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The British Columbia Federationist May 15, 1914

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
INDUSTRIAL UNITY: STRENGTH. -^ OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR. ^^fcPOUM^-^OT^WWMofl
SIXTH YEAB, No. 162.         J[_                   ~                 '" VANCOUVER B. C, FBIDAT MAY 15, 1914. EIGHT PAGES (^^^50 PER~Y*-W
rnii inn nniiiimr    ^ '         ' ~" ' • ■' ■      ' T'L     '"^y l-l *n:X=&
VANCOUVER B. C, FRIDAY MAY 15,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
(tooW*Mii.50PEE
They Can Only Be Stopped
by Abolishing Private
Concerns
First Civil Case in Courts-
Federal Inspector Is
Handicapped
A Miniature Moscow
Employment agency frauds have
Veen going on ln this city for a number ot years past Hardly a day
passes but that something transpires
In favor of the adoption and putting
Into foroe that part of the labor commission's report abolishing intelligence offices or private employment
agencies. The commissioners strongly recommended the establishment of
public employment bureaux, with the
Ilea of ultimately having all employment offices ln this province operated
as public Institutions for the protection of. all honest employers and employees) trom unsrupulous labor
agents'and "grafting" foremen. The
wisdom of this suggestion would be
readily realised and carried out to
the letter if the workingmen's side of
the case was clearly known to everyone. Reoently the press freely discussed the "shameful trafflc tn workmen for sordid fees," aa practised by
so-called "employment agents," who
are not .a few hereabouts. Stories
of the most callous deception of
workmen out of employment ate
heard every day on the streets and
In the hotels, where Idle men may be
seen by the hundreds having no place
else to go to put ln the time—which
should serve as sufficient warning to
Immigrants who may be tempted by
alluring promises of getting a sure
job lt he would but pay the price,
Employment Sharks
Unemployment—abnormally great
tn Vancouver and elsewhere In the
province—at least so far as white
men are concerned, as cheap
Mongol labor Is always preferred
by the big corporations. Besides, there are plenty of "employment sharks" who fatten off the destitution of the workmen, and by a
cruel and Ingenious system make fortunes out of their misery. The Federatlonist, after discussing the situation with Fred. F. Qulnn, the dominion Inspector of employment agencies,
learned from that gentleman something of the dastardly doings ot
aome of these shyster labor agents.
The local by-laws allow an agent to
charge a fee of (1.60 to a three-year
citizen who wants a position of skill,
but all that could be collected for a
similar positon trom a new arrival—
—an Immigrant—of less than three
years' standing, Ib (1. The result Is
that the agency Invariably refuse to
list the 11 "boys." It ia surprising
how quickly jobless Immigrants learn
to Bay and declare they have been In
the country the three years. If they
don't do that the'y wtll not get any
work the "home-bird" stands ln com
'petition for. Vancouver should follow
Victoria city and make It unlawful
for the agents to make a charge ln
excess of >1 "for registering the
names and residences of, and giving
Information to, or procuring a servant,
laborer, workman, clerk or other employee In want ot the same.'.'
Should Reduce Fat
Violators of this bylaw are suB-
Jeot to 0 $20 fine. The Vancouver
olty council should be urged to reduce
the deposit fee of $1.50 and make it
$1. This would do away with misrepresentation and place all Idle men
on an equal footing, Another Important personage who gets his "rake-
on"' too, Is the Interpreter.    Instead
i of the employment agent engaging
him, tbe foreign Immigrant must hire
bis own Interpreter who will explain
all about the   three-year   residence
I and the $l.r>0. Mr. Qulnn states that
the only cases he can prosecute are
brought under the criminal code and
the lines and costs therefrom all go to
1 the government. That the first one
brought as a civil aotlon was on
Tuesday when Fred, Lllyman & Co.,
labor agents, must pay Emails Lobje,
a Russian laborer, $81 and costs as
■ a result ol sending him to Hazelton,
where no work waited him.     This
' was tbe judgment of Judge Orant on
Tuesday morning In a oase brought
against the defendant firm by one of
a party of eighteen Russians who complain of similar treatment.
Was Refused Work
Lobje    ln his   evidence,   admitted
having been given a ticket to Prince
I Rupert, and a railway ticket from Ru
pert to Haselton, but on arrival at
the latter place, said he was rotused
work, and after tramping on foot for
fifty miles up the line seeking work,
had to return to Vancouver at his
own expense. An adjournment had
been granted when the case came up
several weeks ago, to enable the defendants to call witnesses to support
their defence that Lobje had been offered work, and had refused to take
it. This morning no witnesses were
called. Mr. 8. Alexander appeared on
behalf of Lobje, and Mr. R. Symes on
behalf of Lllyman & Co. The legal
firm of Alexander & Sears have sixteen more Individual casea similar to
this that will be taken to court unless
some settlement Is come to In the
meantime.
May Take a Week's Holiday
A former Vancouverlte and reader
of The Federatlonist writing undei
Toronto date says: "The police on
point duty here are a bit too officious,
Every week there are so many street
car motormen summoned to appear in
court for disobeying the policeman's
signal. Of course, the motormen get
fined $10 ln each case. The "boys"
claim, and rightly ao, that the police
do not give proper signals, and have
decided to send a committee to Inter,
view the police commissioners. If
they fall to get any satisfaction, steps
will be taken to take a week's holiday.'
*„v
f      t    „-r»»   S      *■  •   J
tx    ••   ., .*,:»"-. -
-*    ,■•■:■ ■■I'^'-'-fWS ^M^"'":-Xn' ,-***-. '    ■'
Scabherders aent to Nanalmo   prior  to  unton  miners'   Hay-day  celebration
parading tn front of United Mine Workers' headquarters.
ELECTION OFFICERS
Takes Place May 27th—
President and Secretary
Elected
Local No. 226 Will Send
Delegate to Providence, B. I.
TRADES COUNCIL
COMMITTEE  OF
WELCOME APPOINTED
Presldsnt Walker of the
Vancouver Tradss and Labor
oouncll  hat this week   ap-
Eolntad the following mem-
sre of the oounoil an the
oommlttee to take up the
work of securing ths 1415
convention ef the Tradee
and Labor Congress of Canada far Vaneouvar: R. P.
Pettlpleoe, chairman, of the
typographical union; J. Sully
of the laborers' union, and
P. L. Estinghausen of the Inside electrical workere,
The committee will have
a buiy time between now
and when oongress meeta at
St. John'e, arousing the lntereat of the local unlona,
aeeurlng the official Invitation of the olty counoll, and
doing tha thousand and one
(hinge which will be nscee-
airy If their work Is to be
carried te a sueeeaaful Issue.
The annual election of officers for
the International Typographical Union
of America will be held on Wednesday,
May 27th. The general officers are
elected by a referendum ballot and
this has always aroused the keenest
Interest among the printers all over
the continent. This year, however,
has proven an exception, as for the
flrst time the international president
and secretary-treasurer have been
elected by acclammatlon. In Vancouver, though, considerable ardor will be
thrown Into the contest, owing to the
fact that the local union will elect a
delegate to attend the convention
which will be held at Providence, R. I.,
In August. The contestants for this
delegateshlp are R. P. Pettipiece,
president of 226, and J, E. Wilton, a prominent member of the
union and chairman of the local Labor
Representation League. The official
ballot contains the following names:
First Vice-President (One elected)—
Barrett, Walter W„ Chicago; Hitch-
ens, Edwin L„ Cincinnati; Shrewsbury, S. M. Nashville.
Delegates to A. F. of L., (four elected)—Morrison, Frank, Chicago; Hayes,
Max S„ Cleveland; Stevenson, Hugh,
Toronto; Bonnlngton, F. J„ San Francisco; McCullough, T. W„ Omaha;
Fear, Charles W., Joplin; Campbell,
Robert, Dallas; Sprunk, Otto C, Detroit; Wise, Joseph A., Indianapolis;
McDevitt, Edward P., Steubenvllle;
Rodriguez, Armand B„ New York;
Vanderveld, Henry L„ Paterson.
Trustees, Union Printers' Home-
Wilson, Anna C, Columbia (Washington); McCaffery, Thomas, Colorado
Springs; Nichols,, Oeorge P., Baltimore; Wood, C. L„ Fort Worth; Mc-
Kee, Walter H„ New York; Bleaken,
John C, Calgary; Grimes, William W.,
New York; O'Leary, William E., Boston; Lacher, Martin, Denver; Taylor,
Bert, Toledo; McLaughlan, W. J., Buf
Merritt, Oeorge R„ Cheyenne;
PAINTERS
Trade Conditions Continue to Improve
—The Cloud Shop
Members of Painters local union,
No. 138, are fairly busy at present,
this being the season of the year
when their services are in demand,
prospects at present are that the demand will Increase as the season advances. Most of the painting work ln
the oity that requires skilled mechanics to do is being performed by
members of the union, and large numbers of men on the outside, who are
willing to undercut the union rate of
wages and accept almost any conditions, are atlll unable to get employment "Closed shop" work continue to Increase. The membership of
the union Is steadily Increasing and.
members are showing a lively Interest
In the business ot the meetings.
Fisherman Dies
Investigation Into the death of Peter
Samuel, a well-known local fisherman,
who died a few days ago at Pender
Harbor, confirmed the report tbat the
man came to his death from natural
causes. The deceased Is said to have
owned six lots in Vancouver besides a
number of shares ln oil companies and
prairie town propositions. The investigations were conducted by the officers of the provincial police.
falo;
Whlttemore, Charles H., Albany; Wai-
den, J. W„ Clarksburg.
Agent Union Prlnten' Home—Canty,
John, Chicago; Johnson, Joe M„ Columbia (Washington).
Marsden O, Scott, New York, President (acol.).
J. W. Hayes, Minneapolis, secreUry
(acol.),
MARTIAL LAW IN
ISLAND GOAL CITY
Mounted Military Men
Marching Ready for
May Day Massacre
SCAB-HERDERS IN
THE STRIKE ZONE
Impudent, Armed and
Insolent Defy to the
Peaceable Miners
Workers of Britlah Columbia! Look
carefully at these pictures. Ponder
well their meaning. Use that practical, commonsense mind of yours to
grasp the truth ae you see It here before your eyes. Men ot your own
class, men of your own country, aye
and perhaps your own kith and
kin, ready, able and willing to shoot,
stab and slaughter you and your Und
at the word "Fire," given by a member of the same class which owns the
coal mines and city Council of Nanalmo, and the government of British
Columbia.
This la no theorising whloh you see.
It Is hard solid faot These men with
their bayonets, their rifles and their
artillery, are there to do the work-
It ordered—for which their weapons
were made. Don't fix your eyes on
the shambles of far-off Colorado and
say, "Ah, but It could never happen
ln British Columbia." It could and
would happen here unless this military display at Nanalmo on May 1st
was all a joke, which, on the word
ot the authorities responsible, we
know was not It was a grim and
deadly threat, pregnant with the promise of workers' blood to be spilled
by workers at the behest of their
common masters,
And all uecause the miners had decided to hold their annual demonstration on the day which seemed best
to them. Mayor Planta and hla henchmen were annoyed because they
would not hold lt on Empire Day, so
they peevishly refused their consent
to a peaoeful parade, r.-id further emphasised their vicious attitude by calling for troops.
The marvel Is that their blind bigotry, fanned by the Inflammatory turnings of their party press, did not
cause an outburst which would have
been quenched in blood. They tried
their best to do their worst. At the
very moment the miners were peaceably gathered listening to the sane
counsels of their speakers, the voice
of human prudence was drowned by
the ominous clatter of mounted
soldiery thundering by as a brutal reminder of the purposes to which the
day might see them put. Every
effort was made to Intimidate and
humiliate the miners.
For a whole week previous to May
1st the big gun, seen tn the illustration, was paraded twice a day in and
around Nanalmo. Since then lt haB
disappeared. But the memory of it
will remain, along with the memory
of the machine guns and soldiers
with fixed bayonets posted at the
doors of the Athletic Club last Aug-
UBt while the miners were holding a
peaoeful meeting.
That was part of the tyrranlcal
boast of Attorney-general Bowser
that the dawn of August 16th would
see a thousand soldiers ln the coal
camps. He disclaims responsibility
for May 1st by saying that only the
olty council of Nanalmo la to blame.
But that will not reduce the measure
of his culpability whqp the day of
reckoning comes.   If he and McBride
Governmental executive committee for Sirs Bill and Dan teaching the workers
the modern method of breaking strikes,—Tempting men to meet tone with
force.
had not been such pitiable tools ln
the hands of the mine-owners at the
start of this trouble, lt would never
have attained the dimensions which
lt has. But, drunk wtth the egotism
of offlce, and the prostitution of the
political powers of the province, they,
by their deliberate and wilful neglect,
and by their failure to break the
spirit and endurance ot the miners
were forced to show their hands. Like
a vaudeville team they tour the province and speak of the need which
British Columbia has for manly, self-
reliant and self-respecting men, They
have them tn the miners, but their
only answer to the demand ot these
men for wages and working condl-
YOUNG HOPEFULS
The Alms and Ambitions of Some
Vancouver Boys
Recently a local master questioned
286 school boys, ot ages ranging between 14 and 18 years, as to what occupations they would follow after
leaving school. Ninety per cent
chose non-productive occupations—50
per cent, being prospective lawyers;
30 per cent doctors, dentists, real estate, etc., while two hoys wanted fo
become printers, two farmers and one
lad would like to be a school teacher.
Bowser's lambs parading streets of Nanalmo with Maxim guns for purpose of
Intimidating striking coal miners.
tlons commensurate with self respect Is, Chinese labor, special police
recruited trom the very dregs of those
who have no self respect, and the
bayonets and bullets of militiamen
who have not enough intelligence to
grasp the fact that they are working men of the same flesh and blood
as those whom they may be called
upon to kill.
If blood had been spilled on May
1st It might have been by the hands
of their hirelings, but the real responsibility would have rested) on McBride and Bowser.
The incidents of the last twelve
months In Nanaimo, culminating ln
the miserable outrage of May 1st,
will sink deep into the minds and
memories of the workers of this province and will sooner or later bear
fruit which will prove that, as a factor ln the education of the workers,
one ounce of McBride Bowser realism
will go farther and produce more
tangible results than a ton ot aimless
theorizing.
The Late Elliot S. Rows
Dr. Elliott S. Rowe, the active spirit
ot the local Industrial bureau, and
who died last Sunday, was well-
known to many In the labor movement. His invariable practice, when
receiving Inquiries re rates of wages
and conditions of employment was to
seek his information from the Labor
Temple.
EMPLOYEES
B
C. Federation asd The
Federationist are Congratulated
Business Agent Elected—
Presentation for Manager Sperling
Corner Stones of Society Itself Contributing to the History of Organized
- Labor in British Columbia	
NANAIMO SOCIALISTS LAVING FOUNDATION STONE OF NEW HALL
A GLIMPSE AT THB PHOTOS ABOVE WILL EXPLAIN THB IMPETUS FOR A MOVEMENT THAT AIMS TO SEIZE THE POWERS OF STATE; MAKE THB COALMINES AND ALL COLLECTIVELY-USED PROPERTY THE PBOPERTY OP THOSE
WHO DO THB WORK.
NEW WESTMINSTER, May 1!,—
The regular meeting of tbe Street
Railway Employees Union, held in the
Labor Tomple on Tuesday, May 12.
was the best attended one for a long
time, and the discussion on the various matters considered was spirited
at times, and showed that the members were taking a lively interest ln
the questions before them.
The secretary was instructed to
write to the B. C. Federation and compliment them on tho settlement of
their differences with the Federationist and express the desire to assist
them In making the paper a worthy
mouthpiece of labor ln this province.
The question of the advisability of
appointing a permanent business
agent was the subject of considerable
blscueslon, but those who favored the
proposition had the best of the argu
ment and vote, nnd an election between Bros. YateB and Dodd resulted
In the selection ot tho former.
A committee was appointed tn get
up a souvenir album for presentation
to the retiring general manager of the
H. C. E. R., Mr. Sperling, who Is leaving for the old country soon.
The proposition of forming a Light,
Power and Transportation Council to
consist of electrical workers and electric railway employees, was favorably
considered. Other Interested unions
will be Interviewed by a committee,
and It Is hoped that the matter will
soon take some definite shape.
After the transaction of regular routine business, which was present In
considerable volume, the meeting adjourned.
