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The British Columbia Federationist Apr 17, 1914

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 «PR. i
m
THE  BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
NDUSTRIAL UNI'      *iTRENOTH.   ^B> OFFICIAL PAPER:  VANCOUVER TRADEB AND QCBOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR,' 4^. POLITICAL UNITY:  VICTOIIT!.
INDUSTRIAL
SIXTH YE7,,/
_*
No. 158.
VANCOUVER, B. 0., ERIDAY, APRIL 17, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
( tacu?nWr) $1-50 PER YEAR:
«£ J UNERS
Unlike 0. P. R. Fleet Nothing But White Union
Hen are Employed
Industrial Conflicts Supplement Independent Political Action
The S. S. Makura, plying
between this  port  and  Australia, is manned by an entirely
union crew of 63, as are all
boats coming into Vancouver
from that country.
Such Is the Information given The
Federatlonist by two members of the
Makura crew who visited the Labor
Temple this week.    They belong to
the Federated    Seamen's   Union of
Australia, and ln the course of an interview said that their organization,
with headquarters at Lawson House,
Sydney, N. 8. W„ had 11,656 members,
distributed over the ports of Australasia.
Asked as to labor conditions over
there, they said they were good, although the strike ot waterfront workers ln New Zealand had been lost.
This they attributed to the fact that
farmers, clerks and others, were induced to act aB strike-breakers, and
were afforded the protection of the
police ln their work. The strike commenced with the shipwrights, who received the full support of all dock-
workers.
The Big Strike Last Winter
Speaking ot the strike of waterfront
workers In Australia last winter, they
said that 9,000 union workers in the
various ports went out. Their demand
was for fifteen shillings per hour for
all work on Sundays and holidays,
and live shillings per hour tor all ordinary overtime. The object of this
demand was chiefly to put a stop to
overtime. The employers refused
their demands and a conference of
both sides waB held ln Victoria, at
which the men were represented by
W. M. Hughes, labor member of the
federal parliament tor WeBt Sydney.
A vote of the men was taken on the
question of an eight-hour day and no
overtime. Eight thousand voted ln
favor and eight thousand against. The
matter eventually went to a oourt of
arbitration and was settled by the
men accepting an. agreement conceding half their wage demands and this
was signed up, from February, 1914,
to February, 1915.
Botchera Well Organized
Last February the butchers of New
South Wales went out for a reduction
of hours from 56 to 48 per week. The
'strike was strenuously contested and
'1,500 working people pledged themselveB to boycott fresh meat to assist
the men ln their demands. That lasted four weeks. The employers then
offered a rise of five shillings and a
reduction of hours to 51 per week.
The strike was settled by the men securing a 49^-hour week at a wage of
two pounds ten shillings. Next May
the matter Is to be reopened by arbitration. The demand then is for 48
hours at a wage of three pounds.
Believe In Political Action
The two visitors were of the opinion that the part taken by labor ln the
politics of Australasia is beneficial to
them at times of Industrial conflict.
SOCIAL SEWAGE BILL
Salvation Army Gets Grant
of $2,200
The Salvation Army got away with
$2,200 from the city council this
week. Two hundred dollars of that
goes to the band and the balance Ib
for relieving the olty council of the
responsibility of cleaning up the results of bringing thousands of people
here for the sake of selling them real
estate. The army gets money from
the federal and provincial governments for bringing immigrants, and
money from the city to keep them
alive when they get here. They land
men and women out here by the thousand, owing their passage to the army
ind paying It off with interest by instalments after arrival. These people know nothing about the relation
which wages out here bear to the
price of living, and take Jobs for any
sort of wage.
Tallore' Snlpplngs
The tailors report that the firm of
r H. Cook, In the Loo Building, is not
m their fair list, owing to the fact
;hat the tailors employed there are
vorklng below scale. Secretary C.
McDonald has received a commission
ib local organizer of the Tailors' In-
lustrlal union. The following mem-
iers have been appointed aB an or-
janlzation committee: Miss H. Gut-
;enrldge, C. MoDonald and F. Dolk.
A woman sighs with regret. A man
ilghe with relief.
B. C. E. R. INQUIRY
IS IGNORED BY THE
LOCAL DAILY PRESS
Conciliation Board Fails to
Reconcile Contending
Parties
Continued Deadlock Necessitates the Taking of
Evidence
MEN BECOME UNEASY
Conflicting Evidence Makes
Calling of Judge Murphy
Company Insists on Right
to Discharge Employees
at Will
DISTRICT No. 18
WILL CELEBRATE
MAY 1st A8 USUAL
District No. 18, U. M. W. of
A., wlU celebrate May 1st by
holiday and speech-making.
Sub-district No. 1 will gather ln
Fernle, and Sub-district No. 4
at Bankhead. Parker Williams,
M. P. P., and John Loughran,
will speak at Fernle, whilst J.
D. Harrington, of New Westminster, wll address tbe gathering at Bankhead.
The federal board of inquiry
held a late session at the court
house last night. The full quota
of representatives of both the B.
C. E. R. Co. and its employees
were present, and the court-room
was crowded with interested
streetrallway employees. Only
The Federationist was represented
at the press table. If there is .any
possibility of an amicable understanding between the contending
parties there were few indications
of it last night. Attempts of both
parties to enlighten the board with
reference to the intent of previous
findings resulted in chairman calling Judge Murphy as a witness at
this afternoon's session, which
convened at 2:30 and is in session
as The Federationist goes to press.
Last Night's Session.
The board reassembled last night
when Judge McDonald stated that
their efforts to reconcile the parties
by private conference bad. failed. It
was also decided, in face ot that fact,
and the continual deadlock, to take
iWddeiree. "Mr.'Wover was SWorn and
gave under oath evidence which was
practically the same as hla previous
argument. When nailed down on the
question of night carmen's wages under the new agreement he admitted
they were less. Mr. Hoover in his
testimony said that the men had
placed full reliance ln Clause I. of the
agreement which was supposed to protect old employees from a decrease In
wages. Mr. Murrin and Mr. Saville
were also sworn and gave evidence
covering their former statements. In
spite of the other points In dispute
It again became obvious that -the one
matter which overshadows all else Is
the question of the company's right
to discharge for dishonesty without
an Inquiry for tbe accused employee.
The Importance of having the view of
the old board was shown ln the decision to request Justice Murphy to
attend this Inquiry and give evidence.
It Is likely that Mr. CotBworth, who
acted for the men on the last board,
will also be needed. As tbe inquiry
proceeds the determination ttt the
company to stand pat and refuse to
move from their original position becomes more obvious. The entire evening was taken up with contention
which brougbt forth no agreement.
Wednesday's 8esslon
Another session of tbe arbitration
board, which Ib dealing with the matters in dispute between the B. C.
Electric Railway company and the
Street Rallwaymen's association, took
place last Wednesday afternoon.
Practically No Progress
Judge McDonald, the chairman, said
ln opening, that the board had consulted among themselves and had
been ln touoh with both parties since
last session. He much regretted that
practically no progress had resulted.
After reviewing the matters dealt with
at the two previous sessions, he said
the board were of the opinion that the
most serious question to be met was
that of the company's refusal to acknowledge the right ot the men to an
inquiry ln cases where men were discharged for what the company considered proven dishonesty. Continuing he said, that it the attitude of the
company now was different from what
lt was previous to the drafting of the
present agreement, lt was desirable
to know why, and evidence to decide
the point would be necessary.
The chairman asked the men if they
could show Cases where the right of
inquiry was previously recognized.
On behalf of the men it was stated
that the evidence was ready.
Mr. Olover, for the company, said
that they had always been willing to
listen to any complaints or grievances of their employees. He wished
however to say emphatically, that the
company could not recognize the
right of the board of inquiry to Inter
fere in any way wltb company's
right to the final word In cases where
the honesty of employees was involved.
New Clause  Suggested
Judge MoDonald then asked both
parties If they would agree to the addition of the following to clause (b)
WM.   QREEN
General secretary-treasurer of the United
Mine Workers of America, with headquarters at the State Life Buildings,
Indianapolis, Ind.
INVESTIGATION ACT
IRE
FARCICAL
Big Corporations Simply
Snap Their Fingers at
Adverse Findings
Unions Compelled to Follow
Suit—Depend on Power
to Enforce
For some time past a dtepute has
been on between the Orand Trunk
Pacific Ry. Co. and its shop employees
over the wages paid ln the west. Two
boards of conciliation, appointed under
the Industrial Disputes Investigation
Act have dealt with the matter, and
the report of the second board is now
published.
Judge Haggart, the chairman and
T.A. Murray, representing the men,
have'made the majority report which
recommends that the O. T. P. pay the
same scale as other western roads.
At the previous arbitration tbe men
claimed that the company undertook
to abide by the finding, which they
afterwards refused to do.
Thus does this merry farce of an
act go on. It can, in some cases, compel investigation, but If either party
doesn't like the results they don't
have to.
Even when lt comes to compelling
parties in dispute to come together,
there is not one case out of a hundred
where the authorities dare try and Impose the penalties.
This has put the Act on the Joke
shelf. A law which cannot be enforced soon falls Into contempt and
disrepute. The Industrial Disputes
Investigation Act Is rapidly going that
way.
On the other hand, should the gov
ernment try to put more ginger Into
lt by making it apply to all Industries
and the findings binding on parties to
the dispute, then the fat will be ln
the fire.
No Work In Ottawa
The following from the Evening
Citizen, Ottawa, tells Its own story:
"At present there is scarcely any employment in the building trades, and
in several of the large factories of the
city men have been or are now 'laid
off."'
B.C. UNIVERSITY
USELESS TO
WORKERS
Endowment. Fund Derived
From Common Lands of
British Columbia
But Children of Workers
Must Go Into Labor
Market Early
Dr. W. C. Murray, president of the
University of Saskatchewan, speaking
at the recent teachers' convention,
In Vancouver, aald that the British Columbia University must be
secured for the masses and not the
classes. There is always a good deal
of meaningless pleasantry surrounding the opening of conventions, and
this worthy pedant was but trying Mb
best to say his piece. It does not
cost anything to say that kind-of
thing, but it usually stops at that.
Ways and means, or a praotlcal plan
for realizing such sentiments are
never forthcoming! a small omission
which leaves good ground for the
opinion that lt Ib all a method of
bluffing the working people by flattering them with the Idea that nothing Is too good for their children,
whilst making no provision for' them
getting it. The position as It confronts tbe average parent of the working class Is, that the wages of the
breadwinner leaves no margin after
household expenses and family maintenance have been provided for. During the time the ohlldren are being
raised it takes all to pay for food and
clothes for them. Boys' boots are
a nightmare for tbe worker's wife.
This steady drudgery goes on until
the ohlldren become old enough to
earn a wage, however small, to eke
out the family budget, and then they
go to work to take their places in the
labor market often In competition with
the father himself. So what chance
have the average working parents of
sending their children to the university, where their maintenance costs
money? A few scholarships may be
given from high schools. Those are
the prizes of the brighter few, but
are no provision tor the vast mass ot
ordinary children.
The endowment of the B. C. University was secured by the appropriation of publlo fundsjind a large tract
of land, but Its educational courses
will only be within leach of the children of tke richer class who can afford
to support them whilst pursuing their
studies. If the pedagogues will show
how to secure wage.> vbieh will leave
a margin over family expenses wide
enough to put by for the maintenance
of the workers' ohlldren whilst they
are attending the university, then they
will be doing something real. Otherwise all .talk about securing the university for "the masses" Is tbe merest
sophistry.
NO IMPROVEMENT
IN THE LOCAL LABOR
MARKET IN SIGHT
JOHN P. WHITE
President of the United Mine Workers
of America, embracing a membership
of over 400,000 coal miners, In all parts
of the American continent.
1
Corporation Seeks to Undermine Protection to Union
Members
Would Stoop to Stigma of
Dishonesty to Accomplish
Their Ends
Average Number of Out-of-
__Worka Placed at 60
Per Cent.
Very Little New Work Being Started This
Season
THOUSANDS IDLE MEN
Vancouver Reaping Whirlwind of Government's
Immigration Policy
Desperate Condition of Out-
of-Works May Lead to
\ Disorder
MINERS' TICKET IS
SUCCESSFUL IN
Where the Militia Committed Its Robberies and
Other Outrages
Illegal
Votes of Two Hundred Scabs Win in One
District
The trouble between the B. C,
Electric Hallway company and the
Street Rallwaymen's union, has
parallel la the case of a number of
conductors on the C. N. II. They
were dismissed for alleged "knocking
down" of fares, upon the testimony of
spotters. The order of railway conductors, of which the accused men
were members, took up the. .question
and demanded that the men dismissed
be either prosecuted or reinstated ln
their jobs. The company officials,
however, refused to take any action,
but the persistency of the representatives of the unton at last forced tbem
to enter a prosecution against one of
the victims, R. A. Buchanan, who was
brought to trial and adjudged not
guilty.
Since the case was thus disposed of,
every effort has been made by the
O. R. C. to secure satisfaction from
tbe Canadian Northern, but without
avail. The discharged employees
were to be left with the stigma of dishonesty against them.
The representatives of the union
made formal application to the minister of labor for tbe appointment of
a board of investigation ln accordance with tbe provisions of tbe Industrial Disputes act, which has been
granted.
The outcome In both this case and
the local one will be awaited with
Interest. If corporations are conceded the right to charge employees
with dishonesty, and then discbarge
them, without legal prosecution or
other cause, then the whole basis
upon which unions attempt to maintain protection for their membership
goes by the board and there is little
else to do but told up their charters
and consent to submit to any conditions which an overstocked labor market will allow the employers to get
away with.
COMPENSATION ACT
I POOREST IN
Wholly Inadequate to Meet
Needs and Requirements j
of the Workera
Its Abolition Should BeFol-
lowed by Adoption of the
California Act
Work In Australia
A bricklayer and a coal miner, on
their way from Australia to England,
called at The Federatlonist ofllce last
Monday. 'Asked as to. conditions in
Australia, the bricklayer said the
building trade was booming. Mining
was also active enough to absorb all
who wanted jobs.
Fred Bassett, a plasterer's laborer,
had his leg broken some weeks ago on
the Credit Fonder block elevator. He
Is Improving, but Is still ln St. Paul's
hospital.
of section 5 of the present working
conditions:
"The provisions of this clause
shall not apply to charges of dls
honesty, but should eany employee be discharged or suspended for dishonesty, and the company tall to take criminal proceedings within a period of seven
days from the date of such discharge or suspension, then the accused employee shall have the
same rights under this and the
following section as though the
reason for dlsmlssial or suspension had been for cause other
than dishonesty."
On behalf of the men this proposed
addition was accepted, b*ut the company declined to agree to lt. Mr.
Glover's statement was "We will
never voluntarily relinquish our right
to the final word In cases where men
are charged with drunkenness or dls
honesty."
Thus matters reached a deadlock
again.
Judge McDonald asked the representatives of the company to meet
the board ln private conference at 10
o'clock, yesterday morning and made
a similar request of the representatives of the employees tor 4 o'clock
ln the afternoon, with the object of
hearing the views of each side ex
pressed separately. Both agroed, and
the board adjourned to meet in full
session last evening at 8.30 p. m.
(Special to The Federatlonist)
DENVER, Col., April 16—The reign
of terror which has prevailed in the
strike district since the wholesale importation by the coal operators of
hired gunmen, and the added tyrannical rule of the militia resulted this
week ln the preliminary organization
of a law and order league among the
members of organized labor in Colorado. Trade unionists throughout the
state will band themselves together
and take any necessary steps to
obtain justice ln the civil courts and
the rights guaranteed them by the
constitutions of the United States and
Colorado. That the good citizenship
of Colorado is thoroughly disgusted
with the high-handed anarchistic
methods of the governor, the mllltla
and the operators, was shown at the
elections this week, when the United
Mine Workers' tickets won out In
every district except Walsenburg, the
notorious kingdom of Jeff Farr. The
Mine Workers' candidates made a
sweeping victory ot Superior, Louisville, Lafayette, Frederick, Oak Creek,
La Veta, and Agullar. The victory in
the latter three towns, where the mill
tla has committed Its robberies and
other outrages, shows that the people
are aU on the side of the striking coal
miners. Jeff Farr, who was exposed
before the congressional committee,
proved just as crooked as ever ln his
political methods. It waB a city election but that did not deter Farr from
bringing ln 200 employees of the Wai-
sen mine, four miles outside the city
limits, and voting thorn. The union
ticket lost out by but 115 and a contest Is anticipated. If the Illegal votes
of the 200 scabs are thrown out, lt
will give the mine workerB a complete
victory and mark tho downfall of Farr
and his deputies who have tyranlzed
and murdered the miners ln Huerfano
county for years.
Mines at Merritt Idle
Reports from Merritt, B.C., are to
the effect that the coal mines there
are only working two days a week.
NO PROMISE, NO JOB
London Builders Try Desperate Measures In Dealing With Employees
The dispute ln the building trades,
London, Eng., is responsible for the
following Interesting effort of despair:
 1914.
To Messrs	
"I agree, If employed by you,
to peacefully work with my fellow-employees (engaged either in
your direct employment or in that
of any subcontractor) whether
they are members of a Trade
Society or not, and I agree that I
will not quit your employment because any of my fellow-employees
Is or Ib not a member of any
Trade Society; and I also agree
that If I commit any breach of
this agreement I shall he subject
to a flne of twenty Ave shillings,
and I agree that the amount of
such fine may be deducted from
my wages which may be due to
me."
Witness    Name	
 Address	
This is only history repeating Itself. Away hack In the '60's the term
"the document" was a byword In England. The flrst flerco antagonisms to
the iabor movement were then In full
swing and men seeking work were
required to sign just such a thing as
this.
Miners Idle at Fernle
At Fernle the coal miners, according to the District Ledge, are only
working three shifts per week.
Monthly wages were anywhere bo-
tween $10 and |55, There aro over
300 unemployed.
No "Lemon" Act for Norway
The Norwegian Trades Union congress protested ns one man against
tho attempt on the part of the Liberal
government to Introduce compulsory
courts of arbitration In the case of
labor disputes.
So far thfe month conditions in
the building trades in this city are
exceedingly dull and quiet. It is
conservatively estimated that the
average number of out-of-works
can be placed at 60 per cent. Very
little new work is being started. The
prospects for the season are decidedly poor.
The bricklayers out of an active
membership of 341 report that only
117 are employed. The outlook is not
encouraging.
The building laborers report that
fully three-fourths of their number are
out of Jobs, and not a few are leaving
the city.
The membership fee for the city
sewer employees has been reduced to
tl from now to May 1st
The sheet metal workera report that
60 per cent, of those In the trade are
unemployed, at present. The general outlook is no Improvement ln
sight.
Bridge and structural lronworkera
state that all hands are working, numbering over 200. The prospects are
good for the summer.
