to have McBride and
Bowser bought and paid for.
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT
OF WORK IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A
MAN TO GET A JOB UNLESS HE
GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN.   *
KEEP AWAY
FROM
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
S REAL
From Farm's
Potato Patch
Their Gallant Resistance to
Injustice Is Being
Recognized
The Industrial Banner Comments on the Strike
Situation
While the great strike in Colorado,
our late strike In West Virginia, and
the need tor further Improvements,
better organisation in that and other
states nearer home has occupied our
attention and most ol our space, let
us not forget that in the far western
province of British Columbia a gallant
band of true-blue union men are battling theBe many weary months for
the right to guard their working conditions, to protect their very lives, by
joining the union of their choice—the
United Mine Workers. The strike ln
Its inception was a demand for safety
conditions supposedly guaranteed by
the laws of the province, and of q>e
empire of which lt is a part. The original cause has apparently been kept
a dark secret by the press, as usual,
and the cry of "foreign union" has by
these been raised ln the hopes of
clouding the issue. The men ln that
section realize, however, that there,
as elsewhere, the law has been, and
will be openly Ignored by the corporations, which, by the way, are also
financed In this and other countries unless they, the miners, have the necessary power to demand the enforcement of the law, and that power csn
only be exercised by the combined
miners, backed by a powerful organization. In British Columbia, as in
theBe United States, lh Oreat Britain,
3<rath Africa or Russia, the Government has proved Itself a ready tool of
the corporations. The law, never enforced to ensure the safety of the
Workers or their rights as free citizens; has been invoked to send many
of our fellow workers to foul ceils lh
the jails and penetentlarles. The
judges have displayed prejudice, hatred and desire for vengeance In the
place of justice, ih the hope bf breaking down the stubborn resistance of
the Vanoouver island miners. But
these men are genuine union men,
they stand fire. From their cells the
victims of the rancor of the judges
send words of encouragement to their
fellows. And their gallant resistance
tb injustice is at last meeting with
the recognition lt deserves. All over
Canada there are demands that justice Shall no longer play harlot to the
international money lords. The operators are at laat discovering that these
determined strikers will not be coerced, and cannot successfully be replaced. The British Columbia Federatlonist, and the organization it speaks
for, has, all through the fight, gallantly supported the, striking miners.
Let us not get weary of aiding these
gallant brothers who are so ably, so
bravely and with so much sacrifice
ready to continue the fight indefinitely.—Industrial (Toronto) Banner.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
B. C Miners Liberation League
Dissolves—Auditors' Report
Following Is the financial statement
of the B, C. Minera Liberation league
since its Inception until its dissolution
on April 4,1914:
Receipts
Collections at meetings... I  288.00
■•   Donations
Brlcklsyers' Union $50.00
Longshoremen's Union   60.00
Trades and Labor Council 60.00
Electrical Workers Union
No.  218  -  60.00
Building Trades Council:... 26.00
Tllelayers' Union   26.00
Brewery Workers Union.... 16.26
Painters' Union   10.00
Steam Engineers' Union.... 10.00
Plumbers' Union     6.00
Street Rall'ymen'B Union..164.75
Plumbers'   Union,   Hamilton, Ont  10.00
Total donations from unions..    466.00
Other donations      151.60
Repayment of Loans to Victoria
Miners' Liberation League, to
special train, expenses, advertising, etc     887.60
By sale of books, buttons, window .cards, photos, etc  1,078.26
Loans received     180.00
Donations from wives and children of Imprisoned miners     700.45
Disbursements
Printing  I
Advertising	
Hall Rent  .'.	
Buttons pamphletB and photos....
Loans to Victoria "Tag Day"
Special train and expenses......
Express, Postage, etc	
Wages and commission for sale
of window cards A pamphlets
Street BignB  ,..:...,,.,	
Distribution of Stickers In Calgary, Victoria, Edmonton, etc.,
etc	
Secretary-Treasurer's Salary ....
LoaiiH  repaid 	
Hotel Expenses and fares met
by D. Todd, Nanalnio "Tag
Day"	
13,206.80
662.80
275.36
365.60
808.06
397.60
120.65
302.05
102.75
78.35
84.00
130.00
Total  12,927.90
Total Receipts  ,  3,206.80
Total DIsbursemcntR   2,927.90
Balance on hand  % 277.90
HUdH J. McEWEN,
.We, the undersigned, have gone
carefully over the books of the Miners
Liberation League and found everything O.K. The books have been kept
ln a neat, methodical manner and balance accurately, -
(Signed) JAMBS BITCON,
J. FRECKLETON,
Auditors.