IIKM
NEXT WEEK
Pacific Coast District IL.A.
to Meet in Vancouver,
B. 0.
Over Sixty Delegates From
Pacific Ports Will
Assemble
The seventh annual convention of
the Pacific coast dlatrlct, International Longshoremen's aaaocfatkn,
will convene In Labor Temple, thl*
city, on Monday. This gathering wttl
be the most Important and far-reaching ln the history ot the longshore
workers ot the Paelfle coast Matten
pertaining to oa
ness that will affect
will be transacted. Rules and regulations will be adopted to goreim
each afflliated local union. The et-',
ganlsatlon of the cout district has
reached a stag* where It la neoeasary
to establish It more firmly than aver
and to prepare for the opening of
the Panama canal. The longshoremen will be called upon to preeent a
solid and united front, backed up by
practical and well-conducted, organisation. It la expected tbat every
local on the Pacific coast will be represented. There will he over sixty
delegatea present. John .Keen, ot
San Francisco, president of the dlatrlct 1. L. A., and 3. A. Madsen, of
Portland, dlatrlct secretary, will arrive on Saturday and confer with hat
executive as well aa the officers of
the local union on organisation affairs. The reception oommlttee comprise President 8. J. Kelly, Secretary
H. Hannlng, F. Payne and W-Long-
worth, who have left no stone unturned to make matten agreeable to
the delegates while they are ln Vaa-
couver. The sessions will be held ta
the Labor Temple during all ntxt,
week.   ,
JOHN SKINNER
Diss Suddenly—Member af Amalgamated Carpentera Over 21 Years
John Skinner, aged 47 yean, a
valued member of the Amalgamated
branch ot the United Brotherhood of
Carpenten and Joiners, died suddenly at the Palace hotel on Monday. Ha
came to thla city a few yean ago
from Carlisle, Bug., when he leaves a ,
wife and eight children to mount hla
untimely lost. The funeral, which'
was well attended by brother carpenten and friends of deceased took -
place on Wednesday from the under''
taking parlors of Edwards * Co.,
Main street Rev. B. H. West wu tha
officiating clergyman, and the pallbearers were Messn T. Simpson and
I. Little, carpenten, and J. Robinson
and R. Simpson, plasterers. The Interment took place at Mountain View
cemetery. The late Mr. Skinner wu
a member of the Amalgamated Carpenten for over 25 yean.
Got An Increase
Local No. 312 ot the United Brewery Workers, Toronto, Ont, has just
succeeded ln concluding a new agreement with the boss brewers, under
which the wage rate has been Increased two dollara per week. Time
and a half will be allowed for overtime and double time for Sunday work
and holidays. It Is also stipulated that
there shall be no work on Labor Day
or upon the date selected for the annual picnic.
Want Barbara' Convention
London and Ottawa have both got
their eyes upon the 1916 convention
of the Journeymen Barbers' International union. It Is also said that other
Canadian cities have similar ambitious
views and are anxious to land this desirable plum. One thing is sure, there
Is only one ot them due to land it, and
perhaps some of the big Industrial
centres south of the boundary line
may yot be heard from in connection
therewith.
Necessity Propels
The teamsters, general laboren and
store clerks of Moose Jaw bave  all
started organization campaigns this
month.
Missing Miner
Information Is wanted by the provincial police as to the whereabouts of
James Alexander, late of Glasgow, wbo
was last heard ot at Spence's Bridge
on April 15, when he said he was going to Nanalmo, The missing man la
a miner, aged 38, height about 5 feet
4 Inches, has brown hair and grey
eyes and bears a tattoo mark of a
tombstone on his arm. When last
seen he waa wearing a dark blue suit
and cowboy hat Enquiry Is made by
Miss Marjory Cox, T. W. C. A., New
Westminster.
From a small boy's letter to his
chum: "Tou know Bob Jones' neck?
Well, he fell In the river up to IL"
An immigration agent was recently
fined heavily In London, England In
a case brought against him by the
board of trade for Inducing seven
Englishmen to emigrate to the Argentine republic by means of mlsn-
presentation of existing industrial
conditions.
B. C. FEDERATIONS
EXTENDS WELCOME
TO LONGSHOREMEN
The Federatlonist welcomes to Vaneouvar the seventh annual convention of
the Pacific coast district of
the International Longshoremen's association, which convenes In the Labor Temple
Monday morning next. Matters of first Importance to
the workera on tbe water-
front will be up for discussion and decision. Increased
organization of members hss
nscsssltated closer organlutlon of unions. In addition,
the opening of ths Panama
csnal confronts them with
grave problems. We csn say
In advance that the social
side of thslr visit will be
lacking In no hospitality
which the flnanclal meana
and personal efforts of ths
local longshoremen can provide. If their stay extendi
ever next Thuraday they are
assured of a welcome at ths
meeting of the Tradss and
Labor counoll that night. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY, ....'.„.MAY, 16, 111
ROYAL CITY REVIEW
 EDITED BV H. OIBB, BOX IM, NjW WESTMINSTER	
I
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, u,ooo,ooo.oo.
Inbsoiksd, IS01,000.00
We have MONEf TO LOAN on improved property.
Estates managed .for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and aale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on daily balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Ofllce:
Columbia and Begbie Strset, Now Westminster, B. C.
J. J. Itate, Henselae Dtnotw <
I. A. Beaaie, Beczetaay-Trsssaier.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
■uowMon to Oeatw a manna, Lit,
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
401 COLUMBIA STBMT
SMOKE
NBW WEBTMINSTBH, B. 0,
MADE
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS S.~
PREMIER
BEER
Is a Mild Beverage.
Used temperately, it Is highly beneficial. It Is both a food and a
drink, q ORDER A CASE FOR
YOUR TABLE.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
PHONE No. L-78
A. E. SUCKLING & CO, VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Caplti
-UI,M*,0M        Rsat_
..•ll.iOMII
Mai* Officii Comer Haatinga and Qranvllle Itrsets, Vancouvtr.
CITV BRANCHBS
HASTINGS and CAMBIE	
■AST BIND ..-___ ,
COMMERCIAL DRIVE	
PAIRVIEW ™...
K2.U?.T.?.I'BA8ANT	
KITSILANO 	
POWKLL BTREET	
BOTJTH HILL «...™.^	
LOCATION IM
..Cor. Heatings and Cambie Streeta.
..Cor. Pender aad Main Streets.
...Cor. First Avenue) and Commercial Drive.
..Cor. Sixth Avenue ant Oranvllls Street
~Cor, Bighth Avsnus ant Main Stmt
..Cor. Fourth Aysms ant Taw Strset,
—Cor. Victoria Drive ant Powell Strset
               ...Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraier Read.
Alto North Vancouvtr Branch, aer.   Lemdile  Ave.  and   Esplanade.
EVERY UNION
HOTEL WILL
DISPLAY THIS
SIGN IN THE
BAR.
LOOK FOR IT.
i'js-AJ&i
r %
mm
DEWARS
SCOTCH
Whisky
vtri
PATRONIZE UBOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
Vincouver wage-workers can materially assist The  Federation! it  by calling or
writing for a few cards which have juit been printed, reading:
I came here became I read your
advertisement in our paper,
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Owned snd published b)r organized
lahor, in our own oiiarter-of-i-million
dollsr Lsbor Temple, every Friday
morning, and I always give prclerence
to  goods  bearing  the   union   Lsbel.
. When est shopping go to federationlit advcrtlwra, snd before leaving leave s
card where ft csn be found by the clerks snd probably resch the principals. It Is
sn esay way to help Ths Federationlit get remits—hence more advertising—and a
bigger and better pifper to chsmplon the csuie of Labor.
Remember, too, when sou sre in need of printing ef sny kind thst The Peters-
tionlst sccepts orders.   Union paper—union printer!.
Shingle Weavers Walk Out
As a Protest Against
Chinese
Sending of Troops to Nanaimo May Day Strongly
Condemned
NBW WESTMINSTER, May 13.—
The reports from delegatea In regard
to the condition of the various trades
Were, ln several cases, of a more encouraging nature than has been the
caae tor some time past, tbe Stationary Engineers, Moulders and Tailora
reporting a slight improvement, but
the remainder of unions represented
by delegates present reported trade ln
poor condition.
The Shingle Weavers' branoh of the
Timber Workers, through Delegate
Iverson, stated that up to this morning all their members had been steadily employed, but when a Chinese bad
been put to work on a machine at the
Fraaer Mills, aa a sawyer, all the men
employed ln the shingle department
to the number of thirteen, had walked
out. While endeavors were being made
to secure the discharge of the obnoxious Asiatic, little hope was entertained of success. The men state there
was no known reason why the Asiatic
waa put to work, as the machine waa
only temporarily Idle through the sickness of a regular sawyer, and hts place
could have been easily filled by a white
man, If the slightest effort had been
made to do ao. The hope waa expressed
that all white men would stay away
from the mill until, the trouble was
settled.
Complaint was lodged by the numbers' delegatea against one Wheeler, a
member of the Street Railway Bmplojw
eea' Union, for taking plumbing contracts while regularly employed as a
conductor. President Tates stated that
when hla attention had been called to
tbe matter he had spoken to Wheeler
and had been assured by him that he
would refrain trom working at the
plumbing business. Bro. Tates requested the Plumbers' Union to take
the matter up with the Street Railway-
men's Union it there was any further
cause for complaint.
BroB. T. Moore, N. Lewis and Jaa.
McCormick presented credentials from
the Plumbers' Union and were seated
as delegates.
A communication from- the Labor
Temple Company stating that the,
board of directors had under consideration the request of the council for
a letter box and blackboard, waa received and flled. .
President Cameron reported haying
attended the meeting of the fishermen
held May 2, and waa pleated to be able
to state that an organization had been
effected that promised to be a great
help ln aecurlng the elimination of tbe
Japanese from the river. Secretary
Maiden ot the council had been selected as president, and under his guidance the new organisation had every
promise of being successful ln Its chosen wort. An Invitation trom the fishermen to be present at a meeting ln
the Conservative Club rooms on Saturday next was accepted.
The Building Trades committee reported that Messrs. Keith ot the Dominion Trust Co. and Richardson of
the Royal Bank had been interviewed
in regard to the employment ot local
labor on the new bu.ldlngs about to
be erected by their respective corporations. Every assurance had been
given that their best endeavors would
be exercised to iecure the employment
of local people on the new work, and
the committee requested that the aeeretary write the respective contractors
and make the same request
A communication from the B. C.
Federation urging the membership at
large to give a whole-hearted support
to the official organ, The Federationist, was read, and the delegates were
requested to bring the matter to the
attention of their unions.
The reply of the Tailors' Unton to
the request ot the council for an apology tor certain derogatory remarks
made by a member ot the Tailors'
union against R. A. Stoney was considered at length. The main point In
the controversy seemed apparently to
be a misunderstanding as to what Mr.
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURES
GARGET IN COWS.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
"We demand attention of every
worker and dtiien!"
"It you wish to organize in your
locality, write us."
Our mall order, department will
meet your requirements. We can
supply best quality at fair prices.
Special blend Tea, 3 lbs. for fl.00
Pure Ground Coffee, per lb..,..40c
Monk & Glass Custard Powder, per tin 25c
Jellies, assorted, 3 for. 25c
Prunes, 3 lbs. for 35o
B. C. Milk, 20 oz. tin, each.:....10o
Large assortment ot Summer
Beverages. Fresh supplies of
Fruit and Vegetables dally.
Note Addreu: Phone  58
33 EIGHTH STREET
Nur Corner of Columbia Stnet
NEW WESTMINSTER
Mass   Meeting . Condemns
Firm that Discharged
a Man
Refused to Sign "Slaved'
Petition"—City Council
and the By-law
VICTORIA, B. C, May 14.—Since
the Retail Employees association has
persuaded the city council to enact
an early closing bylaw, one or two
of the Victoria employers have been
active In preventing Its consummation. A petition was circulated by
the Arm of Fltipatrlck ft O'Connell,
clothiers, ln Victoria, among their
employees petitioning against the
passing of the by-law and Incidentally the early closing movement. All
of them signed except a tailor in their
employ, He was a union man and
ln favor of better working conditions. On refusing to sign, he was
told tbat hla services would not be
required after Saturday, He then
made out the following affidavit:
R. Fostcr-i Affidavit '
"Dominion of Canada,  Province*   of
British Columbia, to wit:
"In the matter of the Early. Closing
bylaw:
"I, Richard Foster, of the city of
Victoria, (n the provinoe of British
Columbia, do solemnly declare:
"(1) Thai up to May 6th, 1914, and
for some years previous to. that time,
I was a journeyman tailor In the employ of the firm of Fltipatrlck ft
O'Connell, olothlers, of the city of
Vlotoria.
(2) On the said May 6th, 1914,
Mr. 3. D. O'Connell, of the said firm,
presented to me a petition with the
request that I should sign the same,
and which said petition requested the
olty counoll of Vlotoria to refrain
from passing an Early Closing bylaw for the Introduction of a weekly
halfholdtay. In reply to the said request I answered that I would not do
lt, and Mr. J. D. O'Connell Immediately said, "All right, you go Saturday," The words "You go Saturday" meant that I was dismissed
from his employ. Following this I
was abused by a brother of the laid
J. D. O'Connell, namely, P. L.
O'Connell, who challenged me to
flght without further provocation
than above mentioned.
"(3) I further Btate that I have
never taken any active part In the
present agitation for the halt-holiday,
and during the four years I was employed with the said Arm of Fits-
patrlok ft O'Connell they have had no
fault to find with my services, and
I took the stand ot refusing to sign
the counter petition simply as my individual right
"And I make thla solemn declaration conscientiously believing It to be
true and knowing that It Is of the
aame force and effect as If made under oath, and by virtue of the Canada
Evidence act ,
"RICHARD FOSTER."
"Declared before me at tbe city of
Victoria In the province ot BrltlBh
Columbia, this 8th day of May, A. D.
1914.—Ernest L. Tait, Commissioner
for taking affidavits within British
Columbia."
As a protest agalnat this treatment
the Retail Clerks' organization took
up the ease and called a mass meeting ln the Victoria theatre on Sunday last The meeting from every
standpoint was a huge success, the
theatre' being well filled. On the
platform were officers of tbe organisation, also J. L. Martin, vice-president ot the local trades council.
James Talbot, president of the association, occupied the chair.
Objects of Meeting
In his opening remarks he explained the objects of the meeting;
which, he said, was made necessary
by the attitude.of certain employers.
Now that the cause of the early closing movement had almost bsen won
and the city council was about to
pass the necessary bylaw, employers were prepared to resort to Intimidation In order to defeat it. Such
disregard tor personal liberty would
work finally against the employers
conoerned aad tor the speedy success of the movement for more fresh
air for indoor workers.
The first speaker called on was
J. M. Anderson, vice president ot the
organization.   He made a logical plea
Stoney's Intention* were ln trying to
organize a local tailors' union In opposition to the stand taken by the Vancouver local. Mr. Stoney's character
was warmly defended by several
speakers, A motion to send a delegation to tbe Vancouver Tailors' meeting
and present Mr. Stoney's case before
tbe membership, waa amended to let
the -matter lie on tbe table until Mr.
Stoney could be present, he being absent from the city on offlcia. business.
The matter of olty .finances, especially the method of disposing of
bonds and debentures was brought to
the attention ot the. council °t Delegate! Mackie and Maguire. It wai
contended that the plan of municipal
bond selling 111 vogue ln the city of
St Paul, Minn., was showing excellent
result!, and should be given consideration by the Board of Aldermen ot the
city of New Westminster. On motion
the Municipal committee wu Instructed to gather data to try and enlist
the Influence of the different bodies
that have tbe lnterelta of tbe city at
heart, and present the St. Paul plan
to the city council for its consideration. The courtesy of the Dally News
In furnishing a copy of an editorial
printed some time ago on the subject, was acknowledged with thanks.
Resolutions strongly condemning
the powers that were responsible'for
Bending troops to Nanaimo to threaton
peaceful citizens on May Day because
they were only workingmen, were
presented by the Hodcarrlers' local.
Wonder was expressed why the government did not call out the militia
to stop the parade In New Westminster on the same day. The resolutions
were adopted and the secretary instructed to send a copy to the city
council of Nanalmo.
Receipts slnoe last meeting were
reported as being 171.10. Bills to tbe
amount of 164 were ordered paid.
CAPITAL CITY BUDGET
 EDITED BY JOHN L. MARTIN, LABOR HALL, VICTORIA, B.C. 	
for fair-play and justice. One man
bad the courage of his convictions
and refused to swear away his own
personal liberty. While he was hot
a member of their organization, yet
they were working with him for the
right of the open air on Saturday
afternoon. He hoped that all- would
lend a helping hand as the man tn
question had done—to the cause ot
personal liberty.
Half-holiday Favored
The next speaker was Dan Loupard,
seoretary ot the association. He Informed the audience that the movement had commended itself to many
sections of the publlo: The local
tradea oauncol had gone ln favor of
lt and had asked for the by-law to
I be passed. The adult bible classes of
the city; the local council of women; the ministerial association; the
sooial service commission; the grocers association, and even Sir Richard MoBrlde had' expressed sentiments ln favor of It The labor commission also had recommended lt to
the legislature as a measure to be
enacted, The cause was euro to win,
he concluded, with all this public sentiment behind lt.
He Refuiid to Sign'
'The chairman then Introduced Richard Foster, the man who refused to
sign the above-mentioned petition.
On approaching the footlights he was
greeted 'with an enthusiastic outburst of applause. He told the audience that he was a member of the
tailora' union, and that he believed lu
living up to his union principles. He
considered that he would be going
against them if, he had signed the
petition. He conoluded by reading
the affidavit he had signed.
Will Uie Hli Influence
The next ipeaker waa the Rev.
John Inkster. He told of his experiences In a draper's store in the north
of Scotland, where they had the
Saturday half-holiday. His experiences taught him the necessity tor it.
He also favored lt from an economlo
standpoint Also .that lt would assist
men and women to spend the Sabbath
in a becoming manner by them having a half-holiday some day ln the
week. He said that "Scotchmen were
noted for keeping the Sabbath and
everything they .laid their hands on,"
a remark that Invoked the laughter
of the audience. He said that the
majority of the people didn't care
how they acted so long as they were
free. He would use the best Influence he could for the half-holiday, he
conoluded.