The situation with the carpenters
haa not been worse In years. There
f^™*"/ f0» aumyrawmftoant-.
looking for employment   X^
Reports from several departments
among the Btreet rallwaymen are to
the effect that more men are Idle than
ever. The outlook at present Is discouraging.
There are at present over 1,000 belonging to the culinary crafts, with
about 300 loafing. Ninety-live per
cent, of those organized are working. BuBlness held up well till March
1st, since which time work decreased.
The prospects are poor, as the culinary crafts reflect the prosperity of all
other trades,
Boilermakers report trade very dull'
The outlook Ib uncertain.
Printers number 265, with about 65
Idle.
Laundry workers report over 300
out of employment. There are about
800 altogether connected with the
trade.
Last fall there were some 550 electrical workers employed. At present
there are about 450 here, and 10 per
cent, are Idle. As a rule when a man
gets out of work be leaves the city.
Steam and operating engineers report that thero are 1,000 men following the trade, and but 750 are working at the present time. The prospects
are poor; work slack all winter.
The photo engravers Btate that business Is fair, although lt may be stated
that last fall twice as many men were
employed as there are at the present
time.
The barbers say that business is
very dull, and Is steadily decreasing,
and about one-fourth of their members are unemployed. There are
about 200 men following the trade In
the city.
Bartenders—The state of trade Is
very poor: prospects uncertain. Last
fall there were 350 men employed. At
present there are 300 holding regular
jobs. About 16 per cent, of tbe men
are Idle.
The pressmen report that 25 per
cent of members are out of work,
Prospects uncertain.
Machinists state that 15 per cent of
those following the trade are Idle.
A majority of the painters are Idle,
although this Is "clean-up season.
DANGER OF APATHY
Org. Harlng Issues Timely Warning
to Labor Unions
J, C. Harding, organizer for the
Brotherhood of Carpenters, of Winnipeg, was in Reglna recently, and ln
the course of an address to the
Trades and Labor council, issued a
warning to labor unions. He stated
he had found In his official travels
that the greatest drawback to the
causo of lahor was the apathy—the
utter lack of interest—displayed by
the members of unions throughout
the west. He emphasized the point
that unless the workers awake to
their responsibilities and take an Intelligent interest in matters which
vitally affect them, their organizations
are doomed to failure.
Nothing short of its abolition will properly amend the
B. C. Workmen's Compensation Act.  It is so full of legal
holes as to be all but useless.
First one technicality is raised,
then another.    In all cases the
legislation costs money* and in
most cases some poor injured
workman is the loser.
The loggers, for Instance, do not
come within Its provisions at all Ex-.
perlence Is rapidly proving that the
present act falls short of wbat wu
Intended—that Industry  ahould bear
the cost of maintenance for its maimed, injured and killed.  Thla the present act miserably falls to do.   Appeal
after appeal from one court to another breaks the plaintiff and renders
assistance ln time of need well nigh
Impossible.   The workers of British
Columbia must strive to have thla
legislation wiped out and something
embodying the principle of the Insurance aot of California substituted Instead.
Government at Fault
The Federatlonist stated laat week
that one of the most eminent legal
authorities in the city was of the opinion that Sunday employment waa Illegal In face ot the Lord's Day Observation act,   He was of the opinion
that thla fact would nullify any claim
for compensation made by a workman under the Workmen's Compensation act of Britlah Columbia, If the
Injuries were received on a Sunday.
It should be pointed out that Mr. J.
Place, M.P.P. for Nanalmo, introduced
an amendment to the act at tbe laat
session ot the legislature as follows:
"No claimant   under   thli aet
shall be debarred by reaaon ot
accident having oeourred while
performing   any   labor   on   the
Lord's Day."
Thla amendment wae .not aeoepted
Toy Bowser, and consequently met
with an untimely end.
BARBERS HOLD BUSY MEETING
Several Applications for Membership
—Affiliations Withdrawn
The barbers report a good meeting
last Tuesday night. Two new members were initiated. Communication
read stating tbat Koken Barber Supply company were employing all nonunion labor and unionists throughout
tbe States and Canada were asked to
regard them as on the unfair list.
Owing to heavy flnanclal liabilities it
was decided to suspend, for the present at least, the affiliation of tbe barbers with the B. C. Federation of
Labor and tbe Trades and Labor
congress of Canada. Bro. H. Procter
of Vancouver, Is In hospital Buffering
from appendicitis, for which he has
been operated upon; he Ib now recovering.
Bro. F. Orr, an old time member,
has Just returned to Vancouver after
attending the Veterinary College ln
San Francisco. He proposes to return next fall to continue his studies.
FIRST OFMAY
Miners of Fernie Will Hold
Celebration
..Arrangements are progressing rapidly for the first of May celebration,
says the Ledge. Sub-dfstrlct No. 1
will celebrate at Fernie, and sub-
district No. 4 will hold Its celebration
at Bankhead. Tbe speakers for Fernle will be Parker Williams, M. L. A.,
of Ladysmlth, B. C, and John Loughran, secretary of Beaver Miners' union The oratorical capabilities of
Parker Williams are too well known
to need any advertising. ThoBO who
have read his speeches in the provincial house will appreciate bis visit,
and It Is to be hoped that both Hosmer and Michel will be well represented. John Loughran conies wltb
a reputation from the old country, although he haB been a resident in Canada for some years. John has addressed some of the largest labor
gatherings In the old country, and can
hand out a line of talk that Is not only
straight to the point, but straight
from the shoulder. J. D. Harrington,
well known to Fernie and at the
coaBt will speak at Bankhead on May
1st. J. D. Is one of tbe brightest and
most convincing speakers that has
ever been heard in British Columbia,
and in spite of a period of hibernation Ib still able to hold an audience
when speaking on strictly economic
or labor topics.
New Dally Paper.
In Hplte of the depression Vancouver Is to have another dally paper,
which will bo sold for a penny, so
sailh Dame Rumour. The new Times
will cut quite a swath hereabouts.
Ons Nordstrom, a ptostoror'B laborer, met with a severe accident by a
fall from a scaffold on tho now C. P. R.
depot the other day. Ho Is at the
general hospital where he lies ln a
critical condition.
LABOR CONGRESS
WORKING FOR
JAILED MINERS
The Federatlonist has this
week received information from
the executive of the Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada, In
Ottawa, that no effort Is being
spared by them to secure the
release of the miners still ln
jail. The Department of Justice
has notified President Watters
that the evidence adduced ln
the cases of the seventeen men
still detained is being closely
examined with a view to recommendations of clemency. PAGE TWO
THB BRITISH CQLtJin-p. FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY .APRIL 17, 1»14
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Per Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situate ln tbe fertile Bella Coola District, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or bog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
sos Moiaw anuainf
16 SMtinn Strut But
YAVCOVm B. 0.
Without  obligation,   please  mail  me
particulars of your ten-acre farms.
Name   ....
Address
Brown Bros. & Co, Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU ST0RI8 IN VANCOUVER
«• Hastings It.      Phene ley. Its        401 Giunflb St.      Phons Isy. Oltt
Ttt Qranvllls It.    Phons Uy. M1I
VICTORIA DTORE, UI VIEW IT.
list Ave. and Main It.
Phono Fairmont TH,
GREENHOUSES
Victoria, B.C.
Hammond, I.e.
Long Distance Phono IT
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE,
STALEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc., STARRETT'S
FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN LOCKS
SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR 634
7 HASTINGS ST. WEST
Your First Suit of
Perry Clothes
Makes You a Regular
Customer
For eight years I have been making
olothes under'my own and the union
label, and gradually building up a
business with a, back-bone. My success rests on my regular customers
and regular customers rest on satisfaction. In all my eight years of business experience I have never had to
resort to a cheap sale. Cheap sales
mean cheap goods and cheap goods
mean clothes that can't wear. I Insist
on using the best class of British
woolens that I can buy for every suit
,, I make and I charge you a fair price.
I am ready to start you on the road to the clothing satisfaction that some men have enjoyed for this eight years past Call In
any time and let yonr own eyes and own fingers speak to the excellence ot the woolens I am using.
Fred Perry
Labor Temple   Dunsmuir St.
PATH LABOR TEMPLE Pi ROOM
INI
IT OF
New Six-storey Addition to
Seattle's Fine Shopping
Depot
Additional Accommodations
for Patrons and Some Two
Hundred Farmers
The achievements of Seattle ln providing public markets as a big factor
ln aiding her people to reduce tlie
cost ot living, are well told in the following article from the Post-Intelligencer: "A new epoch in Seattle public marketdom will be celebrated on
April 18 with the opening of the new
six-storey addition to the old Pike
Place public market. This popular
shopping depot, with Its 155 stores
and stalls and additional accommodations for some 200 farmers, resembles
but little Seattle's original public market opened on the same site seven
years ago. Many changes have been
made and numerous features added
for the benefit of the marketing public. <Stairs have given way to easy
inclines, with such gradual slopes as
to be hardly noticeable. A commodious rest room for women, with all
modern appointments, has been added. Wide aisles to relieve congestion
have been made a feature of the new
establishment. The store and stall
plan has been bo arranged that the
public is afforded a magnificent view
of Puget Sound and the Olympic
mountains.
Walk Has Been Canopied
"The walk leading from First
avenue to the market has been canopied to protect the patrons from sun
and storm. A new arcade of mission
architecture, exclusively for farmers,
is an added feature of much importance to shoppers. Here is truly a
cosmopolitan assemblage of merchants, one being scarcely able to call
to mind a nation not represented, and
all of them marketing the produce of
their own soil. Their displays of
fresh vegetables and fruits will give
many a housewife an inspiration for
her Sunday and weekday dinners.
The new lighting system is. tha acme
of tbe electrician's art. When the
sun drops behind the mountains and
tbe shadows lengthen across the waters of the sound, one's attention is
brought back to a new scene of
beauty by the appearance of a myriad
of artistically arranged electric lights,
whloh pour their soft radiance against
the ivory-tinted walls and ceilings and
over the piles of fresh-smelling fruits
and vegetables One cannot but be
Impressed wltb the atmosphere of
cleanliness and wholesomeness.
Served by All Carllnea
"The growth of this old market Ib
due largely to Its strategic location,
it being served by practically 90 per
cent of all the carlines in the city.
An Idea that has met with much favor
is the establishment In the market of
a stall devoted exclusively to the Bale
of sugar. This commodity is put up
in eight-pound paokages and sold at
cost every day ln the week. To fittingly celebrate the opening day, a
musical treat has been arranged for
each section of the market, and each
stall will be decorated with a profusion of flowers and foliage."
CONFLICT OF CUSTOMS
Over Panama Canal Model
at Starks & Son
At the present time there Ib on
exhibition in the store of Stark &
Sons, limited, Hastings street, a model
of the Panama canal. It is being vis
lted by thousands of people who Uttle
know of the trouble tbat enterprising
firm had recently with the customs
officials of this port, what had the
resemblance of a "holdup" and unjustifiable action on the part of local
customs officials was the prohibiting
by them of the continuance of the exhibition during tbe last week of this
magnificent model and the lectures on
the details of its construction, until
further duty bad been paid, and tbe
whole thing put In oharge of two
brass buttoned officials. The facts of
the case are that Mr. Sanders, of Portland, Ore., the owner of the model,
some two months ago had made a
contract with Messrs. Stark & Sons
to bring It here for exhibition purposes. He made his own arrangements with regard to entering lt and
passing the customs. He was advised
by a firm of custom brokers to bring
lt to Vancouver via Victoria, whioh he
did, and at the latter port made entry.
The model was duly appraised, the
dutys fixed and paid by the owner,
The official receipt for the payment
and the attestation of the aprpalser
are now in the hands of Stark ft Sons,
limited. The model waa brougbt to
this city and set up ln this firm's store
and, as advertised for days before,
the lectures on the great canal were
begun, the model being used for tbe
Illustrations. It took the customs officials three days to flnd out that they
wished to Interfere. But then the
peculiar stand was taken that the
duties must be paid not only on the
value of the model, as decided by the
ruling of the Canadian customs appraiser, at Victoria, but on the cost
of transportation, duty and other expenses, as well as on the contract
price of the lectures. Even at this
time some temporary arrangement
might have been made, awaiting a
ruling from Ottawa, the more so seeing that Messrs. Stark A Sons have
been In business ln this city for 23
years. However, it was asserted, the
officials acted ln a somewhat abrupt
and strenuouB manner In the matter.
Although it waB Saturday afternoon
when a marked cheque could not he
got ln the usual way, and the firm's
cash had been deposited for that day,
BY GEORGE BARTLEY
THIS WEEK'S PRICES:
Apples
Royal Jenette, No, 1,
box       0     2.00
Royal Jenetto, No. S, A
box     ffl    2.SB
Ben    Davis,    No.    t, -
box    .'.:  9    1.00
an    Davis,    No.    2, _
box    9    1.71
Cookers, box  9    1.60
Vegetables
Potatoes, sack  .1   .80 9 I 1.00
Carrots, sack   9 .TS
Turnips, sack  00 _ .76
Parsnips, sack    Q .86
Rhubarb, lb.     9 .10
Head Lettuce, dos  O .00
Cut Flowers
Sweet Peas, bunoh     9      .06
Carnations, doz     9      .10
Eggs
Local now laid, dos      9     .2*j
Wash., new laid, dos       9      .23
Poultry
young hens, doi.:.........H0.00 9 112.00
Heavy hens, lb.  9 .21
Pullets,  dos..'...    9.00 § 12.00
Broilers, dos     5.00 9 9.00
Ducks, dos  10.00 9 12.00
Feed
Hay, ton  _|14.00 _ 119.00
Straw, bale   O .11
Oats, ton   9 21.00
Wheat, ton   f 20.00
Bran, ton   § 28.00
Shorts, ton  -   9 20.00
Beef
T-bone    and   Porter-
house steaks, lb    9 I   .26
Round steak, lb  9 .20
Pot roast, lb   9 .16
Pork
Leg and loins, lh......  9 %   .22
Shoulder, Ib : - 9 .10
Chops,  lb  9 .22H
Lamb
Legs, lb  9 »   .22
Loins, lb  9 .20
Pore quarters, lb  9 .14 ;
Chops, loin, lb  @ .22(4
Chops,  lb  @ .16
Finest Local Beef.
Best cuts, lb.  9 .26
Ribs, lb _  9 .20
Pot Roasts, lb  _ .16
Lamb,  legs, lb  P .22
Lamb, loins, lb  9 .20
Lamb, shoulders, lb  Q ,14
Pork, legs, lb  9 .22
Pork,  loins,  lb  9 .20
Pork, shoulders, lb  9 .16
Sausages, lb.  O .12)4
RETAIL PRICE3.
Following are cash prices for delivered staple   commodities   by local
dealers:
Beef, sirloin steak, best,
lb     9   .26
Beef,  medium,  shoulder,
roast, lb 16    9    .18
Veal, roasting piece from
forequarter, lh 16    9   .20
Mutton, leg roast, lb  17      @    .26
Pork,     fresh,     roasting
piece from bam, lb 22   9   .26
Pork,    salt,   short   cut,
Canadian mess, lb      9    .18
Breakfast bacon, smoked, -
best, not sliced  ••;•     ®    -26
Fish, fresh, good quality,
Salmon, lb      9   .16
Lard, pure leaf, best, lb      9   .16
Eggs, strictly fresh, dos      @   .30
Eggs, packed, doz      ®   .25
Milk, delivered, quart	
Butter, dairy, ln tubs, lb      9   .28
Butter, creamery, prints,
lb      9   .36
Cheese,   local,  Canadian,
old, lb        9   .30
Cheese,  local,  Canadian,
new, lb      9   .26
Bread, white, IH lb.loaf ....     9   .00
Flour,   ordinary  family,
25 lb. hag . ...:     9   .26
Rolled oats, standard, 7
lbs „      9   .35
Rice, good medium "B"
brand - «      O   .08
Beans,     common,     dry,
hand picked, lb  ....     9   .06
Apples, evaporated, lb.      9   .12)4
Prunes, lb.    ....     9   .12)4
Tea, black, Ceylon, Pekoe.  Souchongs, lb      9   .40
Tea, green, Japan, good
common          @   ,50
Coffee,   roasted,  Rio or
Santos   ....  ....     9    40
Potatoes, local, sack—... ....    9 1.50
Vinegar, white wine, xxx
Ot    - ^™™. ....     9   .25
.Starch, laundry, lb. .. ty>    08
Sugar,  cane, granulated,
ln 18 lb, bags »      9 1.00
Sugar,  cane,  yellow,  in
17 lb. bags  ....     0 1 00
Coal, Fenn. good anthracite, stove size, delivered, ton  .        @18 00
Coal, bituminous, delivered,   lump,   ton.......— a 7 bo
Coal, bituminous, dellv- *
ered, nut, ton-j  ...      9 a 50
Coal, bituminous, deliv-
ered, pea, ton .... ....     n 6.26
Dry oordwood,  cord  8 0 00
Blocks,   load  .  & 360
Mill ends, load ... ~     I 3 00
Slabs, short lengths, load ....     6 2.00
Slabs, four foot lengths,
oord       9 2.50
Point of Order
Speaker-It Bro.   makes  any
such assertion I'll call him a liar.
President—Bro. , I call you to
order. Our by-laws do not allow you
to go that far.
Speaker-Then I call Bro. a liar
as far as lt is permitted by the bylaws of this organisation.
Hli Party
A young woman reporter on a
country paper was sent out to interview leading citlsens as to their politics. "May I see the gentleman of the
house?" she asked of a large woman
who opened the door at one residence.
"No, you can't," answered the matron decisively.
"But I want to know what party he
belongs to," pleaded the girl.
"Well, take a good look at me," she
said sternly: "I'm the party he belongs
to."
Union Flour -
The flour and Cereal Mill Employees' union No. 14039, desires It to be
known that the Taylor Milling oompany, manufacturers of Pride of Alberta and Mother's Favorite flour,
have signed the label contracts of the
A. F. of L., and that the same has
been returned signed and approved by
Samuel Oompers, president, of the A.
F. bf ti„ and ask that all unton men
assist the unton by purchasing these
union made goods, as the Taylor Milling company employs nothing bnt
strictly union labor. T. Wood, secretary, Lethbrldge.
When a man is always telling how
honest he Is, we begin to get suspicious.
a release would not be given until
1750, which was the further sum demanded, had been paid over. A receipt was given for this amount,
which Stark ft Son, limited, paid, and
the receipt states that the money Is
for "contravention of customs laws,
(which Includes the payment of a
flne), and that it has been paid pend
Ing decision of the minister ot customs at Ottawa. Just how the course
of the local official can be squared
with the full and free entry and receipt through the port of Victoria is
a question the answer to which is
awaited with some Interest. It may
be added that the United States consul will take up the whole case with
the governments.
IM STATES
Over Three Million Dollars'
Worth' Sold Last
Year
City Council Should Oo Into
Market Business Like.