Balance of $277.90 has been remitted
to Robert Foster, President 'of District 28, ]J. M. W- Of A„ to be used
on behalf of the miners who have been
or are In prison, and their dependants.
WILL RETAIN BUSINESS AGENT.
Winnipeg Unionists Raise Central
Body Per Capita to Meet Expenses.
Winnipeg Trades and Labor Council
Is, confronted with the need for raising the dues paid by affiliated unions
fifty per cent., If the council is to retain the services of Secretary-business
Agent R. A. Rigg. Up to April 3,
eight of the chief organizations had
voted In favor and none against. There
Is Sot a more conscientious or hard
working officer ln the entire labor
movement of this continent than
"Dick" Rigg and lt IS to be hoped
that the Winnipeg council will be able
to keep him at his work.
A Great Success
The ball given by the Irish Boosa-
leers last Monday was quite the social
event of the season. A brilliant scene
was presented by the many smartly
dressed couples present, the men being in uniform and the ladles not having had to pay for their clothes either.
A daring departure In hall decoration
featured the occasion. A pile of rifles
rested on the top of each radiator,
while here and there around the hall
conspicuous places were reserved for
men with one eye and one leg apiece.
The air was fragrant with the delicate
aroma from some rations composed
of high beef specially canned and condemned for the occasion. A large
pile of human bones to the right of
the entrance to the hall struck the
visitor as unique. Altogether the
scenic effects were most striking. To
make the affair -even more realistic,
arrangements were made to give the
guests slight attacks of malarial and
other fevers, but unfortunately these
fell through for lack of volunteers.
Honest Advertising
"Have you a weak back? Do you
have dizzy spells In the morning? Are
you troubled with tired feeling, headache, sick stomach, sore feet, warts,
dandruff, colds in the head or stiff
joints? We do not know what Is the
matter with you, if anything. But if
you will give us a chance we will
take your symptoms and prove that
you have kidney trouble, torpid liver,
weak heart, dyspepsia, catarrh and
lumbago. Then, If you are not convinced that you are ailing, take one
bottle of Dr. Freeque's Weird Compound and you will be. You will be
able to discover symptoms hitherto
undreamed of. A vast number of ailing people, suffering from supposedly
Incurable diseases, bave been treated
with this great liquid and are now
where there Ib neither pain nor sorrow, A spoonful of our medicine is
eleven times as injurious and fourteen times harder to take than a glass
of whiskey. No household should be
without It. Let us send our free booklet containing a large number of
heartfelt testimonials that cost us five
dollars each, good money. These
testimonials are carefully selected,
being from the people who have never
taken our remedy. Do not hesitate.
Yott may die tomorrow without the
assistance of this great boon. Think!
If you Bhould pass away without first
experiencing all the horrors by which
the human frame can be assailed, your
life would not have been complete.
Act now. Beware of imitations. The
bottle does not bear the skull and
crossbohes, but lt should. One dollar
at all druggists."
Thousands Are Walking the
Streets Lacking Food
and Shelter
REAL INQUIRY DEMANDED
Canadian Public Thoroughly Aroused
Through Publicity Given Strike
The B. C. Federatlonist has amply
proved the benefit a labor paper can
be to the oppressed members of the
working class. While all the capitalist papera have been publishing unfair and false statements concerning
the conditions on Vancouver island,
the B. C. Federationist haa been, waging a strong publicity campaign on
behalf of the striking miners. Through
Its instrumentality the conditions in
British Columbia have been brought
more clearly and forcibly before the
general public and the result is shown
ln the changed attitude adopted by
that body. Public institutions all over
the dominion are demanding a government Inquiry aB to the causes and
conditions existing at the seat, of
trouble. At last lt looks as if that
trouble Is at the breaking point The
government and the mine owners are
beginning to weaken, and mariy ot the
miners who had been imprisoned have
been released. Colonel Hall,, who was
tn charge of the mllltla on the island
during the strike, has been criticized
by the department ot mllltla for over
offlclousness, and has resigned bin
command. If straws show the direction of the wind, then tbe fight is
nearing Its end. The struggle waged
by the miners during the long period
which the strike has been ln existence, has shown a solidarity amongst
the miners which can only assure
them a successful issue. Tbe International Union headquarters have paid
out in strike benefits the sum ot sixteen thousand dollars a week. No
wonder the employers, don't like the
ides of the men belonging to an international organization. The only newspaper to back up the men was The
Federatlonist, and to that publication
great credit Ib due for the exposure
of crimes committed under the law
and other information which has resulted ln an enlightened public opinion.—Labor page, Reglna Leader.
