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The British Columbia Federationist May 8, 1914

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Array THE BRITISH
NDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STREP
SIXTH YEAB, No ^s
OFFICUL PA£BB> VANCOnVlUl'tRAbES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR,
FEDERATIONIST
POLITICAL UNITY:  VICTOBTI
TVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MAY 8,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
(te«w?wuM') -*1-50 PER YEAB
^gainst Employment of Orientals in Eating Houses
) Live Topic
,'rades and Labor—Typographical Notes—Will
Hold Smoker
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C., May. 3. —
)ne ot the chief topics ot conversa-
(on in labor circles here 'for some
line past has been the question of
Mental labor.   Prince Rupert has In
fie past been comparatively free
om this common curse of coast
ltles, due principally to the Influence
rhlch John Houston exerted during
he time he ran the Empire here. But
ately the Orientals, mostly Chinese,
lave begun to creep in, and are now
imployed quite extensively in the
■omes of those who could well afford
p hire white people, also in the red
lght district.   A few weeks ago   a
tew restaurant on Third avenue put
i three Chinese as dishwashers, and
is this seemed to be the opening
vedge to put them ln all the res-
aurants, tne unions took the matter
fp ln earnest, and have won their
|ght ln this particular case, the res-
aurant In question dispensing with
he services of the Orientals, and it
s to be hoped lt will be some time
>efore any other eating house tries
he same game. It is said that the
hree Chinese employed in this case
ecelved only eight dollars a week
ler Chink, so It Is no wonder that
injection was made to firing them
.nd putting in white men, who will
irobably not work for less than twice
hat money.
Some other instances of the era
t'oyment of Orientals in business
louses havq come to light, and the
>ropr!etors of some of these have dispensed with the services of this labor
vhen their attention was called to it
y their patrons.
One of the most flagrant cases,
lowever, was that where Japanese
bre employed by a so-called patriotic
bclety with a high-Bounding name to
lean up a hall and assist in decorat-
ng tor a dance to be held by this
bclety, which, by the way, shows Its
latrlotlsm chiefly by holding dances,
.'his danco was heid ln the St. An-
Irew's society hall, and many ot the
nembers ot the latter society object-
Id to having Japanese or other
Mentals employed on their premises.
,o at the next meeting of the St. Andrew's society a resolution was un-
tilmously adopted to the effect that
he hall should be let to no organlza-
Ion which employed Orientals for
Iny purpose In the hall. Which goes
' show the difference between a real
ritrkitlc society like the St. Andrew's
nd the one which bears such a high-
minding name.
Much can be done by the union men
[ this city in keeping the Orientals
nt if they will Bhow thair displeasure
hen they are employed by business
puses which are patronized by
ilonlsts.
Tradea Council Is Alive
The Trades and Labor council con-
Inues to Improve, and it Is hoped that
lie days, not very far past, when
here were frequently not enough
nembers present for a quorum, are
;one forever. A decided accession to
he strength of the council is the re-
ent affiliation of the longshoremen,
rtio have some live delegates. At
he last meeting of the council it was
lectded to invite Mr. Heatherton,
imerican Federation of Labor organ-
ser, to come here on an organizing
our. The laborers seem to be ripe
or organization and there are other
rades who, with a little effort, could
robably be got Into shape.
It has been decided to hold a smok-
r for all union men In the city,
rhether they have local organizations
r not, on the 14th of May, In the
'nights of Pythias hall. There are
lany men ln the city who hold unton
ards, connected with trades ln which
here are not enough to form a local
nlon, and tt Is hoped to get ln touch
Mth these through the medium of the
moker. The programme has not yet
een completed, but there will be
ome good music, and short speeches
-also other things. If you have a
nlon card, working or travelling,
ome to the smoker and have a good
ime.
Frank Salter has been appointed
ical correspondent of the Labor
lazette, and A. E. Robb has been ap-
olnted by the trades council as offi-
!al correspondent for The Federa-
lonlst.
Rupert Labor Conditions
Although the Grand Trunk Pacific
as been temporarily linked up, there
as been little change ln labor con-
ltions here. The real linking up will
ot be done until some time this fall,
s there are still several bridges to be
ompleted and some permanent track
0 lay. The ballasting, too, Is just
airly started. There Is considerable
ulldlng going on here, but there are
;11 kinds of men to do it. That
bere is no scarcity of labor is shown
y the fact, reported by the Daily
lews one day last week, that the
:. T. P. advertised for thirty men to
ork up the line, and the employment
gent was mobbed by hundreds and
nally had to make a quick getaway.
Typographical Notes
Nominations of officers were held at
he last meeting of the Typographical
nlon. There are four ln the field for
resident, much against the will of all
f them.
Rlddell Elliott, "the poet of the
pen road," who Is well known ln
'ancouver, was a recent visitor here,
ut has started on a long walk to the
'eace river country.
1 Frank Cullen will probably go Into
ae Casslar country a»ain this sum
ter. Frank has a homestead there,
nd expects to raise a great crop this
rason.
Business Is just ahout the same ln
"JOE" AINEY
Labor's re-elected Comptroller in the
city ot Montreal, where he officially
welcomed the delegates to last year's
convention of the Trades and Lahor
Congress of Canada—a member of the
Brotherhood ot Carpenters.
OF
WILL HAVE TWO
F. H. Shepherd, M. P., Outlines Proposed Redistribution of Seats
Question of Two Electoral
Ridings for City Not
Yet Settled
A most significant letter regarding
the redistribution of federal seats in
and around Vancouver was read at last
night's meeting of the Trades and Labor council. F. H. Shepherd, M.P., for
Nanaimo, B, Or, who is now at Ottawa
attending his parliamentary duties, replied to a resolution passed sometime
ago by the central body ln favor of the
Vancouver City electoral district being divided into two ridings—thus favoring the principle of one man, one
vote. He says: "I may say that the
electoral division of the district of
Vancouver City Ib to be divided as
follows: The electoral district of Vancouver city comprising the City ot Vancouver and that portion of the electoral district ot Richmond which
lies east of the described limit, commencing at the northwest corner of
the provincial district of Dewdney,
thence in a southwesterly direction to
the south of the east branch ot the
Squamish at the head of Howe sound,
thence tn a southerly direction along
the easterly Bhore of Howe sound to
llurrard Inlet, thence In an easterly
direction along the north shore of Burrard inlet and in fi northerly direction
along the westerly shore of the north
arm of said Burrard inlet to the northern extremity of said arm. The other
subdivision Is described as follows:
The electoral district of Vancouver
South, comprising the municipalities of
South Vancouver and Point Grey. "This
subdivision of course, is not equal as
far as population Is concerned, but the
subdivision has been suggested by the
member for Vancouver, Mr. Stevens.
Vancouver city, therefore, gets two
members and the electoral district of
Vancouver South, one member. .
Of course, there Is a counter proposal
to divide the city of Vancouver into
two portions, and naming them Vancouver City East and Vancouver City
West. ThlB, I take It, Is In accordance with the request of the Trades
and Labor council. However, I will
take the matter up with Mr. Stevens,
as this is a matter which concerns him
more than it does the other members,
with the exception that the final arrangements must meet with the approval ot the British Columbia mem
bers as a whole."
Laboring People Ruthlessly
Slaughtered to Satisfy
Greed of Gold
Rockefeller Announces He
Will Never Confer
With His Men
[Special to The Federatlonist]
DENVER, Colo., May 7.—At least
one hundred men, women and children i are murdered or cremated and
one hundred more are missing aB a
result of the two weeks' war of explosive bullet and torch made by
John D. Rockefeller on the striking
coal miners of Colorado, Never before ln the history of the world have
the laboring people been so ruthlessly
slaughtered to satisfy the gold-greedy,
blood-thirst of the capitalist, as during the past two weeks. Since Monday two weeks ago when 150 assassins of the operators ln militiamen's
uniform attacked the Ludlow tent
colony with machine. guns and explosive bullets slaughtering and cremating 21 women and children, who
have been found, and probably 100
more who are missing, the struggle
has continued without cessation.
Proof has been established by eyewitnesses before coroners' juries that
Louis Tlkas, leader of the Greeks, was
beaten to death with a revolver, then
kicked In the face and finally shot to
cover up the heinous crime; slain
women and children were not only
thrown Into a huge funeral pyre and
burned, hut living motherB and babes
were burned to death, according to
the testimony of witnesses who have
escaped from the horrible disaster of
Ludlow. And wtth all of this John D.
Rockefeller calmly announces that he
will never confer with his men, that
he will lose every cent ln his war by
machine guns and torches on defenceless women and children, and that his
Sunday school teaching conscience Is
clear. The position he takes should
arouse the laboring people of the
country to the peril that confronts
them.
A YELLOW CITY COUNCIL
Favors City Supplies Being Produced
by Oriental Lahor
The nine days' public interest
which was raised by the alleged murder of a woman uy her. Chinese servant caused the city council to pass
a resolution to the effect that all
lumber for city work should be
bought from firms not employing
Oriental labor. The "cheap John'
proviso was added "provided It can
be obtained as cheaply." The novelty
has worn off during the month which
elapsed since then and at its meeting
last Monday the council rescinded its
former action. The resolution to res
clnd carried by ten to five votes in
favor were cast by Aid. Crowe, Cottrell, Evans, Ramsay, Trimble, White,
Hepburn, Mahon, Kirkpatrick and
James; against: Aid. McBeath, Enrlght, Rogers, Hoskin and Hamilton.
Alderman Crowe, Introducing the re
solution, felt it was but fitting*- that
since the city bought its nails from a
firm employing Asiatics, Its concrete
and gravel also, its lumber should
come from the same source.
District 18 Delegates Elected
District 18, U. M. W. of A., which
means the coal camps of the Crow's
Nest valley, will be represented at
the St. John convention of the Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada by
Mesars. Graham and Martin. David
Rees will represent the district at
the Rocky Mountain association convention which meets May 25th next.
WHAT TRAGIC LACK
OF ORGANIZATION
MEANS TO LOGGERS
The body of Peter Samuel,
a logger, was brought down
\to Vancouver last Wednesday from Pender Harbor.
The only thing known about
him was that he was dead.
How he met his death, no
one knew and apparently no
one cared. Of all the workere who wrestle for bread In
the- wild and desolate places
ot B. C. none receive less
consideration than the loggers. Tbe workmens' compensation act does not Include them, and when Injury
or death comes upon them
by falling tree or bursting
boom-chain that Is the end of
them.
I CONGRESS OF
I WORKERS OF
[
For Militia Going to Nanaimo City on May
Day
Says Council Is to Blame-
Former Actions on
Record
Fifty Thousand Gather to
Confer and Plan for
Progress
Keynote of Deliberations Is
the Necessity of
Organization
The first trades union congress held
In Portugal met this year. The
gathering had been planned to take
piece earlier but had to be postponed
owing to the rallwaymen's strike.
Fifty thousand members were represented by 108 delegates from 208 organizations. At the opening session
it became apparent that the delegates were of two schools of working
class thought—the revolutionary syndicalists, and the plain trades unionists. The only socialist member of
the Portugese parliament, Mario No-
gueira, who Is secretary of the Lisbon
trades council,, was also a delegate.
Mr. Barrio of Madrid, general secretary of the Spanish trades unions, was
there as fraternal delegate. The early
sessions were characterized by heated
debates between the two sections and
for a while it was doubtful whether
the congress would proceed. ' The
desire of both parties to bring the
workers of the country closer together
ultimately led to them settling down
to business, after a tremendous flare-
The Federatlonlst'B Victoria correspondent sends the following anent the
resolution that was passed by the
Victoria local, S. D. P., and which was
sent to the attorney-general and also
Mayor Planta of Nanalmo, which has
called forth a reply from the attorney-
general as follows:
[Copy]
"Attorney-general's  ofllce.
"Secretary Social Democratic Party,
Local No. 9', Victoria, B. C. :
Dear Sir,—I beg to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the
28th Inst, protesting against the dispatch ot militiamen to Nanalmo on
May 1st hy this department and ln reply beg to state that I am In no way
responsible for any of the mllltla that
are at present In Nanalmo, nor any
that are being called out on the first
of May. This action has been taken
entirely by the city council of Nanalmo without any reference to me and
I am not ln a position to stop lt, as
they have the right to do this under
the Dominion Mllltla act.—Yours
truly, "W. J. BOWSER.
"Attorney-general."
Alongside ot this hack-down from
the responsibility should be compared
his statement made on the eve of
sending the troops-to Nanaimo, The
following is the report of his statement in the Victoria Colonist of August 15, 1913: "When day breaks
there will be nearly a thousand men
In the strike zone wearing the uniform
of his majesty and prepared to quell
disturbances that threaten Nanalmo,
Ladysmlth, Cumberland and South
Wellington. That Is my answer to
the proposition of the strikers, that
they will preserve the peace if they
are left unmolested by the special
police." Again ln the same report:
"It is the business of the police to
preserve law and order and we are
going to do It at Nanalmo and tho
other affected places, If we have to
call out every militiaman ln the
country." Again: "Tonight will see
the departure of 150 men. from Victoria to Ladysmlth. That is my response to the strikers' intimation of
peace." In other words, he holds the
dominion government responsible for
the SI per day meal ticket for the
militiamen that he sent up there in
the first place.
JAMES WILSON
General president of the Pattern-
Makers' League of North America, with
headquarters at 1008-9 Second National Bank Building, Cincinnati, Ohio.
BOARD SESSIONS IN
B. C.  E.  R. CO.  DISPUTE
HAVE BEEN HELD UP
Board-member J. H. McVety, who is representing
the men on the board of investigation which is dealing
with the dispute between
the streetraiiwaymen and
the B. C. E. Railway Company, states that the board
have not yet decided on their
award. The private sessions
of the board have had to be
perforce suspended for a
few days owing to Mr. Justice McDonald, the chairman, being away in Nanalmo, where he Is holding
court.
"A White B. C."
Six hundred and forty Asiatics came
over ln the steerage of the Empress of
Asia last week. ,
. This spring has seen a great rush
of settlers to the land. This is desperation born of a conviction that a
mnn may as well go on the land and
be settled as starve around town and
be settled that way.
up had been terminated by the singing of the "International." A Portugese federation of trades unions has
been formed with an executive of
nine. The first and chief work of the
new organization is to be the organizing of the unorganized. No person
In the employ ot the government ln
any other capacity than that of a
workman will be permitted to belong
or be connected with the new federations. Plans were laid for financing
and for another congress ln 191C.
THE TOLL OF THE  MINES
Ten Miners Killed In B. C. During
First Quarter of the Year
During the first three months of
this year seven coal miners and three
metal miners were killed In the mines
of BrltlBh Columbia by falls of rock
or coal and the premature explosion
of powder, Of the seven coal mino
fatalities, one occurred iii January at
the Hosmer mines of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Natural Resources
Coal company; four In February, two
at the mines of the same company,
and two at the Cumberland mines of
the Canadian Collieries company, and
two ln March, one at the Michel mine
of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal company
and one at the Nanalmo mine of the
Western Fuel company.
The causes of the accidents are
given as follows: Falls of roof and
rock, 2; falls of coal, 1; by mine cars
and haulage, 1; by suffocation In fine
coal, 2. The seventh accident occurred on the surface and was caused by
a coke-oven larry.
Ottawa Carpenters Want Raise
Ottawa carpenters are demanding
an Increase from the old rateB of 40
cents an hour to 45 cents, and the men
are confident concerning the outcome,
James Usher, the carpenters' secretary, Is endeavoring to have the
wages of the men In the employ ot
the city raised to this standard and
thus constitute a fair wage rate ln all
future olty contracts,
printing circles and there Is no call
for any extra men.
At the last meeting ot the union lt
was deolded, ln view of conditions up
the line, where a great many papers
ave starting ln the new towns, that
a request should be sent to President
Duncan asking that Organizer Stoney
be authorized to make a trip through
the Interior country. Now Is the time
to get this country solid for unionism.
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada
 1915 Convention for Vancouver	
Since the Trades and Labor Congress of Cuniulii met in convention in Calgary in 1011,
the feeling lias been steadily growing nnd cultivated Unit tlie 1915 convention of the Congress should be held in Vancouver. At nil the conventions hold since 1911, "Vancouver for
1915" has been the claim presented by one or unolbcr of the delegates from the Wesl, and
there is every reason to believe that the sentiment finds general favor throughout the trade
union movement of the Dominion. "*
The year 1915 will see tjie exposition opened in Sun Francisco to celebrate the completion
of the Panama canal, which is without doubt destined to have nn important effect upon the
status of the workers of the entire Pacific coast. By that time it is likely that the transportation of emigrants from Europe via the canal to various parts of this west coast—including
British Columbia—will be in full swing, and tlie practical aspects of the problem will be more
than evident and ripe for the consideration of organized labor.
The American Federation of Labor convention will be held in San Francisco in 1915, one
month after the Congress meets, and the two bodies in their respective spheres of jurisdiction
will have to deal with this immigration difficulty, which will be common to both.
If the future of labor in the 'West develops nlong tlie lines predicted by those who bave
given careful thought to the question, the impetus which the opening of the canal will give
to the industrialization of the Northwest, will justify the representatives of organized labor
in coming to the 'West to see and hear for themselves.
Further than that, whilst the Congress has not loomed large in the minds of the mass of
western workers up to the present—owing to tho fact tbat most of its meetings have been
held in the East, where the industrial life of Canada is chiefly centered—yet if it is to meet
with that appreciation from the West which i*s usefulness deserves, it will be essential that
we should see its gatherings in our midst a little oftener in future.
The.$250,000 Labor Temple which the workers of Vancouver have erected for their
housing and accommodation will be able to seat the convention when it comes, and it should
be made the business of the hTcal movement from now on to strive and plan to secure the
convention for this city in 1915.
In this connection The Federationist proposes to prepare a special invitation edition to
be sent down to the convention of the Congress at St.'John's, N. B., next September, setting
forth the reasons and attractions whioh justify the claims of Vancouver for the honor.
The Trades and Labor Council will also take the matter-up at tho earliest possible moment, so that nothing shall be left undone to make it possible to hold the convention of the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada in Vancouver in 1915. ,
All Forces  of Employing
Class Arrayed Against
Workers
The Official Organ Is In
Best Interests of
Movement
I MA. MEXICAN
REVOLUTIONIST
LEADER
Has Three Million Followers—A Revolt Against
Landlordism
Masses Against the Domination, of a Cruel
Aristocracy
[Special to The Federationist]
VICTORIA, B. C, May 6.—A circular-letter has just been sent out to all
central bodies and local unions ln the
province bf British Columbia by the
B. C. Federation of Labor. The document was Issued In this city and bears
the signatures of President A. Watchman and Secretary-treasurer A. S.
Wells, and reads as follows: "At the
present time, owing to the depression
and the recurring attacks of the employing class, there was never a time
in the history of the trade-union
movement in this province when
unity of purpose and action on the
part of organized labor was more
necessary than at the present time,
internal conflict has arisen ln the
past which haB been detrimental and
has tended to disorganise our forces.