Slaves' Petition
Rev. W. Stevenson, the last speaker,
said that the cause of the retail clerks
was just coming In. It was part of a
world-wide movement on the part of
labor to free itself, The struggles of
labor were bitter, but In the end, he
believed It would triumph. He referred to the petition that was signed
as a "slaves' petition," and the retail
clerkB were justified In fighting
against suoh high-handed Intimidation as wai uied. Such actions were
driving men the world over Into organizations that were gathering In
strength. He advised them when the
half-holiday had been accomplished
to hang together, for other accomplishments. By maintaining their organization they were sure to win out.
Reiolutiom Passed
Two resolutions were adopted unanimously. One to condemn the action, of the employers Fiztpatrlck ft
O'Connell for their action,' aiid the
other expressing the opinion of the
meeting that the city council should
pass the half-holiday bylaw. With
this the' meeting closed.
BOTHA'S BLUDGEON BROKEN
Drastically Worded Place Bill ll
Withdrawn
The Botha-Smuts effort to hand the
working-class of South Africa over,
body, boots and breeches, to the rand-
lords, has met with complete and ignominious failure. The Peace' Preservation .bill was too raw, providing for
the Infliction of aevere penalties tor
riotous assemblies, Interference with
men willing to remain at work, and Intimidation. The measure vwas ao
worded that peaceful picketing' would
be Impossible lt the bill became law,
and lt was regarded by labor men ln
South Africa' as striking a serious
blow at trade unionism. The bill gave
the government power to deport person! convicted of violence. It was
withdrawn by the government
and
BIG  IN  NOISE
Canadian Federation of Labor
National Movement
So little Is beard at the present
time In regard, to the so-called Canadian Federation of Labor and the
national movement, that one may well
ask as to what Is the matter ln this
direction. While accounts appear
with the greatest regularity ■ in the
daily papers ln regard to the organizing ot new International unions In
every province of the dominion, there
Is never any account of the tormina
of a purely national concern. This
silence Is certainly ominous, for, aB a
rule, the orowd, while always small tn
growth, has been big ln proto'ationa
and noise.
East Full of Unemployed
James Joad, superintendent of the
Union Mission In Ottawa, speaking
this week pf labor conditions In the
east Bald, "Instead of the men going
to the west, lt seems that men are
coming east," said Mr. Joad. "During
the whole time I have been superintendent ot this home I have never
known so many men stay bere at this
time of the year. The big contracting
companies lh the west and northwest
do not seem to want any men. In past
years there has been plenty of permanent, work for the men with the
railway companies in construction
work, but up to the present I have reoelved no Intimation that men are
wanted for this kind of work."
Cleaning Up
Montreal laborltes will expend Ave
thousand dollars ln renovating and
Improving the labor headquarters. A
pew electric light and ventilating system will be Installed, and when completed the unions will have one of the
most cosy and comfortable meeting
places to be found anywhere.
Works Close at Hamilton
Steel and screw works closed down
ln Hamilton, Ontario, this week. Four
hnudred men were thrown out of employment ln Consequence.
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURES
COLDS, AC.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
■  -        >    ,
FORT S.T., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MGR. FREE AUTO BUS
Ca     C__..!_   LI—1—1 formerlyOrientslHotel,O.D.Ssdaw,Prop.
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M> YATES STREET, VICTORIA. B.C. nectlon. Union home. tUtssi We.,Ms.,II
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Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
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improvements to the extent
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For further information apply to
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Secretary, Bureau of Ptovindal Information, Vi
JOBSEEKERS EVERYWHERE SHOULD
REMEMBER THAT THE STRIKE ON VANCOUVER ISLAND IS NOT SETTLED
PAY NO ATTENTION TO PHONEY DAILY
PRESS REPORTS SENT OUT BY THE OOAL
COMPANIES. WAIT UNTIL OFFICIAL NOTICE HAS BEEN GIVEN THROUGH THE
LABOR PRESS.  -
Help the Ooal Miners to win the right to organiie by
remaining away from Vancouver Island.
Named Show are frequent!jr made ia Nob-
, Union Faeteriet—De Net Bay Any Shoe
no matter what tta name, unless lt bean a
plain and readable impression or thla itamp.
All shooa without tha union Stamp art
alwayi Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS* UNION
246 Snmmor Strait, Boston, Mail.
3. P. Tobln, Prea.    0. L. Blalna, Bfo.-Tnaa.
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LOOK FOR THIS PACKAGE WHEN
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—BY	
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LIMITED
VICTORIA    VANCOUVER ' CALGARY    EDMONTON.. official PAHR VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEBtERATlONIST
8E&H YEAR, No. 162.
VANCOUVER, fi. C£ FRIDAY MAY 15,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
yi -_x"-y
BRING THIS AD. WITH YOU AND GET
THIS SWELL LOOKING
$2&» SUrr for $I4»
its the greatest suit bargain ever off ered
in this city—and, mind you, this special
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suits are right up to the minute in style,
made of imported tweeds, and worsteds
in the season's latest color combinations.
Every suit is man-tailor finished and
guaranteed to fit perfectly. $30.00 is the
cost of thetse-suits in exclusive suit
stores, our leader to readers of the Federationist, $14.95.' .
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU
Hudson's Bay Stores
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Tailored so that the style
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514 Granville St
THE WORKWOMAN'S STORE
"LANG'S"  626 MAIN STREET
Everything for the working man—BOOTS and SHOES, CLOTHING, HATS and CAPS, GENTS' FURNISHINGS, Eto, at prises that
will pay you to come aid Investigate.
EXTRA SPECIAL THIS WEEK:
$10.60Bnlto .....:.. $7.50
$22.60 Suits $15.00
THESE ARE WONDERS.
Labor Unrest Everywhere
Best Beacon—Opening
Eyes of Masses
Chairman J. E. Wilton Gives
- Interview on General
Situation
At the present time the queatlon. ot
'organised'labor In British Columbia
taking a hand In provlnolal politics Is
a very live one. This week The Federatlonist Interviewed 3. B. Wltton,
chairman of the local Labor Representation league, who spoke interestingly on the matter. He said: "This'
la not a new Idea—labor has a right
to be represented—labor la the fundamental of wealth—without labor the
world could not* advance, If labor sat
back and folded Its arms, chaos would
result—wealth would njt accumulate—capital could not be utilized. The
laborer produces, the capitalist exploits, and lt we allow that each has
Its right—one to employ and the
other to be employed—then equally
each has Its right in' a share to all
the things that go to make up the
world of civilisation and progress-
each haa lta right In soolety and In
the governmental processes of the
world." .
"What about -labor discontent?"
asked the reporter.
"The labor discontent everywhere
to-day, In erery country, Is only part
of a great evolution that Is going on,
and which Is brought about by education and greater enlightenment ot
the masses. The capitalist Is the
same to-day as he was a hundred
years ago—always wanting more,
never satisfied, always endeavoring to
secure labor for less, never giving the
people who produce for him what his
Increased wealth oould afford—but always seeking to pay less. But, on the
other hand, the laborer Is not the
tame; he Is a very different creature
to what he was even twenty years
ago. He Is advancing, he no longer is
satisfied to go down Into the coalpit
as a boy and come up to die when an
old man; he no longer is satisfied to
see his children follow In his steps
and become the slave that he has
been and that his ancestors were,"
"Don't you think labor is apath
ettor'
"Labor unrest everywhere is the
best beacon that has shone in the
horlion for many a decade-'-the worm
will turn—labor ts shaking Itself of
Its lethargy—lt Is like the nine days'
old kitten,: opening Its eyes, and the
sight of light and freedom Is uplifting to tbe masses; but the capitalists
remain the same."
"In every country labor Is on the
qui vlve. On the continent, as In
Switzerland the other day, even the
cry for a national defence, raised by
the capitalists to cement the contending political parties failed to have the
desired result.
"In England labor Is more, than ever
active, and the Incident of a Jim Lar-
Kin, which let the sunlight Into a very,
very sore,' muddy mire In Ireland recently, Is only part of the evolution.
'In South Africa again labor is active, and the transportation of the
labor leaders la only like anarchism—
the king Is killed, and another king is
crowned. In the United States the
march forward Ib under way,-labor
will predominate, and quicker than
most people Imagine, and what they
do In America we In Canada will do,
even If under another name and ln
another way."
Mr. Wilton, from your experience
In Australia, wbat do you think of-
labor conditions there?"
"In Australia labor predominates,
and, notwithstanding all that Is written and said to the contrary, the masses in that country have better conditions, better wages and a freer life
than has ever been; girls- and women
are oared for and receive higher
salaries and better hours for similar
work than they do in this olty to-day,
or anywhere on this continent, with
one or two exceptions. In Australia,
lt is a new civilisation, new methods,
and If a few mistakes do occur as they
go along, that- will not deter them,
for Is not the old system even In B.
C. today one huge mistake?
"And so tt Is no new thing. Labor
will be represented. Labor Is tbe majority, and for my part I never could
see why a representative to make the
laws under which we live should be
any different to the representative we
Intrust to make our own working
laws.
"When we send a delegate to one of
our great trade conventions we pick
one of our own men, one who understands us and knows our needs and
alms. We get results. And yet when
we want a representative to make and J
frame the laws under whloh we shall
live and labor we elect a capitalist-
one from the parties that care nothing fos us beyond our votes.
"Vou say to me, It Is not my fault,
|we have never had a chance In this
city anyway. Well, brother, you get
behind the gun right now. The political Labor Representation league Is
formed to give you a chance. Tou do
your share, help,us to say, even In
this corner of the world, that labor
unrest and discontent means that
from now on we will act for ourselves,
and when the time shall come we will
be ready with the 8,000 or 10,000
votes that the working men control
here, to say: 'Labor shall be represented.'"
HUNTING A JOB
Conservative Association an
Employment Agency
VICTORIA, B. C, May 14.—An employment agency of no mean worth
Is operating in Victoria.. The Fed-
erationtst's correspondent bere one
day last Week a—e across a longshoreman who used to be a delegate
trom the -local "wharf rata" on the
central body. He was in search bf
the invisible1—a Job. In the process
of the conversation he intimated that
he might have had a Job had he used
an opportunity .that was given him.
He had went Into the local conservative headquarters as he had heard
many jobs could be had were the recipients ot the true-blue persuasion.
Though not one of the party's men
he managed to bluff the seoretary Into thinking that he was, the result
being'that the following was handed
to him with the* secretary's name .attached and- hla own name and kind
of occupation defh-ed:
"Victoria Conservative Association
"Mr. Tupper, contractor, Indian Re-
, serve, Victoria,' B. ft:
"Dear SJr^-The bearer ■— has
been recommended for a position as
laborer on your staff, and he will be
pleased to accept your Instructions.
Yours respectfully. ■      ■'
1 "Honorary secretary,
"Victoria Conservative Association."
It might be added that, like the gospel, it Is free, without money or price.
Since this was Issued to the longshoreman trom whom tt was received,
the supply, ot Jobs has become limited and has necessitated the putting
up of the following sign on the window: "No more men wanted."
1:
PROBLEM
Committees- Report—B. C.
Federation of Labor and
The Federationist
Reports of Unions—Be the
24th May Celebration-
Special Meeting
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II HASTINOS STRUT WUT
PROM WINNIPEG, MAN.
Thousands of Men Unemployed — Immigrant*'An Arriving
Advices from'Winnipeg go to show
that things are In very bad shape In
that city at the present time. There
are not only hundreds, but thousands
of men unemployed, and the various
employment agencies are besieged by
an evergrowing* army ot out-of-works.
To intensify the evil, Immigrants are
Coming in by the train-load dally. All
over the city are to be noted, crowds
of Idle men,' many of whom have been
idle all winter, and who now see no
prospects ahead of a chance to earn
a livelihood. Suoh a state of affairs
has.never existed before at this time
of the year ln the history ot the city.
If the tide of Immigration continues as
now, pouring In, tbe west will be up
against an unemployment problem
that lt wtU.be dearly Impossible to
cope with, and In comparison with
which that of last winter, grave as lt
wes,. will sink- Into comparative Inslg-
nmoance.
OTTAWA MACHINISTS.    ,
Proposition to Oo Back to Ten-hour
Work-day
The machinists of Ottawa. do not
take kindly to the proposition to go
back to the ten-hour day. Nine hours
is now .the standard ln that city, but
the bosses bave nev r taken kindly to
lt, and.have announced that they desire to go back to the long hour system. The members of the International association state that If there Is any
change It will have to be along the
lines of another reduction Instead ot
Increasing the hours of labor. The
union will put up a determined fight |
if any attempt ts made to force them
back to the old system. The International association is now out ln advocacy of eight hours, and will assuredly give the fullest measure of flnanclal support to the Ottawa local If Its
members are compelled to take drastic action.
"PAIR WAGE" CLAUSE
Enforced at Brandon, Man.—Men Receive Back Pay
The contractors who secured tbe
erection of the new normal school In
Brandon, Man., have learned that tbe
"fair wage" clauses In their contracts
really amount to something. The local
laborltes got next to the fact that the
workmen employed on the job were
not receiving the rate of wages as
stipulated ln the terms of the contracts, and they at once got busy
with tbe provincial authorities. The
result was the holding of an Investigation that showed that the wages
stipulated in the contracts had not
been paid. Consequently the govern
ment has deducted the sum of (1420
from the amounts due the contractor
and will pay all bona Sde claims presented by men who have been engaged
upon the job, of which over $1100
have been filed.
Labor Candidate
It looks at the present time as
though the liberals in Bast Hamilton
will not put a candidate In the field
against Allan Studholme, the little
labor member, who has put up such
a splendid flght ln the Interests of the
workers ln the Ontario legislature.
There Is a proposition to bring out an
Independent temperance candidate,
but It does not look as though lt will
amount to anything. Such a move
would be recognised as coming from
circles interested ln the election of a
government Supporter. 'Allan should
go back with a good majority. He Is
respected by all1 classes of the citizens In Bast Hamilton, who generally
recognise his sturdy political honesty
and genuine sympathy with all measures advanced ln the Interests of the
general welfare. The boys are light
back of the little fighter, and do not
propose to see him turned down
either.—Industrial Banner.
Co-operation at Welland
And now the co-operative movement
has got a hold In Welland, the lively
burg on the big canal. The workers of
the town have taken the Initial steps
tb establish a co-operative store, and
at a meeting recently held, a large
number of the citlsens put up their
money for shares. A temporary board
of management was appointed and
empowered to get busy on the proposition without any loss of time. From
the enthusiasm that Is being manifested lt looks as though It will be a
reel go.
VICTORIA, B. C, Maroh 18.—The
Trades and Labor council met last
Wednesday evening in Labor Temple,
President O. Dykeman was ln the
chair. After a few credentials had
been read and the delegates Introduced, and seated, Statistician ft
Siverts reported on the number of
delegates who attended the meetings
held during the previous quarter. The
report was accepted. A new system
was Introduced wherein blank cards
would be Issued to the delegates to
be filled out and handed to the statistician from which a table would be
prepared of the delegates In attendance.from time to time,
Committee Report/
Delegate- Siverts reported for organising committee that the seme had
visited the Bookbinders' union asking
tbem, to affiliate with the council. The
matter was yet to be deolded by the
union et their nest meeting.
A special committee to adjust the
grievance between the. Theatrical
Stage Employees and the Majestic
theatre reported that the matter had
practically been settled, and was
thanked for its services.
Federation and Pederatlonlst
Communications from the B. C. P.
of L. re organisation and urging that
greater unity ln the ranks of the
unions. ,
" Secretary-treasurer A. S. Wells
spoke on the activities of the federation and the harmonious relationship
tbat at present exists between the
federation and The Federatlonist,
"Delegate Siverts also spoke on the
past and present policy of that jour
naL He noted an Improvement ln
the paper and considered that the
same was becoming a force In the
labor movement of this province. As
a medium ot expression it was Increasing In power and efficiency.
Delegate 3. L. Martin also spoke in
the interest of the paper and urged
that besides Its efficiency ln the editorial part of the paper's progress It
was also necessary to have the support of tbe rank and file of the federation,
A communication waa read from J.
8. Moran, regarding the pamphlet on
the /'Mexican Revolution." The same
was flled for the Information of tbe
delegates.
Also from the Trades and Labor
congress regarding Immigration and
enolosed a circular for distribution
among workers'in Jreat Britain.   -
A letter was read from J. D. McNIven correcting the "fair wage"
schedule of the department of labor
as published ln the Labor Gazette lit
connection with a contract let to
Grant, Smith & McDonald.
Reports of Unions
Delegate Neate, of the Typographical union, reported that the Sweeney
A McConnell case was still unsettled
and Is a non-union shop. Furthermore that the printing ln connection
with the 24th of May celebration did
not bear the union label. The city
council had granted (2000 towards the
celebration and are therefore to be
asked to use Its influence In Insisting
on the label being In evidence on all
the printing done by the citlsens'
committee having the arrangements
ln hand for the celebration. The
legislation committee will handle the
matter.
Sheet Metal Workers reported that
20 per cent, of their members were
working.
Theatrical Stage Employees,thanked
the council for Its efforts In regard
to having signed up the Majestic
theatre.
Letter Carriers reported that an
arrangement between the postal department and the B. C. Blectric Railway company whereby carriers could
have the use of the cars for the malls
had been arrived at.
Re Immigration
Delegate A. 8. Wells brought up
the matter of alien immigration. He
stated that the order-in-councll Is
continually being violated. The men
are being imported for the job on
the Hudson's Bay Company's building. He stated that local men had
been Idle all winter and had been
waiting for work on that building, but
men had been brought In from Portland. This, he said, was felt keenly
by his organization. While personally he had no objections to members
of International unions coming into
Canada, yet his organisation realized
that the policy thus pursued of admitting these men was spelling' hardship for local men.