LITTLE TOILERS
Little children, leave your playing,
Leave the happy birds Snd flowers,
Your fair lives wll) give the wealthy
Land and riches, pomp and power;
Little children, leave the valleys
Echoing with the brooklet's sound,
You're compelled to face the conflict
By our rotten laws you're bound.
Little children, scatter daisies,
Ih the meadows where you play
Soon your fettered baby fingers
Will be tired at close of day.
In the sweatshops of the masters
Workers' ohlldren pow.muSt Stand
Piling up the goods for profit
With their shackled baby hands.
Little children, jails are waiting
When you grow to man's estate,
If you dare to raise your voices
'Gainst the rulers pf the state.
Prison bars and Iron fetters
Heritage of toll and woe,
Will you sfcrlhk then from the conflict
With the lords who lay you low?
Little children,. open-minded,
Eager, *llling still to learn;
Barons He, and will deceive you;
Steal the, good for whioh you yeara;
Little children, up and doing,
You are holding with frail bands
Mighty iron bands that bind you,
Future WorkerB ot our land.
Little children', 'neath the Standard
O'f the "Workers of the World"
Chalus will fall, and right will triumph
Wheii the "Red Flag" is unfurled.
Little children, truth will conquer
And to earth's remotest bound
Will your gladsome notes victorious,
Echo all the world around.
—LAURA F. JACOBS.
Nanalmo, B.O.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DANDRUFF
Every One Knows Business
Is Practically at a
Standstill
Soup kltchenB ln Vancouver, the laat
word In poverty, misery and squalor!
A Cordova street restaurant advertises
a free bowl of soup on a cotton sign.
Sociologists generally recognize
soup ktichens and bread lines as marking the existence of the submerged—
those who for divers reasons are, to
use a paradox, existing below the line
of barest existence—as publishing to
the world the. fact that slums and all
they imply are either in being or Inception. Practically everything tha:
makes lite hideous. And Vancouver
bas come to this pass! A new city,
one that had the example of centuries
before tt, and yet one tbat apparently
is striving to emulate the overcrowded
urban districts of the eastern states
and the Old .World. Before it's too
late surely the press and the many
patriotic and other societies Bhould
bestir themselveB and give the He to
the false statements that workers are
wanted here.   Workers wanted Indeed
with thousands now walking the
streeta lacking food and shelter, and
thousands more silently starving. An
appalling state, but unfortunately a
true one, and the wicked fact is that
the "business" people of the city deliberately encourage new comers,
knowing full well the parlous state of
those unfortunate enough to be here.
LesB than a month ago lt was shouted
from the housetops that Vancouver
had sold about a couple of million dollars' worth of bonds ln London. Equal
prominence waa not given to the fact
that the British public only subscribed
20 per cent, tbe Underwriters being
saddled with the remaining 80 per
cent. That very same week a loan for
the Argentine was oversubscribed
about, eight times. Even the optimistic minister of finance in the Dominion
parliament Monday had to admit that
he expected the federal revenue for
1914 would be millions behind that of
1913. And Btlll the cry goes on tbat
thie country is an El Dorado. The
empty houses and stores, the literally starving in this city show differently. The fact Is that Western
Canada's boom is, to use a vulgarism,
bust. The promoters of land deala
and mongers of city lots have had their
day, but unfortunately ln many caaes
they have folded up their tents and
got away with the loot. They found
the type who'Is born every minute,
sucked Mm and threw him away. Now
they are spending their ill-gotten gains
generally in another country. Everyone here knows that business ts practically at a standstill, and the sooner
people outside know lt the better. It's
no use living in a fool's paradise, pretending things are "going good" when
they are emphatically not Tell the
truth and stop things going from bad
to worse. Even the financial columns
of a prominent newspaper calls the
British Columbia Electric Railway
only a "fair speculative Investment."
Surely that should show how the wind
Is blowing. It is- now time to get
down to bedrock. Cut out the schemes
of the get-rlch-qulck, kerbstone artists
who want a good wage without working, touts and all of the same kidney.