Recent events In this province arising
out of the Vancouver Island strike,
which haB shown all the forces of the
employing class arrayed against the
workers. The power of the labor organization to discipline its members
has been jeopardized by a recent
court decision. All this should prove
conclusively to us thnt any time
spent In wrangling or in petty jealousies is not only time wasted but Is
playing into the hands of those whom
we are united for protection against.
The B. C. Federation of Labor Is the
central labor organization of the province and was organized to provide a
means of giving expression of labor's
needs and to carry on a campaign of
education amongst the organized
and unorganized workers of the province. We are pleased to report that
the federation has now equal voting
power with all other shareholders of
The FederatlonlBt, our official organ.
In the best interest of the movement
we, therefore, respectfully request
your hearty siinnort and co-operation
to make The Federationist a power ln
your vicinity, to voice the needs and
aspirations of those who toil to live,
to accomplish that which must be
done before labor at last stands free.
You can accomplish much, your organization more.   Will you asBlBt?"
DIRTY,  DESTITUTE  DUBLIN
City Councillors' Income Derived
From Slum Property
From 'official figures Just published
dealing with housing conditions in the
city of Dublin, 14,000 new houses are
urgently needed. Over 20,000 families
have only one room each to live ln
while 1500 families live in cellars con
verted into living places. Out of
the whole of the dwellings In Dublin
1)3.9 per cent, havo only one "room. In
the case of 12,000 of these an average
of 0.1 persons live 111 the one room.
In one typical house aro 98 persons,
In another 74. The report brings out
tho fact thnt 14 of the city councillors
of Dublin are among tho owners of
those houses. Five thousond six hundred fathers of families receive a
wage of not more thnn $.175 per week,
while 900 others get from $3.00 to
$5.00 per week.
PICTURE OPERATORS PROTEST
Trades Council Delegation Supports
Them At City Hall
A delegation from the tradee and
labor council am! the moving picture
operators union protested at the city
hall lost Wednesday against the nonunion operators who examine applicants for operating licenses at the city
hall. The union operators have good
ground for believing that deliberate
discrimination against them Is practised. Mayor Baxter suggested that
they submit the names of three union
operators, with a view to the city elec-
trlcinn selecting one es nn examiner.
Representing the trades council were
MeBsrs. W. B. Walker, president, and
J. II. McVety, vice-president, while
Mr. L. E. Qoodwln, of the moving picture operators' union, was also present.
Hundreds Try to Leave Vancouver
Between 400 and 500 men visited the
"Lord Erne" before It Bailed from Vancouver to Australia a week ago, In Uie
hope of being allowed ot work their
passage to the Antipodes and escape
the miseries of unemployment here.
Winter In Australia was preferable to
summer In Vancouver.
Emlllano Zapata, the social revolutionist of Mexico, who hu been up In
arms since 1911, has a following et
60,000 armed men and three millions
of people In six states of the southern republic. Zapata stands for the
collective ownership of the land, forests, water-powers, oil wells and all
means of production and distribution.
If there Is a man today In the world
who possesses the genuine lov^ ot the.
workers, that man Is Emlllano Zapata
of Mexico. Zapata Is loved and also
hated—loved by the working class of
Mexico; hated by the capitalist class
of Mexico, the United States and Canada. The workers ot Mexico love him
because he has been the .man who,
with his organizing faculties, could
form a powerful party that has fought
four governments for the right of collective ownership of the land, forests,
water-powers, 611 wells and all means
of production and distribution. The
capitalists of Mexico and the hired
writers of the bourgeois press of
North America call him a "bloodthirsty bandit." because he has sentenced to death high military officers,
attorney-generals, premiers, wealthy
capitalists and prominent bishops,
found guilty of many crimes against
the working class.
People Rose In Arms
Mexico has been ln revolt more or
less since the fall of 1906. The people
rose up In arms to overthrow the
three powers that oppressed them:
the dictatorship, the clergy and the
capitalists. The Mexican peon, particularly, roBe the standard of revolt
against landlordism and declared war
to the-death with the usurer and the
tax-gatherer. Among the men that'
went to the b'attlefleld, was n former
peon of one of the big estates ot
Morelos, a man of thirty-five years,
former reader of revolutionary papers,
Emlllano Zapata. He1 had been a neon
since he was a child. He had worked
for the seventeen landlords that owned
the state of Morelos. He had suffered
hardships, poverty and misery. His
salary never amounted to fifty cents
a day after a task of fourteen hours.
And after the first battles, ln which
he distinguished himself, giving many
proofs of bravery, energy and character, Zapata begun to organize an army
In order to prevent the capitalist politician Madero from taking advantage
of the sacrifices of the peons. And
since the fall of 1911, Zapata and hts
followers have driven out the federal
army of the southern states and taken
possession of the wealth of the parasites. Zapata's operations cover the
state of Morelos and large portions
of the states of Mexico, Puebla,
Oaxaca, Guerrero, Hidalgo and Tlax*
cala and the federal district.
Land Ownership
Zapata owes his following to the
fact that he represents the one great
Idea rooted Ineradicably In the peasant's mind, namely, that the land and
all the products of the land Bhould
belong to the man who works the
land. Referring to the Zapata forces,
a member of the cabinet of Madero
on a certain occasion said: "It won't
be with guns that we can quiet them;
because they are not bandits, but revolutionists, and the revolutionists
always have a principle of justice."
In all the territory where the red
nag flies, the co-operation system has
been Implanted; the change of production and consumption has been accepted enthusiastically by thousands
of peasants. They have seen with
great pleasure that their miserable
lives of peons and slaves are over.
They will not produce and more for
the landlords. They are producing for
themselves. Wherever the red flag
files ln Morelos, Guerrero, southern
Puebia and other states, the dry
goods and grocery stores have been
declnred public property; the plows
and tools of production have remained
in the hands of the workers and all
the lands havo been expropriated. The
title deeds ore generally burned ns
also the records of tho civil and criminal courts. The prisons ore abolished. The new society is now being
tried In souther* Mexico.
Masses Against Classes
The war of Zapata is no ordinary
warfare. It is a war of extermination;
a war of a large section of the masses
against the domination of ns cruel an
aristocracy as ever crushed humanity
beneath its pitiless heel. No quarter
is asked, no quarter Is given. Intervention by the United States would
mean the prolongation of a sanguinary war In which the flower of the
manhood of the United States would
perish among the gigantic mountains
and great deeps of the Mexican Sierras, for these nre the strongholds of
Zapata. This man nnd the three millions of peons of southern Mexico
would never surrender to any govern- •
ment. Tho Mexican revolution
should be better known by the workers of Cannda. The Federationist
should advise its readers to get the
pamphlet "The Mexican Revolution,
19061914" that a Mexican revoutlonlst
has written dealing with the causes,
progress, purpose and probable results
of that movement. Such an Interesting
pamphlet that is sold at the small
price of ten cents would give Idea "of
Mexican conditions to the working-
man of Canada. J. S. M.
First Aid for Metal Minera '
The British Columbia government
has decided to appoint an official who
will organize first-aid classes among
the men in the metalliferous mines of
the province, this official to work In
conjunction with the St John's Ambulance association. PAGE TWO
THB BKITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY   MAT 8, :
ROYAL CITY REVIEW
EDITED BY H. OIBB, BOX (34. NEW'WESTMINSTER	
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, »l,ooo,ooo.oo. Basam Tnat, 1000,000.00
■utsortbrt, SMl.ooo.oo
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
8AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C.
J. J. Jobm, WMftar DlnoWr
3. A. Xannla, atetttetr-tttttotet.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
■noorason to Outer A Sanaa, tta.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
non hi
4M COLOMBIA IIUR NBW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Ng SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS
UNION MADE
H»ua Filltd
WHEN YOU DRINK
PREMIER BEER
Note the brilliancy, the zest, the pleasing aroma that are characteristic of this fine brew. They all denote honesty in brewing
and quality in the product.
If you have cultivated a taste for the best beers, try
PREMIER. Many good judges place it above all other brands.
When you simply order beer, you leave the selection of the brand
to the whim of another. Use your own discretion and ask for
PREMIER.    Why not try a case?
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
PHONE No. L-7B
A. E. SUCKLING ft CO, VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS
Your First Suit of
Perry Clothes
aj   Makes You a Regular
Customer
For eight years I have been making
clothes under my own and the union
label, and gradually building up a
business with a backbone. My success rests on my regular customers
and regular customers rest on satisfaction. In all my eight years of business experience I have never had to
resort to a cheap sale. Cheap sales
mean cheap goods and cheap goods
mean clothes that can't wear. I Insist
on using the best class of British
woolens that I can buy tor every suit
I make and I charge you a fair price.
I am ready to start you on the road to the clothing satisfaction that some men have enjoyed for this eight years past. Call In
any time and let your own eyes and own fingers speak to the excellence of the woolens I am using.
Fred Perry
Labor Temple   Dunsmuir St.
PATRONIZE UBOR TEMPLE IL
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
MATINEE DAILY 2.30
EVE. PERFORMANCE 8.16
PANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE  SHOWS DAILY
2.46, 7.20, 1.16
Season's Prices—
Matinee 15c, Evenings 16c, 16c.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF MAY 11
MON.,    TUE8.,    WED.
3 HVHCA& BBOWH■
Colored Comcd>  Hinging, TalkliiB,
Dancing Musical Act.
JBBOKZ A*D BASIV
Character Comedy  flinging
OVSA  OB SCHOlf
Indian Singing Scenic Novelty.
' UOBBL ABB WX»TO*
Comedy Entertainers.
THURS.,   FRI.,   SAT.
3 SULLrVAK  BBOTKSBS
Classy   Entertainers.
Harmony   unci   Comedy;   Singing,
Dancing and Violin Act.
Ut PETITE JAMS
Novelty Singing and Dancing
JACK ABB NELLYS U7VZLX,
Singing,   Talking,   Piano   Dancing
Act.
EUGENE OB BELL
Singing Comedian.
t-REELS LATEST PICTURES-4
10 Cents—ANY SEAT—10 Cents
AMATEUR NIGHT-WEDNESDAY.
Fishermen Elect Officers-
Large Number Sign
Membership Roll
chance of crowding. An excellent
program haB been arranged consisting
of a baseball* game between the barbers and bartenders, a tug-of-war between teams ' from the cigarmakers
and bartenders, foot races, an egg and
spoon race, also races and games for
children, and for those who do not
oare for the sports, an excellent orchestra will dispense music ln a pavilion on the grounds where they trip
the light fantastic.
The general committee in charge
of the arrangements consists of Peter
Poison, chairman; Ernie Hunt, Jas.
Woods, Banks Jackson aad Herb
Schofleld, and each and every one Is
working hard to make the affair a
success and the best ever. ThlB is
the third annual picnic of the bartenders, and If the past Ib any criterion
all who participate will enjoy an outing that will linger long with them as
a pelasant memory.
Orientals Must Be Driven
Out of Industrial Life
of B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER, May 5.—
When the mass meeting of the fishermen of the Fraser river was called
to order on Saturday afternoon last,
the room waB well filled with representatives of the Industry from both
the upper and lower reaches of the
river. The principal business was to
hear the report of the committee on
permanent organization appointed at
the meeting one week previous. That
the men appointed on the committee
had done good work was well attested
hy the reports handed in, a total of
300 persons engaged in Ashing In the
river having been Interviewed and
who signed the roll 'as members of
the Fraser River Fishermen's Protective association.
Secretary W. E. Maiden, of tho
Trades and Labor council, called the
meeting to order at the request of
those present, and Aid. Walter Dodd
acted as temporary secretary. The
report of the committee.on permanent
organization, recommending an Initiation fee of 60 cents with dues at 26
cents per month; the election of a
president, vice-president,. secretary
and treasurer, these to constitute an
executive committee with three others
elected trom the floor, was adopted
with Uttle discussion. The officers
elected were: W. E, Maiden, president; Daniel McPherson, vice-president; M. Connell, secretary; J. Reich-
enbach, treasurer; Messrs. Qeorge
Browse, Port Haney; Fred. Taylor,
Canoe Pass, and John Haggmann,
North Arm, were chosen as members
of the executive committee.
The executive committee were Instructed to draft a constitution and
by-laws to govern the organization for
submission to the next meeting, which
will be held in about two weeks. While
the main object of tbe new organization Is the elimination of the Asiatics
from the river, the sentiment of the
meeting was ln favor of admitting to
membership all persons who believed
in driving the Orientals out of the
Industrial life of the province.
A meeting of the executive will be
held on Thursday afternoon, when reports from the Skeena river sbowlng
how the question has been handled In
the northern part of the province to
the practical elimination of the Japs,
will be ln hand, and lt Is expected that
much of the future action of the new
organization will be based on these
methods.
Those who have taken up the work
of organizing the fishermen report an
intense Interest of all classes of citizens' throughout the valley and It is
fully believed that the membership
roll will mave over 500 names on lt
by the next meeting.
BARTENDERS
Will Hold Annual Picnic
May 17th
NEW WESTMINSTER, May 6—On
Sunday, May 17, one of the great
events of the summer season In this
city will take place, when the Bartenders' union will, with the aid of
their many friends, make merry at
Derby on the Fraser river. For several years past the bartenders have
given their picnics and lt has been
always one of the best. One of the
biggest boasts of the local mixologists is that their outing has been
conducted In a fashion that would
meet the approval of anyone, and lt
Is one In which they have always
made good. Any man, woman or child
can attend with the assurance they
will be treated in a gentlemanly und
courteous manner, and have the best
time ln their lives.
A committee has been making the
arrangement for several weeks and
have chartered the steamer Pay-
streak. The tickets have been limited
to a number well within the capacity
of the boat, so there will be ample
room for everyone on board, and no
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURE8
GARGET IN COWS.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
"We demand attention of every
worker and citizen I"
"If you wish to organize In your
locality, write us."
Our mall order department will
meet your requirements. We can
supply best quality at fair prices.
Special blend Tea, 3 lbs. for $1.00
Pure Ground Coffee, per Ib 40c
Monk & Glass Custard Powder, per tin 26c
Jellies, assorted, 3 for 25c
Prunes, 3 lbs. for .....25c
B. C. Milk, 20 oz. tin, each 10c
Large assortment of Summer
Beverages. Fresh supplies of
Fruit and Vegetables dally.
Note Address: Phone   58
33 EIGHTH STREET
Near Corner of Columbia Street
NEW WE8TMIN8TER
THE HALF-HOLIDAY
AI
Soldier Was Fined for Refusing to Attend
Parade
Laborers' Wages Reduced-
''Solemn and Binding
Contract" Broken
CAPITAL CITY BUDGET
EDITED BY JOHN L. MARTIN, LABOR HALL, VICTORIA, B. C.
CARPENTERS STRIKE
AT
Unsanitary   Conditions -
Strong Protests Made-
Troops for Nanaimo
Greeks,  Montenegrins and
Other Foreigners Now
Working in Mines
VICTORIA, B. C, May 7—A member of the fifth regiment was the
other day fined ln the Victoria police
oourt for refusing to attend parade.
The press here are in ecstacy over ft
and think that lt will act as a warning
to others who follow suit. There are
many others who think as this militiaman does, but have not the courage
to follow his example. There Is every
probability that lt will have another
effect, as lt will have the tendency to
cause men to halt before they exchange their liberty for a soldier's
uniform. At present the Victoria regiments are - kept up mainly because
many of them have to be members
of tbe mllltla before they can get a
job.
Strike Settled
The carpenters who went on strike
at Cooper's cove have won out. The
city engineer was approached by a
deputation of the carpenters Involved
and the Vlotoria local S. D. P. with
the result that he came through and
dismissed the men that had been
taken on in their places and had
them reinstated. The camp conditions against which the men protested have been Improved.
Wages Reduced
Following the precedent set by the
municipal authorities in lowering
some of their employees' wages the
contractors on the new Hudson's
Bay company's building have done the
same. They have made a cut ln
wages of laborers to $2.50 a day. The
contract Is supposed to have a union
clause in lt, but It does not avail very
much. There Is no stated schedule
of wages, consequently the contractors like to form a union of their employees with the purpose ln view of
having them agree to work for a
lesser scale of wages than a union
recognized as a federal or International union, they could do so and still
hide themselves behind the ambiguity
ot a "union clause," There Is a
Building Laborers' union here with
the scale demanded of $3.25 a day.
This puts the labor on the contractors'
fidelity to the "union" clause in the
contract. The only way that they
will employ union men, Is for the
latter to accept any scale of wages
they like to impose on them. Sucli
Is the respect of Victoria contractors
for "a solemn and binding contract."
The firm having the jobs to dispose of
on this undertaking Ib the B. C. Construction and Engineering company.
It Is the same firm that erected the
new provincial jail.
A firm known as the Sound Construction company, with headquarters
in the state of Washington, opened
up a branch here. The provincial
government Is at all times ready to
recognize American firms, although
not American unions, gave them the
jail job. When this was done, they
realised that their chances of obtaining other work In B. C. would be enhanced hy changing their name so as
to give It the appearance of a British
Columbia firm. By the usual form of
"hocus pocus," the Victoria branch of
the Sound Construction company be
came the B. C. Construction and En
glneerlng company. When a working-
man- wants to be naturalized he has
to live here for three years, but when
a firm from tho other side of the International boundary line wishes to
become "naturalized," this Ib done
just as soon as their legal acrobat
can change the name for them. A
few foreign foremen will then handle
the transaction, and a full blown Brit
Ish Columbia firm Is the result.
Weekly Half-holiday
After montlw of agitation the efforts of tho Victoria branch of the
Retail Employees association has begun to take effect. The city council
have, after considerable hesitation,
acceded to a request of the association,
for a weekly half-holiday for shop assistants. Under the Shops Regulation
act, any municipality ma"y enact a bylaw providing for the early closing of
stores on any particular day In tho
week. On the council being Informed
of this by their own solicitor, one way
of escape from deciding one way or
another was cut off, and It remained
for them to decide whether or not
they would prepare the bylaw desired. The Retail ClerkB kept after
their heels for what they wanted. The
chief bone of contention was the day
on which it should be. Some of the
merchants were favorable to Saturday, and others to Thursday. Others
were opposed to either. One raised
the argument that business was too
bad to justify him In supporting a
weekly halfholdlay movement, and
would sooner go out of business than
accede to the requests for It. After
the council had heard both sides of
the proposition, they arrived at the
above decision, and the bylaw will lie
prepared accordingly.- The main credit for the success of the agitation Is
due to the painstaking efforts of the
officers nf the Retail ClerkB association. They have worked hard ln the
cause and it Is them that those working In stores have to thank.     The
VICTORIA, B. C„ May. 4.—A small
strike occurred near Victoria last Friday ln which sixteen carpenters were
Involved. They were working for the
city at Cooper's Cove, erecting a plant
for tbe city's new water-supply. A
contract had been drawn up between
the city and the Westholme Lumber
company for the construction of the
aupply system. Owing to the company failing to fulfill the contract, the
same reverted back to the city, and
part of the same is today being done
by the city by day labor, under the
water commissioner's control, tinder
the terms of the previous contract the
company had to provide sanitary conveniences, etc., for Its employees.