Seattle
It will doubtless surprise many people to know that during the year 1913
three million dollars were spent ln
this city for green foodstuffs, or to
use the farmers' expressive phrase,
'garden sass." At the present the
main supply of this stuff oomes from
the neighboring states of Washington, Oregon and California. The bulk
of the apples supplied Vancouver
comes from the fertile valleys of Wen-
atchee and Yakima, in the State of
Washington. The green foodstuffs at
present sold in Vanoouver are nearly
all imported. A fair amount of such
delicacies as lettuce, radishes, etc.,
arrive at the Water street market
from Burnaby, Ladner and North Vancouver, but the green onions, which
are so palatable to those, having the
appetite therefor, are imported trom
across the line, Also most of the
cabbage, spinach, parsley, green peas
and beans. Cauliflower, it is true, oo.
casionally comes from Vancouver
Island, but not tn large quantities. The
best ones coming from Oregon. Further, cabbage is
Arriving in "Drum"
from the United States, and, as the
season advances, thia vegetable is
brought from the northern states. It
must always be remembered that as
one advances northward lettuce, radishes, and the like, are produced
nearer home. Root vegetables are
grown in large quantities ln the lower
mainland. Potatoes, while grown in
large quantities on the coast of British Columbia, have not exactly the
preference over the product of the
highlands, namely, at Sardls, Chilllwack and other places adjacent. Of
course those of Ashcroft are well
known so far as the local market in
respect to potatoes is concerned, the
surrounding districts can keep the
markets fairly well supplied. There
Is no necessity to import them from
abroad, but the new potatoes arriving
are all from Florida, because the government restrictions bar the California
product. The bulk of "old" potatoes
are ample to meet the requirements
ot
The Local Demand
The winter stock of turnips, parsnips,
and carrots oome mainly from the
Delta, Richmond and Sea island districts. It may be added that there Is
nowhere ln the world anything that
oan surpass the produce coming from
these places, inasmuch as the alluvial soil of these localities is particularly adapted for the growing of roots.
It Is at last realized that the condition
and stability of these vegetables pays
well to store them as winter stock,
ln the old days lt used to be the cry
that they were not of the quality for
winter keeping. But this notion has
been exploded, as they have proven
to be the best "winter roots" extant.
Even during the summer, with all
that can be produced in this province,
Vancouver still must Import green
peas, green beans, etc—such stuff as
the old-time farmer calls "garden
truck." Altogether it is freely admitted that all this could be grown
Within Easy Distance
of this city since the Improved transportation facilities have been established, the tendency becomes less and
less each year to be dependent on
the outside for "garden sass." For
Instance, the Chilllwack line already
has proved a boon for the market, as
loaded cars come direot. Also lt may
be mentioned that the wholesale
handlers are looking to the Paelfle
Oreat Eastern to open up that unquestionably rich, arable land ln the Pemberton Meadows and the Squamlsh
Valley. The bulk of the garden truck
grown by Chinese Is within a radius
of ten miles from the post offlce. At
the present time local Chinese peddlers get their stocks from the dealers on Water street, who buy direct
from suoh native sons of California
known as Yamada Tamaskl, Yam-
amoto, Togo, et al. There Ib always
a good market for ranchers' produce
and gardeners' truck ln Vancouver.
The city counoll should be urged to
go Into tbe market business ln the
same manner as did Seattle.
C. M. A. I8SUE WARNING
One Word for Parcel! Post System
and Two for Express Companlei
If the contention of the Canadian
Manufacturers' association is correct
the federal government should at once
amend the parcels post system to
meet the objections set forth:
1. It does not collect parcels.
2. It does not give receipts.
3. It does not provide Indemnity
for loss, except upon extra payment.
4. It does not provide any Indemnity for damage.
6. It does not provide controlling
records, by reason of which omission
the volume ot loss is Increased.
6. It does not provide special
means of security for valuable parcels.
7. It does not provide adequate
protection against damage.
8. It does not provide tor the transportation of a wide range of special
commodities.
DONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for beautiful gardens, making home surroundlnga attractive,
with flowers, shrubbery, shade and fruit treee, la a natural human
trait implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Universal
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fullest, and
make not only your own life batter, but alao that of your fellow citizen who may not have the opportunities you have.    .
Now Is the time to make your selections, when our prices were
never lower, and our atock never batter to meat the demanda of the
cultivated aesthetic taetea.
In our etook of over 1100,000.00, we have choice flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental trees and ahruba In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for hedges, all sixes; eholoe
atock of 8hade Traaa, and an Immense atock of all ths most approved
varieties of apples, pears, plums, cherries, and amall fruit. The latter
(fruit treea) we are offering at special low prloea to clear tha ground
for additional atock coming In.
Don't forget we can meet your needa batter than you oan get
from atock grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West.
'PHONE:  SEYMOUR IMS. '
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayvlew 1926
Greenhouses and Nursarlee at Roya, on B. C. E. Ry. Eburne Lino,
about two miles aouth of elty limits. .Phone: Eburne 49.
We have them for your garden—everything that grows. Also a
full line ot field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, also grains. We also
have a. full line of fruit and ornamental stock, fertilizers, agricultural
implements, spray pumps, spraying'material, bee supplies and all
garden requisites.     Catalogue tor asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
194 KINGSWAY ■ ■ ■ VANCOUVER, B. C.
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains and thoroughly
tested ns to quality nnd growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
and THE FINEST LAWNS
CATALOGUE AND QUIDS FKEK ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robion Street
Vancouver, B.C.
Garland Stoves and Ranges «*"*-«**•
__        Phona SiraourSsao
MADE AND USED BY UNION MEN FOR FIFTY YEARS
Wbole Wboat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Casta.
We Use Valoa float.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drlnke and Lunebos
All Oooda Freah Dally.
see osajmLU ■>.
Tol Mr. T104.
Workers and Woodsmen
All interested
in organization are requested to at
once call at Room 217, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
OEO. HEATHERTON
A. F. at L. General Organiser
RENNIE'S
SEEDS IVi
p— OUR CATALOGUE—
la larger and better than ever. Severs
splendid new varieties. For tf years tb
leading authority on Vegetable, Flowe
aad Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs. Yoi
need it before you decide what kinds t
plant.   Send for your copy to-d»y.
W" RENNIE C0^,^
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVE1
jU>illmalo,»IMndudWtalM
Saskatchewan's Printing Bureau
The government printer   ot    Saskatchewan   has   Installed   a   small
printing plant, which it is proposed to
run under union conditions.
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR SALE
•EVERYWHERE
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED OROSS DRUG STORE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted. OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICUL PAPER BRflSM CM.
UMBIA FEDCRATIOH OF LABOR
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 158.
VANCOUVER, B. (^FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
CoSTST) $1-50 PER YEAR
Our Federationist Special
$17-5?
You'll look smart in it, whether it be
for business, the temple, or Sunday wear.
It is made of a fine imported tweed, stylishly Tciit, Weirtrimmed and carefully fin-
, ished. It's made for appearances as well as
for wear, and it looks as good, and ia as good
as though it bore a price ticket calling for
$25.00. We are calling this line our "Federationist Special," so call it by that name
if you answer this advertisement, for it ■
assures you the best suit value obtainable
anywhere.
SIZES TO MT ALL MEN, AND A
PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND GEORGIA
Dressing Robes and House Coats
We an showing a beautiful lino ot House Coats In Wool, Silk and Velvet!
. also Dressing Robes tn Wool.   All sises from 14 to 41.
PRICKS OF HOUSE COATS RANQR FROM IBM ts MMO
DRESSING ROBIS FROM 17 to It)
Thess make handsome Christmaa (Itta tor Husband, Bon or Friends.
Call and Inspect our stook.   By paying a deposit we will lay ont aalde tor
you for a reasonable length of time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel. toy. TOt
SOt-ltS HASTINGS ITRIKT W.
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wc manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
togging, etc
IL
With Oriental Labor They
Fear Competition of Well
Paid Union Whites
Not Satisfied With Present
Tariff Cinch Seek to Bluff
City Council
FromParm's
Potato Patch
Ever try "holding hands" with your
wife?
■Wage-workers pay an awful toll tor
their political stupidity.
Ever try spending -union-earned
wages tor union-made goods?
One who tries to be consistent Is
apt to meet himself before sunset.
The recent holiday reminded one
of .what living without the dally press
would be.
If some Vancouver women prefer
Chinamen they ahould have 'em. It's
a matter of taste.
The Vanoouver olty council at a
meeting held last week, wont on re-
oord to the effect that lumber for olty
work should not be purchased from
firms employing Oriental labor. The
following 'qualification was, however,
added to the resolution: "provided
white handled lumber can be got as
cheaply." If that stands for anything
at all, lt means that providing white
men are prepared to accept yellow
men's wages, with the standard of living to match, the city oouncll Is willing to help drag them down to that
level. If there were any exceptions
to' that view they did not make muoh
noise about their disapproval.
The B. C. Manufacturers' Association, however, Is not satisfied even
with that.     The News-Advertiser of
April 12, contained the following:
"The B. 0. Manufacturers' Association has appointed a oommlt-   '
tee to take up tbe decision of the '
olty counoll that lumber would be
bought   trom    firms   employing
white labor exclusively providing
the prevailing prices be met and
they will probably make representations to the olty on the subject.    The mlllmen oontend now
as In the past that not only la the
Oriental labor cheaper, thus assisting tbem   In   their   fight to
meet the competition of American
manufacturers   who  are able to
"dump" their surplus stock Into
Canada, but that lt Is also more
satisfactory.    Oreat difficulty bas
always been found ln this province ln securing the right kind of
white labor for the mills and ln
retaining lt tor   any   length   of
time."
For this plain statement, however
much we may dislike the sentiments
contained ln lt—organised labor says
"Thank you." It's raw, but tt has at
least the merit of being brutally
frank, and we know where we are at.
The streets of this city are crowded
wtth unemployed workmen; every
other town ln British Columbia reports similar conditions, and lota of
white men would gladly work for a
Chinaman's wage to-day. But perhaps they are not the "right kind" referred to, meaning that they would
not be so steadily servile.
The great finanoial Interests which
control the lumber mills Interests of
this province have obtained their timber limits ln most cases for mere nothing compared with their actual value.
This bas been accomplished by the
same methods of graft and wire-pulling which have been used to induce
the MoBrlde-Bowser administration to
hand over the natural resources of
BrltlBh Columbia to speculators dur
Ing the last ten years.
Now, ln spite of the cheap way they
bave acquired their raw material,
they contend that they cannot meet
competition from their own kind. The
chief competition which British Co.
lumbia lumber mills have to face Is
from the State of Washington,
where no Orientals are employed.
White lahor exclusively Is used over
there.
The local lumber merohants, with
their strong union, want such extortionate profits that they fear the introduction of white labor would lower
them. Rather than do that they
would drag the whole community
down to the level of the Oriental.
Whatever their reason may be, or
ganlsed labor can safely take the
same stand on this question as on
others of a similar nature. It an industry will not yield enough returnB
to pay wages to sustain a white man's
standard of living, then let that industry go out of business—and stay
out.
IS
People Must Prepare For
Industrial Unrest in
Near Future
Premier Asquith Says That
He Has No Remedy
to Offer
Coquitlam Quiet
Sam Kernighan, the well known
member of Local No. 617 of tbe carpenters, has returned to the olty from
Coquitlam, where he has been for the
past few months. He reports very
little building work going on out
there.
Labor 8hould Worry
The latest In British politics Ib a
Conservative Labor Party. At a convention held ln Sheffield last week
they claimed to have 30 branches.
ThlB Ib evidently the political arm of
the Free Labor Union. Tbe combination will go on tour.
If might doea not make right, why
so muoh alarm over the refusal ot
British soldiers to obey orders?
Clam-digging for "home" consumption is on the Increase along tbe Pacific coast   Necessity demands.
A history of tbe part played by
women "Hon tamers" in the affairs of
a nation would make spicy reading.
It's a dead safe proposition tor
wage-workers to believe all the Liberals and Conservatives say of each
other,
Scarcity of jobs—and huge profits-
produces some curious specimens of
patriotism, expressed ln "buy at
home" terms.
Ever meet one of those "I-do-as-I-
please" sort? Just then the foreman
hove ln sight—and the I. D. A. I. P.
abruptly disappeared to take up tools.
Organised labor In British Columbia used to deservedly be termed the
"trail blazers of Canada." But the
hired help of Sirs Bill and Dan haB
succeeded in taking the "—1" out of
that appellation.
Inasmuch as a tew modern pirates
have "acquired" practically all the
available land ln British Columbia
one may reasonably expect a newspaper campaign shortly advocating
"back to the land." The speculators
need the money.
Tbe big corporations in British Columbia control the stomach materials; the workere own the appetites.
When the workers become as politically sagacious as their employers the
proper relationship between the two
will bo established.
"Owing to the Illness of Hon. T. W.
Crothers, minister of labor," says the
daily press, "the proposed amendments to the Lemleux act will not be
Introduced this session." The prospect waa enough to make anybody
sick—ot the whole screaming farce.
It's too bad some way could not be
devised to equip the Chinese boys for
service In Vancouver's departmental
stores. But then, a Chinaman could
scarcely live on the wages at present
being paid departments store employees in Vancouver!—South Vancouver Chinook.
Between the painful old dyspeptic
editorial hack on the News-Ad. the
Wade-McConnell-Smlth millstone carried by the Sun, and the cheerful idiot
who draws "leader" compensation
from the Province, Vancouver printers
and proof-readers have their own
troubles. They are compelled to read
the output
The condition of the labor market
on the Job reflects Itself ln the.demeanor of those on the job. Hence
the governmental expression ot the
corporations have no hesitancy In
bonuslng tbe Salvation Army to Increase the competition for the right
to earn one's own wages and something over tor the boss.
It's almost music to tbe old-time
B. C. trades unionist to hear the
small-fry merchants crying out against
Asiatic competition. So long as the
Oriental only lowered the wage-workers' standard of living there waB no
squawk in the land from the present
source. The vision of the average
"business" man Is muoh shorter than
his nose.
Viscount Morley Is likely to become
noted for illuminating replies. In
response to a recent query In the
House of Lords he said: "I will answer that question more or less satisfactorily to-morrow, perhaps." Many
of us would Uke to reply ln historic
question which runs as follows:
"When can we expect you to make us
a payment on our account?"
At the annual banquet ot the Associated Chambers of Commerce held
the other day at the Whitehall, Lon-
don, Premier Asquith made an Inter
est Ing reference In a speech upon the
question of capital and labor. One
of the most Important questions ot
the day, he remarked, was the condition ot labor. During the yeara 1911-13
employment had reached lta highest
point In the firat part of 1913 there
was some slight Indications of a, slackening, but as against the greater volume of employment and of higher
wages there was a very substantial
rise In the price of commodities consumed by the laborer. It was satisfactory to note that during the flrst
quarter of this year the prices of food
showed some reduction. Apart from
this they might note with satisfaction
the dying down of the acute labor
controversies of two years ago. Still,
the time lost ln labor disputes In 1913
muoh exceeded the average, although
lt was substantially less than In 1912.
During the flrst two months of the
present year there had heen a still
further decline, but they would be deceiving themselves if they did not
admit that they had still to make up
their minds for a considerable amount
of Industrial unrest. He had no
remedy to offer, nor was it wise or
prudent for any statesman to offer
any remedy tor the abatement, and
still less for the cure, or the cause of
serious anxiety. The growing strength
ot capital and labor organisations was
not, in his opinion, a phenomenon
tbat ought to be regarded with disquietude. What was more disquieting
was the growing disposition ln many
quarters, he would not say to rebel
against, but not to acquiesce ln, a
common decision of the organization
whloh represented a trade.
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VANCOUVER
B.C.
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Telephone Fairmont 33d L
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
•THE strike ia still on nt the
* Queeu Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike Is settled
Order Ymir Minen' Union
-Among the poorest paid workers ln
the whole of Europe are the Sicilian
farm laborers, whose average weekly
wage amounts to less than fifty cents.
Vices are Indispensable. Especially
to the virtuous. Where, for Instance,
would those people who make conspicuous virtue a sort of business be If
there were no vicious folks with
whom to contrast themselves? Suppose the world to have become uniformly good and devoting Its spare
time to devout reflection and church
socials. No one could possibly attract
attention on account of special purity.
The exhorter's voice would fall Into
disuse and disrepair. The churches
would become mere Instruments of
mild and restricted amusement. Hell
would be forgotten and saving souls
a lost art. Such a condition would be
unbearable and the brethren who are
accustomed to shine before their
weaker fellows with exceptional virtue would simply have to cultivate a
few of the old vices in order to be
different.
An extraordinary meeting of the
board of directors of the Blood and
Bones Mexican Tramways Corporation. A little man with a bald head,
prominent nasal curvature and a
querulous voice rises to speak:
"Gentlemen: A concession has been
granted to a British syndicate for the
construction of another tramline ln
Mexico city. ThlB will practically put
us out of business. It Is another evidence of what we are to expect from
that outlaw who occupies the presidential chair. Now, the question Is,
what are we going to do about It?"
"Do!" shouted an excitable, youngish mnn on the other side of the
table, jumping to his feet. "It Isn't a
question of what wo are going to do
at all.  What Is the government going
to do? That's what I want to know.
Here we atand to lose, not only hundreds of thousands ln dividends, but
millions ln capital as well, snd the
government goes on as If nothing was
happening. This country's going to
the dogs."
"There's no use getting excited," Interjected Mr. Haumateln, a large
stockholder, and an authority on patriotism. "Our congressmen are doing
the best they can. The stories of
violence to Amerloan life and property they uncover every day would
fill a large book." This little pleas
antry evoked a ripple of merriment
and seemed to raise the spirits of
everyone. Mr. Haumsteln continued
"There was a time when you could
get every true American to rally to
the flag and be ready to fight, by hav
ing a no-account missionary killed off.
But things are' different now-adays.
It's true you can still stir up a lot of
excitement by spending enough money
with the newspapers, but lt Isn't a
case of licking Mexico just now—we
might get tangled up with Europe,
which wouldn't pay. The best thing
I can think of for us to do, Is to act
with our Interested friends and do all
we can to keep the revolution going.
As .long aB we can get a bunch of
cheap greasers to flght their heads
off, and there's a chance to win, there
Isn't such a lot to worry about."
"That's so," agreed another large
shareholder, "and, of course, If things
go wrong with the rebels, we can still
begin operations in this country. The
times are changed alright, but not
such an awful lot. There's a lot ot
talk about people who Invest their
money ln other countries being obliged to do their own fighting. Quite a
number of people seem to have the
Idea that when we put our money ln
Mexico we expected to get all the
benefits, and we have no business to
expect other people to risk their lives
protecting our Interests, especially at
government expense. There didn't
used to be any such absurd Ideas, and
I guess they are not very deep rooted
now. Money still talks, as tho saying Is. Congressmen and newspapers
don't cost much more than tbey ever
did, and when you get them, national
Indignation Isn't very far away."
Fears having thus been set temporarily at rest, the meeting proceeded to other business.