Then, perhaps, with the help of sane
Immigration regulations, some measurable degree of prosperity may be
attained ln the near future. Until
then—nothing.       OEO. BARTLEY.
STRIKE THREATENED
Italian Railwayman to Declare General Strike at Rome April 16th
A Rome cable last Week states that
another general railroad strike is
threatened In Italy. Eighty thousand
railroad employees are agitating for
an amellloratlon Of their condition ot
employment, which would represent
an Increase of 110,000,000 In the state
budget The employees held several
meetings recently, the most Important
of these at Ancona, a great railway
centre, at which lt was decided that
If the government refused to give a
satisfactory answer to the men, a
general strike would be proclaimed
on April 16th. Enrico Malatesta, the
anarchist leader, promised the support pf his farty to the railway men,
and the republicans and socialist leaders gave a promise also.
Labor Temple for Reglna
Some definite action ts to be taken
on the labor temple scheme for Reglna Sask., and lt Is expected that a
building will materialize as a result It
all depends on the action of the workerB ln buying the stook of the company. The deal whereby they obtain
the site precludes the Labor Temple
company from raising money by
means of mortgage, so that the building will have to be obtained by paying
cash for the erection. That can be
done by the sale of 3,000 shares of the
capital stock, which are for sale at a
par value of 15 per share. The directors expect to put up a building 75 by
50 feet basement and two stories, for
the sum of twenty thousand dollars.
The balance of the cost to be taken
out ln shares for labor performed by
the union men of the olty.
Lathers Recovering.
International Organizer V. R. Midgley of the Lathers' Union, who Is at
present engaged In and around Vancouver, reports a slight Improvement
In employment among the members of
his craft, although many are Btlll Idle.
In face of adverse conditions organizing results are at least fair. Many
backsliders have been rounded up and
last Monday nlght'a meeting of the
Lathers was the best attended of any
this year.
Specials in Dinnerware
44 PIECE SIT  WlO
sr piici sit tries
8PIECS   SET    it.w
PIECE   SIT.. ........SiO.SS
DISPLAYED IN EAST WINDOW
MltlAttCOl    MSHiiMapStW.
WOOD'S SALE
.'■■• ^     . . ■ .,
COME TO THIS SALE ON SATURDAY
THE ABSOLUTE, UTT,ER SINCERITY OF THIS SACRIFICE IS
PLAINLY SHOWN BY THE CONTINUED PATRONAGE OF THE
PUBLIC. READ THE PRICE LIST THOROUGHLY—CUT IT OUT
OF THE PAPER—THEN COME AFTER THE GOOD8. EVERYTHING ADVERTI8ED IS POSITIVELY ON SALE AT THIS STORE.
EXTRAI
10c Ivory Soap; per cake	
CANDY DEPARTMENT
Wood's Candiet are made in our own faotory and are the best
made or obtainable In Vancouver.    Easter Novelties and candles on
sale Saturday below cost.
Up to 26c articles, your choice.       I    Up lo 50c articles—your cholce-
    5o     )       'or    10c
for
TOItEt
26o Talcum Powder	
EOo Pompelan Massage Cream
26o   Hydrogen   Peroxide	
60c Hydrogen Peroxide  	
76c Hydrogen Peroxide	
11  Plnaud's Bau de  Quinine.
25o Ingram's Camphor Ice....
26o Ingram's Cold Cream	
26c Puritan Skin Food	
$1.  Cyclamen Face Powder....
36c Rubberset Tooth Brushes.