Now, that the city Ib doing the work
Itself, they don't seem to be In any
very anxious to fulfill what they undertook to compel the contractors to
live up to. This Is not the first time
that the water* commissioners have
erred In this connection. At the
Humpback reservoir, on tbe same
water supply system, the city showed
an equal disregard for the provisions
of the contract, and permitted the
most abominable conditions to prevail.
Very Unsanitary
These carpenters were compelled to
live in lousy tents. They complained
about the existence of the live stock
as their bed mates, to the superintendent in charge. He told them that
they would have to sleep tbere, or
construct a place for themselves on
their own time. They preferred to
sleep In the bush for two nights
rather than do It. The superintendent refused to provide a sanitary
place when asked, and consequently they packed up their tools and came
Into tbe city to lay their case before
the city council. Ab the city ts at
present afflicted by the most adverse
council to the Interests of labor that
there has been for years, nothing waB
done In the matter. To add Insult to
Injury, they permitted the superintendent to engage men to take their
places. This is being resented by the
organized carpenters in the city.
Will Protest
The Victoria local of the social-democratic party are protesting against
these conditions and are following the
council with the matter, with the
view of having them Insist on better
conditions. There Is every llklthood
tbat the central labor body will also
get after them about it. ft goes to
show how little disregard the tools of
employing class on the municipal
council at Victoria have for the Interests of organized labor, when they
even refused to live up to their own
regulations on city work.        	
Troops for Nanalmo*
Last Friday, Robert Foster, president of the district, and Frank Farrington; were ln town interviewing
the members of the cabinet, when Informed of the Intention to send more
troops to Nanalmo they expressed in
dlgnatlon saying that everything was
as quiet ln Nanalmo as in Victoria.
"If Col. Hall needs more troops why
doesn't he recall the big drummer of
tbe Highlanders, who was permitted
to leave the mllltla to go to work as
a strike breaker In the mines? There
are over a dozen former provincial
constables working In the mines now
also," he added. Frank Farrington
said that the Western Fuel company's
manager had made public statements
about foreigners domination the union,
but he had no scruples about putting
Greeks, Montenegrins and other foreigners at work ln his mines. He
stated that "there Is no reason why
the city police cannot handle tbe situation as lt exists in Nanalmo at present. I am Informed that the mllltla
department and the provincial authorities are anxious to have Col. Hall
withdraw his troops and he refuses."
The provincial authorities, however,
sent up armed soldiers to cow Into
submission men whose only ambition
Ib to celebrate labor's day by enjoying themselvea. The attorney-general
Is endorsed by both conservative and
liberal press in this olty, which goes
to show that there is no difference
between them In the extent to which
they are prepared to prostitute themselves to the Interests of the employ's.
Strong Protest
The Social-Democratic local tn the
city has expressed its protest against
It and has adopted the following resolution:
'We, the Victoria local of the Social
Democratic party In meeting assembled, most vigorously protest
against the dispatch of militiamen to
Nanalmo on the flrst of May by the
attorney-general's department, and
also protests against these methods of
preventing Nanalmo citizens from exercising their right to conduct a
peaceable parade on labor's International day, and that we furthermore
express our disapproval of Mayor
Planta's action in this connection."
A copy of this resolution was ordered to be sent to Mayor Planta and
also to the Times for publication.
Victoria local of the 8. P. of C. held
their annual dance on the evening of
May-day, which was a big success.
organization has grown by leaps and
hounds and a Bectlon of the working
class hitherto unacquainted with organization work, has demonstrated to
themselves Just what capabilities He
In organization. The organization has
not finished Its work when It has obtained the weekly half-holiday. There
are other conditions In the life of a
retail clerk that hove to be made better. What organization has done organization can do. This lesson is no
doubt by this time deeply Impressed
on the membership of the Retll
ClerkB association. J, l M.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
St. Francis Hotel
formerly Oriental Hotel, G. D. Scdntr,Prop,
Special inducements to transients.   Rates
—    „*».... mm.**.*— *f.^»n..   » -     reasonable.  First class cafe and BrilUn con-
MO YATES STREET, VICTORIA, B.C. . nection. Union house. rUt—i 50c., 75c,$1
BRITISH COLUMBIA UND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Panning, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual, Settlers
FREE   *
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.	
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
JOBSEEKERS EVERYWHERE SHOULD
REMEMBER THAT THE STRIKE ON VANCOUVER ISLAND IS NOT SETTLED
PAY NO ATTENTION TO PHONEY DAILY
PRESS REPORTS SENT OUT BY THE COAL
COMPANIES. WAIT UNTIL OFFICIAL NOTICE HAS BEEN GIVEN THROUGH THE
LABOR PRESS.
Help the Coal Miners .to win the right to organise by
remaining away from Vancouver Island.
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It bears >
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without Ufa Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
146 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
3. F. Tobln, Pres.    C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
Prudential
LOOK FOR THIS PACKAGE WHEN
YOU WANT A REAL GOOD WASHABLE WALL FINISH-A FINISH
THAT WON'T RUB OFF OR FADE OUT.
IT IS MADE IN B.C.
 BY	
British America Paint Co.
LIMITED
VICTORIA     VANCOUVER    CALGARY    EDMONTON ■^^sh;
W:
orncuL patch Vancouver
TKADE3 AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OffKUL PMII
SIXTH YEAR, No. 161.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MAY 8,1914.
eight Pages
(War) n^oPBBYSAm
Mr. Man!
THIS IS ONE OF OUR
$17.50 Suits
Look how well it fits; note the smart
lines, the perfect fit of the collar—the
good length sleeves. No custom tailor
could turn you out a fit like this, we
don't care how much you'd pay him.
And this suit is made of a material that
will hold its shape and give satisfactory
wear. We show it in all the season's
new color combinations, in all sizes, and
guarantee a perfect fit. Come in and
try a few suits on and see if you don't
like them.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BAUBRIQQAN UNDERWEAR
At SOo. and 78c. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear-Just right tor this warm weather
LIGHT WEIQHT UNION SUITS
From 91.00 per Butt up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, no. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel. s.y. tta^ ao-at Hastings street w.
J. L.ECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS  I
We manufacture every kind of
work ihoe, snd specialize in lines
'or minen, railroad conitniclion,
logging, etc
VANCOUVER   -  ■   B.C.
MAY DAY AT NANAIMO
A PRONOUNCED SUCCESS
•>       ».    ..     —    i _.    ,   .    »•   I   We muet not know retreat  ,
Despite the Pact That Auth- **<'_l_*_,____*i«&+-
orities Were Hostile to     w'-T^ZSru,'"a' w* """"
riAl*»U«.a+iMi We won't retreat or change our seat,
veiODraUVll For the union demands that every man
will light for recognition.
They have faced us with the gun, In the
darkness and the sun
With "Bowser's'Seventy-Twa."
No spirit have they broke, nor our am-
. bltlon choke,
For we are strong and brave.
jWlth Bowser's tun and kiltie show, we'll
win the flght o'er every foe,
The fight for recognition, the flght for
recognition.
We'll live or die, but ne'er give in
For the union expects that every man
will flght for;recognition.
Let tyrants on us frown, and try to put
ue down,
Between Five and Six Thousand Working People
Foregather
The Nanaimo May-day celebration by the miners of Vancouver
island was held on the Cricket
grounds at Five Acre Lots, on Friday last, under most trying circumstances. The Black Diamond City
has always been an ideal place to go
aholidaying, but on this occasion
the town itself was quieter than a
Puritan Sunday. In fact, it was a
veritable little Moscow, soldiers
and police appearing everywhere,
many of whom were mounted. If
two or three happened to meet and
stood, conversing for a few minutes on the street, they would be
politely but firmly ordered to move
on. There were really more men
in uniform than civilians on the
streets in the afterrtoon. Mayor
Planta and his council were hostile
to the miners' celebration and did
all in their power to make it' a failure, and by bringing large numbers
of soldiers there hoped to terrorize
the citizens, and by so acting thousands of prospective visitors from
the coast cities decided not to go
to Nanaimo on May first. The authorities have done not a little to
spread the factional feeling. They
refused permission for a parade,
compelled all proprietors to close
their bars, ordered the police to
strictly enforce traffic regulations,
which ordinarily, are more observed
in the breach than the observance
thereof. Everyone arriving on the
boats or trains was watched and
trailed as if he were an escaped
criminal. And to crown all, the
miners' bands were not allowed to
play on the streets!
In spite of all these handicaps the
celebration committees went ahead
with their great mass picnic and Held
sports and speechifying. At the
grounds there were between live and
six thousand people. No arrests were
recorded and not even a common
drunk appeared to disturb the peace.
Mounted soldiers were pn the Held
all day. There were three silver cornet bands present and rendered popular airs tor the occasion, namely, Nanalmo silver cornet, Ladysmlth and
Chase River. The physical drill demonstration by the Chase River Finns
was much applauded. Adults, youths
and children, one and all, enjoyed
themselves Immensely. The third
annual miners' Mayday festival will
go down as a unique success among
the great Industrial events In British
Columbia. The whole affair opened
and closed under the most favorable
conditions possible as regards the
beautiful weather and the enthusiasm
whloh prevailed among the large
crowds.
The Speeohes
I'resldent Robert Foster, of the
United Mine Workers, who acted as
chairman started the day's festivities with a few well-chosen remarks.
He Bald that this would be the third
Mayday celebration held by the miners on the Island. Last year lt was
held at Ladysmith. Although lt was
the general custom on such occasions
as this for the mayor of the city and
members of the council to be present,
yet ln this Instance they were absent
for reasons best known to themselves.
It was always considered an honor
for the mayor to welcome everyone
to Join In and have a good time, "but
this time we'll have to welcome ourselves and make the best of It," said
the president amidst applauae. The
miners on this island, as well oa In
Colorado and other places on the continent, were facing the most critical
struggle In history. They were not
only up against the mine operators,
but also the government who brought
the mllltla to beat them down. He
bade all a hearty welcome and called
upon T. J. Shenton, who sang the following song to the tune of '"Twas In
Trafalgar Bay," at the conclusion of
which he was loudly applauded:
Fight for Recognition
'Tie   Just   one   year   to-day, when   tho
U. H. W. of A.
Said: "Boys, lay down your tools."
We answered to the call to light for one
and all
All o'er Vancouver's Islo.
The masters now have proved our grit,
that we know how to tightly sit
Upon the corporation, upon the corporation,
That we may surely win the flght
The union expects that every man will
flght for recognition.
Now, brother workers all, don't let   us
cringe or crawl.
This foe can sure be beat.
We have counted well the cost; this battle can't bo lost.
Though  traitors Jeave^ our side,  though
We'll conquer bye and bye.
gh  traitors leave our
Bowser and McBride
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Support our enemies' cause,
tWe will the powere of hell defy, we won't
give up though we may die,
We will have recognition to better our
condition,
So doff your hat and all sit pat,
For the union expects that every man
will flght for recognition.    ,
Three oheers to strikers all, on this year's
festive call W  '
To wives and ohlldren dear,
To the U. M. W. of A., who support us
In the fray,
We shout hurrah for all;
To our brothers   Just   across   the   line,
whose love tor us is genuine.
When we get recognition, when we get
recognition,
We'll pay baok then our debt of love,
For the union expects' that every man
will flght for recognition.
Lest we should now forget the .comrades
we have yet
In Bowser's prison cell,        ,
Who can't be here to-day to hear the
music play-
How muoh we this regret;
But they are men every whit, and for
their sakes we'll never quit,
Until we have got victory,  until  we
have got victory.
Then on, each brother, on and on,
For the union expects that every man
will flght tell we get victory.
President Watchman
President A. Watchman, of the B.
C. Federation ot Labor, followed with
an excellent address, In which he said
that- the working class came together periodically to enjoy themselves and to celebrate the cause of
labor. It Is now over twenty-five
years since the Knights of Labor
started the great agitation for a universal eight-hour work day, which has
now been made legal by a number of
legislatures. The International socialist workingclass parties all over the
world are holding May-day celebrations today when the alms and aspirations of labor will be reviewed. In
Nanalmo, Ladysmlth and Wellington
the miners are conducting the strike
for the betterment ot their conditions
and recognition of the union, and he
regretted to say that they were being
surrounded with all the forces that
both the mine operators and government could bring to bear against
them, Such a state of warfare between capital and labor was a disgrace to civilization. It was a re'
proach upon the intelligence ot the
working-class and organised, labor In
British Columbia to not realise the
paramount necessity ot well-directed
political action and the need of a cam1
palgn ot education along these UneB.
B. C. Federation of Labor
The British Columbia Federation of
Labor Is endeavoring to teach the
workers to realize their helpless position unless they get together on In
du'strlal lines similar to those of the
United Mine Workers. Only a great
organization similar to that of the
miners could finance a strike campaign like this one. And ln spite of
the government with all Its powers,
Its soldiers, guards, police, spies and
a prostituted press, the miners will
surely succeed. By their work
against al lthese odds they have demonstrated that their organization Is
In first-class fighting trim. The military procession through the streets of
Vancouver Intimidated people from
coming to Nanalmo, where the festive
spirit prevailed and conditions of
strife did not exist like they do ln
Colorado. Workers must learn that
tbey cannot accomplish or get anything with the gun. By education
only can they hope to overthrow off
their backs the parasites on labor.
May first will go down on record ln
Nanalmo as unique In the annals of
labor. After all, there Is something
else in view for the working-class besides the privilege of a mere existence and that la all shall work for a
living, not as slaves as they are doing
now, but as free people.   (Applause.)
Rev. A. W. McLeod
Rev. A. W. McLeod, of Chilllwack,
was the next speaker. He Is well and
favorably known to the citizens of
Nanalmo, having been a former resident of that city. He said that the
Herald wanted to know If he came to
town to stir up things a bit, and he
said yes—to that worthy scribe's' discomfort. "I had a guard ot honor of
thirty soldiers with me all the way
from Chilllwack," said Mr. McLeod,
amidst applause and laughter. There
were not very many men among them,
however—most of them being young
fellows not very long out of the care
of their mothers. Treat them kindly
for their mothers' sakes, (Laughter.)
"You have not been beaten. You have
won the greatest industrial battle ln
Canada." He came from the land of
milk and honey and pork, and was
with the miners In their struggle for
their rights. When Attorney-general
Bowser wanted jurymen to try the
striking miners, he regretted to say,
that he got the kind he was after In
the Fraser valley. However, these
men have had their eyes opened to
the fact that there Is no chance for a
man who opposes a corporation to get
fair play or justice before any court
of law ln this province.  These, too,
Are the Conditions
that exist ln the greatest empire on
which the sun ever shone. Here a
Judge sets out alleged facts and tells
the jury that they must bring In a
certain verdict, and then they do it
This Is a deplorable state of affairs,
and can only be remedied through
solidarity and activity on the political
field. There were four enemies of
labor In British Columbia, namely (1)
a subsidized press, (2) hostile courts,
(3) a timid church, and (4) a capitalist government. The church, however, had demanded an Investigation
Into the causes of this great strike.
What have the ministers of Nanalmo
done, excepting ln one case, to help
Prominent  Speakers  All
Favored Labor Taking
Political Action
The Field Sports—The Prise
Winners—The Sports
Committees
the cause of the miners? Regarding
hostile courts, Uke, for Instance, a
shyster lawyer, who will always stand
and defend the Interests of the capitalist, put him on the bench, and what
can you expect? Here two men, liberals, of course, were appointed by the
late liberal government who were
twins In the sodlao of dirt No one ever
read such prostitution of justice. According to press reports Attorney-
general Bowser delivered a speech the
other day on tbe freedom of the British subject from the days of Magna
Charts down to the present time.
Ae Te Freedom
The great charter says that right
or justice shall not be spld, or refused, or delayed, and that no freeman
shall be Imprisoned without a fair
trial. Every one of these principles
have been flagrantly violated by Bowser. A working man has no chance
whatever In the courts of British Columbia. Labor Is up against a, subsidized press as well. Sir Richard
McBride says that ninety per cent, of
the voters In this province are workingmen. If this Is a fact they should
control the legislature. The miners
will get recognition of their union
snd the struggle must continue on and
on until all will get the equivalent of
what they earn. It has been proved
that the miners must not only fight
the mine owners, but they must combat the governments of British Columbia and Ottawa, which are ln alliance with the Mackenzie and Mann
Interests. Then why hesitate about
taking political action? The International is the only union that can possibly stand against these big corporations. As stated In the subsidized
press, Frank Shepherd, member of the
federal house for Nanalmo, has great
sympathy- for the imprisoned miners
and the way they have been punished.
That reminded Uie speaker of a story.
An Irishman just arrived In New
York was gazing up at a tall building. Some one shouted from a window ln an upper Btory.
Pat Saw the Devil
"Pat, do you think that this Is a
Catholic ohurchc He replied: "Be
gorra, I did, till I aaw the devil stick
his head out the winder." Then
Mayor Planta and Magistrate Simpson
also sympathize—at all of which the
devil la laughing uproariously. Leaders In all matters for and against the
interests of labor may play their
many parts, but the leader Death Is
the great conqueror of them all. (Applause.)
Secretary A. 8. Wells
A. 8. Wells, secretary-treasurer of
the B. C. Federation of Labor, had
Just started speaking when a number
of mounted soldiers came galloping
down the road amidst clouds of dust
and all eyes at once turned towards
them and a murmur of protest swept
over the vast crowd. When quiet was
again restored Mr. Wells said that ln
spite of this burlesque ln Nanalmo as
carried on by the government, the
working men had gone on with the
strike against terrific odds and pushed
forward the movement ln the cause of
the miners. Thanka to the provincial
government for the good propaganda
work it was doing for labor by marching the soldiers down the road! Here
the military power Is seen. These
powers are given to the ruling class
of Nanalmo and Ladysmlth from
James Bay. The government Is more
afraid of the dawning of enlightenment among the laboring classes than
any other thing on earth. History
may repeat Itself, for we read where
the early Romans adopted direct, action and overthrew the ruling olasses
of the day. The government posseaaes
everything that Is held through political power. The working claaa can
only obtain their rlghta when it gains
political power. Until lt does so,
there will only be repetitions of labor
troubles. Whether thla atrlke be
lost or won the same condltlona atlll
remain awaiting aolutlons.
Labor Must Organize
on the political Held before It ever can
solve the problem. A peculiar feature
of the labor question la the periodical
trade depressions, which are becoming more frequent than formerly. This
is owing in a large measure to the
further Introduction of new kinds of
machinery. Consequently, larger
numbers of men are being thrown out
of work. And lt Is from this reserve
army of unemployed that the powers
draw their recruits. These men, considering aelfpreservatlon of Immediate importance to them, enlist aa aoldlera to beat down their own claas,
not realizing that the more lt Ib oppressed the more they become oppressed. Mr. Wells dwelt at aome
length ln reference to Industrial and
trade organizations, and aald that
ninety per cent, of thoae out of work,
(Continued on page five)
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"Unity of Lebor; the hope of the world.'