I
Berry Bros.
Agents for
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Repairs promptly executed
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Phone Highland 895
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WIRE FENCING
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46 inches Ugh, ln 10-rod length!, per rod Ne
58 Inohea high, ln 10-rod lengths, per rod. Ws
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10-tooth, eaoh 70o
12-tooth, each SOo
14-tooth, eaeh      SOo
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MALLEABLE IRON   RAKES—12  and   14   tooth; eaeh
3Bc and       40o
GARDEN AND FIELD HOES—eaeh, 38c, 85c, Ue and 76o.
CULTIVATORS—5 prongs, adjustable; each ..SIM
GARDEN SPADES AND SHOVELS—Any style, long or
short handle;   ,90c
GARDEN WHEELBARROWS—each   84.50
GARDEN HOSE COMPLETE—with noitle, 50 feet. .14.50
LAWN FENCINGS—30 Inches wide, per foot 10a
36 Inches wide, per foot Iiyio
MATTOCKS, with handle; best quality—each SIM
GRUBBING HOES with handle  »1.00
'AXES, single bit handled; each $1.25 and 11.50
' DOUBLE BIT AXES, without handle—eaeh. .75c and 11.2*
SLEDGE HAMMERS—All sises. Per pound 10c
FROES—each   85c.
CROSS CUT SAWS—per foot 45c, SOo. and 11.25
PICKS, handled, each 11.00
All kinds of Shovels and Spades  .90c.
AXE HANDLES—each 26c, 36c and 50c
PICK AND MATTOCK HANDLES—eaoh 26o
SLEDGE HANDLES—eaeh   30c
David Spencer Limited
A Message to the Union Man's Wife
YOU'LL EVENTUALLY BECOME A CUSTOMER, SO* WHY
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R. G. Buchanan & Co.
VANCOUVER'S 8ELECT CHINA STORE
Telephone 8eymour 2021
BUCHANAN BUILDING 1126 ROBSON ST.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Statet
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware and
Sporting Goodi
111 Hastings St., W.
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street Weit
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operatei by the latest, mut Kienb'fic and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
B. C. Electric Irons
The Cheapest
High Standard
Electric Iron
On the Market
By Fat the Beit
Electric lion
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At Any Price
PRICE (to partlea uelng B. C. Electric current)
$3.00
Every Iron Is Guaranteed by the Company for TEN YEARS.
Carrall and
Hailingi Street
B.C. ELECTRIC ■»»«*
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000 PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY APRIL 17, 1914    **
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve,  .. 18,700,000
85 tranches ln Canada
A general banking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
160 HASTING* STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1861
Paid-up Capital ■ • ■ » 11,600,00
Reaerve     12,600,000
Total Aaaete 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE.
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
busineu will be welcome be It large or
amall
POURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1SSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve 111,176,678
Savings Accounts
Savings accounts are conducive
to provident living. In onr
Savings Department they may
be opened In the name ot one
Individual or tn the names ot
two or more Jointly, with the
privilege tor each ot depositing
or withdrawing money aa de-
aired, The Bank oi Toronto accepts Savings Accounts, lrrei-
peotlve ot the amount of the
Initial deposit
Aeaeta 160,000,000
Deposits      ..     ..   841.000,000
Main Office—
466 HASTINOS ST. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Cor. Hastings and Carrall Ste.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONET TO LOAN ON IMPROVED OITT PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply st Compsny'i Office
SS7 HASTINOS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
S2S-333 ROQER8 BUILDING
VANCOUVER      -      -       B.C.
FIRE, UFE snd ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreements Por Sale purchaaed
Safe Deposit Vaults
12.60 a year
Guaranteed Investment of Punda
for Clients
Published every Friday morula* by lbe
B. C. redamlloidat, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece -
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, president;
J H. McVety, secretary-treaaurer; H.
Glbb; G. J. Kelly; and R. P. Pettlplece.
Offloe! Boom 317, Labor Temple.
Tel. Escbangre Sey. 7485.
Advertising Manager   -     M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.10 per year; ln Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, 11.00.
unity of Labor,' ttt bopt of tbe world.'
FRIDAY APRIL 17, 1914
BREAKERS AHEAD
Speaking before the Associated
Chambers of Commerce ln London
last week, Premier Asquith devoted
the main portion of his speech to the
relations between Labor and Capital.
That faot alone is somewhat signlflcant when we remember that until
recent years the burden of nearly all
such utterances was "trade expansion," "spheres of influence," "foreign
markets," "colonial preference," and
like subjects, all far away from the
essential basis upon which Industry Is
founded. It haB been the fate of his
government to be confronted with
more serious Industrial problems than
any that have preceded lt. That In
spite ot the daring attempts at legislation which lt was predicted would
heal some of the more gaping wounds
in the body, Industrial and sooial.
Keen students, whose scientific training In the study of political economy
had enabled them to penetrate to the
essentials of that legislation, and foresee its failure, were never deceived as
to what the ultimate outcome would
be. The Liberal party has an agelong reputation for applying court
plaster to cancers, and it will take
more than Old Age Pensions and Unemployed Insurance to obliterate that
reputation. As time goes by, lt Is
seen, by practical proof that such measures, whilst highly conducive to the
production of the Servile State, do not
give to the worker any more of the
product of his labor than he had before. Hence the disquietude which
Asquith deplored still continues. Be
said "they had still to make up their
minds for a considerable amount of
Industrial unrest." He much regretted
that there was a growing disposition
on the part of labor to disturb an entire Industry for the sake of the Interests of one trade in that Industry.
In a word, he deplored the growth In
Oreat Britain of the idea of industrial
unionism. Finally, he made the last
admission of inefficiency by saying
point blank that he had no remedy to
offer. Of course he hadn't. It Ib not
the business of the highest political
representative ot a capitalist state to
offer remedies, since the only ones he
could offer would be diametrically opposed to the economlo Interests of the
profiteers whose high priest he is and
must be until he steps forever from
the arena of politics. Moreover, If
the workers expect remedies from
Liberal politicians—well, lt will serve
'em right. Better any time a good
old hard-shelled tory than the sniffling
hypocrisies of Liberalism with its Mr.
Faclng-bothways policy.
• * *
There are still political Canutes
who think that this swelling tide of
Industrial evolution and development
can be held baok by parliamentary
phrases. But lt Is not necessarily because the organized workers have
divined by theory the necessity of
closer Industrial action, at times of
strife, that they have adopted those
methodB. They have, been forced
upon the workers by bitter practical
experience whioh has driven conviction into their heads. As science and
invention gradually extend the use of
mechanical power in Industry, so do
the Individual workerB and groups ot
workers see their old-time economlo
strength taken away from them. A
large part of some tradeB disappears,
and the whole of others, by tbe substitution of the machine. With that
change also disappears a great deal
of that old trade snobbery, which formerly kept the various groups apart.
The longer the process continues, the
more the main fact that all are workers, Irrespective of calling, Is revealed; with the slowly accruing result which manifests Itself in Increased solidification of forces for the
attainment of common ends ln the
shape of food, shelter and raiment
The passing of the small employer
and the earlier forms of associated
capital have made way for the formidable aggregations of finance which today embrace all branches of an entire
industry; often in several countries.
The power which this consolidation of
capital has given, Is perhaps more
responsible than any other factor for
causing the workers to make common
cause for the common, protection Of
their class. And the trouble which
Asquith is up against is not confined
solely to Oreat Britain, but is equally
existent In all commercial countries
today. It Is due to an economlo process working out the destiny of nations and governments, with a logical
persistency which will Inevitably
overwhelm Liberal patchwork and
Tory bluster ln one common ruin. Today both are politically barren. The
times are suggesting to the workers
the right methods and bringing forth
the men to apply them. Asqulth's wall
was only a glimpse of the great
struggle whloh he can see ^coming
with the rallwaymen, the miners, and
the transport workers, and neither his
class outlook or political training can
furnish him with a solution.
MAY DAY AT NANAIMO
The Nanaimo Herald is really angry
this time. It's all because the miners
have decided to hold a holiday and
celebration on May 1st. What right
have they to do. this? asks the Herald
ln a recent issue. Does not May 24th
come to Nanalmo too? Is It not
Empire Day and the natal day of "Victoria the Good;" and have they not
an official labor day in September,
duly arranged for and fully approved
by their employers, when they can
prance and procesh to their hearts'
content? After the foregoing gush ot
queries the Herald comes to the conclusion that any one of them would be
sufflclent reason for the miners choosing some other day. For once our
contemporary is right. What's more
they know they are right. That's
where the rub comes in. It appears
that because the miners did not put
labor day in the list of holidays they
are dissatisfied and want "one of their
very own." So away they go, proposing, devising, arranging and fixing
up for a real good time on May 1st;
utterly regardless of the fact that the
Herald has not been consulted, and
the "upper classes" of Nanalmo may
may not be able to make it convenient to be there. It's nothing short
ot base ingratitude after tbe really
handsome way Nanalmo has treated
the miners, and in tbe full flush of
Its outraged pride the Herald asks
"Why should Nanalmo and the people
of Nanalmo be offered aB a sacrifice
to the fetish of Internationalism?" So
that's where the shoe pinches, eh? Its
the international aspect of the miners
celebration which is the real trouble.
Poor pettifogging, parochial Herald;
with two arms round the village
pump; with blinkered eyes and barnacled brain; whining in Its gibbering
senility because Time and the
thoughts of men will not stand still,
for the perpetuation of such benighted
mentality as Inspired Its peevish
protest. What a pitiful travesty of
its own name it Is. A real herald
goes tn front to clear the way and
prepare the path for those that come
after. But this one Is the Nanaimo
variety; so it goes backwards like a
crawfish.
* * *
All the same the miners will hold
their celebration on May 1st. The
reason why they will celebrate that
day is, because May 1st Is the day,
chosen by that portion of the working
class all over the world, which Is educated to a true understanding of Its
position in the economic system of
our time. And the Herald might just
as well be told- frankly and plainly
that the mental attitude of the miners
towards this question is due to the
fact that their political faith is centered ln the international Socialist movement, backed by the Industrial organisation of their olass on an International basis, with the object of securing unified action for the common
benefit of the workers of all countries
Irrespective of geography, creed, or
language. The necessity of tbat has
heen taught them by the methods of
the International capitalists whose interests the Herald has so faithfully
served during the course of the
trouble on Vancouver Island. Apart
even from those reasons, what more
fitting time of the year could labor
choose for Its holiday? May Day Is
nature's perennial promise to man of
renewed life today and fresh hope
for the future. Everything is bubbling with vitality and pregnant with
assurance of the coming harvest The
workers have shown much more delicacy and Imagination in their choice
of May than did their capitalist
isors ln choosing September,
when the year Is dying and the Immediate future Is to bring the dark
and dismal winter. The miners have
chosen wisely, and lt they ever had
any doubt as to the wisdom ot their
choice, the tact that the Herald does
not like It would be sufficient to convince them they were right.
THE EXCLU8ION ORDER
The Vlotoria Colonist says that lt
trade unions are not, prepared to
recognize International boundary lines
they ought not to expect the government to do so hy such tblngs as the
present order-in-councll prohibiting
workmen from entering British Columbia from a foreign country. 'If
there are any workmen here who are
under the Impression that the foregoing measure was taken primarily
for the benefit of the workers, we
would prefer that they should stay so,
rather than we should go to the expense ot such an operation as would
be necessary before they could understand. The real reason why the
authorities have prevented the Influx
ot workers Into this province Is that
there are already three for-every job
to be got. To allow more to come
would only mean that the ratepayers
would either have to feed them or be
confronted with all the desperation
which the sheer need of bread will
put Into men. The number of unemployed here now Is such that several
thousand cannot get work and bun
dredB are glad to support themselves
from day to day on a handout of food
In return for work done. The order-
in-councll was lsBUed to protect the
rate and tax payers, not the workmen
of BrltlBh Columbia. We do not oppose the issuing of the order, because
It prevents many of our fellow-workers from spending their savings to
get here, only to discover when they
arrive thai there Is no work; but we
do not want the authorities to think
we are so simple as to believe that
they were actuated by a desire to
lighten the burden of our class ln this
olty. "Things ain't always what they
seem to he,"
CHINAMEN PREFERRED
A worthy dame from the west end
writes to the News-Advertiser breathing gratitude and appreciation (or Its
warning to people not to lose sight
of the many advantages in having
Chinese domestic servants, just because one of them has confessed to
chopping up his mistress and putting
her In the furnace. She speaks ln
glowing terms Of the excellent qualities of her three Chinese domestics,
who do everything for her, even to
the laying out of the housekeeping
money. She winds up her epistle
thus:
"We tried white women as servants when we first came here,
partly as a matter of sentiment,
I admit   We had eight ln four
months, which speaks for Itself;
then we gave up the experiment."
Now, why Is it that this dame cannot be satisfied with a white girl? The
Impression she would give us from her
last sentence Is that the girls sho had
were inefficient.   She admits leaving
everything to her Chinaman, which
would seem to  suggest  that she Is
either   a  lazy  or  inefficient  housekeeper  herself,  ln  which  case  she
would be a very unsatisfactory woman
for any girl to work for, and a girl
who knew her business would not stay
round such a house.   It ln addition
she Is one of our real estateooracy,
elevated   to   economic   affluence  by
boom and without breed, she Is most
likely one of those viragos who bully
a white girl from morn till night, but
is too scared of her Chinaman to try
any of her nagging on him.  It Ib difficult to get to the bottom of cases like
this, but it is very apparent that the
Chinaman has some very satisfying
qualities which a white girl cannot
supply.     	
ANOTHER MENACE
The "Menace" Is published ln the
United States where lt has freedom of
the malls. Recently a Canadian edition was started with publishing headquarters at Aurora, Ont. The paper
Is devoted to very slashing and vigorous criticism of Roman Catholicism,
particularly with respect to the Influence of that religion on local and
national politics. The paper referred
to makes no disguise of the fact that
lt regards Roman Catholicism as a
menace to progress. Hence its name.
The trouble is that the Canadian postal authorities have now barred it
from the malls. We are not concerned at all about the various brands
of religion, but we can see here what
we believe to be a flagrant violation
of press liberty and The Federatlonist
would be failing in its mission to
allow Buch a thing to pass without
protest. If actions of this kind are
to go without notice the time might
come when The Federationist itself
would get a dose; It ts not possible
to say what Influence has been
brought to bear on the authorities, but
there is good ground to assume that
this Is another example of ecclesiastical pressure using politicians for the
purpose of boosting their own particular nostrums. Moreover, it is only a
week or two since the North West
Review, the Roman Catholic organ ln
Winnipeg, suggested that the Orange
Sentinel Bhould be debarred from the
malls, and whilst we have no use for
either, we can see a pernicious principle at the back of lt all. The flght
for press freedom was fought long
ago at great cost, and no one hu
greater reason to assist ln preserving
lt than the Labor movement.
CAPITAL SCARED ONCE MORE
The British Trades Unton Congress
Is quietly seeking the opinion of lta
afflliated membership on the question of a simultaneous movement of
all workers tor an advance ot five
shillings per week. The tory Standard, in an article headed "Ruinous
Plot by Syndicalists," declares that
a combined move of miners, railway-
men and transport workers Is planned
for 1916, which will "paralyze British
trade and Imperil the country's prosperity." Why? Have we not been
assured long ago that "capital" waB
the only essential quantity ln Industry? Perhaps "capital" Is going on
strike. Or can It be that "trade" and
"prosperity" are solely the product of
the work of the workers? If not then
the workers should be pretty well off
ln a place like British Columbia, for
Instance, where we have just had such
a long run ot "prosperity." Yet our
streets are overflowing with unemployed, and private destitution has
surpassed all effort to cope with it.
So Where's the "prosperity" gone?
The other fellow must have lt. Now,
since he is practically admitting there
oan be no trade, or prosperity, or Industry without the worker, why does
not the worker see to lt tbat he gets
what Is due to his labor?
According to the local press the
Chinese murderer Ib an anarchist. By
the time he comes to trial he'll be a
socialist, and when the trial is over
he will be just about as bad as an
ordinary business agent.
Tom Mann has landed ln Capetown
without Interference front Botha,
Smutz & Co. It must have been a
bitter pill for them to swallow, and
the fact that they made lt themselves
would not sweeten lt any.
There are many varieties of fools,
but none quite so deyold of sense as the
ordinary civilian who voluntarily goes
out to try and capture an armed bank
robber. Let thieves catch their own
kind.   Keep your fool head out.
The Ottawa Evening Citizen says:
"There Is a healthy sign all over the
world that the average citizen Ib now
thinking and voting Independently."
They ought to come to B. C. and watch
the McBride Bowser machine. It
works "independently"—of everything
but Itself and Its heelers.
The provincial legislature of Ontario has turned down the bill,for the
proposed enfranchisement of married
women who are property owners. That
Is as lt should be. If women are to
be given the vote, then let It be ALL
women, and particularly those whose
only property Is their ability to labor.
If we've got to suffer Bowser as the
next premier of this province, why
uot settle the Job at one smack by
making him Emperor Billy? It Is
rumored that he has already Inquired
the price of tin hats, and Is deeply
interested ln studying the life and
poses of the Corslcan corporal.
Another bank has been "held up."
Just their own game put over them
by the Illegal thief. That's all. The
whole banking business Is based on
tbat portion ot wealth produced by
workers over and above their wages,
and which is taken aB profit, and which
again Is only legalized robbery made
possible by the density of the robbed,
General Smutz, referring to the exiled nine, says;
"Their action has resulted in
the recent departure ot thousands
ot workers. He feared that the
cherished white Ideal had been
shattered."
The nine were exiled for working
for a white Ideal—cleaning the Smuts
off South Africa.
C. W. Post, of grapenuts and postmortem coffee notoriety, boosted his
goods by the announcement that they
would prevent Indigestion and appendicitis. Out of the profits derived, he
spent a pile of money In fighting and
defaming organized labor. Two weeks
ago he was rushed, from Los Angeles
to Rochester, Minn., to be operated on
for appendicitis and chronic stomach
trouble. He bluffed the public with
lucrative success, hut "little Mary"
had* the last word as far as he was
concerned.
Why is it that less than a dozen
of the members of the Street Rallwaymen's Union were present at the
sessions of the arbitration board now
Bitting? Can lt be that they do not
realize the significance which their
presence would have held? Do they
suppose the company didn't notice
their absence and the lack of Interest
which lt Implied? Can't they Bee
what Is going to happen If the company has lt all Its own way? Can't
they see that the company Is only
stalling for time, and that the farther
they get away (rom the recent rise
in car farps the less will the sympathy
of the public be on the side ot the
men In case ot an open rupture? The
"standing room only" sign ought to
have been qut at every sitting of the
board.
When the Ottawa Citizen sets out
to be candid lt does the job properly.