Others took part ln the discussion
that ensued. It was decided to hold
a special meeting next Wednesday to
discuss the immigration question.
The council then adjourned.
■,:■' -, '-.,,'■.■,■ :v...\...\jyMfb:,,^tm
Q£*f"*j*
HBI
Pour Thousand Idle
At the present time, so a press dispatch states, tbere are four thousand
unemployed at Fort William, Ont,
and many out-of-works from ether
places are drifting In ln the hope of
finding things on the up move.
SPENCER'S SELL
Union-Made
OVERALLS
We have garments especially assigned for erery
. ^      ' —        .' ...\.. \.—-—.—. i,...
class of work. Made of the best quality materials
and by skilled workers. Bevra in every garment is
the label of the United Garment Workers of America, and every garment Is made in British Columbia.
Spencer Dollar Bib Overalls are made ot stout dealm
ln black snd Hue; tour pockets, full bibs, good suspenders,
wito. elasUo set-In.  All sises...—. , »i.00
Engineers' Overalle are made of fast dyed Hue drill
with white pencil stripe; six pockets; bibs and suspenders.
This garment washes well.  Prioe___ „..—I 11.00
Dollar Overall Panto—Made tn plain black, Hue aad
an olive shade drill. Double stitched seems; Ave pockets;
buttons rivetted on.  Price. „.___..„_„ SIM
Plasterers' end Painters' Overalle In plain white with
seven pockjto; brush hold at back; double fronts; bihe
and 'suspenders.. Price..._.„__. —„..;,„„...„;.,.'„,, ,.,',...M,|l'jS
Double Duck Pants—A pant for extra hard wear and
made with double seat snd fronts. Made of brown or ton
duck.  Price _ -,...,,,„ ,-, ;,i ,.,.. , S1.7S
Brotherhood Overalle—This le the garment that nil-
way man, holier "makers, machinists, etc, demsnd. Made
extra full, double stitched snd seven pockets; plain Hack,
plain blue and blue stripe. A British Columbia product
and the best value on the market Price.... ._ ..atj*s
Overall Jackets ere made to match all overalls et the
same price,
Warehouse Coata—A good coat for the warehouse man
or the man that works at a bench. Made bf strong khaki
drill, detachable buttons; three-quarter length; sises 16 to
44.   Price ~ ~„_tM0
David Spencer limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTB.
WEEOND SPECIAL
China Cups and Saucers, $1.95 doz.
BLUE BAND DECORATION WITH OOLD EDGE
REGULAR VALUE, 12.50 PER DOZ.
R. G. Buchanan & Co.
VANCOUVER'S SELECT CHINA STORE
Telephone Seymour HBI
BUCHANAN BUILDING 1121 ROBSON ST.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Plestaat headquarter! tet Carpenten' Tools sad all
kinds ef Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fab. 447. 2337 Main StrsoL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA'BUILDING
602 Htibjp Street Wert
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific aad painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plats ud Cold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A.M. TO 6 P.M.
75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and convenience.
Blectric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an Instant's attention to connecting the cord with the household
socket
They can do everything ln the line of light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, eto. Tou don't
want heavy meals during tbe hot weather and the appliances Just
meet this demsnd and make It unnecessary to bave a hot Sre going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few oents per hour of continuous, operation. To prepare, an ordinary meal takes but s fraction
of an hour.  They are guaranteed by the manufacturers.
SEE OUR PULL LINE OP ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
•figsL   B.C. ELECTRIC  ■*
Ns«De*~
St PAGE FOUR
THB BBITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY 7. .MAY, 15, 1st*
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital  snd  Reserve,   ..   18,700,000
86 branches ln Canada
A seueial baxking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest -allowed, at highest
ourrent rate
East End Branch
1«0 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvis, Manager
I been   excelled   by   any   government! loqjted upon as a social aBset to bo
Published  every   Friday morning  by the
-   C. Federatlonist, Ltd.
R. Paim PoUlpiec» -   ■   "   -   M"**?r.
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, president;
J. H. McVety, secretary-treasurer; H.
Glbb; Q. J. Kelly; R. P. Pettlplece.
Offlce: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrad.r
Subscription: 81.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, 11.00
Altlllateil   with   Western   Labor   Press
Association.
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE.
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
business will bs welcome be It large or
small
I  POURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
| VANCOUVER
"Unity of Labor; the hope ot the world.'
FRIDAY. MAY, 15, 1914
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve |11,17*i»7B
WAGE-EARNERS
kssp your savings In the Bank
of Toronto, arid watch your deposits and Interest sdded by the
bsnk grow to a most desirable
bank bslsnce. The nnanclal
strength ef this ,long-eetab-
llshed, well-conducted Institution ensures safety for your
money, snd you will reoelve
every courteey, end your account careful, attention.
luaia tsUUt flflfl flflfl
AMVt*   • ■ ajejojfoaiaoTfirvw
Deposits      ..     •■   M1.OWO0O
Main Office—
461 HASTINOS ST. WEST
(Neer Rloharde)
0
Branches—
Cor. Hastings and Csrrsll Sts.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONEY   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITY    PROPBBTT.
NO BROKERAOE.
Apply at Company's Office
Sir HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
Ize-IU ROGERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER -       B.C.
FIRE, UFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreements Per Ssle purchased
Ssfe Deposit Vsulte
SUO s yser
Guaranteed Investment ef Punde
for Clients
LIBERALI8M IS DEAD
It is an ill wind that ^lows nobody
any good, and the Liberals of British
Columbia are trying hard to make tbe
present conditions ot bad trade and
unemployment serve their ends. They
are anxious   to win   the   confidence
and votes of the workers ln time for
the provincial   election, which   will
take place some time during the next
two years.   Their lust   tor   sower
would be pitiful If lt were not funny,
and Its only saving   grace   Is   that
chances of satisfaction are In Inverse
ratio to their hopes. Tbe publlo meeting held by them In the Labor Temple
last week was a bold piece of flirtation, but It fell horribly flat     The
chief thing lt demonstrated was, that
If Liberalism ever had the right to be
called a definite political creed anywhere, tbat day has gone by In this
province, if Indeed lt ever really existed at all.   Liberalism tound some
place In British politics in the middle
of the nineteenth century..    It represented the bourgeois mind as opposed
to the old landed aristocracy in the
newly developing industrialism of that
day, and Its mission was to secure for
the middle class the control of political
power for the exploitation   ot the
workers in their factories and various
commercial enterprises.     They succeeded ln their efforts and contrived
to attach to their party name a reputation  for   being  progressive, while
really they only represented one section of the possessing class struggling
for mastery with tbe other.    They
typified the tradesman mind ln politics, coupled with the snuffling attributes of the nonconformist temperament ln matters religious; as opposed-
to the patrician conservatism of the
old feudal families who maintained
themselves ln political power by the
"pocket borough" method.
•>     *   »   »
And so for a time there seemed to
be a difference between the two, al
though actually each was trying to
reserve for Itself the privilege of exploiting the  working class through
either the medium of land ownership
or manufacturing capital.  But just as
the economlo conditions at that tune
were responsible for the apparent difference, so, as Industrial development
went on apace did that peculiarity dls
appear and the material Interests of
both parties become the same.     It
may not- be that they were Consciously desirous of that, but politics are
only a secondary factor ln the process.
It Is the Industrial system of any age
which determines the politics of that
age and not vice versa.   In the mid-
Victorian era, capitalism   was   more
personal than lt Is now.     Employer
and. employed saw  and  knew  each
other, and that personal contact, td a
certain extent and ln some ways, en
sured better relations  between  tbe
two.   But Industry has passed rapidly
Into the small limited liability company stage, then into the corporation,
and on still further Into the aggregation ot corporations ln the form  of
a trust.    Employer   na   longer sees
worker. Often he never sees the plant
ln which his money is Invested, and
be may not know  tbe   least  thing
about   the industry—except, that he
wants his profits.   This rapid maturing of capitalism   has   reduced   the
human equation In Industry to a minimum, and tbe extraction   of   proflt
from the labor of tbe workers to a
aolence.
e   •   »
This Ib tbe condition of Industry In
British Columbia today. We have not
had to pass through the intermediate
stages as In Europe, but we see capitalism earn: Halted from the very beginning In Its most modern aspects.
The difference between capitalist and
worker Is thus made clearer and more
sharply defined;   and tbe real meaning of the opposition between liberal
and tory here Is that they are equally
desirous of being the chosen henchmen of tbe   American   and   British
moneybags which are in control  of
the province.   There Is only one tunc
tlon that liberate and  conservatives
alike can perform and that Is to manipulate the political power, of the province In the interests of capital for
the exploitation of tho workers. And
li! ever a party  should  attain office
here which la liberal by name .their
function would still be to do as they
were told, and they would be only too
Clad to do it, even as they do In
land.   There they denounce the house
ot lords halt the week and fill up the
vacancies and make additions to the
peerage the other half.   They do tbat
for two reasons.   One Is because the
secret party funds are replenished by
tbe sale of titles, and the other is so
that tbey can delude the people by
pretending In the commons that they
are really anxious   to  do something
tor the workers, yet conscious all the
time that" they can rely upon   their
party ln the lords to throw out any
bill when they get the tip from the
lower house.
e   »   # '
As the toadies of capitalism, the
present liberal aggregation has never
which has been in power there.   They
have sent the  military against  the
workers more times since they came
Into power in 1906  than  they have
been years in offlce.   They have been
responsible for the slaughter of working men and women at Dublin, Llan-
elly, Liverpool,  BelfaBt and London.
Tiiey have grovelled on their knees
to   the   Jew   mine-owners   of South
lAfrica, and   would   have   pulled the
whole nation down with them if it
had not been for .the trades unionists
of both countries,   ln addition to that
they made Rufus Isaacs Lord Chief
Justice of England to show their ap
preciation   of   his   racial   acuteness
in   using  his   inside   knowledge
a    member    of    the    cabinet
speculate     ln     Marconi   . wireless
shares   because   he knew   the   government was   about to make a contract with that company.     They are
Indeed  a   great   party;   and   only
equalled ln their latter-day corruption
by the credulity of the workers who
put them where_they are.  But if they
ever make the grade again ln British
Columbia we shall be very much surprised, for though the workers here
have not yet as a body decided what
the name of a purely working class
political party Bhall be, yet tbey display a very hopeful Indifference  to
liberal blandishments,   and   for that
they bave ample reason.     The outstanding merit of the torles Is that
they are shameless pirates; but the
disaster of the liberate Is that they
have nothing to offer but liberalism,
neither have they mastered the flrst
principle of their trade, which Is that
there must be some honor even among
thieves.
used  for  the   purpose   of   building
homes which would make health  for
all the people possible.   It is the private property of the few, and the first
and last consideration of that ownership is to extract the maximum amount of rent regardless of all consideration tor health.    Building regulations are framed lt is true, but they
are framed by the owning class with
first regard to their property Interests.   Vancouver is one of the worst
examples ot that -kind of thing, and a
careful analysis   of  the membership
of     the  ' Anti-Tuberculosis   Society
would reveal the fact that ownership
of tenement and slum property is responsible' for an Income which makes
lt unnecessary for some of them  to
work, but leaves time for dabbling in
feather-headed schemes  for patching
up the poor.   They wax enthusiastic
on the question of street spitting, but
are* not Interested ln any movement
to raise wage's and working conditions
so as to enable the workers to house
and feed themselves healthily.     But
that does not save tbem.   The very
air they breathe is contaminated by
their own pestilential property,   and
In many cases -the clothes tbey wear
are produced by the sweated labor of
their hapless tenants, and are loaded
with disease germs generated In the
devitalized bodies ot emaciated seamstresses tolling for bare sustenance in'
unhygienic surroundings.
f  '»   *
The doctor fraternity   themselves
bave never yet been honest with the
world about this question. Here again
the mark ot the economic beast   is
Perhaps they cannot afford to
be candid as a body.   They do not de
rive their fees from healthy people,
and the higher the standard of public
health, the lower would be the demand for their services and the keen
competition for business, whioh would
but an incident whlcb took place in
the Spanish chamber ot deputies last
Friday proves that "he being dead
yet speaketh." Francisco Ugarte is
the minister of public works. At tbe
time ot Ferrer's murder he waa procurator general and aB such rejected
Ferrer's appeal against his sentence.
Last week, referring to an entirely
different matter he described it as "a
corpse which does not exist"     This
brougbt the reply from the other side
of the house that "the only corpse
here Is that of Ferrer and it is still
palpitating"; the subsequent uproar
broke up the session. The Incident
goes far to show that below the surface of ruling class corruption—frqm
Alpbonso with bis physically degenerate offspring downwards—there is
a leaven of revolt working toward tbe
realization of those truths for which
Ferrer gave his life,
THE WHITE PLAGUE
The sanatorium for consumptives
at Tranqullle Is likely to be closed for
lack of funds, and the Anti-Tuberculosis Society is making efforts to get I thus be set up, would have the effect
money to keep it open.    There are |0f lowering their incomes.    They arc
two aspects to the "white plague"
problem. One Is the cure, and the
other the prevention of lt, and wltb
no* desire to ignore or minimise the
condition of those who are now Buffer
ing from its ravages, we think the
question of prevention te the more
Important ot the two.. It Ib, moreover, a matter of vital interest to the
workers because from their ranks the
majority of its victims are drawn
Medical science during the last
twenty years haB devoted a vast
amount of study to this disease and
three main facts concerning it have
been established—that lt Is possible
to cure lt; that lt Is possible to catch
lt from someone Infected, or independently Of personal contact. Those are
just cold, scientific tacts, but immediately we begin fo consider the data
upon which they are based we come
Into touch with the. living, human
side of the question, and are logically
led to the deeper underlying economic
causes. At one tune the opinion was
held by many medical men that one of
the ohlet causes of consumption was
heredity, and that children of Infected
parents were especially prone to the
disease. Subsequent scientific research, conducted simultaneously In
all civilized countries, haB changed
.that opinion. The frequent occurrence of consumption among members
of the same family used to be ex
plained by assuming a consumptive
disposition or Inherent liability which
ran In families, and was handed down
from one generation to thb other. The
children of consumptive parents were
supposed to have the seeds of the disease tn them, and for that reason
were considered as doomed sooner or
later.
»   #   #
However, the discovery  that lt *s
no more to blame personally than the
unemployed carpenter who feels pleasure ln seeing half the town burn
down. It is the economic system of
our time whloh Is responsible and
which separates economic Interest
from social truth. As far as the
Tranqullle Sanatorium Ib concerned,
it should be taken over and properly
financed by the provincial govern-,
ment. They have millions for Mackenzie & Mann and other financial
ghouls who hover at the baok of.
politics In this province, but they
pretend they have no money for
Tranqullle. Eventually It will have to
be done, and tbe entire hospital service and medical profession too will
have to be made a part of the. state
services. Meantime, a higher standard of general Intelligence and common honesty will be heeded in the
Anti-Tuberculosis Society. All they
are Interested In Is getting rid of the
nasty smell. We wonder what they
would say to a proposition to have the
sewers examined and cleaned.
ONTARIO'S COMPENSATION ACT
The workmen's compensation aot
just passed ln Ontario is the result of
long and patient efforts put forth by
all sections of the organised labor
movement ln that province during the
past few years, Under ordinary circumstances it would perhaps be Invidious to single out anyone for
special mention or congratulation. But
we know there is no one taan In all
Ontario to whom the placing of this
legislation on the statute books will
give more pleasure and satisfaction
than to Fred. Bancroft, the vice-president of the Trades and Labor con-
press of Canada, and in saying so we
know that" no twinge of envy will be
felt by any one of the hard-working
supporters who have backed him up
all along the line. As a prominent
officer ot the congress he has been
able to Invoke and use the larger
prestige and resources of that body
in his Work, and no small amount ot
credit is due to the congress for Its
share in making the new act possible.
It should result ln attracting the attention ot all workers to the fact tbat
trade unionists are spending their
monepr and efforts continually ln trying to produce laws for the benefit of
their class irrespective of whether
they are members of unions or not
It should also be a potent argument
ln the work ot organizing "the cent
belt" and should furnish encouragement and Impetus to the future efforts
of the wise men from the east.
Vincent Astor bad a quiet wedding.
Perhaps he was afraid that some of
the Indians who were, intoxicated-and
murdered by the agents of his ancestor in laying the family fortune might
hear about lt and take a notion to
leave the happy hunting grounds to
come down.to New York to inquire
the present-day price of furs.
The B. 0. Sugar Refinery is making
an appeal to the public not to buy
sugar which te refined by "cheap
Chinese labor." The Chinese bave
never sought employment ln the
B. C. Sugar,Refinery. They learned
.what the wages are there and that
was enough.
Chas. W, Post, ot gripe nuts notoriety, shot himself dead at Santa Barbara last Saturday. His best Invest
meat was the credulity of the American people; his worst was the
money he spent trying, to break up
the labor union movement.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meeta first and third Thursday*.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, preaident; J. H. McVety, vice-president; Oeo.
Bartley, general seoretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Ghitterldge, treaeurer;
Miss P. Brisbane, statistician: sergeant-
st-arms, John Sully; G, Curnock, t.