FRIDAY. MAY 8, 1914.
PROFIT SHARING—AND MAKING
The general unrest whloh prevails
among the workers of all commercialized countries has attained to such
proportions as to make "the labor
question" one ot the foremost Importance to the governing class the
world over. The time has gone by
when the worker was content to toll
along at a dead level of dally drudgery, and when the running of Industry was not attended by any of the
perplexities which organised labor
has Introduced Into the lite of the
capitalist of today. The workers
everywhere are demanding a larger
share of the good things of life, after
full proof that they will never get
tbem until they are prepared to get
them for themselves. The mere demand would cause no disquietude to
the' capitalist, but the growing
strength ot the movement at the back
ot that* demand has forced him to seek
for solutions to the dilemma in which
he finds himself. Many things have
been tried, both through the general
agency of legislation seeking to curb
and restrict the efficiency of labor organization, and by methods which individual capitalists have devised for
themselves. The more sagacious and
farseelng capitalists realize that an
open display of force against the
workers has Its drawbacks eventually.
It may succeed at the time, but as a
method of educating the workers lt
promises to produce results which
will prevent its continuance. Any
bully ln office can send a militiaman
against a worker, but lt requires a
more machlavellan mind to send the
worker against himself—which is the
more desirable of the two from the
modern financier's point of view.
Craftier methods are necessary, and
of all the suggested remedies for the
restlveneBB of Demos none Is more
Interesting than which has become
known as profit-sharing, and which
has been brought to the front again
by the action of Ford, the automobile
manufacturer, ln placing his establishment on tbat basis. Workmen are
given a bonus or share of the profits
of the business according to the work
they do. From Mr. Ford's own statement the system works out very well
—for Mr. Ford. In a recent Interview
he Bays, "The number of cars we
made ln February last year waB 16,000,
With the same number of employees
In February this year, under the profit-sharing plan, we put out 25,000
cars." That means an Increase of
over 56 per cent. The system ts In
vogue In a few places in France, while
in England the best known examples
are Wills', the big tobacco Arm; Cas-
sell and company, printers; Whit-
worth's engineering works at Manchester, and the South Metropolitan
Oaa oompany.
#   *   *
It is a subtle and carefully con
ceived plan for breaking that com
mon bond of fellowship and Interest
which tbe labor movement has bred
among the workers. It appears to
offer a direct monetary and economic
advantage to the Individual worker,
while actually It Ib only a method ot
stimulating and organizing his highest powers ot production tor the benefit of his employer by making a,cunning appeal to that element of cupidity
and selfishness which Is present to a
greater or less degree In all men. It
operates much tn the same fashion
as a bunch ot luscious carrots continually held two feet above and two
feet In front of a donkey's nose. It
keep his head well up ln the air bo
that he cannot see what is really going on around him—but he never gets
the carrots. It transfers the "speeding up" medium from outside tbe
worker to the inside. He "rushes"
and "drives" himself In order
that he may produce value for
his employer out of which he
receives a very minor portion-
not enough In fact to repair the excess wear and tear on his constitution
whereby he Is bringing himself to his
employer's "too old at forty" scrap-
heap. The system not only makes
each worker drive himself, but lt also
makes him anxious to drive his neighbor, and destroys that atmosphere ot
comradeship which trade-unionism
has built up. It makes worker spy on
worker, lest the portion of Lazarus
should be less. The workers might
with advantage become Interested in
profit-sharing—they have been engaged ln it a long time, tut not interested. All the profit which has
ever been made has been produced by
the mental and physical labor of the
workers, and they have shared those
profits with their capitalist masters
on the basis of ten tenths to them In
return for wages enough to'reproduce
their dally stupidity. Proflt Is the difference between the value of labor and
the value of the product of labor. The
product of labor ts produced by labor
but belongs to the capitalist, because
labor Is content with the ten tenths
ratio of profit-sharing. Wages are
that part of the value of of the product of labor which must be appropriated for the reproduction of labor,
so that lahor may continue to pro
duce value ln excess of what lt receives for Its folly. This "profit-sharing" Is only another of the red herrings which are continually being
passed under the nose of the worker
to lead him away from habits of
thought which might prove Inimical
to the economic Interests of his employer. It is not quite so "sniffy" as
some, but infinitely more rotten and
insidious in effect. Perhaps, when
the workers have sampled all the
quack devices and nostrums which
the charlatan economists of capitalism can Invent, they will seriously
set to work to discover for themselves
how and by whom profits are really
made. Meantime It will be wise to
remember that "profit-sharing" Is a
present to the workers from the capitalist. It ts a gift horse with a mouth
which will repay for examination.
MEN AND MACHINERY
"Formerly the great workshop
contained an 'army' of laborers,
and ln many cases this Is yet the
fact, but the proportion of men
to the output Ib growing continually smaller, and In certain departments of industry, notably ln
tbe Iron and steel manufacture,
and even more ln the great power
houses, the small number of men
compared with conditions a few
decades ago, Is remarkable."
Thus, ln one short sentence, does
the "Scientific American" call attention to the most pregnant factor ln
the Industrial system of our time.   It
Is not the function of that Journal to
dwell upon the effect which the use
of machinery has had upon the economic status of the working class, but
lt should be the business of the workers to study the question for themselves.   It Is a scientific fact, enunciated In plain, Impersonal terms, but
it Ib also the keystone to the whole
fabric of working class life,    lt sheds
the white blaze of passionless scrutiny
on the daily struggle of the multitude
for the bread that perleheth.   It Is
the missing link which establishes the
connection between the chief economic phenomena of the day—the growing wealth of the comparatively few
rich and the growing poverty of the
Increasing poor.    It is the explanation of the paradox of unemployment
coupled with the fact that the work-
less are wanting the cardinal necessities of life not because they are not
able and  anxious to produce them
but because they have produced too
much.   It Is the explanation of the
starving multitude, divorced from the
products of their labor.
* *   *
The history of machinery and its
application to Industry during the last
one hundred years Is the history of
the working class during that period
Labor organization as we know it, Is
he human reflex of applied mechanics
and the discovery of steam wtth its
application to the processes of production, marks the dividing line between
the age of hands and the age of machines. The use ot machinery haB
facilitated the production ot all those
things which men need for their daily
life, a hundred fold. Whereas formerly one man's labor would scarce
suffice to satisfy his own wants, today by the help of the machine he
can produce ln one day more than a
hundred of his kind can consume tn a
month. The result is that while more
wealth Ib created, less men are
needed ln the process ot Its creation.
But the fact that less men are needed
does not make the needs of men less.
Whatever arguments may be put forward by apologists desirous of Justifying the present day economic system, the natural fact remains that all
men are entitled to food, clothing and
shelter. But lt Is also a fact that
while machinery has made the production of those things easier and more
rapid, yet It Is harder for the workers to obtain them, and lt becomes
obvious tbat there ts some difference
between those who make and those
who take.
• •   #
The fairy wand of science has
been waved over the land and all
the powers of earth and air have been
rendered subservient to the purposes
of man. The advantages of Invention
however, are the privilege of the few—
and that few does not by any means
Include all the Inventors—and the
problem of this and coming generations is how to put the mass of the
people ln correct relation with the
natural resources of the earth and
the agencies whereby the needs of
men are produced and distributed. As
tt Is today, these things are passing
Into the hands of a minority which
grows more powerful with reduced
numbers, and unless the signs of the
times belle themselveB, the day Is
fast coming when society will be
divided Into two camps. On the one
hand will be a small minority owning
and controlling all the means of life.
On the otber hand will be the multitudes of the masses, owning nothing, and lacking everything. In that
day, human hunger, the most elemental and basic Instinct of human kind,
may prove the motive force which
will declare the new economic principles which shall make the mass of
the people the possessors and not the
slaves of machinery. As owners of
the machine and administrators of Its
products, "the proportion of men to
the output" will mean time for healthful leisure and culture. Today It
means the haunting fear of a bread-
less morrow because men are so
many and Jobs are so few.
FARMERS AND ASIATICS
As long as the presence ot Asiatics
In British Columbia was nothing more
than a menace to the wages and standard of living of the white working-
class, no serious or continued effort
waa put forth to secure their exclusion except by the workers.     But
times are changing, the "yellow
peril" la going Into Industry, and
many who were quite content to see
Asiatics aa competitors with white
workers ln the labor market, are now
becoming alarmed. Among these are
the small farmers who, since the
passing of the law ln California preventing Japanese from buying any
more land, have begun to agitate for
similar legislation In this province,
The DuncanB board ot trade started
the ball rolling last summer, and the
same question was the subject of a
lecture recently delivered before the
Langley farmers' Institute. The lee
turer cited facts which the organized
labor movement had brought Into the
limelight long ago. He pointed out
that the Japanese control the salmon
fishing and the Chinese the canning.
That the manufacture of shingles is
largely in the hands of Orientals who
were also entering the logging and
lumber industries. That Chinese are
controlling the market gardening and
Orientals are fast going into the
mixed farming and fruit Industries;
not as wage-workers but as owners of
farms ln competition with white farmers. This was his solution. He
suggested "federal regulation prohibiting Immigration where any race ln
any province already exceeded two
per cent, of the population of that
province. BrltlBh Columbia has a
population of 460,000. Out ot that
number 25,000 are Chinese, 10,000
Japanese and 3,200 Hindoos, leaving a
white population of 411,800. Two per
cent, of that number Is 8236. So each
of the three races, the Japanese, the
Chinese and the Hindoos would be
allowed to come in to the extent of
8236 for each race, making a total of
24,708 of an Oriental population, and
13,492 less than at present. In a
word just enough to be a menace to
wage workers In urban Industries and
agriculture, but not so many as would
cause them to overflow Into the ranks
of owners and employers.
*   #   *
Very nice. And no doubt they'd
like the workers to pull their chestnuts out of the fire ln return for the
privilege of getting burnt. The farmers of this province have been only
too glad to hire Orientals to work on
their farms because the labor was
cheap and have had no use for white
men who wanted a white man's wages.
Now the Oriental has taken a page
out of his master's book and Is going
into the farming and fruitgrowing In
dustries on his own account, and the
pinch of competition Is catching his
former exploiter. The farmer has his
troubles. Land sharks held him up
ln the first place for the price of his
land. The railway companies hold
him up all the time for transporting
the products of his land and now the
Oriental comes along to add to his
troubles. Incidentally the farmers of
British Columbia are the chief supporters of the McBride government.
Maybe It's because they have a con
vlction that the liberals would serve
them Just as bad lt not worse. Anyhow they are entitled to no sympathy
from the wage-workers. All they want
Is to buy labor at yellow man's price
and Bell the products of that labor to
white men at white man's price. Let
'em stew ln their own fat.
WIL80N, THE MEDIOCRITY
Wilson said 'Boo" to Huerta, who
then said, "Boo yourself." If Wilson
had been a big man, he would have
laughed, for he could afford to do it,
Just as a mastiff dog can afford to
bark with Joyful ridicule at the Ill-
tempered yappings of a dyspeptic terrier. But this posing blubber baby of
the American capitalists did what
most scurvy politicians who take
themselves for statesmen because they
are the chosen henchmen of flnanclal
crooks would do. He took himself
seriously, and ln so doing forfeited the
right to be taken seriously by serious
men. He climbed on the top of the
Capitol so that his bletherlngs about
"honor and dignity" might be heard
far enough to prove to his masters
what a faithful servant he was. At
that very moment a frail old woman
of eighty was lying ln one of his state
prisons for no greater crime than having tried to carry succor and encouragement to the striking miners' wives
and children who were being driven
from their flimsy canvas shelters to
face the rigors of frost and snow. But
he was too busy listening to the Instructions of his masters to bother.
Piteous appeals were reaching him
every hour to exercise his great personal and official powers to prevent
further outrages and bloodshed, and lt
Ib as sure as the sun ln heaven that
if he had been a big enough man to
put common humanity first and tell
his vampire masters to go to hell he
could have prevented tbe terrible
slaughter of helpless women and babies ln Colorado. He had the chance
of his life to stand out ln the history
of his country head and shoulders
above the mean-souled multitude of
human mediocrities around him. But
he either had not the Imagination to
grasp his glorious opportunity of doing a really great action, or else he
deliberately allowed It to pass by for
lack of that calibre ln his personality
which would have handed hln name to
posterity as A MAN who had dared
and defied the carrion of American
politics rather than sacrifice his self-
respect in face of the desperate appeals for help which he had power
to give but was not big enough to
render. His epitaph should be: "Here
lies a president who might have been
A MAN. Learning made him clever,
wealth made him powerful, but politics
made him a poltroon."
THE NEW BOGIE
The   Calgary   News-Telegram and
the Kamloops Standard are both very
much alarmed at the prospect ot an
amalgamation of force* by tbe rallwaymen, the miners, and the transport workers ln Oreat Britain. They
describe the proposal as syndicalism,
which Is likely to "ruin the country"
and which "must be put down wtth a
strong hand."
Speaking of the "strong hand"
method. In South Africa a tew
months ago—well, all right, we won't
Botha about that Just now. But,
really, the editorial capacity of those
two journals should lend Itself to the
task ot acquiring a correct knowledge
of what syndicalism means. The very
term syndicalism is becoming the
great bogle-word of semi-informed
editors and scare-mongerlng journalists, who flourish by the Illiteracy of
the benighted mob who have neither
the intelligence nor the energy to in
quire tor themselves. The word Itself
Is derived from the French term
"Byndlcat," meaning an organization
of working men of a very militant
type of labor unionism. As advocated
ln Great Britain, syndicalism means
that all the workers ln an Industry
should be organized for the purpose
of taking possession of all the agencies of production used ln that Industry, and operating It for the benefit
of themselves. The mines would belong to the miners, the railways to
the rallwaymen, and so on. A central legislative body, like parliament,
with administrative functions Ib no
part of the syndicalist idea of things.
But at least two ot the unions named
—the miners and the rallwaymen—
believe ln seeking to Improve their
status by political methods, and have
spent large Bums of money to elect
rallwaymen and miners to parliament. The step they now propose to
take is not syndicalism but Industrial
unionism, which Ib a very different
thing to those who understand, those
who don't should either take steps to
Inform themselves or cease to advertise their Inefficiency to the world at
large as in the case of our two contemporaries.
THE PORTUGESE CONGRESS
The fact that a trades union congress has been held ln Portugal recently, Is a sign tbat even the most
backward countries of Europe are beginning to awaken. Portugal has, during the last half century, given many
brilliant thinkers and writers to the
European labor movement, but there
has not, until now, been any general
and organized sign of advancement.
Spasmodic revolts of the workers have
taken place from time to time In various parts of the country, due to desperation born of conditions replete
with every humiliation. Portugal, like
all the Latin countries, has been chiefly notable for priestcraft and Illiteracy
—which invariably go together. Such
primary education as there Is, Ib regulated by law of 1844, and children between the ages of 7 and 16 are expected to attend school if there Ib one
within a mile of their homes. But
It Is notorious that the law has never
been enforced and education has been
ln consequence but scanty. The pro-
portion of the people unable to read
and write was 82.1 per cent, ln 1878,
79.2 In 1890, and 78.6 in 1900. After
making allowance for the richer
classes, who would receive primary
education'as a matter of course, the
lamentable condition of the proletariat
becomes obvlouB. Wherever Ignorance
is most prevalent there the taak of
rousing and organizing tho workers is
the most difficult, and it is little wonder that those who have attempted
the work In Portugal have met with
some of their worst opposition from
the workers themselves. But lt Is evident from this congress that the country Is slowly awakening from the lethargy of Ignorance to take Its part
and place ln the labor movement of
the world.
WHITE LABOR FOR CANNERIES
The local press calls publlo atten
tlon to the fact that 75 per cent, less
Chinamen will be employed ln the
salmon canning Industry this year.
Cans are to be made and filled this
year by white men. Juat so, but
tarry thee a moment, gentle reader;
don't Imagine the packers' association Intend to pay more for their labor this year. This Is no bursting of
the floodgates of generosity, but Juit
a "business Is business" decision,
based on the obvious facts of the labor market. Last year It paid the
canners to bring Scotch girls out from
their "aln countree" to take the place
of Chinamen, because the girls were
cheaper, and, according to the manager of the canneries, more docile.
ThlB year they don't need to send
anywhere to get white men willing
to work for Chinamen's wages ln the
canneries. The streets and homes of
Vancouver and Vlotoria contain hundreds—aye, thousands—of men only
too glad to work day and night for
the 460 per month which a Chinaman
makes during the canning season.
White immigration bids fair to solve
the "yellow peril" by making lt not
worth a Chinaman's while to come to
British Columbia.
A flye-cent hot lunch joint has bees
opened In Victoria, and according to
all report is doing a roaring trade. As
a "sign of the times" lt testifies more
than a volume of statistics to the
amount of genuine poverty and destitution which prevails among the workers In the capital city.
Soldiers went on Btrike ln the military camp at Wellington, New Zealand, last Monday, because the food
and accommodation were bad. The
authorities ordered the mounted police
to sail ln and wallop tbem, which they
at once did. Their experience will
teach them what lt feels like to be a
striker receiving the tender ministrations of a mounted policeman with a
club.
Nanaimo wants a new city hall. It
needs other things, too. The grand
jury lu connection with the spring assizes, describes the city court house
and Jail as "absolutely unfit for the
various purposes for which it Is used."
The cells at the police jail are "such
sb would not be allowed for one day
In any other city." In addition lt
needs a city council with a few Ideas
beyond those of real estate sharks,
lt also needs a real newspaper. Beyond that It's alright for some things.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention In January. Executive oBcers, 1114-11: President, A. Watchman: vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. McEwen, Oeo. Hardy, J.
W. Gray, H. Kundson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. g.
Wells, Box mi, Victoria, B. C.
NSW WESTMINSTER, B.O.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every seeond
and fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labor
Hall. President, D. s. Cameron; flnanclal
aeeretary, H. Olbb: genera! secretary, W.
E. Maiden. P. O. Box 114. The public Is
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STBAMSTTTERS LO-
. %* _*?!-•*•!" every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7.10 p.m. President, D. Webster; secretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box HI, New
Westminster, B. C.
BnITBD BROTHERHOOD d* CAR-
penters, Local Union No. lilt—Meets
every Monday, I p. m„ Labor Temple,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh street.
Preeldent, M. C. Sohmendt; secretary, A.
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westmtn-
eter, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 714—MEETS ffi
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
corner Seventh etret and Royal avenue,
every seeond Sunday of each month, at
1.10 p. ra. President, F. S. Hunt: secre-
fary. F. W. Jameson.   Visiting brothers
VICTORIA, B. O.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meete flnt and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 781 Johnston street,
at I p. m. President, George Dykeman;
lecretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box III,
Victoria, B. C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLEI MINE.RB' UNION, No. iee*
Western Federation of ISkiers—MeeU
Sunday evening. In Union Hall. President, Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllloneuvl, Klmberley, B. C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LtJOAL
No. 1311, U. H. W. of A.-Meets Wednetday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan McKen-
ile, Ladytmlth, B.C.