Dealing ln a recent Issue with the
question of the Immigrant lt .says
"Wherever rough work and low wages
go together we have a job for the
Immigrant." Further on we are told
that "We owe to mere musole a measure ot recognition proportionate to
our need of muscle ln our boasted
material progress." Render unto
Muscle the things which are his-
wages—and unto Midas all the rest.
Well, well! Maybe some day muscle
will take a notion to render "a measure of recognition" to Itself and
meanwhile its not up to the other fellow to worry his head.
Now, Mr. A. F. Rutter comes from
Toronto. He makes paper and stationery and things like that at ordinary times, hut he's just been to Vancouver. He has no patience with the
people out here who .are "broke," and
says that If they had only put money
by for a "rainy day" conditions would
be prosperous Instead of as they are.
If he can produce a family budget
which will leave any margin over and
above the wages of the average workman out here even ln good times, he
will be able to demonstrate something
ln theory which any ordinary workman's wife will reduce to a heap of
ruins by her practical experience, In
very short time. What about the
thousands of destitutes and workless
In your own city, Mr. Rutter? They
get no chance to put by anything.
They only do the producing. You do
the "putting by."
Tbe Austrian government has Issued a lengthy warning to Austrian
workmen not to he misled by advertisements of South African mine
owners. The circular states that the
object Is to get Austrlans out there tn
place of striking miners, and at lower
wages, and displays a regard for the
Interests of Austrian workmen whloh
would be touching lt we bad not seen
the same wolf ln the same sheep's
clothes before. What Is really the
matter Is, that the Austrian capital-
lets are afraid that if the workers of
that country, leave there ln any considerable numbers lt may have the
effect ot causing a shortage of labor
with consequent rise ln wages. It
might also mean that many men
would thereby evade military service
and the supply of conscripts be reduced. That would mean there would
be less fools to put up as targets, and
the ruling classes who are responsible
for the circular mentioned would thus
be ln danger of losing some of their
landed possessions. Anyhow they
might Just as well stay at home and
be shot by the Russians as go to
South Africa and be shot by Botha.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention In January. Executive officers, 1914-16: Preildent, A. Watchman: vice-presidents, -W.
F. Dunn, H. J. McEwen, Geo. Hardy, J,
W. Gray, H, KundBon, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wella, Box 1538, Victoria, B, C.	
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B.C.
NEW WEBTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor
Hall. President, D. S. Cameron; flnanclal
secretary, H. Glbb; general secretary, W.
E. Maiden. P. O. Box 934. The publlo is
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTERS LO-
cal 495—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month ln Labor Hall,
7.30 p. m. President, D. Webster; secretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box S68, New
Westminster, B. C.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
penters, Local Union No. 1689—Meets
every Monday, 8 p. m., Labor Temple,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh street.
President, M. C. Schmendt; secretary, A.
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westminster, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MBBTS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
oorner Seventh stret and Royal. avenue,
every second Sunday of each month, at
1.80 p. m. President, F. S. Hunt; seoretary, F. W. - Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
VICTORIA, B. 0.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets first and third Wed*
nesday, Labor Halt, 731 Johnston itreet,
at 8 p.m. Preildent, George Dykeman;
lecretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box 808,
Vlotoria, B.C.
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners—Meets every Tuesday,
8 p.m., at Labor hall, 781 Johnston Bt.
President, A. Watchman; recording secretary, Geo. L. Dykeman; business agent
and financial seoretary, W. A. Parkinson, Box '238.
MINERS' UNION8
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. 100,
Western Federation of Mtoiers—Meete
Sunday evenings In Union Halt. President, Alex, Wilson; secretary-treasurer,
"   P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 2388, U. M. W. of A.—Meets Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan McKensle, Ladysmlth, B. C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M7 W. of
A.—Meets every Monday at 7.30 p. m,
In the Athletto Club, Chapel street.   Arthur Jor^an^Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND    LOCAL    UNION,    No.
2299, U. M. W. of A.—Meets   every
Sunday 7 p.m. ln U. M. W. of A. hall.
President, Jos. Naylor; secretary, James
Smith, Box 84, Cumberland, B. C.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No. 48—Meets sec--**
ond and fourth Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President,
H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding secretary, R. J,
Adams; business agent, J.
Black,   Room  220,   Labor
..     __ ___ Temple.	
BARhbjrb' LOCAL, NO. ISO—MBETR
«™a&con.'L »?•*.fourth Thursday**-. 8:80
BmV,p£58,dent' J- w- 0re«n: recorder, C.
H.  Herrltt; secretary-business agent, C.
LMf't11!? a?08' Labor T«npfi
Hours: H to I; 6 to 7 p.m.
Bartenders; local no. «7i.-of:
«„.flSe Tioom 208 Labor Temple.   Meets
F. F. Lavigne; flnanclal eecretary, Geo
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor Tenipte
HRICKLAYERS' ANb MASONS'. No' 1
~L« "•"'dent, James Haslett; corresponding secretary, W. 8. Daman; 35
U: flnanclal secretaryF. tt Brow?
business  agent  W.  £ DagrSn,  fi
BOSniESDTC-..1i0CAL union TK
105—Meets third Tuesday In everv
month I„ room 205, Labor Temp?. pKE
dent, F. J. Milne; vice-president, Wm
Bushman; secretary, George Mowat, 615
i£3STWaTWfc. secretary-treasurer, £
Perry, 1180 Tenth avenue east.
BR(1T!FtRH022 °S boiler makers'
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. ill-
Meets flrst and third Mondays, 8. p m
President, F. Barclay, 853 Co&oVa fait
seoretary, A. Fraser, 1151 Howe str-S." '
CIGARMAKBRS* LOCAL No. 357-MeetS
first Tuesday each month,, 8 pm!
2£?,dS,n\ £&ltY Hosklns; v\clVrtS-
dent, F. J. Brandt; secretary, Robert J.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, B
W. Johnson.
TRAIL    MILL    AND    SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p.m. President,
F. W. Perrln; secretary, Frank Campbell. Box 26, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. 81,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
every Saturday ln the Miners' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
DEMOCRATIC PARTY—Public meetings ln Colonial Theatre, corner Granville
and Dunsmuir Streets, Sunday evenings.
Secretary, J. Adams, Room 804 Labor
Temple.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. Federatlonist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
nous leymonr 876B
DIXON & MURRAY
OAinVfUl, BTO.
Ottos aad Store Kiting.   Osnsral
Jobbing
Offloa aad Bhopi
ion Dumnram tram
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper in
Canada. Price 50 cents per
year; 'In clubs of four, 26 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVILLB, P.Q.
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction, arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements,
ARTHUR   B.   BETCHLEY
8mythe and Qranvllle Streets
Auctioneer Sey 2973
PHONE SEYMOUR 8086
(A TRUST COMPANY)
THRIFT BEGAN
with civilization. It began as soon
as men realized that lt was necessary to provide for to-morrow as
well as for to-day. It began before
money was invented, Thrift means
private economy as well as the
order and management of a family, Samuel smiles, Industry earns,
economy manages, prudence plans,
frugality saves, but Thrift earns,
plans, manages and saves.
We pay 4% interest on savings
deposits, subject to cheque, and
credit the Interest
12 TIMES  A  YEAR
AGREEMENTS*
BOUGHT
COLLECTED,,
SKort,
l_0**M\S>
HtMia
Oow.Fr&ser L CoIirj
3I7-321 CwnbiK SLred.l
SAFETY DEPOSIT ■
HOXES FOR. RENT |P^^
DOW, FRASER & CO.; Ltd.
317-321   Gamble  Street; 2313  Main
Street, (between 7th and 8th Aves.)
Vancouver,  and  McKay Station,
Burnaby,  B. C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meets first and third Thursdays.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, president; J. H, MoVety, vlce-prealdent; Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Miss P. Brisbane, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnook, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing  director,  J.   H.   McVety,   Room  211.
ALLIED  PRINTING   TRADES   COUN-
CIL—Meets 2nd Monday In month,
President, Geo. Mowat; secretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box 86.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTBRB
meets second and fourth Thursday of
each month, 8 p.m. Secretary. J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby Btreet; business agent,
H. J. McEwen, room 209. Local 617 meets
first and third Monday of each month,
and Local 2647 meets first and third
Tuesday of eaoh month.
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1836.   Incorporated
by Koyal Charter in 1840.
Paid-up  Capital      -     14,868,866,68
Reserve Fund     -     -.    8,017,230.00
Head Offlce ln Canada:
BT. JAMBS ST., MONTREAL
H, B. MACKENZIE - Central Manner
SAVINGS  DEPARTMENT AT
ALU BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
Accounts on which Interest is allowed from date of deposit.
Open a Savings Account and add
to It every pay day.
Drafts and Money Orders sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
J, R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALB BRANCH
D. Nell, Manager,
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, busfnes representative. Offlce:
P°^2f,.?osJ ttm T«*PPle. Hours: > a.m.
to 10.80: 1 p.m. to 8.80 and S p.m. to 6 00
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO
213—Meets Room 801 every Monday
• p. :n. Preeldent, Dave Fink: vlce-presl-
S.<,n,'-.M- Sanger: recording seoretary,
Ro.' Elgar, Labor Temple: financial sec-
retaiy and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room g07. Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.... VI. 'Inside Men)—Meets first and
third Mondays of each month. Room SOS.
I p.m. President, H. P. McCoy; recording seoretary, Oeo. Albers; business
agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207.
LONGSHORBMENS' INTBRNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No. 38 z 62—Meet!
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander
street, President, S. J. Kelly; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS, NO. 1S2-MBETS SEC-
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. m.
President, A. R. Towler; recording secretary, J. Brookes; flnanolal secretary, J. H.
MoVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 233, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p. m. President, A. O. Hansen;
secretary-treasurer, O. R. Hamilton: business agent, H. I. Hugg, Offloe, Room 100,
Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 8045.	
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTTV*
. Union. Local No. 141. A F. of M.—
Meets second Sunday of each month,
room. u-80,. Williams Bldg.. 418 QraiS
villa stnet President, 3. Bowyer:
vice-president. F English: secretary.
H. J. Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler
OPERATIVF. PLASTERERS', INTER*.
„ NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. M-
Meets first and third Wednesday, O'Brlei
Hall, 8 p.m. President, G. Peon: cor-
responding secretary, F. Sumpter: financial secretary. D. Scott; treasurer. I. Tyson; business agent. Joe Hampton. Phons
Sey. 1fi14.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OI*
, NORTH AMERICA.-Vancouver and
vicinity. Branoh meetB 1st and 3rd Fridays'at Labor Temple, room 206. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.:
Jos. G. Loyn, financial secretary, 1721
Grant street; J. Campbell, recording secretary, 4869 Argyle street.
8TONF,Cl!TTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets seoond Tuesday. 8:06
p.m. President, J Marshall; corresponding secretary. Wm. Rowan, Box 1647;
flnanolal secretary, K. McKensle.
PAINTERS',    PAPERHANGERS'    AND
Decorator*'. Local 188—Meet every
Thuraday, 7.J6 p.m. President Skene
Thomson; financial secretary, J. Freckelton, 111 Seymour street; recording secretary, George Powell, 1660 Fourth ava.
west. Business agent, James Train,
room 808, Labor Temple.
■ Ti.-noTvTTPS' AND ELECTROTYP-
er«' Union. No. 18. of Vancouver
nnd Victoria.—Meets second Wednesdar
of each month. 4 p.m.. Labor Templt.
President, Chas. Bayley: recording secretary, Chris Homewood, 241 18th Ave
East.
STREET AND BLECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No, 101
—Meets 'Labor Temple, seoond snd
fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m., aiid flnt
end third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President
Adam Taylor: recordlnr secretary.
Albert V. Lofting, 2186 Trinity Street!
phone Highland 1672: flnanclal secretary,
Fred. A. Hoover. 2406 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,  INTERNATTOW-
al Local 117—Meets every Wednesday, I p.m.; Room 204. Labor Temple.
Financial secretary, E. Prendergast.
Room 111.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal), Local No. 178—Meetings
held flnt Tuesday in eaoh month, I p. m.
President. H. Nordlund: recording secre-
tary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanclal
secretary, L. Wakley, P. O. Box t"
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 826-
Meets last Sunday eaeh month, t
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlplece; vice-
president, W. S. Metsger, secretary-
treasurer, R, H. Neelands, P, O. Box 66.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets second Sunday
of each month at Room 284, Labor Temple, President, H, Spears; recording seoretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
$102,954.00
A month is the amount of money
those connected with the printing
offices of Oreater Vancouver are
handling, or a little more than
123,758 every week and $3,958 each
work day, which will be spent with
the merchants of Vancouver. Don't
you think, Mr. Merchant, lt would
be the proper thing for you to
dsmand thu label on your printing?
IT COSTS NO MORE
It is printed at home, and you will
thus secure your share of this
vast amount of printers'
VANCOUVER    ALLIED    PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL
&£****»&
Of America rtQxr
corT.itHTSTmDiHAaK.ratTtMB.ioa FRIDAY APHIL 17, \tli
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE FTVTE
A WORD TO THE UNION MAN
The Union Label ahould atand Ior quality ot material, fit and make-up
of garment, aa well aa the sanitary conditions of a factory,
wage, paid, etc.
A copy of this guarantee goes with every garment
manufactured by us.
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturers of
MAO'S MOGAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIBTS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THE MASTER SHIRT
1176 Homer St., Vancouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831
This garment la guaranteed aa to workmanship, quality of material,
fullness of slse, buttons securely fastened, buttonholes well made,    .
Anyone wearing* one of our garments and finding lt defective will do
us a favor by either returning It to his dealer or mailing lt to us to be
exchanged for another.
All our garments bear the label of the
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA.
You are Invited to visit our factory.
WM, J. HoMABTZR & BONS, LTD.
Per Jas. A. McMaster,
Managing Director.
JAMES STARK USS
unroll iibmt wan
Mora monte, iieo Am. a im ua.
■•tarter siM aa. te MO fn
THB STORB THAT BBRVES TOU WELL
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AT 33$ OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
FOR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE WINDOW 8HADE
DEPARTMENT
We purpose making window shades to your own measurements,
and guarantee the work to be first-olass In every particular.
OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH ON  HARTSHORN'S SPRING  ROLLERS
Patterns of materials displayed ln department, second floor. The whole
continent knows the quality of HARTSHORN'S SPRING ROLLERS.
It's necessary to bring your measurements. We do no fitting. We only
guarantee correctness in executing your orders.
This Is an exceptional oiler and will prove a saving to all householders
with window shades to buy—Don't let this opportunity pass by sny means;
measure up the window with the broken shade now.
CHOOSE YOUR MATERIALS FROM DEPARTMENT PATTERNS.—
Hollands, Imported Lancaster, Daly and Moren's Peerless Shade Cloths.
Opaque Window Shades   Regular esc. for «o.
onHartshornspring   *«£&S:::::•:::::»;
Rollers Reg. ,1.35 for. 90c.
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT  SALE OF   BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $5.00, for. $3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for $2.95
SEE THE WINDOWS
FRANK NEWTON
We keep the largest and most
complete line ot MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices whloh cannot ba duplicated. '.
Everything Is to be found here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada's Snap Specialist
104 and IM CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE   STORE   IS  THE   SPOT  FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Keep the Children Healthy
by sending them out ln the fresh air these flne days. There's nothing better for keeping them exercised than wheeled goods.
Our stock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAGONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAGONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, Is easily tho finest and.most comprehensive In the
elty and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co.. Ltd.
...   UAeTIMnc   oTDErr   WSBT \, a .wa, ,.,*...     —   i.
325 HASTINGS STREET WIST
BEST IN THE WEST
VANCOUVER, B, C.
ESTABLISHED 1886
CANADAATAGLANCE
Industrial Items of Interest
From All Over the
Dominion
Condensed From the Exchanges and Special
Correspondence
%J 1  %J  I  JLllYlfcJ        f0r the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
Phone Exchange Say. 3526-3527
331 Dunsmuir Straet
Toronto Brewery Workers
The brewery workers of Toronto
organised In the United Brewery
Workers have signed up an agreement with the breweries of Toronto.
In addition to a substantial increase
ln wages the agreement provides for
four paid holidays ln each year.
Palntera Seek Raise
Montreal painters and decorators
have decided to ask for an increase of
5 centa per hour. The old soaie called
for 36 cents per hour. There are
about 250 members ln the Montreal
local.
Typo Scale Report
The periodical wage scale report
Just issued by the International Typographical union shows tbat about
thirty-five thousand members, or
about one-half of the total membership of the unton, have received Increases ln their wages since March
1, 1912. The total increase is esti-
mated to amount to about $2,690,000
a year. The average increase per
member has been approximately $1.46
a week.
Reglna Musicians
The Musicians' Union in Reglna report that the Imperial   Band,   with
which tbey have   had   many differ,
ences, has now joined them tn a body.
Fell Eighty-six Feet
Russell Graham, while working on
the new traffic bridge across the
Thompson river, near Lytton B. C.,
Wednesday last week, lost his balance and fell into the lcey waters 86
feet below. He was unhurt, and came
swimming to the bank none the worse
for his mishap. Mr. Graham Is a
member of the Vancouver Bridge and
Structural Ironworkers' union, is 26
years of age, a native of Prince Edward Island, unmarried, and has been
ln British Columbia about a year.
Waiters Organize
Unless conditions under which Toronto, Ont., waiters work are modified
the workers in restaurants in that
city threaten to strike. They also
want higher wages. Leading labor
men will organize them into a union.
Bluffing at Montreal
Unionists at Montreal - are filing
complaints to the authorities because
of tbelr inactivity In enforcing the
workmen's so-called "fair wage"
clause, which, lt is said, is overlooked
In many cases when the government
lets contracts, ln a letter on this subject, the board of business agents
says: "Representatives of the department call upon us and try to make us
believe that they are dealing with
these grievances, but when they leave
and nothing Is done to adjust our
grievances, we have pointed out to
them that the growing opinion that
the department is playing a game of
bluff is firmly implanted among our
members."
Canada'a Shipping Act
The present Canada Shipping act
is- merely a collection ot the various
acts, with amendments , that have
been passed during the last forty
years. So many changes and improvements have taken place in that
time In shipping matters that lt has
become necessary to rewrite the
whole act so as to meet the requirements of the present day.
Double Funeral
Thomas G. Edwards and Alexander
Jordan met with a fatal accident
through a premature blast while at
work on the 300-foot level of the
Jewel mine, Greenwood, B.C., on
March 31st. The funeral was held on
Friday under auspices of the Miners'
union, I. O. O. F. and the Eagles. Rev.
J. R. Munro conducted the services.
Will Smoke Calgary Weeda
Following the agitation Instituted
by the Calgary Trades and Labor
council for the more general use of
Calgary made cigars by real Calgary
boosters, the union men of that city
are combining to buy local goods, in
preference.to others.
Building Conditions In Calgary
John K. Walsh, a Winnipeg contractor and builder who was at Calgary
recently for a few days, states that
while business seems fairly good ln
Edmonton, considerably more building on a large scale will be done at
Calgary this year.