Knowles. W. B, Trotter, trustees.	
MANUFACTURERS  ARE  ALERT
The printed copies of the report of
the labor commission which waB received ln the provincial legislature
March 4th are not yet available. The
first recommendation contained in
the report was "Compulsory Btate insurance against accidents to be
administered by a workmen's compensation board." The Intent of
the commission was to have
workmen's compensation In this province handled in a way similar to the
states of California and Washington,
where industries are taxed according
to the risk involved ln them. The
revenue thus derived goes Into a state
fund   which   is  administered  by a
VANCOUVER UNIONS
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
MoVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian.
James Campbell, 3. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece; John MeMlllan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. R. Free. Manas1-
Ing director, J. H. McVety. Room *lll.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL—Meete Snd Monday lo month.
President, Geo. Mowat; eecretary, F. B.
Fleming, p.p. Box St.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets seeond and fourth Thursday of
eaoh month, 8'p.m. Secretary, J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby street; business agent.
H. J. MoEwen, room 209. Looal 817 meete
first and third Monday of eaeh month,
and   Looal  2847  meets  flrst  and   third
Tuesday of eaoh month. ■
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO'
CAL No. 48—Meeta seoond and fourth Saturdays, 7.80 p.m. President,
H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding secretary, R. J.
Adams; business agent, J.
"'--'-   Room 220, Labor
A WHITE B. C. WANTED, BUT^-
R. B. Angus, ef the C. P. R., wants
Canada "to be a white man's country,
but—." Just so. "But." He says the
Hindoos and Japs make' splendid
workers and are needed ln British
Columbia as laborers. What he
really means Is, that the word "splendid" In his vocabulary Is the synonym
ot "cheap,"' The Oriental will work
for lower wages, and will tolerate the
notoriously filthy conditions and bad
food ot the railway construction
camps where white men will kick.
Railway camp Ufe In British Columbia
means putrid meat, verminous bedding, grafting foremen, $1 per man
per month for a doctor whose vacation begins with the job, a holdup
price for the shoddiest articles of
clothing purchased at the contracting
company's store, and ln case a man
should quit a 20-mile "hike" down
the track with a 10 per cent, "rake
off" from his time check for the saloon-keeper who cashes it. It needs
"yellow" labor right enough.
The Nanalmo Herald hopes that the
celebration to be held there oh the
24th Vlll be free from factional feeling, The Herald did its very worst
to arouse enough factional feeling to
prevent the miners trom holding their
celebration on May 1st aid It was not
their fault that the day passed off
without disturbance,
Judge Gregory says "the Immigration of Asiatics te not an economic
question." It may not be for him, as
it is not expected that any of them
will aspire to the Judge's bench. But
lt Is for the worker who.may be
ousted out of his job to make way for
an Asiatic who will work cheaper. 'It
te also an economic question for the
class the judge belongs to, They want
cheap labor. . The judge needs to
clarify his judgment on the point in
question,
"Human life from the purely business point of view ts valued at Its
earning power," vide Dally Province.
That puts lt very nicely, but there's
just a word more to be said. The
value of human life as embodied in a
working man has two aspects. His
value to his employer Is determined
by what he earns, or, In other words,
by the product of his labor. His value
to himself is determined by the cost of
reproducing daily his mental and
physical energy. The value of that
process Is expressed tn monetary
terms by his wages. The chief business of his life Is to seek the opportunity ot: keeping himself alive for
the subsequent purpose of earning
someone else's living for him. There's
no hurry.  Just think lt over.
The British . government has deolded not to arrest or prosecute Carson and his associates for shipping
guns and rifles Into Ireland, It Is admitted that coastguards were forcibly
detained and telegraph wires tapped
and out to make the scheme successful. Supposing that next year there
Ib a combined, strike of miners, railwaymen and transport workers. And
supposing they import a huge shipment of arms and out wires, etc.
What do you suppose the liberal
government—the champions of tbe
common people—will do? Do you
suppose they will set their law officers to work to show that technically
nothing te being done which te liable
to disturb the peace? If so, keep your
eyes peeled. The Featherstone murderer  knows  how   to handle such
Black,
Tempi'
BARBERS'   LOCAL   No.   120-MBKTB
aecond  and  fourth  Thursdays,  e.30
Ei mi President, 3. W. Green: recorder, c.
E. Herrltt; secretary-business agent,  C-
H^r-ft"."',".00."1,,208' "bor Temple.
Hours: 11 to I; 8 to 7 p. m.	
BARTENDERS' LOCAL. No. 878.^-OF-
«_."£*• 50001 8M Lahor Temple. .Meets
r%*-^_-t. S"h P1?1""- P-*»i»en"
& n "■"jsu* flnanclal secretary, Geo.
W. Curnock. Boom-Mi, Labor Temnle
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', Nd. 1
. —MeetB every 1st and 3rd Tuesday,
LSiS'l.*"-""» S07- President, JaSee
fffSSiV ^"•-"Sending seoretary, W. s.
n B5?1U,»Bo5 6?! «n»"clal aeoretary. F.
ftj-r "Si Sri?*"" ■■«•■■•'w' s>«-.
BooSBT^ajflsv-pwL7>mo*ir-NS
Ml—Meete third Tueeday ■ in evwv
month,Jn mm IN, Labor Tei>XsVeeZ
dent, jr. 3. Milne vice-president. Wn.
Bushman: eecretary, Geow Mowat l&
ffi^..VWa"i"cw,,uT'-,"«uSr, H.
Periryiiw Tenth avenue oaatv
BROTHERHOOD Or BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Heton*
SL„A *?'.•& tyw Mondays, I o. ta.
ftjeldent F. Barclay, 888 Cordova Sast;
secretary. A. Fraser, 1181 Howe otr£t '
CtOARMAjtERg' LOCAL No. W-Um.
t*.1?'.*"£"!'  -th  month..   8  tm.
^ohntn?:0™™™*^™'.*
COOKS. WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
__*• •j* »■■»•. Labor Temple,   w. m.
Walkan buatnne  representative.    OMoe:
to_10.80; 1 p.m. to l.lf and I p.m. to I.8S
E*2l*— Cogip»t«irt help furnished on short
notice.   Phono gey, 8414.     	
ui^UTHWAI, WORKERS, LOCAL, NO.
Ill—Meets Room 101 every Monday
I p. m. Preeldent, Dave Fink; vlce-preei-
dent, M. Sander; recording secretary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; financial eecretary and business agent, W. F. Duns.
Heme**   wrtm    t.Lh   m^^ikt.. r
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple;
retary and business agent
Room MT, Labor Temple,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL 1*0.
.mJ'L (tUBl-le M,n)_Meete ««' onO.
third Mondays ot eaeh month. Room Ml,
8 p.m. Preeldent. H. P. McCoy; record-
— " *etaw Geo. Albers; business
'. L. Betl	
Ing
agent, r.
letlnshaueen, Room NT.
""W—WSEtSSP   tNTHRNATIONAE
ASSOCIATION,    No.    M x II—Meet*
iw PWeay evening, 141 Alexander
street, President. 8. 3. Kelly; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS,   NO.   lll-MEETS  SBC-
ond  and  fourth Fridays,  I p.  m.'
Preeldent, A. R. Towlfr: recording eeere- i
tary, J. Brookes; flnanclal aeeretary. J. H.
MOVING  PICTURE  OPERATORS,  Lo-;
Ml 288, I.A.T.S.E.-Meete every seeond Sunday ef .eaoh month, Labor Tern-1
pie, I p. m.     President, A. O. Hansen;
seorelary-treesurer, O. R. Hamilton; bust- !
«-&&\&%_mm'»m *»'
nasi swi!!
Meets second Sunday of each month,
rooms 28-80, Williams Building, 411 Qranvllle Btreet. President. J. Bowyer; vice-
Eresident. F. English: eecretary, H. 3.
iraefleld: treasurer, W. Fowler.
board, and specified rates of corn-
caused by a specific germ placed the ipensation are laid down for various
whole matter in a different light;   it kinds of injuries.    .During the .time
led to a more careful examination of
tbe facts and has resulted ln a general
and Increasing tendency to minimise
or absolutely deny the Influence > of
heredity. The researches bearing upon
that point were summarised by Vlr-
chow, the eminent German pathologist, at the international congress on
tuberculosis, wblch met In Berlin. He
said:
"I dispute this heredity absolutely. For a course of years I
have been pointing out tbat tf
we examine the bodies of infants
newly born, who bave had no life
apart from the mother, we find no
tuberculosis In them. I am convinced that what looked like
tuberculosis ln the newly born
was none of lt tuberculosis. In
my opinion there Is no authenticated case of tubercule having
' been found In a dissected newly
born Infant."
Observations on animals further
tend to disprove tbe existence of congenital tuberculosis. . All recent research supports this view, and tbe
theory that the germs may remain
latent In the offspring of consumptive parents is unsupported by evidence. The occurrence of the disease
In' such offspring Is ascribed to infection by tbe parents, and tbls view
is confirmed by the fact that the incidence in consumptive families is
greater on female children, who are
more constantly exposed to home infection, than on the male. All statin
tlcal evidence points in the same direction and denies, that the children .of
consumptives are specially predisposed.
• * #
The chief causes ot consumption
are overcrowded conditions of living,
lack of pure air and sunlight, poverty,
worry, insufficient food, insanitary
dwellings, and occupational diseases.
All these causes are characteristic of
the conditions under which the working-class live, and are all of them
traceable to the effects of the private
ownership and monopoly of the cardinal necessities of life. The land
upon which a  city  Is built Is  not
that this legislation was being considered by the legislatures of the two
states named, the fiercest and most
persistent opposition came from the
lawyers and insurance companies —
particularly the latter. They could
see their economlo Interests were
seriously threatened. Now, if the
provincial government decide to initiate, similar legislation here opposition must be looked for from the
same quarters. In the April number
ot the Industrial Progress and Commercial Record, which ta tbe official
organ of the Manufacturers' Association of British Columbia, there 1s a
lengthy article by Mr. A. S. MattheWs.
He is a member of the International
Association of Casualty and Surety
Underwriters, and is looked upon as
an authority on the subject of casualty insurance. In his article he strenuously opposes workmen's compensation as dealt with by the states of
California and Washington, and makes
no disguise ot the fact that any attempt to copy them ln British Columbia will be met with strong opposition'
by the insurance people. Bearing
that ln mind it behooves the labor
movement throughout the province
to make preparation to back its
claims and arguments by all evidence
possible.     	
A VOICE PROM THE GRAVE
Straws will show which way the
wind blows. Francisco Ferrer, the
founder, of the "modern" school In
Spain was condemned by a oourt
martial and shot lir Montju'tch prison
In 1909. He was oonvlcted of things
that were never proved against him,
for the very sufficient reason that he
was innocent. But his head had been
demanded by the priestcraft of Spain
for the crime of teaching children the
truth, and Maura, the premier at that
time, for motives of political expediency, allowed him to be murdered—a
concession to bigotry which cost him
his offlce a few weeks after. .Little
mention of the Ferrer shool has been
heard outside Spain since that time,
WILL HISTORY BE REPEATED
The first constitution of Mexico was
drawn up in the olty of Chtlpancingo,
ln the state of Guerrero, in tbe year
1813. Under Its provisions the suffrage was guaranteed to every male
inhabitant of Mexico over the age of
IS. Liberty of the press was guaranteed. A government with separate
judicial, executive and legislative departments was established. Personal
taxation was abolished and taxation
of capital put In Its stead. The Initiative was adopted as the baste ot all
law-making. The people who did that
were the peons of Mexico whom the
capitalist press would have the world
believe are absolutely Incapable of
governing themselves. It did not tall
because of the political Ineptitude of
the peons, but because the king of
Spain sent a huge army to Mexico to
assist the oppressors of the peons ln
their work of crushing tbe .spirit of
liberty and freedom out of the com
mon people. We shall see what
enlightened America will do after the
lapse of a centruy.
COLONIST ECONOMICS
Says the Vlotoria Dally Colonist:
"We eommend to all labor organisations the --desirability ot considering
this whole question of unemployment
from some other point of view than
the erroneous one that the industrial
situation can be more than temporary
ly relieved by paying out ln wages the
wealth that may have been accumulated."
We can' well imagine tbey would
like us to believe lt too.' It Is* almost
as good as the assertion made by the
same journal a few years ago. They
assured us then that "the worker
should have all he produced, and a
share of the proflt!" It's a clear case
for the examination of mental experts.
Still that $45,000 in the Songbee Reserve deal didn't look as though Sam
MatsoU was—well, never mind.
PHONE SEYMOUR I
<A TRUST COMPANY)
. THRIFT
la the foundation of success and
*      contentment
MAKE A BEGINNING
Save your money now.
We pay 1% Interest on Deposits,
subject to cheque, and credit the
interest
12 TIME8 A YEAR
AGREEMENTS,
BOUGHT an-^
jCOLLECTED^
Shorty
LOMXSi
Mbda
Dow.Fr&ser L Co Lr°
317-321 Crvnl'v. Str-<•»(
SAFETY DEPOSIT |
VXK FOR. RENT ^**m\\
DOW, FRASER & CO., Ltd.
817-811 Gamble Streeti 1811 Main
Street, (between 7th and 8th Avee.)
Vencouver, and MoKay Station,
Burnaby, B, O,
Close at 1 o'olook Saturdey.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' TNTER*.
„ NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. "t
Mests flrat and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. Preeldent, O. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal
secreUry, D. Scott; treaeurer, I. Tyson;
buelneje agent,   Joe   Hampton.   Phoni
IfONEefflTTBRS*
VAtlCOUVB)**-:
"  ', Let
Branch—Meets seoond  Tueeday,
p. m.   President, J. Marshall: corresponding eeoretary. Wm. Rowan, Bo
anolal seoretary, K. McKensle.
spoi
If; I
fln-
PAINTBRS', PAPBRHANOBRS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meets every
Thursday, T.80 p. m. President, Skene
Thomson; flnanolal seoretary, J. Freok-
eiton, 811 Seymour street: recording secretary, Qeorge Powell, 1550 Fourth Ave.,
west. Business agent, James Train, re—
■ Labor Temple. -
STEREOTTPERS' AND BLEOTROTTP-
ers' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver and
Victoria—Meets seeond Wednesday of
eaoh month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. President, Chas. Bayley; recording secretary.
A. Birnle, Co. "News AdvertlBer."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY*
Employees. Pioneer Division No. IM
—Meets Labor Temple, second fourth
Wednesdays at t p. m., and first and
third Wednesdays, 8 p. m. President.
Adam Taylor; recording secretary, Albert
V. Lofting, 1888 Trinity street, phone.
Highland 1611; flnanclal seoretary, Fred.
A. Hoover, 1408 Clark Drive.
:1
STEAM   ENOINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 981—Meete every Wednesday
8 p. m„ room 184, Labor Temple. Flnan-
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 111.
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION  (IN-
ternatlonal), Local No. 111-Meotlnge
held flrst Tuesday ln eaeh month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund: recording secretary, C. McDonald, Box 60S; flnanclal
seoretary, L, Wakley, P. O. Box 888.
THEATRICAL    STAGE    EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meete eecond Sunday-
of each month at Room 114, Labor Temple. President, H. Speare; recording eeoretary, Oeo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Van-
eouver.        	
TYPOGRAPHICAL   ONION   NO.   8M—
i Meete laet Sunday eaeh month, t
p.m. Preeldent, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vice-
president, W. S. Metsger, seoretary-
treaeurer, R. H. Neelands, P. O, Box II.
The Allied Printing Trades
of the City of Vanoouver, respectfully request
Merchente,   Manufacturers,   Lawyers,   Fraternal   Societies,   Clubs,
Unions, Eto., to heve the
UNION LABEL
Put on their Printing, such as Circulars, Briefs, -Records, Books,
Posters. It Is a guarantee of superior workmanship. Thla label le
endorsed by all trades and labor
unions In Vanccuver and vicinity.
VANCOUVER   ALLHSD   PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
F. R. Fleming, Seoretary,
Room 111 Labor Temple
The Nanalmo Herald's goat Is the
easiest thing we know of In this province.
It was too bad of the suffragettes
to so annoy Mr. and Mrs. Qeorge V.
at the opera last Monday night But,
apart altogether from their objects,
they have certainly brought the royal
oircus into the light of ridicule where
its silly mummeries rightly belong.
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1888.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In 1840.
Paid-up Capital     -'     14,888,688.88
Reserve Fund    -     -    8,017,180.00
Head Ofllce In Canada:
BT. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE ■ General M.nit"
SAVINGS ©gPARTMENT AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
Accounts on whioh Interest Is allowed from date of deposit.
Open a Savins' Account and add
te It every pey day.
Drafts and Money Orders sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Maaaser.	
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
3. R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALE BRANCH
"ell, ■ M
p. Nell, Manager.
PATENTS
Trede Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FITHfRSTONHAUOH  « CO.
The Old Established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
ISM Rosen aide., Oranvllle Street
City. Phene Seymour trie. FRIDAY.,,. .....MAY, IB, 1»14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
'B A WORD TO THE UNION MAN-
The Union Label should stand for quality of material, fit and make-up
of garment, aa well as the sanitary conditions ot a factory,
wages paid, etc.
A copy of thjs guarantee goea with every garment
manufactured by us.