NANAIMO LOOAL UNION U. M. W. of
A.—Meets every Monday at 7.10 p. m.
In the Athletic Club, Chapel street.   Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No.
. Jill, U. M. W. of A.-Meets every
Bunday 7 p.m. In U. H. W. of A. hall.
President, Jot. Naylor; seoretary, Janet
Smith, Box 14, Cumberland, B.C.
TRAIL MILL AND 6MELTERMENS
Union, No. IH, W. F. ot M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.10 p.m. Preildent,
F. W. Perrln; secretary, Frank Camp-
bell, Box II, Trail, B, C
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Weitern Federation of Miners—Meets
every Saturday In the Miners' Union
hall. Addreet all communications to the
SecreUry, Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
DEMOCRATIC PARTY-Publle meetings la Colonial Theatre, corner Granville
and Dunsmuir Streets, Sunday evenings.
Secretary, J. Adams, Room 114 Labor
Temple.	
All was quiet ln Nanalmo last Friday, ln spite of the Inflammatory efforts of the Herald during the previous
part of the week.
The Victoria militiaman who was
fined $5 last week for not attending
drill now knows he's "got to" whether
he likes or not. Some more of that
and some more special scab protection
duty will help recruiting wonderfully.
The "yellow" streak In the city council did not take a very long vacation.
Principle may be all very well, but a
cheap bunch will ditch tt any time for
cheapness.  Long live Gradgrind!
PHONE SEYMOUR MM
(A TRUST COMPANY)
Some Folks Pay for
Results —and Get Experience.
Our Clients Oet Results From Our Experience.
PR0POnYT(WW«JEDv
AGREEMENTS,   --*
BOUGHT an*,
COLLECTED^
Short.
Loiuvti
Mfcde-j
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL —
MeeU tint and ttlrd Thursday*.
Bxteutlv* board: W. B. Walker, president: J..H. MoVety, vlet-pratldent: (Je*.
Bartley, general secreUry, IM Labor
Temple; Miss H. Gutttridgt, trauunr;
Miss P. Brisbane, autittlelan: sergeant-
it-arms, John Sully; 0. Curnook, T.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustee*.
LABOR   TBMPLB   COMPANY,   LTD.—
Dlreetors:    Fred A. Hoover. J. H.
Jamea Brown, Edward Lothian,
McVety. J
James Cat
hune. Campbell, J. W. Wllklntoi, R. P.
Mttlpltct, Jobs MeMlllan, Murdoch McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Meats-
Ing director. J. H. MoVety. Boom 111.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUN-
> OIL—Meeu lad Monday In month.
Preeldent, Ok. Mowat; seoretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box II.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meeU seoond and fourth Thursday of
eaoh month, I p. m. Secretary, J. Blt-
S?nv Ml Hornby street; business agent,
H. 3. McEwen,.room 101. Looal 117 meet*
Snt and third Monday of eaeh month,
and Looal 2147 meeU flnt and third
Tuesday of each month,
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO-'
  OAL No. 41—MeeU seoond and fourth Saturdays, 7.11 p.m. President,
H. O. Leeworthy; corresponding eecretary, R. J.
Adams; business agent, J,
Black, Room IM,  Labor
 Temple.       	
BARBERS'   LOCAL,   NO.   ill—MEETS
&ni;.,!!5,l.',"n^ J- w- Oretn; recorder, O.
ff 2"fl!lL•eoretary-bualnees „,„,; 0-
^^."iWJ.WB--^* ^b" Temple.
Hours: 11 to 1; I to f p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. I7I.-OF-
«... . V"" !•' '•a*" Ttmplt. Meet*
flrst Sunday of each month. President
F. F. Lavlgne: flnanolal secretary, Gas*
W. Curnook, Room IMi UbM, TemnhT^
UKICKLAYEHS' AND MASONS'. NO.' i
» „*""*"eo8 6veI!'.ls' o"*1 'rd Tuesday,
kE|m,V Bo*™ 107. President, James
"""'ett; corresponding secretary. W S
nagnall. Box 53; flnanclal seSSarfc F
SuifrS ___[ Bi"""' W' S' H
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION No'
US-Meets third Tueeday"8even"
WJ" rM)E..m' L*b<>r Temple. PrteC-
dent, F. J. Milne; vice-president, Wm
Bushman; eecretary, Oeorge Mowat, 111
Perry, 111! Tenth avenue out.
Brotherhood of boiler makers
and Iron Ship Builders and Helper*
of America, Vancouver Lodge No" lil-
"wu SrsF and third Mondaya, i i m
President, F. Barolay, 888 CoWhrra lait
secretary. A. Fraser, nil HoweietrmL '
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 117-Heet*
_Srst Tuesday each month,. I pTm.
President, Walter Hoeklne; vlce-prosl-
dent. F. J. Brandt: ttcretary, RobsrtJ.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson. '
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Cnlon-Meeti flnt Friday In eaoh
month, 1:10 n.m., Ubor Temple. tr.£
Walker, busfnes representative. OIci:
R»m JM, Ubor Temple. Houn: I a.m.
to lt.lt; i p.m. to 2.10 and I p.m. to I.M
p.m. Competent help furnished on thort
notlee.   Phone Sey. 1414.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
Ill—Meets Room 101 every Monday
I p. m. Prejldent, Dave Fink: vlee-pretl-
dent, M. Sander; recording eecretary,
Roy Elgar. Labor Temple; flnanolal eto-
retary and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 117, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.... !'!. (Tnslde Menl-Meete flnt and
third Mondays of each month. Room IM,
I p.m. President, H. P. McCoy; recording secretary, Oeo. Alben; business
agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room MT.
LONOSHOREMBNS'  international*
ASSOCIATION,    No.    Ilxll—Meet*
every   Friday   evening,   141   Alexander
etreet, Preeldent, 8. J. Kelly; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS, NO. MI-ltBBTS 8*3-
ond and fourth Fridays, I p. m.
Preeldent, A. R. Towler: recording secretary, f. Brookes; flnanolal aeeretary, J. H.
McVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local III, I.A.T.S.E.—Meete every eecond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, I p. m. Preildent, A. o. Hansen;
secretary-treasurer, O. R. Hamilton: business agent, H. I. Hugg.   OBlce, Room 100,
Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey, gjdj,	
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.—
Meets eecond Sunday of each month,
roomo 29-30, Williams Building, 413 Granville street. President, J. Bowyer: vice-
Bresident, F, English: secretary, H. J.
raefleld: treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTER:
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. II-
Meeta first and third Wedneeday, O'Brien
Hall. S p.m. President, O. Dean: oon-es-
pondlng secretary. F. Sumpter; flnanolal
secretary. D. Scott; treaeurer, I. Tyson:
business agent.   Joe   Hampton.    Phone
Sey.1514.	
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, 1.00
p. m. President, J. Marshall: corresponding seoretary. Wm. Rowan. Box 104T: fln-
anclal secretary, K. McKenzle.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 181-Meets every
Thunday, 7.30 p.m. President, Skene
Thomson; flnanolal secretary, J. Freckelton, 111 Seymour street: recording seoretary. Qeorge Powell, 1330 Fourth Ave..
west. Business agent, James Train, room
303. Labor Temple.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYPE
... .er!' t,.n.lon.' No- "■ •>' Vancouver and
Victoria—Meete second Wednesday of
eaeh month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. President, Chaa. Bayley: recording seoretary,
Chris Homewood, 248 13th Avenue East.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. Ill
—Meets Labor Temple, eecond fourth
Wednesdays at I p.m., and flrst and
third Wednesdays, I p.m. President,
Ad*J1 Taylor; reoordlnr secretary, Albert
V. Lofting. 1181 Trinity stnet, phone,
Highland 1671: flnanolal secretary, Fred.
A. Hoover, 1401 Clark Drive.
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 817—Meeta every Wednesday
I p. m., room 204, Labor Temple. Flnan-
clal secretary, E. Prendergaat, room 111.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN.
ternatlonal), Local No. 171-Meetlngs
held flnt Tuesday In eaeh month, I p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording secretary, c. MoDonald, Box E0I; flnanolal
secretary, L. Wakley, P. O. Box 803.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Looal No. Ill-Meets seeond Sunday
of eaeh month at Room M4, Labor Temple. President, H. Spean; recording secretary, Ota. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. III-
- Hsft*. J««J Sunday eaeh month, I
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vice-
president, W. 8. Mttsgtr, secretary-
tretsurer, R. H. Neelands, P. O. Box ft.
SAfETY DEPOSIT
SOXES FOR. RENT
DOW, FRASER ft CO., Ltd.
S17-821  Camblt  Strut; 2S13   Main
Strut, (bttw«n 7th and 8th Av-m.)
Vancouvtr, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, 8. C.
Clote at 1 o'clock Saturday.
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1131.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In ,1840.
Paid-up Capital     -     14,111,111.11
Reserve Fund    -    -    3,017,210.00
-Head Offlee ln Canada:
ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE - Gm.nl Maaanr
SAVINGS  DEPARTMENT AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
AceounU on whloh Interest Is allowed from date of deposit.
Open a Savings Account and add
te It every pay dty.
Dnfu and Money Orden sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfny, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
J. R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRI8DALE BRANCH
D. Nell, Managtr.
The Allied Printing Trades
of the City of Vancouver, respectfully request
Merchtntt,    Manufacturer!,   Lawyer.,   Fraternal   Societies,   Clubs,
Unloni, Etc., to htvt tht
UNION LABEL
Put on their Printing, euoh at Clr-
culars, Briefs, Records, Books,
Posters. It le a guarantee of superior workmanship. This labal Is
endonsd by all tradea and labor
unions ln Vancauver and vicinity.
VANCOUVER ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
F. R. Fleming, Seoretary,
Room IIS Ltbor Ttmplt
PATENTS
Trtdt Mark*, Dtelgne, Copyright..
FRTHBRSTONHAUQH  * CO.
The Ol* Ittabllthtd Firm of
PATINT ATTORNEY!
IMS Rigtrt SM*., Onnvlllt Street
City.  Phoni Stymour I7M.
s^w^-rcittij^a
Union
MADE
Bwr
Me
AND
Porter
Or America *Q*r
t_________—^*" IWOAT.. MAY 8, 1»14.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
A WORD TO THE UNION MAN
The Union Label should atand tor quality ot material, nt sad make-up
ot garment, a* well as th* sanitary condition* ot a factory,
wage* paid, eto. i
A copy of this guarantee goes -wit]*, every garment
. manufactured by ns,
^rXftt^
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturer* ot
MAO'S MOOAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIRTS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THR MASTER SHIRT
1176 Homer St., Vancouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831-
This garment ts guaranteed a* to workmanship, Quality of material,
fullness of slse, buttons securely fastened, buttonholes well made.
Anyone wearing one of our garment! and finding It defective will do
u* a favor by either returning It to hla dealer or mailing It to ut to be
eschanged tor another.
All our garmenu bear thi labtl of tht
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OF AMERICA.
Tou are invited to vlilt our faotory.
WM. J. MoMASTER ft SONS, LTD.
Per Jas. A. McMaster,
Managing Director.
JAMES STARK __t
Mm* Bean, siso u. a SiS* sua
Iff ABBOT* AJTO (ItmmSTiTi BaluSay SlSS U k •«• »m
THB STORB THAT SERVES TOU WELL
WINDOW SHADES
PEERLESS WINDOW SHADES AT ONE-THIRD OFF—We make
to your special measurements; quality 1* naturally superior to regular stock sizes. Your choice trom department patterns. We use only
Hartshorn spring rollers. This Is a great opportunity. It will save
you money and a lot of time.
60c shade* for  ,40c
Regular SOo shade* for  40*
LINOLEUM
THIS POR THE WIFE
Scruh Soon no more. To save time Is to lengthen life. Use
LINOLEUM on your door.
A room 6x8 covered at a cost of 42.40
A room 6 x 10 covered at a cost of  .12.18
A room 8 x 12 covered at a cost of 44.80
A room I x 12 covered at a cost of 45.40
A room 12 x 12 covered at a cost of   47.20
—Second Floor.
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT  SALE OF  BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Man's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.05
Hen's Shoes, Regular $6.00, for   $3.46
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.60, for $2.95
SEE THE WINDOWS
PRANK NEWTON
We keep the largest and most
complete lln* of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
price* which cannot be duplicated.
Everything I* to he found htre.
HENRY D. RAE
Canada's Snap Speclalltt
     104 ind 104 CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE   STORE   IS  THE   SPOT   POR
OOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Keep the Children Healthy
by tending them out ln the (rtih air then Sne dayt. There's nothing better for keeping them exercised than wheeled goodi.
Our atock ot WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAGONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAGONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, ll eaally the finest and mott comprehensive In the
olty and the prlcea are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
Mi HASTINGS STREET WIST VANCOUVER, B.C.
BIST IN THI WIST ISTABLISHID IN*
CVQTFMQ   Scarry everything
JlsJl LmtlllkJ        for the office
The most successful business men sure the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Duntmulr Strut Phone Exchange Say. 3526-3527
MINERS'WAGES
ALASKA ARE NOT
APCM
All the Camp Iniquities of
B. C. Introduced and
Then Some
No Hope of Betterment By
Jumping "North" In
Pursuit of Job
4.00
3.00
5.00
3.00
"Sell Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 GrsBvill* St., Pisa* 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
The Federatlonist has received
many Inquiries ot late as to conditions ln the metalliferous mining
camps of Alaska. A correspondent In
Douglas sends the following wage
scale and comment:
"In answer to your communication
regarding scale of wages ln this
camp can say that this Is a cheap
camp and miners would gain nothing
by coming here from British Columbia.
"The following Is ahout the standard scale, with some variations:
Machine miners   13.60
Shaftmen      4.60
Carpenters     5.00
Helpers     3.26
Holstmen   $3.60 to   4.00
Mlllmen   (3 to
Muckers  	
Blacksmiths  44 to
Surface laborers 	
Board and room to be deduoted amounts to about one dollar per day,
and ln some instances more. Hospital fee, $1.60. Besides that the Tread-
well company charges one dollar per
month for club fee.
"There are now in Juneau at least
five hundred Idle men, and more are
coming ln on every steamer, so we
wll lhave an over supply as usual.
"This Is the dumping ground from
Seattle and we get all kinds of "miners" here. But that is the kind that
the companies want. Would not advise anyone to come here."
From Ketchikan the story Ib' similar:
"In reply to your letter we will
say that the wage scale for this district Is as follows:
"Hammermen, topmen and muckers, (3.60 per day.
''Machlnemen, (4 per day, for sloping or drifting, and 44.60 per day for
raising or sinking ln shaft or winch.
"Hammermen ln shafts receive $4
per day. Blacksmiths' receive 15 per
day. Tlmbermen, (4 per day. Since
January 1, 1913, the eight-hour law
has been in force, so now all the
mines are working eight-hour shifts.
Common labor ln this vicinity receives
40c. per hour and board themselves.
White men working around the canneries during the fishing season receive 475 per month. The Qranby
people are taklnjr' over several properties in this district, and tbe Impression here, from the way tbey are
acting Is that they will try to enforce
the wage scale ln voge at Ooose Bay.
MAY DAY AT NANAIMO
A PRONOUNCED SUCCESS
(Continued from Page 3) .
due no doubt to McBride prosperity,
were 'drawn from all parts of the
earth, and when tbey arrive In British Columbia they find that they are
up against similar conditions prevailing In the places they came from.
All these things spell the downfall of
the capitalist class. The government
Is now more set on splitting up the
labor class than lt ts of getting the
toilers out of their misery. ( Applause.)
Joseph Gilbert
Joseph Gilbert, socialist orator, of
Seattle, made an eloquent plea for
the solidarity of labor on the political
field. Last July he went through
Vancouver Island and addressed several meetings arid would talk on Sunday night at the dedication of tbe
new socialist hall on' the Esplanade.
They (the miners) were not alone In
this struggle for freedom. It was going on throughout the world. Mayday was an International holiday and
In this worldwide movement which
Ib celebrated here today, the capitalist class became cowardly and
craven with fear, because It saw Its
downfall approaching. When In Colorado the master class saw an old
lady, over eighty years of age, make
her appearance in their midst, lt became fearful lest she should be a no
means power within the ranks of the
working-class, and so the masters had
Mother Jones put behind bars and
there kept ln a damp dungeon cell.
Behind It all there Is the comedy of
strutting militarism. The speaker admired the spirit of the hoys In the
local corps as lt evinced a devotion
to a common cause doing team work
on a large scale for a whole community.
The Difference
However, their work was one of destruction, while that of the working-
class was one ot construction. Seventy years ago six men of Dorset
petitioned their masters for an Increase ln wages of one shilling a
week. They were arrested and
thrown Into jail. Judge Williams, In
sentencing them to seven years' penal J
servitude ln exile, said that lt was not
for what they have done, but as an
example to others. Now, the working
people of Dorset are erecting a monument to the memory of their honored
dead. The International socialist
party was started about fifty years
ago. Now It has a membership of
fifty million. Were the working people In power politically there would be
no need of recognition of the union,
because they themselves would own
the Jobs. It must be borne In mind
that the working class of today  Is
CHAS. H. MOVER
Re-elected by acclamation as President
of the Western Federation of Miners,
with headquartera at Denver, Colo.
not the working-class of the past, and
as times advance the conditions of
Bociety keep on ever changing. Tblngs
worth having are worth fighting for,
which fact will teach workers the
great responsibilities of administration.   The
Barbaric Brutalities
of war are alwayB brought about
through trouble Instigated by the
autocracy. What are religious and
political liberties to the workers
when they must beg for the privilege
to toll In order to live? Tbe position
of the men and women of Nanalmo In
tbe forefront of this struggle were
likened unto a stag who when driven
at bay was forced to turn on his pursuers for Belt-preservation. "We must
arm ourselves for a common purpose
and make laws to protect us from the
encroachments of the capitalist class.
Our strength Ilea at the ballot-box.
These military displays cannot and
will not he tolerated for long by a
free people. Already the masters are
skulking behind masked batterleB.
Imagine this vision and you'll never
lie down till you have won your rights.
Already the sealed hand of death Is
upon, the private ownership of the
coal mines," said the speaker amidst
great applause.
New Paper
Chairman Foster read a telegram
from 3. K. Johnson of Revelstoke,
B. C, announcing the fact that the
printing plant had been shipped to
Nanalmo for a dally evening paper to
be issued early in May. This paper
will be called the Labor Telegram
and Chris. Pattlnson, late organiser
for the TJ. M. W. of A., will be editor.
He also announced that Tom Cowler
and A. Monaldl had just been released
from the Okalla prison, having served
a six months' term of Imprisonment.