Quebec Pressman Set Increase
W A. Vlokery, Toronto, the Canadian' organizer, reports that for the
Printing Pressmen and Assistants'
union in the oity ot Quebec, a five
year agreement has been placed ln
operation. Increases of $3 per week
to pressmen and $2 per week in the
feeders and assistants have been scoured. A strong membership has also
been received, so tbat the union of
Quebec has 96 per cent, of the pressmen and assistants working in that
oity, with the union shop agreement
Labor Controls 8mlth'a Falla
Smith's Falls, Ont,, is reported to
be the best organized labor town per
ratio in Canada. It is the only town
in the dominion that Is governed by
the laboring men in both city coun
ell and school board.
3. KEIR HARDIE.
Who retired from the chairmanship of
the Independent Labor Party last week
after twenty-one years' continuous service.
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
Painters on Strike
A strike of painters ln Montreal Is
said to be a possibility of the near
future, 1,000 men being Involved. The
painters now receiving 36 cents an
hour demand an increase of 6 cents
an hour. Last year when they were
getting 30 cents they demanded 40
cents, but as a compromise was accepted at 36 cents, the figure which
they now want raised.
Nine Hours for Reglna Carpentera
The carpenters of the city are negotiating with the Builders' Exchange
for a recognized minimum scale and
a nine hour work day. We believe
that the Builders' Exchange are favorably considering the nine hour day,
seeing that the carpenters are the
only building trade In the city wblch
aB a body are working on the ten hour
system. Some of the employing
painters are also owrklng their men
ten hours, but ot course that would
Btop on the recognition of the nine
hour day by the Builders' Exchange.
The ten hour day is a disgrace to the
city and a decided setback to the idea
of western progress. Here's hoping
its days are numbered.—Leader.
Building In North Country
A Calgary dispatch states that the
greatest general building activity in
Western Canada for the next five
years will be in the Peace River country and other parts of northern Alberta. They say that new towns
springing up there will give plenty of
work to members bf their craft. Carpenters are making $100 a week.
OF hAANY UNIONS
ARE IDLE
Building Trades Committee
Formed—Against Japs
Fishing on River
Tearing Down Old Chinese
Shacks—Patronize Union
Brewery Workers
"The Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
Alleged Socialist Domination
Editor B. C. .Federatlonist: > Replying to the Herald article of Sunday
morning, the Chief hobby of the writer
ln this editorial seems to be that of
standing and making lying attacks
upon the socialist movement, and
he has not the honorableness to do so
ln the open, but attacks under the
guise of imputing that the U. M. W.
of iA. is dominated by the socialists.
The flrst charge contained in this
dual method, which he seeks to es-
tablih is that some unwashed, empty,
and false assertion of "putting Nanalmo on the hog." The writer may
have suffered some primary loss, due
to the strike; that makes him bo reckless ln his spurious charges against
socialism, and evidently desires to
revenge himself on ' something or
somebody. He must know that this
charge Ib as false as false can be. If
it was at all a possible truism, then
these men having tbelr homes and
what little they possess'In Nanalmo,
aided to dispossess themselves too,
of the little they owned, and share ln
the general oblivion mapped ont. This
is too Insane to be considered, and to
find credence by any writer wishing
to be considered honorable. It ts more
—it is in the last analysis, superficial
nonsense. The next charge of this
writer is that a member of the U. M.
W. of A. becomes a socialist, and "enrolls under the red flag of anarchy."
All lt is really necessary to say In
form of reply Is, that this charge is
unvarnished falsehood; and here is
the proof: First, a man becoming a
member of the U. M. W. of A. does
not commit himself to any political
or religious party. Second, neither is
he asked to obligate himself to anything that interferes with his faith ln
any suoh matter. This is He number
one nailed. Third—The red flag and
anarchy is even more dishonorable
as charged and more viciously false,
and here is the proof: The red flag as
the ensign of socialism, is also the
emblem of the red blood of a common
brotherhood of man. Further, the red
flag and socialism is versus anarchy.
If the writer will show that anarchy
is socialism, he then may, claim a
right to be heard In court, but to
charge a connection between the two
teachings Is just as true as lt would
be to state that the north and the
south pole had joined. Follow the
logic of this astute logician and soon
you will discover the shallowness of
his pretensions. In one breath he
states that a man becoming a member
of the U. M. W. ot A. "inevitably enrolls himself under the red flag of
anarchy," and then again he further
states that "there are exceptions".
Here are not only a contradiction in
terms, but ln logic also. If members
of the U. M. W. of A. become as such
members enrolled under the red flag
of anarchy as stated, then there oan
not be any deception. The truth Is
that aB previously proven that a man
becoming a member of the U. M. W.
of A. does not and cannot make him
a member of the socialist party, or
that of the anarchists' association, as
all these bodies are distinctly different in object, principle and policy. Lie
number two nailed. The next venomous and fallacious assumption of this
renegade, and would-be disturber of
the peace, is that socialism professes
a brotherhood abroad and expresses
Itself by clubbing a brother at home.
Also that "they caused the conditions
which necessitated the calling out of
the militia.". Now, Mr. Editor, who
are the parties that precipitated conditions? Why the Western Fuel company, whose petty bosses and underlings went to the homes of the weak
among the men on strike, and Induced
a number of them to commence strikebreaking, and where or what was this
writer of the Herald doing at the
time? I have heard men who are
honorable citizens of Nanalmo state
that had lt not been for the lash and
urged against the oause of the
NBW WESTMINSTER, April 13.-
The attendance at the laat meeting of
the Trades and Labor counoll was the
best for a long time, and fifteen out
of the twenty-one Unions comprising
the council were represented.
President D. 8. Cameron called the
meeting to order promptly at 8
o'clock. After the approval of the
minutes, A. Harvey, trom the tailors,
vice Frotherglll, and T, A. Barnard,
as the fourth delegate from the Steam
and Operating Engineers, presented
credentials and were duly obligated
and seated.
Immigrants and Unemployed
A letter from the Hamilton Trades
and Labor council, protesting against
the means taken by unscrupulous
transportation companies to secure
the emigration of people from foreign countries thereby flooding the
country with workers looking for employment, while tbere were thousands
of unemployed walking the streets of
every city ln the dominion, was read.
The aotlon taken by the Hamilton
Trades council was endorsed, and the
secretary was instructed to comply
with the request that letters be sent
to old country papers telling of the
situation in this part of the country.
An invitation from the United Mine
WorkerB of Vancouver island to participate in tbe celebration at Nanalmo on May 1st was received nad or
dered filed.
The treasurer's report for the quarter ending March 31st was read and
ordered flled for reference. The receipts since the last report were
$118.30; expenditures $98.76; balance
on hand $19.66.
Building Trades Committee
The building trades committee reported having met and organized. The
rules read at a previous meeting of
the council had been considered and
adopted, with but a few minor
changes. The report was adopted
with the changes suggested by the
committee.
Under the head of reports of unions
the barbers reported having removed
the card from the Hub barber shop
for violation of shop rules and scale
ot prices. It was stated that the
proprietor had put in effect prices
which were considerably below the
standard Bet by the Asiatics; ln fact,
he was actually scabbing on the Japs.
The only reason given was that he
was sore at his customers leaving
him. The matter was referred to the
grievance committee to see If the
shop could be brought Into line again.
If not the shop to be placed on unfair
list at once.
Entire Membenhlp Out of Work
Conditions ln the various trades
were reported as about the same.
Many of the unions had almost their
entire membership out of work or
working short time. But ln spite of
the- bad conditions at present, an Improvement all along the line was looked for soon. In this connection several of the delegates stated that ln
order to secure what work was going
on many were working below the union scale. This was deeply deplored,
but under the circumstances nothing
oould be done to remedy lt at the
present time.
On motion of Delegate Tates the
secretary was instructed to have 600
copies of the constitution printed, and
the new code of laws governing the
council was declared ln effect from
April 8th.
Against Japs Fishing
Delegates Cameron, Barnard and
Olbb were appointed a committee to
represent the council at the mass
meeting to be held by the fishermen
to protest against Asiatics being allowed to flsh on the Fraser above the
bridge. The expression of the council was against the Japs being allowed
to fish anyvmerc on the river, and
the sooner they were excluded from
the province entirely the better it
would be for the workers of both city
and country.
nalmo. Just because all the ribald
madness of theBe columns have not
been able to keep the union down ln
its flght, lt still aspires to tantalize
and sling mud, This writer uses all
despotic terms when venting spite
upon the cause he seems to so much
hate. He talks of clubbing brothers,
if any clubbing waB done then lt waB
done by the specials who were
brought Into Nanalmo, who always
are allowed of course, to carry such
brutal weapons, and use them aB the
law demands. The writer seems to
be offering much comment these days
respecting the struggle affecting political prestige. ThlB is too bad. How
ever, be sure his sin will flnd him out
and he can be assured tbat the way
of the transgressor Ib hard. Tbls
writer would like the United Mine
WorkerB of America to be shipped out
as undesirables, like Botha did with
the labor leaders from South Africa.
Why does he not ask Attorney-General Bowser to allow him to do so, and
if granted ot course he could then rid
himself of the necessity for the repeated invasions of mud slinging.
PRESS COMMITTEE,
Nanaimo, B. C.
MINARD'S   LINIMENT   RELIEVE8
NEURALGIA
Removal Announcement
CENT£R&HANNA,Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December-
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,'
one block west of Court House.
Use of Modern ChapelntidFuni-ial
Parlors free to nil patrons
We will now make Man-Tailored
Suits to Your Measure for $25.00
A change has heen made in our tailoring department which enables us to give a reduction on the
cost of making of our STEICTLT MAN TAILORED SUITS.'
The change in price will in no way affect the high
standard of workmanship. We will guarantee
you entire satisfaction as heretofore.
All work as usual will be under the expert supervision of our Ur. Frederick
and in order to take advantage' of the splendid
service and exceptionally low price ALL GOODS
MUST BE PURCHASED HERE.
Trade unionists and their frlendi ihould remember that "thli itore dote* at ilx
o'clock «ery day—Saturday included, a fact T«ry much appreciated by oar em-
ployeei aad an example worthy of emulation by others. Try and do your shopping In the forenoon.
LIMJTtO
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
(ton Hours 8.90 to • p.m.
Saturdays Included
J
WEBSTER'S SroSS
MILK, B. C, 20 02. cans, each
10 cents, per dozen $1.10
TOMATOES, large cans, each
12$jc, per dozen 11.35
PORK AND BEANS, large 3-
,1b. cans, each 10c, doz...$1.10
PLUMS, G. G., in heavy syrup,
a-lb. cans, 2 for 15
PINEAPPLE, large cans, I! for
    3tt
WEEKLY PRICE LIST «
BUTTER, finest New Zealand,
3 lb» '....$1.00
FLOUR, in 49 lb. sacks...$1 JO
FLOUR,   pastry, 10-lb.   sacks,
each     m
ROLLED OATS, fresh milled,
8 pounds for tl
FREIGHT PREPAID ON OOODS WITHIN 100 MILES
The Webster IBros.
LIMITED
PHONES;  SEY. 8301, S302 1270 GRANVILLE STREET
HOMEOPATHISTS
Wa oarry a full atock of
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US SUPPLY YOU
MARETT &""REID
167 HASTINOS ST. W.
WHITE STAR
:S[RVIC[-lARG[ST5VRArCAHA01l
LIVERPOOL
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New 8.8. "Laursntle" (15,000 tons), new S.S. "Magantle."
First Class, 102.60 Second Claaa, 153,75 Third Class, 132.60
ONE CLASS <n.) CABIN SERVICE
Express 8.8. "Teutonic"    '     (Twin Screw Steamers) 8.8. "Canada"
682 feet long (150.00 and up). 614 feet long (3rd class $31.28 and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
BOSTON QUEENSTOWN
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN 8ERVICE
S.S. "Arable" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamers) S.S. "Cymric"
16,000 tons, 600 feet long (Rata 153.76)    13,000 tons, 600 ft. long (Rats 152.60)
610-2nd AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
LET IT RAIN
LET IT HAIL
Let It Snow if it will,
Royal Crown ii Supreme
And ia eailly still
The Beit Soap in the West
for the Laundry, and
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
OLEANSES-PURIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY. APRIL 17, MM
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Ratei to Permanent
Gueiti
COTTINGHAM ft BEATTY
Proprietor!
GO W,TH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
L
PENDER HOTEL
New, Modern, First-Class
Steam Heated, Electric Llfhtad
Telephone Seyaeaw ISSf.
Rates 11.60 per Day and Up.	
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our buitnesa Is Increasing li duo to the foot that our Dullness policy Is correct. We adopted the polloy of Informing the public
through the medium of the press as to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearae, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This has established confidence with the public in us, and for that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue as we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center A Hanna's Branch
|PATENTS
Trada Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FITHER8TONHAUQH   A CO.
The Old established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
10M Rogers Bldg., Oranvllle Strset
City. Phone Seymour »79«.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offloe and Chapel,
1084 Oranvllle St, Phone Sey. III).
North Vancouver — Offloe and
ohapel, 111 Second SL H. Phone
114.
Diseases of Men
Wa luue a written guarantee
that ZIT will euro or your money
bade.
Dlffera from all other remedies.
Prlee Si.00, Port Psld.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
1S2 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. O.
Phose Ssy. 221
D.j.rNi|kl
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 RickirJi St.        Vsacener, B. C.
DsrANIeht Calls
Phone Bar. 043
ParionftCbepel
2398 GruiYlll. SI.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
PATRONIZE LABOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
"DICK" RIGG.
The energetic Secretary Business Agent
of   the  Winnipeg   TradeB   and   Labor
Counoll.   Recently eleoted alderman of
that city.
OALOARY CARPENTERS
Amalgamated and Brotherhood Join Forces
The Amalagamted Carpenters and
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters
have amalgamated under the name of
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters' organization of Calgary. Thero
are 621 members. James Rae is business agent. The amalgamation was
effected at a meeting of the union
carpenters of Calgary, at the Labor
Temple laat week, which was attended hy 193 members from both organizations, James Rae, A. Wilson, J. B.
McKenzle were nominated for the
position ot business agent. Mr. Rae
secured the largest vote on a majority of five over Wilson, the election
later being declared unanimous. Mr.
Rae Is one of the best known carpenters in the city, and those Interested
in the trade look for harmonious relations between the carpenters and
master builders, now that he had
been elected.
Ignorance of the law never prevents
the losing attorney from collecting his
bill.
Minard's Liniment Co., Limited,
Yarmouth, N. S.
Gentlemen,—In January last, Francis Leclare, one of the men employed
by me, working in the lumber woods,
had a tree tall on him, crushing him
fearfully. He was when found, placed
on a sled and taken home, where
grave fears were entertained for his
recovery, his. hips being badly bruised
and his body turned black from his
ribs to his feet We used MINARD'S
LINIMENT on him freely to deaden
the pain and with the use of three
bottles he was completely cured and
able to return to his work.
SAUVBUR DUVAL.
Elgin Road, L'Islet Co., Que.
REFUSE ANY LONGER
IDE
IE
Canadians Favor Solidarity
Idea Regardless of Boundary Lines
Workers Olose the Gap and
Seal Unionism Is
Triumphant
The late advices from the city of
Quebec state that "longheaded" and
practical trade unionists are winning
their fight against a rampant "Jingo"
spirit that would separate Dominion
organized workers from their fellows
ln the United) States by the establishment of "Canadian unions." This
theory had strong supporters among
Quebec workers, but the intelligent
and aggi-essive stand of Canadian
bona Sde unionists.is slowly bringing
about a change of sentiment in favor
of international unionism, which has
been strengthened in this city because
of gains made by the legitimate printing crafts unions and the hostility ot
manufacturers to even the Canadian
Federation of Shoe Workers, whose
members   find   themselves   helpless
A Two Months' Strike
and which is causing many of them to
favor the action ot their Montreal
associates, who recently united with
the bona fide organization of Boot and
Shoe Workers, afflliated to the American Federation ot Labor. The gains
referred to above by the printing
crafts unions are most substantial.
The printing pressmen and assistants
now have enrolled 96 per cent, of the
eligible members and have just signed
a five-years' contract for the union
shop, and an Increase to pressmen of
t3 per week and $2 per week to feeders and assistants. Representatives of
the Typographical union have secured
tor their members the union shop, a
five years' agreement and wage Increases of S3 a week. The success of
these workers will result In the formation ot an Allied Printing Trades
council. „
Automatic Employment Agencies
A Los Angeles inventor has installed a "job seekers'" slot machine
on the streets. The glass case shows
cards stating conditions offered by
employers. Dropping a quarter in the
slot releases the corresponding card,
which bears the employers' address
on the back. It he finds the job taken,
the quarter is refunded by the firm
operating the machine.
A Bad Case
My husband always puts ten cents
on the plate on Sunday.
I shouldn't think that would do
much good in a case like his.
FRED.  BANCROFT.
Vice-president Trades and Labor  Congress of Canada, who ts leading the
flght   for   workmen's compensation In
Ontario.
FATAL ACCIDENTS
Reported in Mines of British
Columbia in 1913
In a report on the mine accidents In
1913 by Thos. Graham, chief Inspector
ot mines, the fatalities ln coal mines
were put at twenty-seven, one less
than in 1912, In metalliferous mines
the fatalities were thirteen, an Increase of five over 1912. In the coal
mines the ratio of fatal accidents per
1,000 persons employed was 4.06, compared with 3.93 ln 1912; in metalliferous mines it was three, compared with
2.10 for 1912. The use of non-freezing
powders, Mr. Graham believed, would
reduce the accidents from drilling
into miss-holes ln metalliferous mines.
He also called attention to the usefulness of pulmotors even ln metalliferous mines. There was one mine
inspector for every 1,837 mine workers ln British Columbia; in Great
Britain the number of mine inspectors
worked out at one for every 21,904
persons employed. Not more than
forty per cent, of the accidents was
due to causes inherent in the business
and unavoidable; sixty per cent, was
due to the negligence of workers, or
lack of maintenance of proper discipline by responsible officials.
FORT WILLIAM'S EFFORT.
Unionists Give Services Free to Build
Temple
The Trades and Labor council of
Fort William Issued a call for volunteers to work on the new Labor
Temple ln that city on Good Friday.
The result was that a young army of
union building tradesmen turned out.
The way they ate up the work was a
revelation to local contractors, and
by night the building was well advanced.
When you go to spend your wages
remember our advertisers. They help
you. So you should help them.
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold   .
Water in every Room.     .:■:      European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
FIREPROOF
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.  L.  WALLINOFORD,  Manager
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKING THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU   HELP YOUR  FELLOW  UNION   MEN  AND   BESIDES, YOU  QIT
THE VERY  BEST  VALUE  FOR YOUR  MONEY
HOTEL
C0NNAUGHT
HAY A DEPTFORD, Props.
PHONE SEYMOUR TMT-T0II.
Buopean naa, VIM *tt Day V*.