Wty. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturers of
MAO'S MOOAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIBTS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO TM MASTER SHIBT
1176 Homer St., Vanoouver, B. 0, Telephone Seymour 831
Thla garment la guaranteed aa to workmanship, quality of material,
fullness of else, buttons aeourely fastened, buttonholes well made.
Anyone wearing one or our garments and finding lt defeotlve will do
ua a favor by either returning it to his dealer or mailing it to ue to be
exchanged for another.
All our garments bear the-label of the
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA  •
Tou are invited to visit our factory.
WM. J. M0MA8TER ft SONS, LTD.
'-   Per Ju. A, Mclfaster,
■ Managing Director. -
JAMES STARK UHK
Retiring from Business Sale
NOW IN FULL SWING
Customers are buying Ooods in
Wholesale Quantities
THE GREATEST MERCHANDISE EVENT IN WESTERN CANADA
$165,000.00 Stock of Staple Dry Goods, Linens,
Ready* to wear, Hosiery, Corsets, Gloves, Carpets,
Laces and Embroideries, Millinery, Etc., Etc., to be
cleared out at once.
WE ARE POSITIVELY RETIRING FROM
BUSINESS.
I JAMES STARK & SONS, Limited   ,
HASTINOS STREET WEST BETWEEN ABBOTT AND CARRALL STREETS
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
_r...,.  _.., ,'..■„,   '„'. :  ,       ,    - ■   ■- -' ■■'■"   -  ■ ■■■"■-- '■ ■    '■ ■ -•-
GREAT SALE OF BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for  .$3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $5.00, for  .$3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for  .$2.95
SEE THE WINDOW8
FRANK NEWTON
We keep the largest and moat
complete line ot MEN'S end
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prlcea which cannot be duplicated.
Everything Is to be found here.
HENRY D. RAE
Canada'e Snap Specialist
104 and lot CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN 8HOE   STORE   IS   THE   SPOT   COR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
MS HASTINOS STREET WEST
BEST IN THI WIST
Keep the Children Healthy
by eendlns them out in the freeh air these flne daya. There'e nothing better for keeping them exercised than wheeled goods.
Our stock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAGONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAGONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, la easily the flneet and moat comprehensive In the
olty and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ESTABLISHED 1181
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL *S_*3&a8_& I
78o. upi weekly, W up.    CM SEYMOUR STREET trenelente
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEYS PLACES, LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS, CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR IM
45  HASTINGS ST.  EAST
AI
I
C. P. R.  Magnates First
Brought Chinese to British Columbia I
Governments Always Played Fast and Loose. With
Mongol Immigration '
According to a Montreal dispatch
Richard Bladworth Angus, 0. P. R.
director, formerly general manager of
the Bank of Montreal, who ln 1880
joined the syndicate formed by Lord
Mount Stephen, Sir Donald A. Smith
and others to build the Canadian Pacific railroad, for which cheap Mongol labor was imported, has jest returned to that city after a trip around
the world. Re states that the viceroy of India had expressed concern to
bim at the threatened exclusion of
some.of his majesty's Hindoo subjects
from British Columbia. Mr. Angus
felt that the exclusion ot all Asiatics
might be fairer, but, said he, "this
would seriously embarrass some
branches of Industry and would also
be met wtth a weighty protest from
Japan.'.' And a reporter ashed him
for his opinion on the Oriental question, and Mr. Angus replied:* "Well,
you know, we want to be a white
man's country," and then he added:
"But—(and, by the way, there are too
many "buts" used by the members ot
the ruling class when they say anything at all about the Asiatic question)—there Is no doubt that the Japanese and Hindoos make splendid
laborers, and they are needed in British Columbia to work tn the canneries
and for the construction of the railroads throughout the mountains.
Mongol Cheap Labor
"The Hindoos are splendid men ln
the lumber industry also, in their
own country they are poor, emaciated
persons, bu tbey Improve over here.
They fill out and seem to 'make' very
good workmen." Tbe C. P. R. company, of which Mr. Angus, was a member In the early eighties, promised the
conservative governments of the day
that after the Chinese had performed
the work of railway construction they
would all be sent back to China. That
promise was never kept. I do not
know what influences were at work at
that particular time, but Instead of
sending the Chinese back, as the government promised it would, lt scattered them all over the province of
BrltlBh Columbia, and that was the
ueglnnlng of the trouble ln this province. The public must fix on the conservative party and the.above-named
gentlemen the whole responsibility for
the troeble which the people of this
province have with the Chinese to-day.
It will be remembered that for the
whole of sixteen years.the conservative party tinkered with the subject
of Oriental Immigration. It took sixteen years for It to give tbe people
a 150 poll tax.
Apologized for Meaaure "
When Hon. Mr. Chapleau brought in
that measure, he apologized for doing
so, and he was not ln sympathy with
lt. He knew perfectly well that most
of the members who sat behind htm
were not In sympathy with the measure, but they were compelled to support lt ln order to satisfy the clamor
of the people of British Columbia over
a quarter of a century ago, and out of
the munificence of sixteen years duration Sir John A, Macdonald's government gave the people a miserable 850
poll tax. The miners of Nanalmo
and working men generally throughout the lower mainland wanted total
exclusion of Chinese from Canada and
from the mines, and tn 1890 sent a
deputation to Ottawa to wait on the
government and urge lt to pass legislation on the lines of the United
States Oeary act, which prohibited
Orientals landing on American shores.
Premier Macdonald replying to the deputation said Canada was unable,
owing to the obligations of imperial
treaties, to exclude the Chinese. He
also pointed out that even at that time
China waB about to shut her gates tn
retaliation on tbe United States.
Canada had a good chance, continued
Sir John, of securing the trade the
United States would lose.
Chinese In Mines
It was also pointed out to Sir John
that the presence of Chinese In mines
was the cause of many explosions and
loss of life. Sir John Macdonald said
he could not see how his government
could admit Chinese Into the country
and exclude them from the mines. All
this happened 25 years ago, about
which time Mr. Angus was very active
ln C. P. railway affairs. The liberals
stayed In power about about fifteen
years, but all they managed to do was
to raise the Chinese head tax to $500
—and thus retained the principle enunciated by their predecessors or. office. And The Federationist is quite
safe In saying that so long as the
C. P. R. want Chinamen the conservative ring at Ottawa will manage to
balk anti-Oriental legislation. When
Mr. Angus or any one of his class state
tbey want this to be a white man's
country, tbey are not sincere but only
say so to hoodwink the general public.
From Welland
The barbers are 100 per cent, organ
lzed, the plumbers over 90 per cent,
and the machinists 75 per cent. Employment Ib very fair for the several
organisations we have here. Wages
have Improved since recent strikes.
Amalgamated carpenters have joined
with the Brotherhood of carpenters,
We have a fair-wage clause ln force
on the ship canal.—H. Hedrick.
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing. Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
» HAD VERY
Shall We Get Out!
Editor B. C. "**ederationist: The
Oriental question seems to have had
another spasm recently and the same
cla arguments that have done duty
for the last thirty years are again
inflicted upon us. Surely if this question Ib capable of being solved an Intelligent people would In thirty years
nave^ made some progress towards
settling It, Instead of that matters
appear to be In a worse muddle than
ever. At present htmtbtmthamh/
ever. At the present time no white
labor Is allowed to enter this province
-^only Asiatics are allowed in now
and those of them wha have to pay a
tax -to get lh have said tax kindly
paid for them by those in whose
hands we have placed the destinies
ot a "white" B. C. It a British citizen,
after losing his Job to some Oriental,
Is found wandering around "broke"
our white magistrates give him
twenty-four hours or les to get out
of town or he Is put in the coop as
ah undesirable.. But our Oriental
friends can break every law on the
statute books, as many as fifty or a
hnudred of them may be arrested for
gambling (Illegal), smuggling opium,
eto., but no learned judge thinks of
deporting them. Business men are
glad to get the mony of their white
customers,. but whenever and wherever they ean, they spend this money
to employ Oriental labor although
they know that not 25 per cent of It
ever' circulates ln this country again.
They call us unpatriotic beoause we
do not Join the mllltla and help to defend the country from the foreigner,
but so far the militia is never vised
tor anything except to drive us away.
Twelve years age the Fraser river
Salmon fishery was practically all In
the hands of whites and natives, but
our 'brave defenders went out to
Steveston and drove ub away. The
same thing is happening ln ihe mines
and other industries and while the
owners of these industries are glad
to sell their products to white men
yet.they believe ln paying wages to
and employing Orientals.; Vancouver city council is a dream when it
comes to big talk and little work.
Tbelr meetings are taken up principally with rescinding resolutions
passed at previous meetings, etc.
They talk about revising< certain
branches of. olvlo work, but their revising consists of firing old and faithful civic employees and putting in
their own Incompetent friends, as they
did with tke school board work recently, and the city pays the difference through Its nose. I would suggest that next .year we elect a Hindoo
for mayor, sixteen Chinese for aldermen, and fill the remaining positions
with Japs.. We could get these Orientals to do our work for less than
half what we now pay and they would
be willing I am sure to' give their
whole time to the work. Of course
cheapness Is what we want htmhrr
if white aldermen are willing to do
the work as cheaply as Orientals (for
cheapness Is what we want) we can
have no objection to employing them,
but as long as the governemtn allows
Orientals to come into the province
I do not see that lt is our place to discriminate against them. Bad as the
present olty council Ib, however, It Is
only fair to state that they are Just
as good as those who elected them.
Fishermen and farmers are howling
particularly loud just now, but they
may Just as well hold their peace for
they will have to get out of this province sooner or later. Already the
exodus has begun. Last year not less
than 50,000 people left this province,
and I would like to propose that we
get together and form what may be
called the "Oo While the Going's
Good" club. Its object to be to assist
in helping each other to get away to
some white man's country and leave
the owners of the province and their
oheap Orientals in peace to work out
their own saivatlon together as behooves two of a kind. Why should we
stay here when we have not only to
struggle for a living but also to struggle to prevent ourselves from being
driven away. The ory for a "White
B. C." is a hopeless one and the Boon
er we realize It the better for us. We
cannot expect any help from the
eastern provinces. Our M. P.'s have
tried hard to put our cases before
them but without success, and lt will
be only when our sister provinces
wake up some fine day to discover
that they have a'n Oriental province
at their western borders that they
will understand what we meant, but
it will be, too late then. If you don't
like, to play second flddie to Orientals
get out before you are driven out or
else quit this silly talk about a "White
B. C." In closing I might remark that
I know how the Oriental question
could be solved within the next three
years if we wanted to, but we don't
want to, so what's the use.
READER.
10
Worked From Twelve
Sixteen Hours
a Day ,
to
What Would Happen Were
*    There No Trades
Unions
In the current Issue of the Toronto Banner lt says that lt seems like
going back .Into, the early days of the
nineteenth century to talk Sbout workmen In May, 1914, being forced to
strike for a ten-hour day, when so
many crafts now enjoy the standard'
of eight hours. It Is, however, a fact
that Ih every trade wheje the unions
are weak or the workers Indifferent to
their own Interests, long, hours are the
rule, ana tt Is not unusual to run
across many localities where a fourteen and even sixteen hour workday
Is ln evidence In "several callings. At
the present time ln Minneapolis, the
employees ot one of the largest transfer companies in the elty are on
strike to enforoe a ten-hour workday
with one day off each week. Heretofore they have had no set standard;
Sixteen Hours a Dsy
Every day they labor all the way
from 12 to 18 hours, and the rate of
wages paid Ib on the flat $13,75 per
week. They have only one Sunday
off eaoh. month, and 11.75 Is deducted
from that week's pay envelope. It
hardly seems possible that such a
state of affaire could exist In a civilized country. At the present time the
employees are asking for. a ten-hour
day, with two Sundays off each month,
and a wage scale of 815 per week,
This request the company absolutely
refused to consider, and those who
were not prepared to work under the
old conditions Were told they could
quit whenever they desired to do so.
This corporation Is now trying to hire
competent strike-breakers, and Is offering aB high as $5 and 86 a day. So
far the help secured has been very
much to the bad,
, Tradea Unions Only Remedy
it is conditions such as these that
prove that the trades unions are the
only agencies, that offer the wage-
earning class any opportunity whatever to benefit their status as workers. - Wherever organised labor la
strong the eight and nine hour day
prevails and a living rate ot wages.
It Is only where men are outside the
pale of organization that it is possible for the employers to enforce a
fourteen or sixteen hour day on a
rate of $13.75 per week, and only one
day off in a whole month, with a cor
responding reduction ln remuneration,
Meagre Pittance
The Minneapolis concern looks
something like tbe Toronto employers
who are fighting to keep the rate of
remuneration paid to men employed
on olvic contracts to a measely little
18 cents per hour, or $1.62 per day. It
is hardly to be wondered at that during the last half doten years the
trades unions have made such phenomenal headway. Then who would
continue to work under such Inhuman conditions without going out on
strike would certainly deserve all they
were getting. In unionism lies the
hope of the workers, a lesson they are
rapidly taking to heart Things like
these cannot longer be tolerated. It's
dearly up to the nonunion element
to get Into line and point their organized fellows ln making this North American continent a place worth living
to.
Union Label Bread *
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Fellow
unionists, do you like to see your
brothers In the other trades patronizing the non-union product of your particular line, which is your only means
of earning a livelihood? You' do not
require to have lt brought home to you
that, by bo doing, you will sooner or
inter be forced into tbe same class
(non-union) whom you are now trying
to throttle In your struggle for living
conditions. There are enough union
men ln Vancouver to keep all the
union bakers busy. Nevertheless, we
find .about 40 per cent, of the "dough
punchers" Idle through the Indifference
of their brothers in not demanding
what they ask the bskers to demand
on tbe goods which you are engaged
In producing, namely, the "union label" article. But the bakers are
still in the flght. An organizer Ib
coming to the city shortly. When he
arrives I hope he will not flnd that It
is the union men of the city that are
the enemies of the local bakers, but
rather that they are all being supplied with union-made bread and cakes
in their homes, as well as tn the restaurants where some of them eat.
Vancouver, B. C„ May 13,1914,
UNION BAKER.
New Unions.
New locals of the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
have recently been organized In Sydney and Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia.
International unionism continues Its
onward march in the Maritime provinces.
The Norwegian sawmill workers
federation, with a membership of 2628
.had a very successful year In 191.1.
Not only was there a substantial raise
1 tn wages, but working hours were reduced by a total of 187,000 during the
yesr. '
MONTREAL BUILDING TRADES
Will Enforce Card System—Case of
Producing the Goods
It a man desires to work at any of
the building trades in Montreal hereafter, his flrst requisite will be to
hold a paid up union card. The local
building trades council Is an up to
date organization, and all the various
crafts are afflliated with lt. Their
members will only work with men
who possess a valid building trades
card. This can only be secured by
men who are in good standing in the
local union of their craft. This rule Ib
now being strictly enforced. The
bosses, of course, do not take kindly
to the innovation, but the building
crafts are now so well organized tbat
they are forced to acquiesce in the
new arrangements. Things are cer
talnly different from a tew short years
ago. If you want a job now It's a case
of producing tho goods.
Quebec and Open Shop
Probably the forcing of the open
shop by tho shoe manufacturers in
the province of Quebec has so thoroughly exposed the weakness of nationalism In its acknowledged strong
hold, that lt Is in a comatose state, ln
which It Is likely to remain. However,
lt is satisfactory to know that the
bona fide international movement Is
steadily advancing. It has got the
goods, and the workers are sufficiently
Intelligent to reason things out. There
Is a reason Why things are going right.
From Edmonton
The conditions of organized labor
is good compared with the rest of
the western towns in this country.
The city council has passed a fair
wage schedule and will urge the city
school board to adopt the same clause.
An Injunction has been Issued against
the painters' local, restraining all
members from speaking to non-union
men. Unions of building laborers and
milk drivers have been organized and
a newsboys union Is under way.—A
Famllo.
gpeolaMosi
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Breed
Wedding and Birthday Cakea.
We tree Vain gloat,
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot- Drinks aad Lunches
All Goods Freeh Dally.
teLley.net.
ATTEND THE GREAT
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THE GREATEST OPPORTUNITY
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REQUIREMENTS AT A SAVING.
Watch the Daily Papers
575 GroniHlle Street      Vancouver, B C.
Pktnt Seyt—r 3540 -
Store Heen US te s am.
Seturtleye Included
WHITE S.TARrDS:r.ISERVICE-IARWST'-V^rsii|iii/
•   ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS 1
MONTREAL QUEIIC LIVERPOOL
New S.8. "Leurentle" (15,000 tons), new S.S. "Mejentlc."
Flrat Class, Wt.M Seoond Class, |Sl.re Third CI*
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ONB CLASS (li) CABIN SBRVICB
Bxpreec 8.8. "Teutonic'' (Twin Screw Steamera) 8.L.   „«....••
61! feet long (M0.M and up).   ' 114 feet long'(ere class ltt JS and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
BOSTON QUEENSTOWN LIVERPOOL
ONB CLASS (II.) CABIN SBRVICB
8.8. "Arable" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamer*) 8.8. "Cymric"
M,0IW tone, too feet long (Rate WJ.71)    11,000 tens, NO ft long (Rat* MUS)
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIGGAN  UNDERWEAR
At Mc. and 75c, per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear—Just right for thla warm weather
LIGHT WEIGHT UNION  SUITS
From 11.00 per Suit up,
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 75c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd. I
Tel, Sey. TSS SOt-HS HASTINOS STREET W.     |
Sum, HOME SWEET HOME »a>
Royal Crown Soap
AND
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
THEY CLEANSE-PURIFY-BEAUTIFY
SAVE THE COUPON* FOR VALUABLE PRESENT*.