(Applause.) He hoped that the men
and women would not become Impatient at the way matters were progressing. It was common knowledge
that negotiations had been opened up
for a settlement of the strike. Up to
the present time these negotiations
have not been broken off. In any
event the miners cannot lose anything
on the island. It may be that ln the
end a few will have to leave but later
on similar troubles would arise. The
International union was going to organize the whole of Vancouver Island
—no matter how long lt will take or
what It will cost. The past policy of
passive resistance adhered to by the
miners' officials, while remaining
strictly within the law, Is going to be
changed to one on a
More Aggrettlve
line of action. Organized labor of the
province will be given a chance to
say whether they are content with the
administration of the powers that be.
They were fully determined, however,
to keep within the requirements of the
law and outside the jail. It were well
to allow their opponents to put the
rope around their own necks and
watch them do their own hanging. He
reminded his hearers that every conceivable opportunity would be taken
by the authorities to provide an excuse for the display of force that day.
"Don't give them a chance, but put
up with any little Indignities In the
meantime."   (Applause.)
"Bower's Seventy-Tws"
James S. Robertson was called upon
to lead the singing of "Bowser's
Seventy-Twa," and was loudly applauded, the audience joining In the
choruB, after which the Finnish silver
cornet band ot Ladysmlth played the
"Marseillaise."
All prizes were   given   as money
PAOBJITt
GRAND FUMY
CELEBRATION AT
HEM
Under Auspices of Miners-
Union—Monster Parade Held
President Flyssik Speaks—
Sports and Dancing—A
Gay Day
[Special to The Federatlonist]
CUMBERLAND, B. C, Hay 7 —
The flrst of May was celebrated here
under the auspice* of the United
Mine Workers of America. The
weather was Ideal tor the occasion
and the whole affair was a big success. The day's festivities, which
were held ln the city park, were
opened with a speech by M. J. Fly-
silk, president of district No. 10,
U. M. W. of A., after which adjournment was taken for lunch. In the
morning a monster parade was held,
made up ot members of the union and
their friends. The manly appearance
of the paraders was highly commended by the onlookers, the class
ot workers that Sir Richard McBride
Bays is wanted ln British Columbia,
but then what Is he doing for them?
At one o'clock the sports commenced,
the very lengthy list of which waa not
finished till late' In the evening. The
dance ln the miners' hall terminated
the day's doings. The sports committee wish to thank the tradesmen and
general public tor their support ln
making the first of May such a huge
success as It was. Everybody seems
none the worse for the lengthy strike.
A. Toseland was the secretary and D.
Marcbettl the treasurer of the celebration committee, and they, together
wtth the large committee, worked
faithfully and hard and deserve the
thanks of all for their energetic labors
to mske the day's entertainment so
enjoyable.
LOCALS
values.
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Picture* and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
Prize Winner*
1. Girls' race, 6 years and under, 50
yards—First prize value $1.60; second, tl; third, 50 cents—1, M. Dobin-
son; 2, O. Thompson; 3, A. Reld.
2. Girls' race, 6 years to 9, 60 ydB.—
First, |1.50; second, $1; third, 50
cents—I, F. Callow; 2, S. Steele; 3,
M. Bllton.
3. Girls' race, 9 years to 12, 75 yds.
—First, $2; second, $1.50; third, 11.—:
1, A. Carr; 2, O. Hendrickson; 3, A.
Griffiths,
4. Girls' race, 12 years to 15, 100
yards—First, $2; second, $1.60; third,
$1.-1, L. Ellis; 2, E. Little; 3, M.
Sheppard.
5. Boys' race, 6 years and under, 50
yards—First prize, $1.50; second, $1;
third, 50 cents.—1, T. Carrol; 2, W.
Mohn; 3, G. Gllmore.
6. Boys' race, 6 years to 9, 60 yards
—First, $1.50; second, $1; third, 50
cents—1, J. Frizzle; 2, W. McNeil; 3,
\V. Hendrickson.
7. Boys' race, 9 years to 12, 76 yds.—
First, $2; second, $1.50; third, $1.-1,
Pete August; 2, W. Johnson; 3, J.
Stewart.
8. Boys' race, 12 years to 15, 100
yards—First, $2; second, $1.50; third,
$1.-1, P. August; 2, H. Mlkola; 3, A.
Tokka.
9. Men's race, 100 yards—First, $10;
second, $5.-1, Zhoyovsky; 2, Duffy.
10. Men's race, 220 yards—First, $7:
second, $5.-1, T. Gomm; 2, T. Moore.
11. Men's race, half mile—First $7;
second, $5.-1, W. Banner; 2, J. Farmer.
12. Men's race, one mile—First, $7;
second, $5.-1, J. Farmer; 2, W. Banner.
13. Old men's race, 50 years and up
—First, box of cigars; second, $1.50.
—1, J. Carson; 2, M. Mlkola.
14. Obstacle race, boys—First, $2;
second, $1.50; third, $1.-1, P. August;
2, M. Mlkola; 3, J. Steward.
16. Obstacle race, men—First, $3;
second, $2.-1, W. White; 2, —Southern.
16. Cycle race, men, two miles—
First, $6; second, $3.-1, J. Mairs; 2,
*  Young.
17. Slow cycle race, men, one lap,
$3; second, $2.-1, J. Young; 2, T.
Moore.
Wm. Johnson, maintenance of way
man, has left North Vancouver for
Alaska.
J. W. Proctor, compositor, has returned to the city, after a sojourn in
the Fraser valley.
H. J. McEwen, carpenter, has resigned the secretaryship of the business agents' board.
John McGlllivray, carpenter, has
returned to this city from Wetaskl-
win, Alta., after an absence of two
years.
Wm. T. McNeil, a well-known local
teamster, has left for Alaska, where
he Intends to follow railway construction work.
Fred. Fowler, ot the World staff,
left this week for a six months' tour
ln Great Britain and on the continent.
He is accompanied by Mrs. Fowler.
J. L. Martin, of Victoria, states that
the Capital City Is quiet In more ways
than one. It Is quiet industrially, but
politically there are rumblings of discontent.
The local Improvement plan to
widen Fourth avenue, between Qranvllle and Alma streets, has passed tbe
court of revision of the city council.
This means an expenditure of $164,-
921, and the work will start shortly.
The term ot payments of the assessments was extended from five to
forty years.
Taffy," a well-known character
around Carrall street, attended the
Arena the other afternoon to hear
Pastor Russell's Btory through the
phonograph. Evidently he thought
the pastor was there ln person, because he stood up and said, "Mister,
you're crazy; you don't know what yer
talkln' about" He was promptly
ejected from the building.
18.. Football match, five a side-
First, $15; second, $10.-1, Northfleld;
2, Nanaimo Athletics.
19. Tug-of-war, seven men on each
Bide—First, $14; second, $7.-1, Chase
River; 2, Harrol's team.
20. Boxing contest, In barrels—First
$3.50; second, $2.-1, H. Thompson;
2, — Meredith.
21. Married ladles' race—First, 3;
second, $2; third, $1.-1, Mrs. Plellle;
2, Mrs. Rose; 3, Mrs. Philip.
Young ladles' race, 16 years and
over—First, $2.60; Becond, $1.60.-1,
Miss A. Russell; 2, Miss Beasoa.
23. First aid demonstration—Prize
to be fixed later.—1, Ladysmlth, No.
1; 2, Ladysmlth, No. 2.
24. U. M. W. of A. officers' race.—1,
R. Foster; 2, J. Domollc; 3, J. Rathlef;
4, D. Irvine.
25. Physical drill demonstration—
By Chase river party.
Tht Committees
The success of the day's doings
were wholly due to the activities of
the different committees, who spared
no efforts on their part, under such
trying circumstances, to make the
Nanalmo Mayday celebration one of
the very best from an Industrialist's
point of view ever pulled off In British Columbia. The following Is a
complete list of the committees:
Central Committee.—Nanalmo — J.
Rathlef (chairman), Wm. Watson
(secretary), J. Cochrane (treasurer),
C. Pattlnson, .fumes Cook, T. J.
Shenton, James Nelson, Tom Tuck.
Extension—A. Qreenwell, J. Luckle.
Ladysmlth—T, Docherty. South
Wellington—W. Richards. Chase
River—G. Wilson.
Collecting Committee — Messrs.
Spowart, Moffat, J. Todd, J. English,
J, Nlmmo, Balnbrldge, Young, Dean.
Field sports committee — Messrs.
Hayton, Metro, Bowater, Todd, Cook,
Klrkpatrlck, Valley, Spowart, Morgan.
Transportation committee — Messrs
Shenton, Foster, Cochrane, Green-
well, Wilson.
Refreshments committee — O.
Young, J. Nlmmo, Thompson, Moffat,
H. Jorth, J. Nelson, T. Moffat, F.
Carrol, Armstrong, Kelly, J. English,
and Ladles Auxiliary.
Gate committee — Messrs. Dean,
Balnbrldge, Moffat, Fearon.
Racing committee—Messrs. 0. Johnston, J. L. Mackay, J. Campbell, W.
Flockhart, O. Hoggan.
Prize committee—Mesars. Todd,
Young Balnbrldge, Tuck, Nelson (seoretary).
PRETTY DRESSES FOR
-*■       **-«———n « —^^^—aa-
WOMEN AT $20.00
These come in art excellent range of dainty Summer-like
materials, and depict styles such as will be in high favor
the Summer season. We invite your special attention
to these new models today. Note:
A pretty dress of pale blue cotton crepe, is made with a
graduated tunic. The soft kimona bodice has a vest of
white net and is finished with a girdle and sash of black
satin ribbon, which gives a very pleasing effect—120.00.
A simple and practical dress of cotton crepe is in white
with a soft draped skirt, which is slit and caught up
with small crochet ornaments, The only trimming on
the bodice is in the form of heavy embroidery in rich
Bulgarian colors—$20.00.
575 Granville Street     Vancouver. B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
Star* Houra MO to I p.m.
Saturdays Include*
HOMEOPATH1STS
W* earry s full stock *f
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US SUPPLY YOU
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Expreae 8.B. "Ttutenle" (Twin Screw Steamera) 8.S. "Canada"
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Th«di: •' 6vy, MARK
** ^-is'- -
Braid's
Best
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:i,*H HHAII) li <-°
Did You Get Youn
Thit Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE |
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA FOR St
YEARS AND HAVE NEVE? EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OP
WHITE
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SOAP
W. J. PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY... MAT 8, UI
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reaaon our bualneaa la Increaaln* la due to tha taet that our bual-
nass policy la correct. We adopted the policy of Informing the public
through the medium of the preaa aa to what our chargea would ba for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse. Carriage for Family, Care of Remalna,
Wagon Service, and all our personal nrvlce for
$65.00
Complete Funeral
$56.00
L
We are living up to our advertisement to the latter. Thla hat established confidence with the public In ua, and for that reason alone wt art tuc-
cettful, and we Intend to continue at wa are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 1S8
Commodious Chapel Frit to All Patrona
Formerly Ctnttr a Hanna'a Branch
A. C. Millar, Pret. P. H. Orott, Mantgtr
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
-T HE itrike is still on st the
* Queen Mine sn'd Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
AH working men nrged to stay
away until the strike ia settled
Order Tsnir Misers' Usiss
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Beit
Socialist propaganda paper ln
Canada. Price CO cent! per
year; In club* ot tour, 25 east*
tor 40 week*.
Address, COWAN8VILLB, P.Q.
DIXON & MURRAY
oamrmmtama, ata
OWe oaA More Tlttta*.   Oeasial
JobWa*
• oaw aad aatat
City Auction sad Commiiiion Cs.
Cash paid fer houtt* and tultte
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlement!.
ARTHUR  S. BETCHLIY
Smyths an* Oranvllle streets
Auetlonssr Sey Tt
L?
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READING ROOM OPEN
8BVEN DATS A WEEK,
Diseases of Men
W* lnu* s written guarantee
thst ZIT will eur* or your money
Seek.
Differ* from all othtr rem*-
dies.
M«* SS.00, Poet Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUQOISTS
111 Cordova St W.
Vaaoouvor, B. O.
WHEN0RDER1NGASUIT
A paid-up union card entitles
you to all the privilege! of tha
Lahor Temple Club.   Try lt
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRSCTORS AND
SMBALMCRS
Vanoouver—Offloa and Chapel,
Ull Oranvllle St, Phont Sty. HII.
North Vancouver — OSIet and
ohapel, UI Second St B. Phont
111.
theae Ssy. 221
Dsy sr Night
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
S2S Richards St.        Vaacoavtr, S. C.
CENTER &HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 GEORGIA STREET
one block west ot Court House.
Use ot Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors tree to all
Patrons
D.T ANlsklC.il.
Phons Bay. MS
PaHonAChsasI
SSMCnafBtSt.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
VICTORIA RETAIL CLERKS.
The retail store clerks ln Victoria
are trying to get a weekly half-holiday,
and the press of that city has been
deluged with correspondence for and
against the proposition. The main fact
which simmers out of lt all is, that
they have not got a union strong
enough In either numbers or desire to
get lt. These people, like offlce clerks,
have got to light themselves a little
before they will be able to effectually
fight their common enemy. Their chief
malady Is that they don't quite know
what class they belong to. In spite of
the tact that their wages are in most
cases less than an average workman's,
they don't seem to like the Idea of admitting they have anything ln common with him. They have a sort of a
union which was launched for them by
McBride ln company with a choice aggregation of Victoria parsons and real-
estateocracy, but if anyone mentions
the words "trade union" at their meetings they go Into six different kinds of
fits. Tbe leading spirits among them
know what Ib needed, but they admit
that the Innate snobbishness and "superior person" attitude of the majority
of their members practically preclude
the possibility of inducing them to take
such measures as would be likely to
produce tangible results of the kind
they want. The sooner Bertie of the
ribbon counter realizes hts economic
Identity with the navvy who Is digging
the sewer trench outside "our store,'
the sooner he will grow to be a man,
and entitled to wages and working conditions befitting his new status.
ERNEST  MILLS
Re-elected as secretary-treasurer of the
Western   Federation   of    Miners,   with
headquarters at Denver, Colo.
Labor Billiard Tournament
Don't forget the billiard handicap
and tournament to be played off In
the Labor Temple club Monday, May
llth. Cash prizes $10, split up Into
$6, S3 and 11. Drop down to the club
room now and enter your name.
New Labor Dally
About the middle of May the
Nanalmo Labor Telegram, a new
dally newspaper, will Issue Its first
publication. iA labor paper In Nan
almo has been Inevitable, especially
so, when papers of the Herald's stamp
must be contended with. The workers In the military-ridden city have
promised their full support. lt
comes on the field of events at
MINARD'S LINIMENT is the only
Liniment asked for at my store and
the only one we keep for sale.
All the people use it.
HARLIN  PULTON.
Pleasant Bay, C. B.
auspicious time and will be tbe first
dally labor paper ln the dominion of
Canada. Chris. Pattlnson, a member
of the miners' union and late organizer for the U. M. W. of A., will be the
editor. The Federationist wishes Its
new contemporary every success.
STRIKES
During Twelve Tears in
Canada
From an Interesting article, concerning strikes and lock-outs, which
haB just been published by the Canadian Labor board, lt will be observed
that no fewer than 1319 strikes have
been conducted during the last
twelve years (that Is 110 per year).
The number of workers taking part
was 319,880, whilst 9,000,000 working
days were lost. The number of working days lost In 1911 was more than
2,000,000, whilst the wage-earning
population of Canada Is only 1,300,000.
One strike in the Nova Scotia coal
mines In 1909, lasted 22 months, another ln which 7,000 miners in British
Columbia were Involved, lasted eight
months. These two strikes alone
mean a loss of 21,000,000 working
days. Most strikes were conducted
for Increase ln wages or recognition
of the union.
Boilermaker Loses Job and Reason
Thomas Tomllnson, a bollermaker,
of Medicine Hat, was discharged from
the C.'P. R. a tew weeks ago because
he was too old, Last week he was
committed to Ponoka lunatic asylum.
He.—"Do you think obtaining the
vote would make women masculine?"
She.—"Why no. It hasn't had that
effect on you."-
R. G. BUCHANAN & CO.'S STORE
'   :    r*
!
*•■■•«
•• '•
WtkHa
__•
" * •         . -^  Ji- :,-    i!
'-•   ._>;'-•*       "j-
*-"*'   1 & i i. %•"•?!
R. O. Buchanan & Co., 1126 Robson
street, has been established ln business ln this city for many years. This
firm, which is known far and wide
for its reliability and fair dealing,
carries a varied stock of select china
and glassware. They have thirty-five
exclusive stock patterns ln dinner
sets in Martin Limoges china, Theu-
dore Haviland china, Mlnton china,
Spode china, Indian tree patterns
(famous). In these they have the
specimens from original plans. Tbe
splendid display of cut-glass can only
be appreciated when seen. The table
cutlery Is of the very best quality, as
well as the wares for cooking. Their
prices are aB low as can be had In
any part of the city, and their trade
one of the largest. The business of
this house has increased to such an
extent that the store Is always kept
full to overflowing with an ever-ln-
creasing stock to accommodate their
patrons. The general public Is given
courteous treatment with amiable attention from all employees and the
benefit of R. M. Mairs' wide experience In all matters pertaining to the
class of goods mentioned above.
The Buchanan store Is where you get
the best ln goods, service, treatment
and accommodation. The late R. O.
Buchanan established this firm some
fifteen years ago on Main street. In
hts time he was the best known authority on china-ware In Canada, and
many of the patterns he himself
selected are kept in stock. Mrs.
Buchanan Is now the popular raanag-
Buchanan is now the popular manageress while Mr. Mairs is her able
assistant Write for samples and
prices. Delivery of goods Is guaranteed to all parts ot the province.
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to*Dkte Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
AHrscthe Rstes to Permanent
GseiU
COTTINGHAM t BEATTY
Proprietor!
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room. European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.   Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m, 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
FIREPROOF EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C.
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-clsss Grill in Connection
F.   L.   WALLINGFORD,   Manager
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
•V SMOKING THI OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU  HILP YOUR   FELLOW  UNION  MEN  AND   BESIDES, YOU  OBT
THE  VERY  BEST VALUE  POR  YOUR  MONEY
GO W,TH THE B U N CH T0 THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
PENDER HOTEL -^SSSS?-
SIS IH1SS atammt matt Rata Sl.SS per Day and Cp.
CANADA
MILLIONS OF ACRES
OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
/ ■
STHOPU8 OF LAUD LAWS
Six months' residence upon ud cultivation of ths Und in seen of three yews. A bomsstssdsr msy live within nine miles of bis homsstssd on s firm of
tt leut 80 sons solely owned snd oceupied by him or his father, mother, son, daughter, brother or sister.
In csrtsin distriets s homesteader in good standing msy prs-smpt a quarter section alongside bis homestead.   Prioe $3.00 per aore.   Duties—Most
reside six months in eaoh of six years from date of homestead entry (including the time required to ean homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra.
' I ' • ,
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA FRIDAY MAY 8, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
DONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for beautiful garden*, making home aurroundlng* attractive,
with flower*, ehrubbery, shad* and fruit tree*, I* ■ natural human
trait Implanted In th* heart of mm by th* Creator of th* Universe.