Up-to-Datt     First-Class     Dlnlni
Room and Cafe ln Conneotlon
110   ROOMS;   10   ROOMS   WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone In Dverr
Room—Elevator  Serviceaj    Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
4N nuDiB nun was*.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
I«ai $3 ptr wed I—   | Telephone, Hot aal
Up. Good Service Throughout      cu wmr i. uck
D. F. Foaaeten, Pro. I ;  I Rata,
33-35 HA8TINOS STREET WEST VANCOUVER, B. C.
Richly Furnished Throughout.
Finest Oaf* aat <MU I
Hot and Cold Water In Bvery Room
i oa «u radio Ooaat U OoaaeMm
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager,
■ateai SIM' aal ex   Spielol Weekly Batoa.
nsonu tuur wis:
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL JgJ &™S£S£_
Maadaomelr Famished SB6 Seymour St. OuMIy Located
EVERY   UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
fAMAhA   MILLIONS OF ACRES
L./\l jr\\Jr\ OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
Six months' residence upon and cultivation of the land in eaoh of three years, A homesteader may live within nine miles of his homestead on a farm of
at least 80 acres solely owned and occupied by him or his father, mother, son, daughter, brother or sister,
In certain distriots a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside his homestead. Price $3.00 per aore, Duties—Must
reside six months in each of six years from date of homestead entry (including the time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty aore* extra.
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D.SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA
—i~-
■■■ ,1 '
■"i'U r
FRIDAY APRIL 17, 1914
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
FEDERATIONIST WESTMINSTER ADVERTISERS
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, 11,000,000.00. —mm ttat, eeoo.000.00
BalMoriboa, H01.000.00
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Eatatoa managed tor out-of-town and city client!. Payments collected and forwarded or invested. We act aa agents only for the
purchase and aale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT ,
Head Ofllce:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Weatminster, B. C.
.    1.1. fosse, Maisflir Blzeotn
J. A. Senate, Seeretarr-Xnasursr.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Ssootaeoie ta Orator a Sanaa, SM.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
NBW WESTMINSTBR, B. C.
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS
union Made
Havana Filled
YOUR CHOICE OF A BEER
In choosing a beer that Is to be yonr favorite brand—the one to
call tor In public places—the one to use in your home—you want a
brew that measures up well to your Judgment of what a good beer
ahould be like.
WINEWEISER Bottled Beer
meets every requirement of the discriminating beer drinker. Its
flavor is exquisite. It-has the clarity and lite and zest that denote
finest quality, and last, but not least, you will flnd that It will "agree"
with you. And this beoause lt is thoroughly aged, or matured, before
lt leaves the brewery. 4
Remember to call for WINEWEISER. And why not order a case
aent home?
ASK YOUR DEALER
Vancouver Distributor: A. E. SUCKLING & CO.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY     NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
T«ADE *_jjl\ MAR1*
*** -^SQ~ -
BraTds
Best
Coffee
t.^fl.BRAIDtt"5,,,
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
(OT&Si
vWORKERSUNlOH
UNipwrcrAMPi
Named Shoes ue frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what It* name, unless lt bear* A
plain and readable Impression or thl* stamp.
AU thoes without tha Union Stamp ar*
alwaya Non-Union;
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
146 Summer Street, Boston, Mus.
J. F. Tobln, Pre*.   C. L. Blaine, 8ae.-Trea*.
NEW WESTMINSTER UNIONS
EDITEP BY H. OIBB, BOX 034, NBW WESTMINSTER
OF I CHINESE
5T
Special Meeting of the City
Council Holds Lively
Session
Deputation of Trades and
Labor Council Granted
Hearing
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 15.—
There Is a Board ot Trade, a Progressive Association, Women's Counoll
and churches galore ln this city, each
one of them loudly proclaiming to the
world the great work they are doing
for the betterment ot thia olty, In particular, and humanity ln general, but
it remained for the Trades and Labor
oounoil to take the Initiative by instructing its municipal committee to
attend the city counoll and present to
that body Its views In regard to the
condemnation of the unsightly dilapidated and unsanitary shacks harboring the Oriental population ln the
lower end of the city, and back up the
oounoil ln Its efforts to have them removed after being several times condemned by Chief Watson ot the fire
department, and Building Inspector
Thos. Turnbull.
Late yesterday afternoon the city
council held a special meeting for the
purpose of considering the recommendations ot the Are chief and the building Inspector that certain buildings
in Chinatown be torn down. These
buildings had been codSemned by the
two officials referred to, but the owner's or their agents strenuously objected to the destruction of the structures, even though they might be a
menace to the health and the safety
ot the city. When the counoll met,
a delegation from the looal Trades
and Labor council was present to support the recommendations of the fire
chief and building inspector, while attorneys and guardians represented
the property owners. The very first
case taken up was argued by W. J.
Whiteside for the guardian of an orphan, owher of the property. A single
question by Seoretary Maiden, ot the
Trades and Labor council, resulted in
the disclosure of the fact that the or
phan owned property worth more
than $40,000, and this so Incensed the
attorney that he objected to the laborltes "butting ln," claiming that it was
a matter solely between his client and
the city oounoil.
Aid. Dodd quickly took exception to
the remarks of the attorney and
showed the utter fallacy of Mr. Whiteside's argument, because the council
were not doing private business but
public business, ln which every citizen was Interested tn having the bylaw carried out without tear or favor,
and lt was to the interests of the
whole olty to have the slums cleaned
out both on the grounds of health and
morality. These shacks are a continual menace to surrounding property and also responsible for the high
Insurance which surrounding business
houses have to pay. They are all in
a delapidated condition and absolutely unfit for human habitation.
Their sanitary conditions are of the
worst, making this locality a Blum of
the very worst kind. It was shown
that the Trades council was the only
organization that was really alive to
the sitiuatlon in backing up the
efforts ot the city council ln. trying to
clean up the city.
Then a motion was put through that
the Trades and Labor council dele-
After a Hard
Day's Work
fteer
Will take the tiredness all away.
The tonic properties of our B. C.
Hops, and the nourishing Alberta Barley Malt combine to give
you food, medicine, and delicious
beverage—all in one.
Keep CASCADE in the house.
Order a case from your dealer.
Pints $1 the dosen; Quarts $2
the dozen. Keep your money in
Vancouver by specifying
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
PARKER WILLIAMS, M. P.
Who will apeak at the miners' Hay-day
celebration In Fernle, B. C.
gates be heard when all the cases had
been laid before the council. This was
negatived by a motion extending the
life of some of the buildings ln question for a year, but this was only
three months longer than the time
recommended by the city officials.
Several were ordered torn down within 30 days. As there was little use In
the delegation waiting any longer,
they withdrew, .with the exception of
the secretary, who remained until the
close ot the session. AU of the settlements effected were In the nature
of a compromise, but ln effect gave
the city officials far more than tb,ey
had expected without resorting to
legal measures to obtain the ends they
sought.
Just before the session ended Mayor
Gray asked Secretary Maiden if he
had anything to say on the mater, and
the latter replied to the effect that
tbe TradeB and Labor council delegation had been sent down with blanket
instructions to support the recom
mendations of the fire chief and the
building inspector, as the Trades and
Labor council considered them two of
the most able and efficient city officials. Regarding the gratuitous remarks of Mr. Whiteside, he pointed
out that neither Mr. Whiteside nor
his client had been given permission
to speak by the city council, but they
had spoken at the Invitation of the
mayor, as he had done, and he did not
consider that the Trades and Labor
council delegates were "butting ln"
snd should not have been accused of
doing such a thing.
The mayor acquiesced in this view,
so the laborltes came out better in
the end than lt appeared they would
at the Btart, and there is no doubt but
that their presence served to help the
city officials ln obtaining concessions
from property owners in the -Chinese
section ot the city.
STREET RAILWAY
Employment Is Far From
" Encouraging
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 16.—
Quite a noticeable improvement in the
attendance was noted at the last regular meeting of the Street Railway
Employees' union, held on Tuesday,
April 14th, and lt is very evident that
the subject matter of the circular letter sent out by President Yates, calling attention to the lack of Interest
in the union shown by the members,
had been taken into earnest consideration by the membership and the
attendance ln future will be nearer
what it should be.
A lengthy report was received from
the business agent on grievances and
the arbitration proceedings now going on with the company.
Four withdrawal cards were granted and two traveling cards issued.
Petitions for signatures for the release of the remaining Vancouver
island miners now in jail were placed
In the hands of committees and an
active campaign will be Inaugurated
to have them tilled at once.
he question of the withdrawal of
the division from the B. C. Federation
of Labor waB laid over till the next
meeting.
Reports from various departments
showed more men Idle than ever and
the outlook at present, as far as
steady employment is concerned, is
far fro mencouraging.
TIMBER WORKERS MEET
Fred 8mlth Elected Secretary, Vice
Oscar Holmes
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 16.—
The International Union ot Timber
Workers, formerly the Shingle Weavers' local, of Fraser Mills, held their
regular bi-monthly meeting on Sunday last ln the Labor Temple. The
resignation ot Secretary Oscar Holmes
was accepted, he having decided to
leave this city for his former home in
Snohomish county, Washington. Bro.
Holmes' resignation was accepted
with regret, and the well wishes of
his brother members will follow him
aoross the border. Bro. Fred Smith
waB elected to All the vacancy. Six
hundred members of the organization
were reported out on strike ln the
Oray's Harbor country in Washington
In an endeavor to secure the signatures of employers to a wage scale
equal to last year's rate. The boys
are very optimistic as to their chances
for succesB and a report as to their
victory Is looked for at any moment.
Live Ottawa Carpentera
Ottawa carpenters are holding a
series of open meetings to encourage
organization among the unorganized,
with satisfactory results. An example
worthy of emulation.
The New Idealism
Professor Odium recently gave a
lecture on "Concrete Idealism." One
might have wondered what his was
made of, and possess an impression
that it was wood, but this clears the
matter up.
Going to Beat the Band
Mr. Gerald McGeer declares that
the next development in Liberal circles ln South Vancouver will be the
organization ot a Liberal brasB band.
—Chinook. Mr. McGeer will be remembered as a delegate to the Vancouver Trades and Labor council from
the Molders' union. During that time
he added not a little to the gaiety
of nations, and those who know him
best already consider that the question of a big drummer for the band is
settled. Incidentally if they run short
of brass, why	
WILL BE HELD
To Protest Against Invasion
of Fraser River by
Japanese
J. D. Taylor, M.P. and Other
Public Men Will
Speak
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 16.—
Preparation for the mass meeting to
be. held in this olty on Saturday next,
April 18th, at 3 p. m. In the. Conservative Club rooms, to protest against
the Invasion of the upper river by the
Japanese, are about complete, and
everything points to a large attendance, both of people In this city interested ln the Asiatic question, and
those from up the river who are
directly affected by the Invasion of
the Orientals. While the meeting Is
held under the auspices of the Board
of Trade, other bodies will be represented, including the Trades and
Labor council who have appointed a
committee to be present and take part
in the meeting. J. D. Taylor, M. P.,
will be present, delaying his departure for the east to enable him to attend the meeting. Thomas Gilford,
M. P. P., who has been ill for some
weeks, will also be present if able to
come, Frank MacKenzie, M. P. P. for
Delta and W. J. Manson, M. P. P. for
Dewdney, have been Invited to attend
and lt Is likely they will be there. Reports from up-river indicate that
there will be a large attendance of
fishermen and small home owners
who divide their time between cultivation of their little farms and Ashing, and who now see a prospect of
losing to the Orientals one ot their
means of livelihood while they are
making their ranches productive.
JOSEPH MAIRS
Memorial Fund Started at
Ladysmith
The United Mine Workers, local
No, 2,388, district 28, of Ladysmlth,
B. C, have started a subscription fund
for the laudable purpose ot erecting
a monument to the late Joseph Mairs,
whose lamentable death occurred
Borne months ago at the Okalla prison
farm. Thia promising young man was
as true as steel to his fellow-workers
in the mines, who are on atrlke on
Vancouver island, and It Is this fact
that has prompted the members of his
union to raise a memorial fund "so
that this monument may Btand for all
time a silent witness of the persecutions of the present powers that be."
Allan McDonald, secretary of the committee, some time ago addressed the
following letter to the press. It Ib to
be hoped that the different local unions will contribute: "I am Instructed
by the memorial committee local No.
2,388, district 28, U. M. W. ot A., to Inform you that we have started a subscription fund to erect a monument
to the memory of our deceased brother, Joseph Mairs, who died in
Okalla prison farm while serving sentence Imposed upon him by Judge
Howay, at Nanalmo, B.C., on Thursday, October 23, 1913, so that this
monument may stand for all time a
silent witness of the persecutions of
the present powers that be against
the striking miners on Vancouver
Island, If any of our brother unionists wish to contribute to the fund,
or any friends of organlezd labor, all
donations will be thankfully received,
and will be acknowledged later ln
The Federatlonist. Hoping you will
insert this letter In your valuable
paper, I will conclude, with personal
regards and best wishes for success.
All moneys should be addressed to
Allan McDonald, P. 0. box 232, Ladysmith, B, C."
Want Bi-monthly Pay Day
It is said that there is trouble brewing among the laborers on the construction of that section of the new
Welland canal which runs through
Thorold, Ont.| At present the men
are paid only once a month, and they
are getting In shape to demand their
pay twice a month. The contractors
claim that paying twice monthly
would be Inconvenient. Of course it
doesn't matter what inconvenience
the men are put to.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
GOOD THINGS TO  EAT
A Delicious Dish For Breakfast,
Tomatoes and Bacon
Canned Tomatoes 2 for 26c
Swift's Premium Bacon,
sliced, per Ib 36c
Swift's Premium Hams,
whole, per lb 27c
Wilson's Special Bacon, -
sliced, per lb 36c.
Wilson's Royal Bacon, Piece
per Ib 26c
Plc-Nlc Hams, per lb 16c
New Westminster Co-operative
Association, United
K. of P. Block
Eighth St. Phone 458
Branch—
1007 Sixth Ave. Phone US
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISERS
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.d
FORT ST:, AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR.
FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, ». 0.
RnlarfM and RwnodtIM   . _JA0 BOOHS >*> BATHS
Comfort     without     Batravaaano*
American Plan   •  Sl.00 Ue Bunpean Clan   •  SIM Us
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.G
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria |
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital   ..$16,000,000        Rest >*. 111,600,000
Main Office: Corner Heatings and Qranvllle Streeta, Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
HASTINGS and CAMBIE, Cor. Hastings and Cambie Streeta.
EAST END :.- —.Cor. Pender and Main "Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIEW * Cor, Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KITSILANO  .Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET .Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street.
SOUTH HILL _ Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraser Road.
Alao North Vancouver Branoh, cor.   Lonsdale   Ave.  and   Eaplanade.
ism'WK
 mt Internal ......
i-made Cigars.
. JaES&-»a*M3rce^
r>tm—_—Z—ttml?fm—,»lm.
fWdiUk—t.
etrtui/amm
as
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
Prudential
LOOK FOR THIS PACKAGE WHEN
YOU WANT A REAL GOOD WASHABLE WALL FINISH —A FINISH
THAT WONT RUB OFF OR FADE OUT.
IT IS MADE IN B.C.
 BY-	
British America Paint Co.
LIMITED j ,
VICTORIA     VANCOUVER    CALGARY     EDMONTON
I PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY APRIL 17, UU
New
Spring
Clothes
We are showing this
week a very special line
in new spring natty
clothes, in all the new
styles and cloths at
OTHER LINES AT
$20, $25,
$30
We want you particularly to see this $15
line. Even though you
don't buy we will appreciate your call.
SEE OUR WINDOWS
J.J.Needham
ft COMPANY
335 Hastings St. W,
IN "GOOD OLD DAYS"
When the Boss Directed the Work of
the Wage-earner
Speaking of the sacrifice made by
thoae who gave the best years at their
life in building up an effective system
of trade unionism, a contemporary
forcibly remarks: "The younger generation has not the slightest Idea of
what their fathers went through in
the so-called 'good old days,' when
the 'boss' not only directed the work
of the wage-earner, but held a chattel
mortgage on him every minute ln his
waking or sleeping hours. In those
days he voted according to the directions of the boss; he traded where
the boss said he should buy his goods;
he did odd work for the boss without
a cent of recompense whenever that
Important personage demanded lt. He
does not do it now however, and
those who were in the thick of tbe
flght In Its early stages know tbe
reason why."
"Regards to the Boys"
Jack McMillan, who at one time conducted the Labor Temple cigar store,
dropped The "Fed." a souvenir poBt-
card this week from South Fort
George.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DANDRUFF
Specials in Dinnerware
41 PIECE SET   S4.B0
47 PIECE SET  {7.61
«   PIECE   SET    W.40
4(   PIECE   SET S10.W
DISPLAYED IN EAST WINDOW
MILLAR A COE    120 Heilisn St. W.
Legislative Assembly a Kind
of Glorified Real Estate
Office
Niggardly  Policy  Toward
Tranquille Sanitarium-
Women's Votes
SYNOP8I8  OP  COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Province
of BrltlBh Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of 91 an acre. Not more than
2,500 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant ln person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and ln unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Saeh application must be accompanied
by a fee of 95, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for ths full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purohase whatever available
surface rlghta mar be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 910 an aore.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
™* W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—80690.
r
in the mining -camp* of Cumberland,
Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, and all
workers are requested to avoid the above
places as a plague.
BOWSER'S SPECIALS AND THE
MILITIA ARE STILL ON
THE GROUND
at the expense of the government, to
do the scab-herding for Mackenzie &
Mann, who seem to have McBride and
Bowser bought and paid for.
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT
OF WORK IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A
MAN TO GET A JOB UNLESS HE
GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN.
KEEP AWAY
FROM
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
Where the Money Goes" might
have been the title of Legislator Parker Williams' address, wblch he delivered ln the Colonial theatre last
Sunday night to a crowded house.
Much information ot a very interesting and signlflcant character waa given
in regard to things that go on In the
legislation chambers at Victoria, and
ln which the average voter takes but
little Interest: That Sir Richard's
heart was elsewhere, and Mr. Bowser,
the man to be reckoned with, was Mr.
Williams' well-expressed opinion—
though he was by no means sure that
the premiership would fall to the
attorney-general. Many people feared
Mr. Bowser but that nobody loved
him lt was hard to believe. What the
rank and file of the conservative members stand for, or why they are in
parliament, was a significant question
that Mr. Williams declared himself
unable to answer.
Of course some of them got rich
and never had to work any more, but
again some of them gave, up tbe emoluments of good professions and businesses where the returns were known
to be more than fair for the sake of
getting into the. house of parliament.
Glorified Real Eetate Office
Once there tn no single Instance
do the records show that they have
the public welfare at heart or any
Issues to maintain. The rural members Indeed, seem to regard tbe legislative chamber as a kind of glorified
real estate office. The water rights
department that required one man
to attend to a few years ago bas now
grown to a gigantic concern, employing over a hundred men and deriving
an Income of something like half as
muoh as lt spends. The forestry department also has been Increased and
magnified and bound with red tape
until no man dare, on. his own Initiative, set fire to a stump ln the middle
of a 40 acre field of plowed ground.