"^S PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY	
...HAT, 16, 1914
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Oar Goods, Is Always the Best
Tht reaaon our bualneia la lncrualng la due to the (aot that our bualneaa policy la correct We adopted the policy or Informing tha publlo
through the medium of the preaa aa to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Care ot Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$56.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. Thla hu established confidence with the public In us, and for that reason alone we an auc-
oeasful, and we Intend to continue aa we aro doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Bighth Ave* and Main Street
Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center a\ Hanna's Branoh
A. C. Miller, Pros.
p. H. Grots, Manager
/
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
•THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollar, st Sheep Creek, B.C.
All working men urged. to stay
away until the strike is settled
Orier Yak Misers' Usies
COTTON'* WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propacante paper ln
Canada. Prlee iS cents per
year; in elate ol four, M cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWAN8VBJJB, P.Q.
GtyAsdieeeKKeBueiuieiCe.
Cash pale for house* and suit**
al furniture er Auction amused:
SaUsfaetioa   guaranteed,
Mttlements.
ARTHUR  I. BRTCHL1Y
LABOB TBHFLB OLBB, POOL
AMD    BHADWO   BOOM-   OPBN
SBTlW DATS A '
Diseases of Men
We issue s written guarantee
that HT will ours or year i
beck.
Differs from sll other remedies.
Price IMP, Port "eld.
McDUFFEE BROS.
inn   OBLIGING   DKCOOIBT8
1SS Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. C.
GRAND SMOKER
Held by B. C. E. Railway
A very enjoyable "smoking" concert was held on Monday night In
the O'Brien hall by the employees ot
the B. C. Electric Railway company.
Fred. A. Hoover, the popular seoretary of the union, acted as chairman,
while H. Hadley relereed the boxing
contests. Among the guests of the
evening were General Manager King,
F. R. Glover, A. E. Beck and a number of others. The star number ot
the evening was a three-round boxing
contest between George Gorry and 13.
Bradshaw, boys In the bantam class,
and lively as crickets. It was the
flrst appearance of both boxers ln the
ring, and they acquitted themselves
excellently. The bout Very Justly
was called a draw. Al. Hatch went
through a number of tumbling stunts
and gave an excellent exhibition
wrestling bout with his manager, and
later appeared with the gloves on for
a two-round boxing contest with
Billy Weeks. Al had the best of It
as he Insisted on wrestling, and Billy
was afraid to hit hard. Prior to this
Arable McDonald boxed a couple of
rounds with Weeks, and tbls also
was strictly a gentleman's affair;
"Rough-house" Charley Burns boxed
a few rounds with Monte Labelle, who
kept him busy and exchanged
punches with energy. The musical
part of the programme was contributed to by an orchestra consisting of
F. W. Parsons, piano; Peter Dugard,
violin; Charles Gaunt, trombone, and
F. Gardner, cornet. Charles Good, the
Scottish comedian, proved highly entertaining ln songs and drolleries.
Messrs. Lewis, Christian and Mudie,
of tbe Welsh choir, contributed songs;
Mr. Smith gave some clever Imitations of the gramophone, a buss' saw,
a gasoline engine, a cornet, and, Anally, with the aid of Mr. Andrews, of
a side show baud. Mr. Cotton sang a
couple of comlo songs, and Mr. Carter
also sang. Mr. Charles Gaunt played
a trombone solo, "Alice, Where Art
Thou," and Messrs Christie and
Mudie sang the "Larboard Watch."
General Manager Ring, called upon
for an address spoke briefly. He
thanked the committee for the invitation to be present, and said that he
had enjoyed the evening's entertain'
ment very muoh. The proceeds will
go towards the fund to be used for
placing a second division team in the
football Held next season.
NEW  CAR  BARNS
Modern Buildings Will Provide
Housing for 200 Cara
On Tuesday Oity Building Inspector Jarrett issued a permit for the
erection of car.barns for the British
Columbia Electric, Railway company.
They will be located on the block ot
land bounded on the east by Main
street, the west by Quebec street, the
north by Thirteenth avenue and the
south by Fourteenth avenue. The
proposed new structure will cost
$275,000, and the contractors are
Messrs. Westinghouse, Church, Kerr
ft Co,, of this olty. This modern
double-deck car barn will be or reinforced concrete, and will provide
housing for 200 core.
The number of members enrolled in
the German co-operative societies
during 1913 increased from 1,483,811
to 1,620,694, and the turnover rose
from 432,000,000 marks to 732,000,000
marks.
BJaston, Pa., brewery workera are on
strike against the twelve-hour day and
Inadequate wages. They demand the
ten-hour standard wtth a wsge rate
running from .$16 to $18 per week.
Engineers $19 and $20 and firemen
$16.
I  was   cured  of  Bronchitis   and
Asthma by MINARD'S LINIMENT.
MRS. A. LIVINGSTONE,
Lot 5, P. E. I.
I was cured of a severe attack* of
Rheumatism by MINARD'S LINIMENT. JOHN MADER.
Mahone Bay.
I was cured of a severely sprained
leg by MINARD'S LINIMENT.
JOSHUiA A,: WYNACHT.
Brldgewater.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FBDBRATION Or LABOR-
Heets In annual convention In January. Executive ofleera, D14-1I: Praaldant, A. Watchman: vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, H. 3. McEwen, Geo. Hardy, **.
W. Gray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary- treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box mi, Victoria. B, O,	
TYPHOID FEVER
N1W WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meeta every seeond
and fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labor
Ball. President, D. 8. Cameron; Snanolal
seoretary, H. Glbb; general seoretary. W.
B. Maiden. P. O. Box 114. The puplie la
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS'AND STEAMJTrTBHS Local 411—Meets every seeond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Ball,
7.10 p. m. President, D. Webster: secretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box lit, New
Westminster, B.C.
RnTED BROTHERHOOD OP CAR.
penters, Local Onion Ne. ltlt-ltet*
every Monday, S p. m., Ltbor Temple,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh street.
President, Mr C. Sebraendt; secretary, A.
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westminster, B.C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 714—MBBTS IR
Labor Tempt., New Weatminster,
earner Seventh etret and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of eaeh month, at
Lit p. m. Preaident, T. a. Hunt; secretary, F. w. Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
Victoria, a. e.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Counoll—Meet* drat and third Wed-
needay, Labor Hall, 711 Johnston street,
at I p. m. Preeldent George Dykeman;
■eoretary, The*. P. Mathlson, box Ml,
Victoria, B.O.
 MINERS' UNIONS    .
RIMBERLET MINERS' UNION. No. IM,
Western Federation of IShten—Meets
Sunday evenings In Unton Hall. President. Alex. Wilaon; secretary-treasurer,
M. P. VHIonouvo, Klmberley, B. C.
Loss of Life and Waste
Enormous
W. Bapty, of the provincial board ot
health, Victoria, B. C, points out In a
letter that typhoid fever is a filth disease, although cleanly people often become affected. It Is carried by human
excretions and gets Into the drinking
water through improperly constructed
wells, defective drains, etc., or on to
food through the agency of flies, and
so on into the mouth and stomach.
This disease is far too prevalent, the
deaths ln British Columbia for the last
year from this cause alone being eighty-five/ Apart from this loss of lite,
tbe economlo waste Is enormous. During the same period about 700 persons
were Hi with this sickness in this
province. If each of these cases were
laid up for eight weeks, a short average, this would, mean a total .period,
of 39,200 days ln hospital, and with
hospital expenses at $2 per day, a total
cost of $78,400. If eaoh patient required a total ot tour months before
he regained his full strength and earning capacity, this would mean a total
loss of 84,000 days. As the majority
of these cases occur ln men earning
$3 a day and over, tbe loss ot earning
capacity would be about $262,000. This,
together with the hospital expenses,
which do not Include doctors' fees and
other Items, gives a gross' total ot
$330,400. Aside from this, many persons never regain their old health, and
this, together with the lost ot Ufe,
cannot be estimated In dollars. To
prevent this disease, besides cleanliness, a method of Immunization Is now
available. This consists of the use of
typhoid prophylactic, which Is a sterile solution for hypodermic Injection.
It may be used by a doctor or nurse,
and will be supplied on application to
the secretary of the Provincial Board
of Health, Victoria. After the flrst
dose there lt some slight react'on, the
person Inoculated feeling as lt he had
an ordinary attack of lagrlppe. Thla
passes off ln the course of a verv few
houra and does not prevent the person following his usual work. The
second dose Is given trom seven to ten
days after the flrst, .and from tbls
practically no reaction occurs. A third
dose, tor still more complete protection, is given from seven to ten days
after the Second. That thla Inoculation
does protect Is shown by tables taken
from the report of Dr. H. O. MacKld,
surgeon-general of the Alberta division of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
I.ADf8MlTH UltfERB'  UNION. W«AL
No. IIM, U. M. w. ot A.-Meets Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. Preeldent,
Sam Guthrie: aeeretary, Duncan McKen-
ala, Ladysmlth, B.C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
A.—Meeta every Monday at 7.It p. m.
in tbe Athletic Club, Chapel street   Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B.C.
CUMBERLAND LOftAL UNION, No.
lilt, U. M. W. of A.—Meeta every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall.
President, Joe. Naylor; secretary, Jamea
Smith, Box 14. Cumberland, B.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMBN'S
Union; No. 108, w. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7. SO p.m. Presldsnt
F. W. Perrin: secretary, Frank Campbell, Box It, Trail, B. C.	
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Federation of Miners—Meete
every Saturday In the Mlnen' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
Seoretary, Drawer f'K.," Sandon, B.C.
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date HoUts
Hotel Regent
At
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone ta Everjr
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
LAttractive Rstet to Penusest
Gsetto
HOTEL jGANADA
C. a MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room.      w      European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.   Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11,30 to 2.30 pan, 3Sc
Dinner a Is Cute, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
S18 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
Will Get Increase
. Carpenters In St. Catherines, Ont,
commencing on July 1st,  will have
their wage soale Increased from 40
cents to 43 cents per hour.
Berry Bros.
Agents (ot
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
Tk* Bloycle with tbe Reputation
Full   Un.  of  accessories
Repair* promptly snouted
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895.
FIREPROOF
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-elass Grill in Connection
P.  L.   WAILINOPOBD,   Manager
BE TROT TO YOURSELVES
BV SMOKINO.THI OLD RIUABLI
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
VOU  HILP YOUR  PILLOW UNION  MSN  AND   IISIDII, VOU  OIT
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•L/\ll/\l//\ OF LAND AVAILABLE
* .... ' ■     -
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Caii I^okTorward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in   .
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made tb induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
., lYXOPHS OF LAJTO LAW!
Six months' reddenee upon snd oultivstidn of the land in eseh of three years, A homesteader msy live within nine nulss of hii homestead on » farm of
st lesst 80 sorts solely owned and occupied hy him or his father, mother, son, daughter, brother or lister.
In certain districts a homestesder in good Handing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside his homestead. Fries fS.OO psr sen. Duties—Must
reside six months — saeh of six years from date of homestead entry (inoludtng the time required to earn homestead patent) snd eulUvsto fifty seres extra.
• ■
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA -J3  ZEIGKECT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY MAT 1>, It
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
HOPPS&DUKER
*BUIIT*-*OR*WXJR
B^tTICULAR PURPOSE
Proprietor
EUROPEAN PLAN
'radwick A. EaslU,,
EMPRESS
235 Hastings St. E., Vancouver, B. C.
f Hot and Cold Water in
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Connected with Baths.
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Absolutely Fireproof
Dinner Sets for $19.50
50 PIECE SET, $8.75
The
t-
regular  price of these 100-piece sets is $26.00.   Get one now
S6.SO.       Samples   mailed   to  out-of-town  customers on re-
G. Buchanan & Co.
Phone   Seymour SMI
waa robson street
VANCOUVER'S
SELECT
CHINA
STORE
OLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE  VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performanea from 1 p.m. te 11 p.m.
Complete  Change of Progrsmnt Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF JUNE 1
MON,        TUBS,      WED.
HC     KSVSTONS   TRIO
Harmony   »lnfl«r»
THE    LUROIOS
ilng,    Talking    and   Tango
Dancing
THURS.,    PRI,    SAT.
FRED  AND  EVA   HURLCV
High   Claaa   Singing  and  Talking
TOLEDO AND BURTON
Comady   Singing   and   Oymnastlo
Nov.lty
JANIS AND CLARK
High   Claaa   Entartaln.ni
Mia*   PRANKIS   TICE
Trombon. Soloist
ETHEL     MAY     FLORENZ
Singing   and   Dancing
DAN      LLEWELLYN
Tha    Hobo    Tonor
4—REELS   LATEST PICTURES—4
IO Cents—ANY SEAT—10 Cents
AMATEUR NIOHT—WEDNESDAY.
U   COT1
D   Soeia
COTTON'S    WKKLY — Best
Socialist  propacanda  paper la
II   Canada.    Prlea  (0  cant* per
H   yaar; In clubs of four, IS eent*
|   (or 40 weeks.
H   Address, COWANSVILIJB, p.Q.
BASEBALL
Vancouver vs. Portland
June 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
'-wit.  4s3C !*.«»•;    2nd,  4r00 p.m.;   3rd, 3:00 p.m.;
4*1»„  4t-€Sa_\ p.m.;   Stb, 4:00 p.m.;  6th, 3:00 p.m.
3W
Granviuc Street
UDEVILLE
_—*E$a~mm daily . a.so
>RMANCE   S.1S
pANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville ^
Meana
,    PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE  SHOWS DAILY
SM, 7.20, B.1S
Season'e Prices—
aa* ISc, Evenings ISo, Sie.
:algary Oil
fter ten days' thorough and careful investigation we have
d, and have for sale, stock in two different companies, right
midst of the development,
e unhesitatingly declare our belief that these stocks at the
it prices are the best buy in the Calgary Oil Fields. _^^^^
Iberta Beaumont, S5c. per share. Four miles northwest of
ian well. Oil struck in adjoining section this morning as per
ing   telegram:
TELEGRAM
"Morning   Albertan   says oil found
in   United   well.     Big company starts
immediately      constructing       railway
Calgary  to  oil  field."
estern Canada is on adjoining property. Stock has gone from
:o S900 a share. On May 25th they sold two sections of their
-, for half a million dollars. Strong company. Good people,
iragon Oil Sl-OO per share. 2380 acres in every promising sec-
■ the entire field. This is an issue we most strongly recommend
insider it the best buy in the entire Calgary Oil Field. This
ny has withstood most rigid investigation on our part. We
nend it.
ther   of   the   above   may  advance without notice.
eJAJPPEN & KNAPPEN
lOlB   ROGERS BLDO, VANCOUVER, B. C.
—- —COUPON	
rith   enclose  S as payment for   shares
lc   aaa
Alberta  Beaumont Company, Ltd.
Paragon Oil Company, Ltd.
The Pacific Coast
District, No. 38,1.L.A.
'   (Continued from page 7)
Delegate   J.   J.   Foley (San Pedro).
Denning eleoted by acclammation.
Secretary-treasurer
Delegate G. J. Kelly (Vancourer)
was nominated by Delegate G.
Thomas (Vancouver) and seconded by
Delegate Jere Hurley (San Francisco).
Seoretary-treasurer J. A. Madsen
was renominated by Delegate M. P.
Cannon (Portland) and seconded by
Delegate A. F. Belts (Taeoma).
Result of ballot: Kelly 3Sy2; Madsen, 3iy2, Seoretary-treasurer Madsen reelected.
Members of Executive Board
For British' Columbia—Delegate J.
Hook (Victoria) was nominated by
Delegate G. A. Kelly (Vancouver) and
seconded by Delegate Jere Hurley
(S»n Francisco).
For British Columbia—Delegate A.
D. McLean (Vancouver) was nominated by Delegate G. Thomas (Vancouver) and seconded by Delegate C.
Hart (Seattle).
Hook and McLean elected by acclammation.
For Washington — Delegate P. J.
Martens (Everett) was nominated by
Delegate P. Taylor (Beilingham) and
seconded by Delegate Nell Blegen
(Mukllteo, Wn.)
For Washington — Delegate Ame
Jones (Taeoma) was nominated by
Delegate 0. Hoffman (Portland) and
seconded by Delegate P. Weasels
(Taeoma).
Martens and Jones elected by ao
clammatlon.
For Oregon—Delegate T. JohanBen
(Rainier) was nominated by Delegate
P. J. Martens (Everett) and seconded
by Delegate W.A.Randall (Portland).
For Oregon—Delegate J. Gordon,
(Portland) was nominated by Delegate 0. Hoffman (Portland) and seconded by Delegate W. A. Randall
(Portland).
Johansen and Gordon elected by
acclammation.
For California — Delegate J. J.
Walsh (San Francisco) was nominated by Delegate J. A. Mitchell (San
Francisco) and seoonded by Delegate
A. F. Setts (Taeoma).
For California — Delegate W. D.
Styles (San Pedro) waB nominated by
Delegate A. B. McKinnon (San Pedro)
and seconded by Delegate Oscar Bor-
lin (San Diego).
For California—Delegate J. J. Foley
(San Pedro) was nominated by Delegate 0. Hart (Seattle) and seconded
by Delegate R. M. Doyle (San Fran-
For California—Delegate 0. A. Lane
(San Franolsco) was nominated by
Delegate F. C. Mueller (San Franolsco) and Delegate A. Curtis
(Seattle).