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fullest, and
make not only your own life better, but alio that of your fallow citizen who may not havt the opportunities you hive,
Now I* th* time to make your aelectlont, when our prion wtr*
never lower, and our etock never batter to meet th* demanda of th*
cultivated aetthetlc taate*.
In our atock of over $100,000.00, we hav* choice flowering plant*,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental tree* and ahrub* In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for hedge*, ill ilx**; cholc*
•tock of Shad* Tree*, and an Immense atock sf all tho mut approved
varietle* of applet, pein, plume, cherrlee, ind email fruit. Thi litter
(fruit trail) wl in offering it special low prion to cliir thi gnund
for additional itock coming In.
Don't forget we can meet your neede better thin you oin git
from itock grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Umited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West.
'PHONE:  SEYMOUR 8866.
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayvlew 1926
Greenhouiei ind Nurseries it Royi, on B. C. E, Ry. Eburni Line,
ibout two mlln south of city limits. .Phono: Eburni 4*.
EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN
BEDDING PLANTS In Great Variety
LAWN MOWERS AND ROLLERS,
ABOL INSECTICIDE and SPRAYERS
and All Garden Tools
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
8EED8MEN, NUR8ERYMEN AND FLORISTS
723 Robson Street Vancouver, B.C.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORIS IN VANCOUVER
IS Hsstings St.       Phont Sty. NS 401 CnnrlUt St       Phont Sey. Stir
ttt Oranvllle St    Phono Sly. mi
VICTORIA STORE, 111 VIEW ST.
Stlt Avt. tn* Main St.
Phont Fairmont TII.
GREENHOUSES
Vlttorlt, a. e.
Hammond, B. C,
Lon* Dlatanoe Phont IT
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTE
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. C.
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $6.00 Down and $5.00 Psr Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land Bituate In the fertile Bella Coola District, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
SOS Soldta Bnlldla*
IS Saattan stnet laet
TAXCOUTBB, B. O.
Without   obligation,   pleaae  mall  me
particulars of your ten-acre farms.
BY QEORGE BARTLEY
TOO DAMP TO RAISE
TUB ON UU1
ANDSEAISLANDS
Poultry Instructor Cannot
Recommend Richmond
Municipality
The Use of Open Front
Chicken Houses Was
Urged by Him
•-ft   POULTRY
*_m  NOTES
Government poultry instructor H. E.
Upton, gave an Instructive talk before
the Richmond poultry association at
its last meeting held at Cambie, Lulu
Island. Dealing flrst with the different varieties and their qualifications,
he passed on to methods of management. The use of open front poultry
houses was urged. A good spray to
eliminate red mites was made of one
part crude carbolic add to three parts
of kerosene. Better than any exploited
patent lice powder was a preparation
made by pouring on plaster of Paris
one part of crude carbolic acid and
three parts gasoline, and pulverizing
the hardened mixture. "I could not
recommend turkey-raising to Richmond," said Mr. Upton. "The climate
las to damp.
BACK TO THE LAND
Once more tlie flowers shall spring for me,
The meadow lark shall sing for me,
The trees shall whisper peace to me
As they were wont of yore.
The festive skeeters hum for me,
In myriads they will come for me,
"BIzee" they'll sing the while they sting
As oft they did before.
The well, lt will go dry for me,
The little chickens cry for me,
The Are will oft go out while I
Am at some other chore,
No telephone will ring for me,
No postman bring a thing for me,
And never will the trolley car
Oo rushing past my door.
The coal-oil lamp will smoke for me,
Tts chimney oft be broke for me,
And wick oft be forgotten when
We fetch things from the store.
The bread won't always rise for me,
And rain will All the skies for me,
The road will be a middy trap
To hold me as of yore.
But still spring does call me,
A silly calf will bawl for me,
['11 hear tbe cow-bell's tinkle, tinkle
As they did of yore.
And so I'll aay "Good-bye" to you
And though I'll sometimes sigh for you,
t do not think, dear comrades, that
I'll come back any more.
—Or only occasionally.
—Ida Douglas Fearn.
10,000 Watches wanted to clean and
repair. All kinds of watches,
clocks, musical boxes and jewellery put into first-class condition,
all mainsprings and cleaning jobs
guaranteed twelve months, and we
undertake any Jobs. No cure no
pay. Let me give you an estimate
on your repairs.
E. C. APPLEBY,
506 Pender West
corner Pender and Richards. Mail
orders promptly attended to. Don't
throw away that old country watch
—let me see It. I will tell you If
It will work.
TO LET.—Cabin, well furnished,
for two men. Clean; quiet; centre
of olty.   Telephone Sey. 7590.
At the Club-
At the Cafe-
At the Bar-
Ask for
-finer
ON DRAUGHT OR IN THE
BROWN BOTTLE-ON ICE
EVERYWHERE.
AT LIQUOR STORES-SIX
PINTS FOR 50 CENTS AND
THREE QUARTS FOR 50
CENTS.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
Cleanliness Is tbe silver key to success ln the poultry business. It la so
strongly essentia* that, given good
poultry to start with, lt Is nearly all
of It, yet lt Is the last thing many
poultry keepers think necessary at
all.
Do not give ducklings water to
swim In; they do not need It and will
thrive as well without it as with It.
Keep drinking water before them all
the time; a duck has no crop as a hen
has and needs water to wash down
her food. ,
Keep on the best of terms with the
mother turkey hens by tossing them
little treats of small grain, table
scraps, etc., and you will experience
less difficulty with the young turks
when you wish to catch them for
market next fall.
Chickens will eat everything imaginable, no difference how filthy. Feed
your poultry well. Give them good
grain and food and you will find them
disdaining filthy, strange food. They
only eat it when turned out to find
what they can or starve. '
Every month during the winter season the poultry building should be
well supplied with clean, dry straw,
leaves, or litter of some kind into
which the feed is thrown in the morning to keep the hens busy.
Leaving dead chickens around is
the surest way to teach a.cat to catch
live ones—cremate every one as Boon
as found.
Do not put males ln adjoining pens
with only netting between them. Have
a 12-Inch board at the Bottom of each
partition.
The basket of eggs that goes to the
market always brings cash, and the
fowls supply their product every day
in the year when not neglected by the
owners,
Try putting a pinch of copperas in
the watering trough once or twice a
month. Better Btlll, scrub out the
trough and spray thoroughly with a
copperas solution.
Potato peelings, cabbage roots, celery tops and such things are relished
by hens and keep the flock healthy.
In summer, the hens pick up quantities of insects and worms, and this
form of food must be supplied In winter by scraps of meat or cut bone.
Let ub not wait until spring to make
up our minds about wbat we are going
to do in the way of poultry raising.
But ln our planning, let us not neglect
the present work in the poultry yard.
Don't expect ducklings to thrive on
the Bame\ diet as chicks. A study of
a duck's digester and habits will show
that ducklings require soft feed and
plenty of drinking water.
Don't forget that turkeys should live
mainly on protein. The run of the
wheat, buckwheat and corn fields
nearly always kills many promising
birds just when mother thinks her
turkey troubles are about over.
TO
A CAR OF H
THIS WEEK'S PRICES:
Apples
Royal Jenette, No, 1,
ft>
•iM
Royal Jenette, No. 1,
tf
2.00
Ben    Davis,    No.    1,
#
1.TB
Ben    Davis,    No.    2,
@
1.50
Cookers, box 	
9
1.60
Vegetables
Potatoes, sack  .$  .90
9
1.10
Carrots, sack 	
a
.76
Turnips, Back  60
Parsnips, sack 	
9
.76
0
.86
Rhubarb, 1 lbs., Ib	
m
.25
%
Radishes,   per  doz	
.40
Special Hot House
Tomatoes,   lb	
Egg*
Local new laid, dos      (
Wash., new laid, dos      (
Poultry
Voting hens, dos. 110.00
Heavy hens, lb	
Pullets,  dos     9.00
Broilers, doz    6.00
Ducks, doz,   10.00
Feed
Hay,  ton   $14.00
Straw, bale       fl
Oats, ton	
wheat, lon 	
Bran, ton 	
Shorts, ton 	
Beef
T-bone    and    Porterhouse steaks, lb	
Round steak, lb	
Pot roast, lb	
Pork
Legr and loins, lb „ 	
Shoulder, lb	
Chops,  lb	
Lamb
Legs, lb	
Loins, lb	
Fore quarters, lb ..;.
Chops, loin,  lb	
Chops, Ib	
Finest Local Beef.
Best cuts, Ib	
Ribs, lb	
Pot  Roasts,  lb	
Lamb,  legs,  Ib	
Lamb, loins, lb	
Lamb, shoulders, lb	
Pork, legs, lb	
Pork,  loins,   Ib	
Pork, shoulders, lb	
Sausages, lb	
Fresh Pith,
Halibut, lb	
Rnlmon, two lbs
Ling cod, lb	
Rock cod, lb	
Red snapper, Ib	
Soles, lb	
Smelts, two lbs	
Herring, Ib	
Whiting, Ib	
Skate, Tb	
Smoked Fish
Kippers, lb	
Kippers, three lbs	
Bloaters, lb   	
Bloaters, three lbs '
Halibut, Ib	
Filleted cod, lb	
Black cod, two lbs	
Eastern hnddle, 2 lbs	
Kippered Salmon, lb...     .11
Shell Flsh.
Crabs,  two	
Clams, lb	
.28
.26
.22 ii
.25
.10
.10
.10
.10
.25
.05
.10
.10
.10
.26
.10
.25
.16
.16
.25
.26
.16
.25
.06
Poultry Is In good demand.
Rhubarb now selling at $1 a box.
Potatoes aro selling stiff at |22 a
ton.   Prices will go up:
Fresh eggs were two cents higher
this week.
Beddlngout and decorative plants
are plentiful and are good sellers.
A subcommittee on tho central
market site will report to the city
council on Monday night In favor of
erecting a temporary market shed on
Pender street between Cantblo and
Beatty streets—on old hospital site.
Manager McMillan Reports
to City Market
Committee
A Very Successful Mission
Through the Orchard-
Growing Country
At Monday's meeting ot the market committee of the city council,
Market Manager McMillan reported a
very successful mission through the
orchard-growing country of the Okanagan, from which be.returned today. "I travelled from Agassis to Slca-
mouB and down the Okanagan branch
line," he said, "and interviewed the
principal growers, who expressed
keen appreciation of the work of the
Vancouver market We shall have a
carload of fruit daily from the Okanagan during the season, three carloads
coming from Kelowna and other
points, and this will give us all the
fruit we oan handle to advantage."
He added that with the opening of
the Kettle river railroad the Okanagan would have all the fruit trade of
Vancouver.
RETAIL PRICES.
Following are cash prices for delivered staple commodities by local
dealers:
Beef, sirloin steak, best
lb	
Beef, medium, shoulder,
roast, lb ,.  15
9   .25
       0   .18
Veal, roasting piece from
forequarter, lb,   15   9   .20
Mutton, leg roast, lb  17     O    .26
Pork,     fresh,     roasting
piece from ham, lb 22    9   .26
Pork,   salt,   short   cut,
Canadian mess, lb  ....     O   .18
Breakfast bacon, smoked,
best, not sliced   ....     9   .25
Flsh, fresh, good quality,
Salmon, lb      9   .16
Lard, pure leaf, best, Ib      9   .16
Eggs, strictly fresh, dos. ....     9   .30
Eggs, packed, doz.       9   ,26
Milk, delivered, quart	
Butter, dairy, ln tuba, lb.
Butter, creamery, prints,
lb	
Cheese, local,  Canadian,
old, lb.
Cheese, local, Canadian,
new, lb.
O   .35
O    .30
Bread, white, ltt lb. loaf .
Flour, ordinary family,
26 lb. bag.	
Rolled oats, standard, 7
lbs ."	
Rice, good medium "B"
brand  	
Beans, common, dry,
hand picked, lb	
Apples, evaporated, lb.	
Prunes, lb  .._
Tea, black, Ceylon, Pekoe, Souchongs, lb	
Tea, green, Japan, good
common	
Coffee, roasted, Rio or
Santos   	
Potatoes, local, sack	
Vinegar, white wine, xxx
qt  	
Starch, laundry, lb „
Sugar, cane, granulated,
ln 18 lb. bogs	
Sugar, cane, yellow, ln
17 lb. bags 	
Coal, Penn. good anthracite, stove slse, delivered, ton  „	
Coal, bituminous, delivered,   lump,   ton	
Coal, bituminous, delivered, nut, ton „
Coal, bituminous, delivered, pea, ton   	
Dry  cordwood,  cord	
Blocks,  load   ....,..,
Mill ends, load 	
Slabs, short lengths, load
Slabs, four foot lengths,
cord 	
.25
.06
O   .36
S.06
.12*
9    .124
9   .'»
O    .60
§.40
1.60
0    .26
U>    .08
9 1.00
O18.00
O 7.50
9 1.60
MINARD'S    LINIMENT
COLD8, AC.
CURES
RENNIE'S
SEEDS 1*914
—OUR CATALOGUE—i
Is larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. For 45 years the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
and Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs, You
need it before you decide what kinds to
plant.   Send for your copy to-day.
WM' RENNIE ClUd
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVER
Alss si Tmals, Msstnsl ssd Wlulpsf
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MININQ REGULATIONS
, c?.al mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of tl an acre. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leased ts one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must bs
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of 15, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for aro not available,
but not otherwise. A royally shall bo
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The ncrBon operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thoreon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at loast oner a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the leseoe may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be oonsldcred necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 810 an aero.
For full Information application should
be made to the 8ocrelary of tho Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORY,
„ _   Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—30680.
THB WORK-WOMAN'S STOXI
aLANG,S,, 686 MAIN STREET
Everything for the working man—BOOTS ind SHOES, CLOTHING, HATS and CAPS, OENTS' PURNISHINGS, Etc, It prices thst
will pay you to come snd investigate.
EXTRA SPECIAL THIS WEEK:
$10.60 Suits .:.. 17.80
122.60 Suits IflfcOO
THESE ARE WONDERS.
BASEBALL
Vancouver vs. Spokane
May 11,12,13,14,
15 and 16
WEEK DAYS, 4:00 P.M.      SATURDAY, 3*00 P.M.
MEN'S $17.50 SUITS TO SEL FOR
,.95
$9;
This is a special bargain for readers
of The Federationist, and you'll have to
bring this ad. with you if you want to
get this Suit at this price.
It's made from all wool tweed, cut in
single breasted style and is well tailored.
Comes in shades of grey and brown, for
present season's wear.' It's smart, well
fitting and shape retaining. Our regular $17.50 leader — a Federationist
leader for $9.95.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND OEOROIA
EVERY UNION MAN IN 'VANCOUVER SHOULD PATRONIZE
LABOR  TEMPLE  CLUB   AND   POOL ROOM
•iIZE    N
3M   J
Superior
Printing I
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printer* a reputation lor
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted. PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY MAY 8, 1914.
HALF-
PRICE
Quitting the
Men's Furnishing
Business
EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD
PRICES HALF AND LESS
SHIRTS.
Balance of broken lines,
worth up to $2.00, for 95c.
Other regular lines out to
insure quick sale at $1.15 and
$136.
HATS.
Any $3.00 Hat for $2.15.
Any $3.50 Hat for $2.36.
NECKWEAR.
Regular 75c and $1.00, for
58c. __
Regular 50c and 75c, for
35c.
Two Big Specials in Clothing':
$12.50 and $16.50
Worth up to $25.00
SEE OUR WINDOWS
J.J.Needham
& COMPANY
335 Hastings St. W.
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS can be bought at BRUMMITT'S from
$10.00 up to $30.00 And thty art worth mora
HAT8, bearing the union label, at $2.00, $2.50, $3.00.
SHOES, all makes and prlceB, bearing the label, at "live and let live
prices, $2.00 up to $6.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at $7.00, $8.00 and $10.00
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
Better Clothes for
Men Who Know and Care
It is our object to sell the best Clothes it is possible to procure in this day and generation; to have
quality of cloth, thoroughness of making, perfection
of fit and style paramount in every garment we offer
for sale; to sell clothes at the lowest possible price
consistent with fair and honest business.
May we show you our new Spring Suits?
THE SHOP OF
"Fashion-Craft"
THOS. FOSTER & CO., Ltd.
514 GRANVILLE STREET
A MUSICAL
SURPRISE
Whether you are a musician
or not you cannot fail to appreciate the treat that
MR. EDISON'S
NEW TONE
PHONOGRAPH
holds in store for you
Mr. Edison prefers not to discuss the
wonderful improvements he has embodied in this instrument. He emphasizes effect rather than detail—
your pleasure and enjoyment rather
than his own genius. There is only
one way to really know this surprise.
Let an EDISON tell it to you. Prices
are from $39.00 upwards. Terms as
low at $1.00 per week.
THE KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
598    GRANVILLE    STREET
IpMUltlMI
Whols Whist Brsad
Choice- Family Brsad
Wedding and Birthday Cakes.
Wa Vet Valoa Tint.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
' CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks and Lunehsl
All Goods Frssh Dally.
»w umrrxua at.
ttt Ssy. 7104.
Berry Bros.
Afenti (01
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
Tha Bleycla with tta* Reputation
Full   lino   of   accessories
Rapaira promptly oieeutad
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
The B. C. FEDERATIONIST
is now affiliated with the '
and will shortly put on a cartoon service which should be
appreciated by the wage-workers of British Columbia.
THREE MONTHS' TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION FREE UPON RECEIPT
OF NAME AND ADDRESS	
Destroy Their Homes and
All Their Household
Effects
Rockefeller's Assassins at
San Rafael Ready
for Action
[Special to The, Federationist]
DENVER, Colo,, May 7—For six
months the state mllltla, made up ot
Baldwin-Felts assassins and barrelhouse bums, have robbed and plundered strikers' homeB, Insulted their'
women and children, and ln every
way possible tried to break the strike,
while the guards are carrying out
their part by murdering the oppressed
miners' leaders. The state government, made up of corporation lickspittles, has approved of all these outrages. Secretary of War Garrison
has issued an order calling for the
disarming of every one. If this Is
carried out to the letter, peaee may
result. Every mine guard Is a deputy
sheriff. There Is a question as to
whether they will Insist on carrying
arms as deputy sheriffs. The striking
coal miners feel that If the mine
guards and deputy sheriffs are disarmed there will be no need for their
having guns. But If these two bodies
of assassins are allowed to keep their
guards there is certain to be more
trouble. And while all of these negotiations are going on, hundreds of
women and children, their homes and
all their effects destroyed, are huddling ln halls ln Trinidad grimly waiting to see whether this horrible war of
John D. Rockefeller Is to be continued
and wondering whether they are the
next to be murdered and cremated as
were their brothers and sisters in the
Ludlow massacre. At San Rafael
Heights in Trinidad, many of the men
have established a camp. There they
wait on their arms not knowing when
Rockefeller's hired assassins may
sweep down on them.