The game wardens who play the political game, and the fire wardens, who
picnic all summer at the people's expense, help to get away with the dols-
lars until we are now ln the hands of
the pawnbrokers, having decided to
borrow ten million dollars for further
expenditure.
The Stratheona park scheme was
Niggardly Policy
The Stratheona park scheme was
ridiculed by Mr. Williams as a foolish
waste ln so sparsely settled a district
and with a natural park all over. Scoring the government for its niggardly
policy towards the Tranquille Sanitarium for tuberculosis, Mr. Williams
said that the grant of 910,000 with a
string to lt represented just two-thirds
of the salary paid to Colonel Thompson for planning the walks and drives
of Stratheona park. The university,
ln prospeot at Point Grey, has also
absorbed an enormous amount ot
money and valuable lands, notwithstanding the fact that only one-third
of one per cent, of the people of the
province are able to take university
courses, while the public schools are
starved and the teachers miserably
underpaid. When be reached the
Canadian Northern Railway company,
or Messrs. Mackenzie and Mann, under their various aliases, Mr. WU-
Hams was warm for the fray.
Slelght-of-Hand Method!
He detailed their various enterprises
in British Columbia and exposed their
methods of financing railroads, and
letting contraots to themselves by
slick practice. That the mortgage
which the province holds, guarantees
security to the country for the money
invested ln the Canadian Northern,
Mr. Williams doubted. lta terms do
not cover the terminals and a road
without terminals, would be deprived
of much of its value in case the province desired to foreclose. Then again,
the Bpeaker was convinced, although
Sir Richard bad assured him to the
oontrary, that the mortgage did not
cover the bridges either, of which
there are many. Here an effective
picture was drawn of the government
attempting to possess itself of a railroad in short strips, and negotiating
with Messrs. Mackenzie and Mann,
under another name, for bridges to
connect lt up. Mr. McBride had been
mistaken in regard to so many of the
terms of this contract, then was it not
probable that he was mistaken ln regard to the bridges also?
Predicts Votes for Women
In regard to women's franchise,
Mr. Williams poBed aB a prophet and
declared that the women of British
Columbia would have the vote within
five years. Concluding, he urged the
workers to send a more powerful opposition to the house of parliament. If
they did not do that, they might as
well send none at all, and this, in
spite of the fact that the speaker was
not laoking ln appreciation of his Job,
which was much easier than coal-mining, but utterly futile with the present
conservative majority masBed solidly
against them.
C. N. R. WILL ARBITRATE
Board Appointed Under "Lemon" Act
to Hear Grievances
The federal department of labor has
appointed a board under the Industrial Disputes Investigation act, at the
request of trainmen and conductors
employed on the C. N. R. at Winnipeg. Mr. D. Campbell of the Railroad
Telegraphers' union, will represent
the men and Mr. I. Pitblado for the
company. Three thousand men are
Involved In the dispute over drafting
a new agreement. The company recently discharged some conductors
for alleged dishonesty in collecting
fares. The union demanded that the
company should prosecute or reinstate, which the company refused
to do, thus producing a situation similar to that created by the B. C. E.
Ry. company in Vancouver. The
result in both cases will be far reaching.
ADAM TAYLOR.
President Street Rallwaymen's Union,
now representing men before Investigation board.
IN I CITY OF
Social Service — Plasterers
Will Appeal—Reports of
Unions
Working Card — Co-opera
tive Stores—Hay Day
at Nanaimo
DISPUTES AOT
"Form of Slavery" Says
Gompers
Testifying at Washington, D. C, last
week before the United States Industrial Relations committee on collective bargains, Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of
Labor, criticized the Canadian Industrial Disputes act, under which employers and employees are forced to
defer drastic action until arbitration
has been tried, as a form of "slaveVy."
W. L. Mackenzie King, former minister ot labor of Canada, defended it
as an excellent method of avoiding
labor troubles, Mr. King added that
he favored any means of reaching
labor disputes which would give publicity.
INDUSTRIAL IMMORALITY
Tradea Unionism Much Mlaunderstood
Even Among Membera Themselves
The great work hefore the labor unions now Is to educate. The people
at large do not understand the purpose of unionism. They are taught
by many Influential agencies that the
union has Improper aims. They must
be made to see that our great organization is contending for great moral
principles that affect home and
national life. For instance, Rev,
Charles Reynolds Brown, in his
"Social Message to the Modern Pulpit," says:
"And some men must be made
to face the fact that no rich man
operation of many other men who
give the best of their lives to the
enterprise he has organized; and
that all talk about 'a man's right
to manage his own business ln his
own way,' regardless of the industrial conditions maintained upon
the health, the happiness, and the
morals of these other men whose
very lives are bound up ln that
bundle of prosperity with hts
own, is both irrational and Immoral. His right to purchase
labor does not Include any sort of
right to purchase the permanent
and Inevitable degradation of the
laborer himself." And thus to purohase labor in the cheapest market, even though it does Involve
the sure degradation of the laborer and the destruction of all
the possibilities of a wholesome
family life for him, Is as openly
Immoral as murder or adultery."
That's pretty plain language. But
It Is none too strong. The crimes of
our great prosperous Industries are a
large and dark chapter ln our modern
civilization.—Los Angeles Citizen.
BRITISH  CONGRES8  MEETING
A. Verville M.P., Will Represent Canadian Workers
The British Trades Union Congress
convention has been fixed for Sep
tember 7 at Portmouth, lstead ot
Southampton as originally Intended
The organized labor movement of
Canada wtll be represented this year
by Alphonse Verville, M. P., who was
elected delegate at the last conven
tlon of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada held ln Montreal last
September. Last year the Canadian
workers were represented at the British congress for the first time, ln the
person of P. M. Draper, the secretary-
treasurer ot the congress. In view of
the campaign of wholesale lying carried on by emigration agents seeking
to persuade workmen In the old country to come to Canada, the platform
of the British workmen presents an
Invaluable medium through which
Canadian workers can speak the truth
concerning conditions ln Canada for
the Information of the working class
of the British Isles.
Last night's meeting of the central
labor body was a brevity record
breaker, adjourning at 9:30. Only
routine business occupied the attention of the delegates.
Credentials.
Letter Carriers — Alfred Wyborn,
vice A. R. Cook.
Musicians—Frederick Parsons.
Steam Engineers—Geo. Day and B.
Prendergaat, vice H. Longley and W.
Byatt.'
Brotherhod of Railway Carmen—F.
Wolfe, Phillip Iliggott, John Sage and
Michael D. Jordan.
Local Social Service Congreaa.
The council adopted the report ot a
special committee to the local branch
of the Social Service Congress and
decided to affiliate and send its quota
of two delegates. W. R. Trotter and
G. Hamilton were appointed by President Walker.
Plasterers Will Appeal.
Del. Sully reported that he had
waited upon the Plasterers' union ln
re the Sleuter judgment. The Plasterers will appeal and a committee of
five will visit local unions wltb a view
to enlisting their support.
Reports of Unions.
Reports from unions Indicated little
or no improvement in the overstocked
condition of the labor market, especially among the building tradeB. The
culinary tradeB are putting up a vigor*
ous organization campaign. Org,
Beck addressed the council and reviewed labor conditions ln the prairie
west.
Working Card System.
After some discussion the question
of adopting a quarterly working card,
to be Issued quarterly, was referred
back to the unions for further consideration to be again taken up at next
meeting.
Want Two Electoral Districts.
Upon motion ot Del. Pettlplece the
council instructed Secretary Bartley
to write Premier Borden and the
seven federal members of British Columbia, urging that in the proposed
new redistribution bill Vancouver City
electoral district be divided Into two
ridings, so that the principle of one
man one vote would prevail.
Co-operative Storea.
Mr. A. Wayles of the New Westminster Co-operative Association, Ltd>,
conducting a store In the Royal City,
was given the floor and addressed the
delegates upon the question of starting a co-operative store In Vancouver,
to become a part of a chain of stores
along the coast. The subject matter
was referred to the executive committee for consideration.
May Day at Nanaimo.
Nanalmo union miners will celebrate May Day in tbe Black Diamond
City. Vancouver unions will respond
to the call for a union rally by sending over a representative delegation,
a committee consisting ot Dels. Pettlplece, Kavanagh, Curnock, Hamilton
and Walker, was named to boost.
Thousands Idle at Montreal
Despite -assurances to the contrary,
the anticipated changes for the better
have not materialized as yet, that Is,
ln this p&rt of the country. Call lt
what you will, flnanolal depression,
stringency In the money market or
any old name, whatever it is, lt has
certainly hit Montreal, and, as usual,
lt Ib the workers who are the chief
sufferers. Right here ln this town we
have hundreds, aye, thousands, of
able-bodied men ready and willing
and anxious to work, yet they cannot
even buy a Job; yet we read that another boatload of Immigrants landed
this week, and upwards of a thousand
new citizens have been added to this
glorious land of promise, .where bread
lines and soup kitchens have ceased
to be a novelty, but rather the reverse. We can only ask, How long
can it last?—J. Foster, Machinists'
Journal.
Pioneer Puses.
James Joseph Mulcahey, aged 51
years, an old-timer of Vancouver and
Victoria, died Sunday in his room at
the Hotel Leland, 925 Granville street.
He was found dead ln bed ln room No.
12 by one of the employees of the
hotel. For twelve years the late
Mr. Mulcahey has acted as bartender
for the firm who owned the Leland
hotel, having served continuously with
the hotel since tt was established at
Its present address five years ago.
Prior to coming to Vancouver, he was
well-known ln Victoria where he followed the vocation of cowpuncher,
which wae a trade more frequently
adopted In the early days than latterly. Mr. Mulcahey ie survived by a
wife and one son and a brother, E. M.
Mulcahey of this city. The remains
were removed to the parlors of Greene
& Merkley, from which place on
Thursday morning the cortege proceeded to the Church of the Holy
Rosary. At 9 o'clock Mass was celebrated by Rev. Father Jahn and at the
grave Rev. Father Connolly conducted
the services. The funeral was held
under the auspices of the Bartenders'
union. The pallbearers were: Wm.
J. Duhamel, David Rodes, Fraternal
Order of Eagles; James Mclsaac, A.
J. Woodward, Bartenders; John Roach,
Fred Shaw, friends.
To Prosecute "Spotters"
Western telegraphers and members
of the craft all over Canada and the
United States are combining forces to
carry on prosecutions against Western Union spotters who spied on union men and who are alleged to have
stolen Important papers and committed other unlawful acts ln the course
of their operations.
Brakeman Loses His Legs
One night recently while switching
a train about to pull out for Walnwright in East Calgary, Alta., O. McDonald, aged 26, a G, T. P. brakeman,
was knocked down by the end car,
and two box cars passed over his legs,
amputating them. He is a member
of the Trainmen's union and had just
returned from a visit to his home in
Nova Scotia and made his first run on
the train which he was switching
when the accident occurred. Last
hospital reports state he Is doing
well.
Laughlan McLeod Dead.
LniiKhlan McLeod, aged 47, died of
Brlght's disease on Sunday morning,
after a long Illness. He leaves a wife
and a brother and sister to mourn hla
demise. The funeral which was largely attended, took place from his late
residence, 786 Hastings street, on
Wednesday, under tbe auspices of the
Bartenders' union. Rev. David Lone
conducted the services. The pallbearers were D. Campbell, F. Mulhern,
J. Allen. Alex. Bvoy, J. Gillis, A. Mala
cord. The large number of floral tributes silently testified to the high esteem ln which the late Mr. McLeod
was held by a host of friends.
Northwest Typo. Membership
According to latest figures received
by the secretary of the Typographical
unions, the membership Is as follows:
Calgary, 162; Edmonton, 136; Lethbrldge, 17; Medicine Hat, 31; Moose
Jaw, 49; Prince Albert, 17; Reglna,
111; Saskatchewan, 75; total, 697, of
which five are females. There are
29 proprietor members, 50 apprentice
members, 53 members In arrears, 175
machine operators, 334 band compositors, etc., 18 machinists, 60 subs, 11
proofreaders, 15 members following
other vocations, no pensioners, 76 union offices, 6 nonunion offices. These
figures are for the organized cities of
the two provinces. •
PATRONIZE "FEDERATIONIST" ADVERTISERS, AND TELL THEM WHY.
SATURDAY
It behooves you to cut the following price-list from the paper, and
retain it until Saturday. Prices so low as these, for merchandise of
such sterling standard, were never even approximated before. It Is
not a case of THINKING you save money at this sale—you KNOW
you save. You are familiar with most of the following lines, and you
can readily see that each and every price haa been, reduced 25 to 60
per cent.
EXTRA!
35c Cuticura Soap; Saturday only
 16o
10c Palm and Olive Soap; per cake
 So
10c Mechanics' Tar Soap; per cake
 BO
50c Gillette Razor Blades; cut to
 350
16c Pears' Soap; three cakes for
 .800
10c Ivory Soap;, Saturday only .
26c Packers' Tar Soap; cut to	
 160
$1,00 Plnaud's Eau de Quinine for
 - Mo
ll.OO Newbro's Herpicide,  cut  to
 TOO
60c Pond's Vanishing Cream; out
to  860
26c Certified Complexion Soap,
Saturday    lBo
6c French Castile Soap,
Saturday, 2 cakes for So
10t! Purity Soap;'6 cakes for llBo
50c box Armour's Toilet Soap.
Saturday for 86o
76c box  Violet  Oatmeal  Soap.
Saturday cut to Mc
80AP8
76c box Imported Lavender Soap.
Saturday for 88o
76c box Benzoin and Cold Cream
Soap.   Saturday    ..350
60c box English Buttermilk Soap.
Saturday    B6o
60c cake French Toilet Soaps.
Your choice  lOo
26c Bath  Soap; large size;  2
for     .860
26c Pocket Combs for loo
11.26  French  Combs  for 60©
60c Rubber Combs for	
■1.95
COMBS AND BRUSHES
11.00 Hair Brushes for ..
$4.00 Hair Brushes for...
$2.60   Whalebone
Brushes 	
50c Mirrors for .
fl.00 Plate Mirrors
$4.0
4.00 Hand  Mirrors
...81.35
 300
.81.96
$7.60   Auto  Strop  Razor  Set
Saturday  84.96
$1.00   Ever-Ready   Safety
Razors    70o
$1.00 Gem Safety Razors..... 70c
26c Shaving Sticks 16o
$2.60 Razors, Guaranteed 81.36
TOILET
60c  Pompeian  Massage  Cream.
Saturday 38o
26c Puritan Skin Food 10c
26c Ingram's Cold Cream 160
76c Cyclamen Face Powder 45c
$1.00   Cyclamen   Vanishing
Cream;   Saturday   45o
25c Talcum Powder; Saturday„10e
25c Sanltol Mouth' Wash.... lbe
50c Odol Mouth Wash  35c
36c Rubberset Tooth Br us lies.. 85c
26c Hydrogen Peroxide  15c
Reg.  60c 8-oz. bottles B8o
RAZORS, ETC.
10c Williams' Shaving Soap Bo
$1.00 Razor Strops SSo
$2.50  Koken's Strops 81.30
$1.60  Pocket Knives;  I. X.  L.
and  Boker's;  eaoh 95c
16c Styptic Pencils for So
$2.00    Rubberset    Shaving
Brushes,   for    U5o
REQUISITES
Reg. 76c 16-oz. bottles 380
26c Arthur's Shampoo Cream....10c
76c Imported Lavender Water..40o
76c Manicure Scissors  46c
26c Nail Files; your choice 15c
50c Buffers,  cut  to  .860
76c Perfumes.   Come early  .BOo
50c Oatlne Complexion Cream..30o
76c Eau de Cologne, cut to 45o
35c Rouge, cut to 16o
50c Rose and Almond Cream....850
25c Tooth Brushes, now .15c
25c Ingram's Camphor Ice I60
50c Cascarets, cut to 38o
50c PVult-a-tives,  only 30c .
50c Gin Pills, special SOo
50c Zam-Buk.   now    30o
$1.00 Wilson's Invalid Port..».75e
$1.25 Wincarnls, cut to 85c
$1.25 Beef, Iron and Wine .65c
PATENT   PREPARATIONS
$1.00 Emulsion  of Cod Liver
. on    50o
$1.00 Sarsaparllla and Burdock.
Special    60c
50c White Pine Cough Syrup....80o
50c Syrup of Figs, for 86c
25c Cascara Tablets ...,18o
RUBBER GOOD8
fl.00  Household Syringes 45o     I    $3.60 Douche Syringes ....
$2.50 Hot Water Bags  81,65 .        11,25 Rubber Gloves	
$3.50 Hot Water Bags  98.38    I    $1.60 Sanitary Syringes
68.10
 65o
 SSO
Wood's Pharmacy
CORNER SEYMOUR STREET
601 HASTINGS STREET WEST
EVERY UNION
HOTEL WILL
DISPLAY THIS
SIGN IN THE
BAR.
LOOK FOR IT.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, Managing Director.)
Two Storee—
u>-a4 oobdota nam* wan   tt
Csrp.nt.ri' Whit. Duck  Ovsrslls,
with It pookst., union lsbsl II .Tl
Msn'a Haavy Tweed Pants, union
lsbsl  M.0O to 11.50
Wa ask for your pstronsg.  In.ur  Suit  and   Overcoat   Depart.
msnts, whsn wo give valuo svsrytlmo.
BASEBALL
Vancouver vs. Taeoma
April 16,17,18
APRIL 16-17,3:30 p.m.
APRIL 18,2:30 p.m.
► Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
MATINEE DAILY 2,30
EVE. PERFORMANCE 8.1S
PANTAGES
Unequalled  Vaudeville
Meana
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, 0.16
Season'a Prlcea—
Matinee 15o, Evenings ISo, 15c
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Contlnuoue Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF APRIL 20
MON.,    TUES.,    WED.
FANNY  DA   BOLL A COMPANY
Comedy Knockabout. Act,  entitled
"F3n *-  "  ""   .•..—. "
tn a Country School."
CYCLING CRANE
"The Bum on the Bike"
FORD  AND  LAIRD
Black-face  Singing and Talking
Act.
MISS  LAURETT  BOYD
Character Comedienne
4-REELS LATEST PICTURES-!
10 Cents—ANY SEAT—10 Cents
AMATEUR NIGHT-WEDNESDAY.
THURS,    FRI„   8AT.
DON   LA   MONT'S   EUROPEAN
OOQ  AND  MONKEY  CIRCUS
20—Trained Animals—20
REYNOLDS   AND   CARPENTER
Singing,   Dancing  and   Saxaphone
Playing
'MAC O'NEIL
Scotch Comedian
THE  WESTONS
Globe Rolling, Knife Walking and
Juggling

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