Result ot ballot: Walsh, Uy,;
Styles, 49; Foley, 20; Lane 3tyi.
Walsh and Styles elected.
I. L. A Delegatea
The following are tbe results ot the
elections of delegates to attend the
Milwaukee, Wis., convention of the
International Longshoremen's association whloh convenes ln that city
on July 8th next:
For California—Delegate J. A. Mitchell
(San Francisco) was nominated by Pel
•sate T. A. Maloney (San Francisco) and
seconded by Nell Blegen (Mukllteo,
Wn.).
For California—Delegate O. A. Lane
(Ban Francisco) vas nominated by Dele-
sate Jere Hurley (San Francisco) and
seoonded by A. Curtis (Seattle).
Result of ballot: Mitchell, SVa; Lane,
I5K.   Mitchell elected.
For Oregon—Secretary-treasurer Madsen (Portland) wu nominated by Delegate C. H. Thomson (Astoria) and seconded by Delegate T. Johansen (Rainier)
Madsen elected by acclamation.
For Washington—Delegate Aug. F.
Belts (Taeoma) was nominated hy Delegate F. MoMahon (Taeoma) and seconded by Delegate T. A. Maloney (San
Franolsco).
. FOr Washington—Delegate T. P. Barry
(Beattle) waa nominated by Delegate F.
J. Bunting (Beattle) and seconded by A.
Curtis (Seattle).
For Washington—Delegate Phil. Taylor
(Beilingham) waa nominated by Delegate
P. J. Martens (Brerett) and seoonded by
Delegate T. Johansen (Rainier).
Result of ballot: Belts, «: Barry 41:
Taylor, II.  Barry elected!
For British Columbia—Delegate G. J.
Kelly (Vancouver) was nominated by T.
A. Maloney (Beattle) and seconded by
Delegate A. Curtis (Beattle).
For British Columbia—Delegate G.
Thomas (Vancouver) was nominated by
Delegate W. B. Denning (Prince Rupert)
and seconded by Delegate Chas. Connor
(Juneau),
Result of ballot: Kelly, MM; Thomu,
lift.   Kelly elected.
Adjourned at 6.30 p. m.
Evening Session
President 3. Kean rapped for order
at 7 o'clock p.m., alt the delegates
being present. The elections of delegates to the Milwaukee convention of
the I. L. A. was continued from previous session:
For delegates-at'large—Delegate W. E.
Denning (Prince Rupert) was nominated
by Delegate O. Thomu (Vanoouver) and
seoonded by Delegate G. J. Kelly (Van-
lue   Sl-OO  per  share, at S  per share.
couver).
Delegate E.
H. Foley (San Franolsco)
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURES
GARGET IN COWS.
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO.
Phone Seymour 3SS7
Rosen' Solldloi    470 Granule Street
was nominated by Delegate J. A. Mitchell
(San Francisco) and seconded by Delegate Nell Blegen (Mukllteo).
. Delegate G. A. Lane (San Francisco)
was nominated by Delegate T. P. Barry
(Seattle) and seconded by Delegate A.
Curtis (Seattle).
Delegate M. P.'Connon (Portland) wu
nominated by T. Johansen (Rainier) and
seconded by Delegate L. Lindgren (Hoqulam). i
Result ot ballot: Denlng, 2714: Foley,
61%; Lane. 40; Connor, 27. Foley and
Lane elected,
The newly-elected officers were then
installed by President J. Kean.
San Francisco Chosen
Delegate Mitchell (San Francisco)
moved, seconded by Delegate Foley
(San Francisco) that the eighth annual convention of the Pacific coast
district, I. L. A., be held at San Francisco ln 1915.
Delegate O. Borlln (San Diego)
moved, seconded by Delegate A. B.
McKinnon (San Pedro) an amendment that lt be held at San Diego.
Then ensued a spirited debate as to
which was the most suitable city In
which to bold the convention next
year. Upon a vote being taken San
Francisco was declared to be the
place by a substantial majority.
Resolutions Passed
Chairman Thomson ot the griev
ance committee introduced several
questions and resolutions that were
discussed at length and passed.
By the San Francisco delegation—
Resolved—That this convention adopt
the Initiative, referendum and recall
as the system of governing the affairs
of the Pacific coast district of tbe I. L.
A.   Carried.
By San Francisco delegation—Resolved—That no local of the Pacific
coast district of tbe I. L. A. close Its
books against workerB wishing to participate ln the labor movement and
help us to maintain our working conditions and wages.
By Thomas A. Maloney (San Francisco)—Whereas the work performed
by freight clerks Is so closely related
to the work performed by longshoremen, and
Whereas — A number of freight
clerks ln different ports ln the Pacific
district are now members of the I. L.
IA., and ,
Whereas—The employers have hindered and opposed the organising of
all the freight clerks and are now opposing and using every effort to prevent the freight clerks from becoming members of the I. L. A.; be It
therefore
Resolved—That the executive committee of the Pacific district, I. L. A.,
take such measures as may be neces
sary to complete the organizing ot all
the freight clerks working on docks
In the Pacific district.   Carried,
By Delegates E. F. MoMahon and
Aug. F. Belts (Taconla)--WhereBB—
The members of local No. 38 working
ln different ports outside ot their
home port, and
Whereas—Men not belonging to
any organization are given preference
over I. L. A. members holding paid-
up books; and
Whereas—We believe there are
men end officers who continually
discriminate against the men who
hold paid-up cards, and
•Whereas—This Is a poor system ot
treating t he out-of-work members,
therefore, be lt
Resolved—That this practice be discontinued, and be tt further
Resolved—That such member who
Is discriminating against has the
right to appeal hts case to the district officer; and be lt further
Resolved—That If an officer or
member be found guilty ot the charge
of hiring outsiders before an I. L. A.
member that he either be suspended
or expelled from the I. L. A.
Amended by resolution committee
—That such out-of-work members be
Instructed to apply for work at the
local union headquarters and we further recommend that the words "district officer" be stricken out and the
words "executive board" be substituted.
By Aug. F, Belts—Whereas—Paok-
Ing flour, shovelling ores, and gypsum
ln the port of Taeoma did not get the
advance ln wages that the work waa
entitled to, according to other commodities; therefore be lt
Resolved—That the convention assembled uses its best powers to have
the scale of Wages raised to 50 cents
raised and 76 cents per hour overtime.
By IA. D. McLean, G. Thomas and
Gordon J. Kelly (Vancouver)—Resolution No. 3, San Pedro convention,
1913 —Whereas — British Columbia
presents a very fertile field tor organising work, which has been neglected;
therefore he it
Resolved—That this convention
take suoh action as Is necessary to
have an organiser appointed;: be lt
further
Resolved—That the organiser be a
member of a British Columbia local.
Carried.
By Delegate Lane (San Francisco)
—Resolved—That the working rules
he amended by Inserting the following clauses: In ease cement, sulphur,
plaster, fertiliser and all like commodities which are carried ln dust-
proof containers general cargo rates
shall apply, and
Resolved—That tho part ot the
working rules pertaining to 1200-
pound loads be changed to read: "AU
sling loads shall be manned by two
men," and
Resolved—That all men shall be
hired from tbe unton hall as tar as
practicable; and further
Resolved—Tbat all ships sailing as
tramps shall be worked at the rate of
56 cents and (1 an hour. Adopted and
sent to referendum.
A large number of recommendations and instructions were made for
delegates to I. L. A.
A hearty vote of thanks was unanimously carried by a standing vote tor
courtesies extended to the delegates
during their stay In the olty by the
officers and members of the Vancouver locals. i
Also a rising vote of thanks was
passed to the retiring officers and the
compliments ot the convention tendered to the new officials.
Delegate Lane (San Francisco)
brought up the question of a constitution tor the Pacific coast district.
The president spoke strongly against
the proposition, after which the convention adjourned sine die at 11.45
p. m., May 23, 1914.
Machinery versus Lsbor
Editor B. C. Federationist: In The
Federationist of May 1st there appeared an article from the pen of R.
J. Watters re the "Taxation of Machinery," such tax to be used forthe
purpose of creating a fund to relieve
those men and. women whose labor
has been displaced by the introduction of machinery. The idea surprises me, coming, as it does, from
the pen of one who is so prominent
in labor circles. Mr. Watters seems
unable to get away from the idea
that the workers are always to remain workers and never owners. He
evidently believes that "God has
plans man must not spoil; some
were made to slave and toil, some to
share the wine and oil, and that all
will be well so long as our class are
to do the slaving, etc." It is rather
late in the day to talk of restricting
the use of machinery. I am always
glad when I hear of the invention of
some new machine whereby the load
of the worker will be lightened, for
I cannot bring myself to believe that
man was ever meant to toil and slave
as he has done in the past. The fault
lies in private ownership, and the
fault will continue until the change
of ownership takes place. I hardly
think that the workers can shirk the
blame for the present state of affairs.
The power has been in their hands
long enough, but at each election they
have thrown away their chance. Had
the workers taken but a trifle of the
interest in matters that concern their
well being and that of their children
as they have 'clone in sport many of
the social evils which trouble us
would not have existed. We have
had the lessons of the told country
before our eyes, lessons which have
taught us, or should have taught us,
the result that follows, and has always followed, when the people allow
the natural resources of the country
to become private property. The
private ownership of machinery is but
a flea-bite compared with the private
ownership of land. I think it is about
time that the workers came to believe
that the world was made for them as
well as for those who have it. So
far the workers have looked upon
themselves as trespassers, and have
been content to allow a large portion
of their earning to be extracted from
them to pay for the privilege of being
allowed to live on the face of the
earth. I believe that the world was
made for me as well as for any other
man, even though that other man
may be the king of England. A tax
on machinery is but playing with the
question, and is no remedy, as the
largest portion of the relief distributed would find its way back Into the
pockets of the land-owners in the
form of rent, which is a tax paid to
one class by another for liberty to
live on the earth.. We need only took
at the "old age pensions" and other
f&rms of relief in England to see thst
the landlord is there every time. In
my opinion the workers are paying
too much attention to the "right to
work." Are we always to be "hewers
of wood and drawers of water?" What
we want is the right to live—to live
a life that will be life and not the
mere bare existence that has been our
experience. Let us' believe and act
as if we did believe that we have as
free and full a claim on the bounty of
nature as others. Let us not be content to think that we and our children
were meant for a life of toil and labor
for the purpose of keeping another
class in idle luxury. Let us believe
that we have a right to share in the
wine and oil.   Your truly,
W. MOORE.
Vancouver, B. C, May 27, 1914.
"For over two hundred years all
Christians were communists, who
held the land and waters, as well as
all timbers and precious metals, in
common. There were no superior
ecclesiastics among them. The lot
was cast in deciding all questions,
and the assembled commune judged
all disputes, and when any decision
was not well' pleasing, the whole
community passed review on it, and
reversed or confirmed it according to
the will of all. This bold democracy
was an inheritance from the Jews,
and was held in abhorrence by pagans who trafficked in land, and made
profits from other's labor."—Rollins'
Ancient History.
"Gracious! That skirt Is so tight
that I can plainly see what you have
ln your pocket!" But I have no pocket." "Then what Is that lump?" "Oh,
that's a mosquito bite."—
EDWARD LIPSETT
FISHING SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
T,ENT5~"
FLAGS SAILS >«° ORE BAGS
DTTDN DUCK ALL WEIDHT5-.WIDTH5 i
ARTHUR JAMES'FISH HDDKS.ETC
Phonal Seymour
6031 and 60S2
68 WATER ST.
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capltl
-.111,000,000      Rest.
..111,100,100
Main Office: Center Hsstings and Oranvllle Streets, Vaneouvar.
CITY BRANCHES
HASTINOS and CAMBIE	
EAST END .
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .
FAIRVTBW	
MOUNT PLEASANT ......
KITSILANO .
LOCATION
...Cor. Baatlnss ua Cambie struts.
-Cor. Pander and Main Street!.
...Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
...Cor. Sixth Avenue and Cbanvllle Btreet
...Cor. Elstath Avenue and Main Straet
...Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Btreet.
POWELL BTREET  Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL .............. .........Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraser Road,
Alee North Vanoouver Branoh, eer.  Lonsdale Ave,  end  Esplanade.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line, of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE,
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETTS FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS, CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR (M
«  HASTINOS ST. EAST
Caks that WateB ts Appleby, SOS
reader West, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nigh-claas watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
Dolls and Toys
Everything In Dolls, Toys, Express Wagons,  Garden   Tools.
Doll Hospital.
UIIXAltCOE    ill H»-f St. W.
Socialist Meetings
Parker Williams, H. P. P. and T.
Blsset, of Vancouver, will speak at
the (Allowing places during the coming week:
Sunday, May 31st — ln Edison
theatre, New Westminster, at 8 p.m.
Monday—In Ollmour avenue school,
Vancouver Heights,
■ Tuesday—In Carlton hall, Colllngwood,
Wednesday—In Finnish hall, Gibson's Heights,
Thursday—Morton hall, Edmonds.
Friday—Marfew hall, Cedar Cottage.
Saturday—'Port Moody.
Trade Reports of Vlotoria- Unions
Under the heading of a report of
organizations some of the organizations reported as follows:
Plumbers—That they had trouble
with a non-union plumber on the new
Hudson's Bay campany's job. Eventually they had him removed.
Typos—That the Sweeney O'Connell company is still unfair.
Cooks and Waiters — That there
were still a large number of their
members were idle. The delegates
reported that their action re the non-
deportation of the men on the Hudson's Bay job was endorsed.
Laborers' Protective Union—That
there were still a large number of
idle men polishing the sidewalks
with their boots. Laborers were
coming in, in spite of warnings to
keep away.
Mining Casualties In Ores! Britain
During 1913 no fewer than 1,741
men and boys were killed In the coal
mines of Oreat Britain. During the
last ten years, 11,701) men and boys
have been.kllled In t he mines.
MINARD'S    LINIMENT
DIPHTHERIA.
CURES
A MUSICAL
SURPRISE
Whether you are a musician
or not you cannot fail to appreciate the treat that
MR. EDISON'S
NEW TONE
PHONOGRAPH
holds in store for you
Mr. Edison prefers not to discuss the
wonderful Improvements he has tm*
bodied -in this instrument. He emphasizes effect rather than detail—
your pleasure and enjoyment rather ,
than his own genius. There Is only
one way to really know this surprise.
Let an EDISON tell it to you, Prices
are from Ijo.oo upwards. Terms as
low at $i.oo per week,
THE KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
HI   ORANVILLE   STREET
Carpenters st Unlontown, Pa., have
received an Increase of five cents per
hour, the established rate now being
tS cents per hour.
The Dayton, Ohio, union palntera
are out for an eight hour day and forty-five centa per hour. Nonunion
painters and decorators are also out
with them.
Buffalo, N. Y., painters and decor
ators have won their strike and established a minimum wage of four dollars
per day. All the big employers have
signed up union agreements. At the
present time less than a hundred men
are on strike, and the job will be completely cleaned up within a dsy or
two.   '
St Paul, Minn., unionists will erec
a labor temnle to cost one hundrei
thousand dollars.
Troy, N. T„ carpenters, after havim
been on strike, have won their de
mends for an Increase In wages o
Ave cents per hour,
In Milwaukee, where the lndooi
wood-workers are unorganised, thi
wage rate ts 16 cents per hour. Ii
Chicago, where the union Is recognl
zed, 41 cents Is the mlnlmun scale-
The Amalgamated (Association o
Street and Electric Railway Employ
ees of Pittsburg, Pa., are asking foi
a minimum rate of 35 cents per hour
The street railway company hai
agreed to arbitrate tha question. Somi
three thousand men ere affected It
the settlement
Akron, Ohio, Btreet car men havt
signed a new wage agreement whlcl
carries with lt a two cents per houi
raise ln wages. Negotiations wen
carried on by the Amalgamated Asto
elation of Street and Bleotrle Ratlwaj
Employees, ot which the mea sn
members,
In Erie, Pa., nonunion carpenten
joined the strike of union carpenten
for better conditions. The demand!
Include an eight hour day at 46 cents
an hour. The old rate called for nln<
hours at 41 1-1 cents an hour. Many
contractors are signing the new
agreements, and the strikers anticipate no extended difficulty.
Canton, Ohio, carpenters have returned to work, their employen agreeing to pay 40 centa an hour. The car
pentera were asking tor 46 cents, but
consider the settlement a victory, at
they formerly worked for any price
the contractors were willing to pay,
These workers also consider the short
Ume ln which tbey perfected an or
ganlzatlon sufficiently strong to command attention,
CALGARY OIL
"TEE BEST OF ALL"
CALGARY ALBERTA
PETROLEUM CO. Ltd.
NON-PERSONAL LIABILITY
l (W. S. HERRON, President)
\ "Properties include 1000 or more acres, the original holdings of Mr. Herron in the heart of the Dingman district,
land that fabulous prices  are  now  being asked for."
THIS STOOK WILL OO ON SALE FOR FIRST
TIME ON SATURDAY, MAY 30th, AT 60 CENTS
PER SHARE. OUT OF TOWN PEOPLE ARE
ADVISED TO WIRE US FOR STOOK TO BE RESERVED AT 0N0E.
Canadian Distributors Co.
LIMITED
Sll BIRKS BUILDING VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE SEYMOUR 3482
OPEN PROM S AM. TO 10 P.M.

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