LETTERS TO
raipjL
A CRITIC CRITICIZED.
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: The
Btrlking miners of Cumberland on the
first of May held a splendid demonstration which speaks well of their solidarity after being on strike for tne
paBt twenty months. It was a magnificent day, everything went on peaceably, and to the satisfaction of all tbat
witnessed It, except the editor of the
Islander. On Saturday, May 2nd, the
famous rag, printed by the renowned
Edward Blckle, commented, criticized
and Insulted, as he thought, many of
those who took part in the parade,
which I Intend to bring back at himself
now that he haB opened the way. He
says others took part In the parade,
and, judging by the paunch they wore,
resembled brewers and distillers, and
must at least, have consumed a great
deal of what a brewery Is built to supply. He goes on again and says that
there are those who prefer to receive
the weekly allowance of four dollars
a week, than go to work, line themselves up at the bar, whenever an opportunity presents Itself or, to use a
common term, when a "live one" happens to pass along that way. Now,
while he waB commenting ln such a
manner, he forgot that he himself haa
been a soak, a "barrel house bum" a
"sewer rat" and a degenerate, more so
than any of the men whom he was criticising as we will plainly see by a
decision given against him the latter
part of 1911, which reads as follows:
"Edward Blckle waB charged ln the
city police court before Messrs. Will-
ard and Shaw, J. P's„ with being
drunk and disorderly and breaking
windows. He was lined $15 and coBtB,
or ten days. The court also put him
under the provisions of the liquor act
as a prohibited person for an Indefinite
period in either the city or any licensed wholesale or retail premises in
Nelson or Comox districts. Under the
recent bylaw any owner of licensed
premises Is liable to prosecution If
they allow a prohibited person upon
their premises, and anyone supplying
the same with liquor Is liable to prosecution and heavy penalties."—Cumberland News, December 13th, 1911.
It Is very obvious now that Mr. Edward Blckle was all of the year 1911,
one of the champions, lining up at the
bar, and waiting until the "live guya"
came along, as the writer haB witnessed him asleep while drunk, In- the
back alleys, under billiard tableB and
bo forth. After the decision of the ,1.
P.'s, his photo was placed In all of the
hotels, which did not exactly suit him.
Having no longer access In the hotels,
he, at that time became demented, but
thought that he was intelligent enough
to make null and void the decision
awarded against him. He then got
out a petition, many copies of which
were printed and placed ln conspicuous
places in the city, which was of no
effect, as he Is still stigmatized and
restrained trom Indulging In Intoxicating liquors ln Comox or Nelson districts. Since then, he was compelled
to be temperate, and not being able
to perform any useful work, he augured himself a way into the company's
office, taking all there that he could
gather, after making himself a name
ln that way, he was exalted and became shortly after the strike, editor
of the Islander. Week In and week
out, he has tried his utmost to break
up tbe ranks of the miners, by causing dissension amongst them, but the
minera knew that he was the most
useless of all human beings that Bociety Is Inoculated with. The very
Bpace that he takes up against our bat.
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURE8
DIPHTHERIA.
DOLL HOSPITAL
None too badly broken but can be
repaired at reasonable prices.
SOLD FISH
Selected Gold Flsh and Oold Flsh
Bowls
MILLAR A C0E    120 Hssliaf s St. W.
PHONE S. 4711
tie for progress Is a wasted spot. His
only effort Ib to check the very advancement ot our strike, and annihilate the microbes of productive creation.* He Is a cancerouB bacllluB whose
presence infects cheer and adulterates
enthusiasm. He hurls the contaminated bricks of slander at every movement that has for its object a higher
standard of productiveness. He possesses no imagination and tries to discount every new weapon that Is conceived In the Interests of the workers.
He consumes vitally, to no purpose,
and growls with discouragement at
every development of credulity. He
has exerted himself and tried without success to retard the machinery
of our movement, its velocity, by applying the brakes of destructiveness and
sowing the seeds of discontent. His
parrot-like voice is recorded at every
place that has been Infested by his
adulterated anatomy—he has ejaculated the Isms of discouragement and
vociferated his cowardly bray that the
cause was lost and that by May 1st
the relief would be stopped. He belongs to no particular period or claBS.
The labor movement had known him
in every evolution, his ancestors skulked In the rear in tho wars of antiquity,
his grandBlres scoffed at the efforts of
the unions for a shorter work day and
better conditions, and since then he
has been hurling the battering ram of
ridicule at nil the developments of progress. He Is simply the most morbid
nnd conceited ass that has evolved
from the progenitors of animalism.
Had the labor movement relied on him
and his tribe for Its progress, chattel
slavery would as yet be ln Its most
primitive stages and prevalent autocracy would be the ulterior dreams In
the far off tomorrow. Had mutton-
heads of hfs calibre controlled the
hands of progression the efforts of the
workers would have been relegated to
the historic monuments of oblivion. He
does not annoy the miners of Cumberland, as they know he Is an Inferior
product, that he Is a drone, a panderer
of the Canadian Collery company, who
use him, and a cancer to our social
system. To him our flght has always
been lost. In his narrow vision the
task was a failure before It started. If
you turn him over you will find that
he Is far from being Intelligent, nature forgot to finish his brain. It was
men of his calibre with brains sodden
with drink who were UBed by the coal
barons of Colorado to openly Bhoot and
kill many of the striking miners, their
wives and innocent children, who were
fighting for Improved conditions. It Is
men of his kind who become gunmen,
thugs, Baldwin felts, scabs, etc., at all
times, as they are always to be found
with stultified brains and ready to pros-'
tltute their manhood for the measly
dish of pottage that the capitalist doles
out to them. On many occasions, as In
his last edition, he has made reference
to the striking miners as being undesirables, and intimated their being
weeded out. But there Is a time coming when these (drones, soaks, scabs,
barrel house bums, thugs and gunmen,
who are not useful members of this
society will be thrown from off the
backs of labor, when they will be compelled to produce to exist, or otherwise
suffer extinction.
j. McAllister.
Cumberland, B. C, May (1, 1914.
Orcheatra (Sic) Strike-breakers
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: In reference to a letter ln your issue of
May 1st taken from the Tipton Herald, a few things here are rather Interesting. In the first place the
writer says "everything was made
comfortable and convenient for tho
passengers." If he travelled as ninety
per cent, of the Immigrants travel
third cabin—I must say he was more
fortunate than myself and family, and
we travelled on the White Star liner,
SS. Megantlc. I must confess that
everything was clean and to some
extent almost as good as King
George's dog kennels, although the
food was not so good. We did not get
rump steak dally as do our sovereign
dogs. I should imagine the writer
had been used to queer surroundings,
otherwise he would searcely have
been so overjoyed as to forget the
swill he was eating. We only got one
meal worthy the name and that was
stale egg and boar hog with plenty of
bristles.. So much for the swill-house.
"The scenery was grand," so it is, but
how much of it is yours, Mister
Writer? He says when we arrived ln
Cumberland we all got situations at
once. Is that so? He must surely be
some one's lackey to procure work so
easily on Vancouver island, even if
there were no strike. He writes
"conditions are good," "living Is Just
as oheap as ln England." Everything
appears good to his eyes. Poor fellow!
Don't let a two-legged ass like him affect you through a capitalist press
Speaking of musicians, the writer says
"there is no talent here and the man
ager where I am employed Is very
anxious to form an orchestra." It is
not the orchestra the manager wants,
He Is much more anxious for English
speaking people to act as strike break
ers. He Is much more anxious to run
the mines and defeat the strikers and
his game is to blind the new arrivals.
I am extremely sorry for the writer
If he swallows such bait from a com
pany's manager. The manager wants
strike-breakers—that's the whole or
chestra in a nut shell. I leave It for
every reader to judge for himself.
Probably he's a bonehead and a bone
head he is likely to remain.—Yours
respectfully,
J. R. JACOBS.
Nanalmo, B. C, May 6, 1914.
Mllltla Search Men
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: This
Is a voice from Ladysmith to let the
public know how the strikers "were
treated on the morning of the flrst of
May. There was quite a big crowd
on the C. P. R. platform waiting for
the special train to be brougbt in
from the siding after the usual nine
o'clock train pulled ln, of course,
quite a number got in, having purchased their tickets the day before,
but they were quickly ordered out by
a squad of mllltla and specials and
made to get oft the platform. We had
to pass one by one between them and
the men were searched to see If they
had any fire-arms, the women were allowed to pass without. Needless to
say, they, had all their trouble for
nothing and had to stand a lot of Jeers
and laughter, which, to say the least,
made them look like a lot of fools.
We think it was done more to make
trouble than anything else by rousing
the men's temper, but our men had
too much sense to spoil their holiday
in that way. At South Wellington It
waB the same. One man had a small
grip, he had to turn out the contents.
Another young lad had a banana in
hla hip pocket. The special thought
he had got a prize and eagerly pulled
lt out, much to the amusement of the
orowd. Well, In spite of it all, we
had a lovely day, and everybody en-
Joyed themselves, which was what we
set out to do; and the poor soldiers
and specials did not have any excite-
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE
It Is Time This Corporation
Was Taken to
Task
The Oovernment Should Enact Legislation to Regulate Its Tolls
Vancouver, the Mecca of British
Columbia, is the home of monopoly,
No other city ln Canada is enchained
by avaricious and over-bearing corporations, whose citizens have to pay
tribute to these buccaneers of finance
in the same ratio as do Vancouverltes.
Among these big concerns may be
mentioned the B. C. E. R. company
and Vancouver Gas company, who
controll the street railway system and
lighting franchises, and charge rates
for same just as they please. The
C. P. R., the G. N. R. and the C. N. R.
are the big sinners which have bled
the citizens time and time again, and do
everything possible to evade the law
of equity The greatest blight however, according to Its ramifications
that Vancouver has to contend with,
is the B, C. Telephone company. Here
you have the qulntescence of nerve
and gall. A few years ago this company was instrumental in smashing
the telephone operators' union, a body,
mind you, composed of girls. Since
that time this company has become
more-intolerant than ever to the public. The Federationist has received
many reports against its doings and
transactions. It levies excessive tolls
for everything the public needs from
it for the transaction of ordinary business and scant courtesy is shown
those of the business community when
they complain about the poor service.
It is time that this soulless corporation wore taught a lesson. It is little
less than an outrage on the rights of
the people that tho B. C. Telephone
company has been allowed to conduct
Its business in the way lt has done
for so many years without the people
protesting. This matter ought to be
taken up by the commercial bodies
and the trades people generally of
Vancouver, and a united effort made
to force this greedy corporation to do
what is right for Its patrons. If necessary, Bteps should also be taken to
force the government to enact legislation and regulate tolls to safeguard
the public from a highbinder's tribute
as is exacted from the citizens of Vancouver city and suburbs.
Unemployment in Victoria, B. C.
There are hundreds   of   deserving
men In the city who cannot flnd work.
■The NewB, Victoria, B. C.
Captain "Jimmy" Moran Dead
Captain James A. Moran, of No. 3
firehall, died last Sunday. He was
well and favorably known among the
pioneer members of the labor movement. Funeral took place on Wednesday.
Thousands Workleaa at Fort William
lt is estimated at the present time
there are four thousand men out of
work In Fort William. Of this number the great majority are men wbo
have drifted there upon reports that
the opening of navigation would cause
a demand for laborers.
Ottawa Machinists Expect Trouble
Trouble is expected by the machinists ln Ottawa, where the employers
have announced that tbey Intend to
go back to the ten-hour day. Nine
hours is now the rule. The members
of the union state they will flght to
retain the present condition, and to
shorten it if possible.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Want Canadian Congreaa To Meet
Here in 1915—Other Bualneaa
The Council met last night with President Walker In the chair and officers
present. A few new delegates were
seated from brewery workerB, railway-
carmen and molders. A letter from
Frank Shoppard, M. P., was received,
dealing with the redistribution of federal parliamentary Beats, and the secretary was instructed to write that
the council desired to see Vancouver
divided into east and weat under the
new redistribution scheme, so that Instead of the two Vancouver members
being elected at large, tho eastern and
western parts of the city would have
separate members. Tho Alberta Fed-
eratlon of Labor wrote that they were
taking close Interest In tbe position
of the plasterers with rogard to the
Sleuter case, and wished to be kept
Informed. W. D. Scott, superintendent of Immigration for the dominion,
wrote stating that tho government only
sought and encouraged the immigration of farm workers. The Typographical Union stated they had flled
the circular received from the council
re universal working card,   The cooks
ment at ail and no fun, and Bowser
had all the extra expense for nothing.
I may add that the sports committee
had to deposit (260 for the train, yet
we were not allowed to use It until
these "pluguglles" had done their
dirty work. I think It made the worn
en feel worse than the men (who took
lt as a big joke) to see them havo to
submit to Buch Indignities from such
low parasites. I hope these few lines
will not take up too much of your
valuable space and thanking you for
past favors, I will sign myself,
ONE OF THE WOMEN.
Ladysmlth, B. C, May 6, 1914.
TOMORROW AT
WOOD'S
Tomorrow will be a red-letter day of thla most remarkable aale,
If HIGHEST GRADE MERCHANDISE at BED-ROCK PRICES will
encompass lt. Many, many persona were disappointed last week
through arriving too late in the day; hence it Is advisable that you
shop early if you would be sure of supplying your wants.
There will positively be a goodly quantity ot each and every advertised article on sale—SO COME EARLY AND HAVE FIRST
CHOICE.    SALE STARTS PROMPTLY AT 9 A.M.
3Gc Cutlcura Soap, cut to ISo
Uu*  Pnlm Olive Soup, 3  cakes
for    85o
Uie Pear's Soup, 3 cakes for BBo
2lic Packer's Tar Soap, cut to....lSo
EXTRA! 1
GOc Giiietto Razor Blades, cut
to
So
50c Pompeilan Massage Cream
cut  to  880
50c    Pond's    Kxtraot   Creams,
cut to  Ue
20c Snap Hand Cleaner, cut to.lOe
BOc Frilltntives, cut to...* ...SSo
10c C. & B. Butter Scotch, cut
to   050
10c   Callard   &   Bowser's   But'
terscotch, for   So
50c MolasseB Toffy, per lb SSo
CANDIE8
fific Assorted Nut Toffy, per lb.BSo
76c Cocoanut Kisses, per lb 4So
RAZORS;
$7.50 Auto Strop Raxor Set, tomorrow    $4.95
$8.00   Gillette   Safety   Razors,
tomorrow for  13.95
50c Gillette Razor Blades for....36c
$1.00 Ever-Ready safety Ra7.ors.70o
$1.00  Gem Safety Razors 70o'
25c Shaving Sticks  ISo
ETC.
$2.60  Razors, Guaranteed 91.35
10c "Williams' Sliavlng Soap  So
$1.00 Razor Strops SSo
$2.50  Koken's  Strops 91,30
$1.50 Pocket Knives;  I, X. L.
and Boker's, eaoh' 9B0
15c Styptic Pencils for 060
$2.00 Rubberset Shaving Brushes for  tBe
60c  Cascarets, cut to...
50c Zam-Buk, cut to	
50c Gin Pills, cut to...
$1.25  Wlncarnls Wine...
PATENT PREPARATIONS
..3So
...30o
...30o
..SSO
$1.00 Wilson's Invalid's Port 75o
$1.00   Scott's  Emulsion 75o
$1.00   Bno's Fruit  Salts 66c
60c Syrup of Figs for BBo
$1.26 Beef, Iron ond Wine OSo
$1.00 Sursnpnrlllu and Burdock. 65o
50c  Emulsion Cod Liver Oll....9Bo
60c Peps Cold Cure 360.
50c   size   White   Pine   Cough
Syrup  BBo
35c Castorla, cut to BOo
$1.00   Ever-Ready   Safety   Razors    *..„ 70o
$1.00 Gem Safety Razors 70o
10c Wllllnms' Shaving Soap 06o
•2.00 Rubberset Lather Brushes    95c
SHAVING SUPPLIES
50c Rubberset Lather Brushes. 85c
$1.00 Razor Strops cut to 65c
$3.00 Koken's Razor Strops....91.06
$2.50 Guaranteed Razors fl.35
25c  Shaving Sticks  for ISo
$1.25 Pocket Knives, pearl handle,   cut   to ,7Bo
$1.00 Hair Brushes, now 35o
25c Pocket Combs, cased, for....10©
60c Rubber Dressing Combs....35c
$4.00 Hair Brushes  91.65
COMBS, BRUSHES, ETC.
$2.50 Whnlebontt Hair Brushes,
now  91.35
50c  Mirrors,  cut  to 300
$1.00 Plato Mirrors, now only....46o
$4.00 Hand Mirrors, now $1.98
RUBBER GOODS
$2.50 Fountain Syringes fl.35 $2.00 Sanitary Syringes for SOo
.I'WW -^Tw1".1   Vn_^a SU $3.50 Douche   Syringes 98.15
$3.00 Hot Water Bags 91.65 ,, „_ „ ..       «,                           „m
$3.50   Combination   Hot   Water *1-25 Rubber Gloves 66c
Bag and Syringe  91-96 ' $' -Otl Household  Syringes ...450
Wood's Pharmacy
CORNER SEYMOUR STREET
601 HASTINGS STREET WEST
wished for a monthly card. The council took steps to secure more rigid enforcement of the Shops Regulation Act
with regard to bakeshops and overtime, lt waB suggested that the organization committee should approach
the carpenters with the view of their
re-afllliation, but the council decided to
take no action. It was decided to
start the agitation to secure the convention of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada for Vancouver    in
1915. A motion to take the Daily
Province off the unfair list was laid
over until next meeting. A notice of
motion was read which, if adopted by
the council, will prevent any delegate
from being a member of the executive
council for more than one year at a
time, and that any delegate having
served one year he shall not be eligible for re-election for another year.
The council adjourned rt 10 p.m.
About sixty delegates were present.
MINARD'S    LINIMENT    CURES
DISTEMPER.
Low Prices on Quality Shoes
Makes McKeen's Going Out
of Business Sale a Big Success
We have made history in high-grade shoe selling in
the past few weeks, and it is doubtful if the good
people of Vancouver and vicinity will have another
chance to get the very best shoes at factory cost and
less. Although eager buyers have kept our sales
force on the jump, the big stock is very well balanced. Inroads have been made into each and every
department, and some lines have been somewhat
broken.   Bemember, no more after these are sold.
Prices Drop Because I Quit Business.
Take the Ooods away.   Prices are plainly marked.
You can see at a glance your saving.
Every day is bargain day at
McKEEN'S SHOE STORE
Ooods sold for cash only. This is not a profit-
making sale, but a real bargain feast. May I expect
you? lt isn't necessary to tell anybody that the sale
is a real sale; that the prices are not remarked up in
order to be marked down. The original price is cut
into the sole of each shoe at the factory with a steel
die.  No humbug here.
C. E. McKEEN'S
607—Hastings Street West—607
NEAR GRANVILLE ST.
Written by Ivor Smith, Advertising Agent

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