PREPARATIONS
10c
SSe
,15c
,25c
,35c
80c
,15c
,15c
,10c
,45c
,25c
25o Orange Flower Cream.,,..15o
26c Arthur's Shampoo Cream.. 10c
60c Rose and Almond Cream...25c
26c Tooth Brushes; cut to 15c
60c Odol Mouth Wash 35c
25c Sanltol Mouth Wash 15c
7Go Imported Lavender Water 46c
75c Manicure  Scissors... 45c
60c Buffers: cut. to 25c
26a Nail  Files;  now 16c
60c lb. Corylbpsls Talcum
Powder 20c
SOAPS
76c English Violet Soap; per
box , t>.*'•• *3Bc
76c Benzoin Cream Soap; per
76c Imported Lavender Soap;
per box  .....; 35c
26c Bath Soap; 2 large tablets 25c
60c French Toilet Soap; per
cake . ., 15o
6c Castile Soap, 2 cakes for Bo
10c purity Soap, 6 cakes for...25c
60c Armour's Toilet Soap; per
box   SSo
25o Certified Complexion Soap 15c
$1 Emulsion Cod Liver Oil 50c
60c Peps' Cold Cure 35c
60c Frult-a-tlves; cut to 35c
SOo Gin Pills now only SSo
60c Zam-Buk cut to 35c
60c White Pine Cough Syrup..SOo
$1 Wilson's Invalid Port 75c
60c  Cascarets cut to ,,36c
PATENT PREPARATIONS
76c—100 Cascara Tablets; -five
grain  for 46c
26c Cascara Tablets, three grain 1Se
**■" Wincarnls;  out to 86c
- Beef, Iron and Wine 65c
Sat-saaparilla and Burdock. .660
._  Perfect Tonic Bitters 60c
50c Syrup of Figs 25c
26c Ca
11.26
51.25 :
|1 Sai
91 Pe
RAZORS, ETC.
$7.60 Auto Strop Razor Set....64-95 "   "
fi Gem Safety Razors 70c
2Ko Shaving Sticks 15c
10c Williams' Shaving Soap 6c
92 Rubberset Shaving Brushes.95c
$1 Ever-Ready Razors ...70c
15c Styptic Pencils;  now 60
61.50  Pocket  Knives—"I.X.L/
now    t
JI Razor Strops; cut to 660
2,60 r ■■   - -       -       -   - -
26c Whisk Brooms; now 15c
26c Pocket Combs; cut to 10c
60c Dressing Combs; now......25c
91,25 French Combs; only 60c
SEE THE WINDOWS
Koken's Razor Strops for $1,30
BRUSHES, ETC.
91 Hair Brushes   .....35c
12.60 Whalebone Hair Brushes 61.35
14 Hair Brushes  61.98
60c Mirrors; now only 80c
94 Ivoride Hand Mirrors for. .11.66
OPEN EVENINGS
Wood's Pharmacy
CORNER SEYMOUR STREET
601 HASTINGS STREET WEST
A. M. McNeill
3. N. Frssman
O. 3. Bensdlet
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender Street, West
We specialize In j
Moving Furniture  (Padded Vane), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage ud
Storage.   Truoks and Wagons tor all description of work...
Estimates cheerfully given. V
Telephones: Seymour 620, 5520 and 1705
Night Calls: Fairmont 2514R.
EVERT UNION
HOTEL WILL
DISPLAY THIS
SIGN IN THE
BAR.
LOOK FOR IT.
Dressing Robes asd House Coats
Wa an showing a beautiful lint of Hsus. Coata In Wool, Silk ana V.lvtt;
alao Drtatlnt Robes In Wool.   All tlsas from 11 to it
PRICM OF HOUIK COAT» RANQI PROlll WOO to MM*
DRiaaiNQ nous From it to m
Theee nako handsome Christmas lifts for Husband, Ion or Friends.
Call and Inaptot onr stock.   Br paying a dspoalt wa will lay one aside far
you for a nasonablo length ef Una.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
TOt. Uy. TM Mi-Ill HAITINOI ITRMT W.
t Granville Street
'   a
VAUDEVILLE
MATINEE DAILY 2.30
BVB. PERFORMANCE 8.16
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Moans
PANTAOES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.48, 7.20, 1.18
Season'! Prices—
Matinee 16o, Evenlnga 16c, 15c.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. ta 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WMK OJ-APRIL 13th.
MON,    TUE8,    WED.
CKAI. AID IUII KOSOsTALB
aad
US ALOm UI OOMVAXT
In  their  own  original   Miniature
'   Musical Farce, Entitled
"CAFE DE LUXE"
LOUIS! OATAUtY
Operatic Singer
amuioi am BtrsaioK
Refined Entertainers'
ixtLT ixaoav .
Black-Face Comedian
THUR8.,   FRI.,   SAT.
zaiiei fiunn mourn
6—People—6
Novelty Acrobats, Jugglers, Contortionists and Rlsley Artists
XXM BBBAVA MACS
Singing Comedienne
****** WSATBM
Colored International Singers and
Dancers.
OBA-nrnro xuuid
ie Sweet Singer from tho
Emerald Isle.
4-REELS LATEST PICTURES-!
10 Centor-ANT SEAT-lO Cents

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