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The British Columbia Federationist Jun 5, 1914

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER:  VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
POLITICAL UNITT:  VICTORY!
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JUNE 5,1914
EIGHT PAGES
V^wSasm  ) $1-50 PER YEAB
The Prise Winners—Music
and Song—Entertainment a Success
What the League Stands for
—Good That Will
Result
The most successful and enjoyable
affair of Its kind held In this olty recently was the social evening of the
Unton Label league, held last Friday
evening, May 29th, In the Labor
Temple. A goodly number ot guests
were present, and whist, music,
songs and a sooial dance at the end
fittingly ooncluded the evening's entertainment. The whist tables occupied the centre of the room at the
beginning, and soon devotees of that
ancient game were deep ln the play.
At the olose of tbls portion ot the
social, the prises were awarded as
follows: Mrs, Bardet won the ladles'
first prize, 0. S. Bret the first gentlemen's prise, Miss Nan Mitchell and
J. H. MoVety won the booby prizes.
The whist tables were In oharge ot
H. 3. McEwen.
Music and Song
(The second portion of the program
followed with Instrumental music and
song, which were well rendered and
deserved the plaudits of the company.
Mrs. H. Evans favored the oompany
with a song; H. Whltesldes piano selections; Sam Hamilton,, recitation;
Walter 0. Westwood, mandolin, and
O. H. Brandenberg, banjo. At the conclusion of the musical programme the
evening ended with a social dance, ln
whloh those who took part thoroughly enjoyed themselves, the music for
the dance being provided by Messrs
Whltesldes and Westwood with piano
and mandolin. During the evening
loe cream and cake were served to the
company, with claret punch as an accompaniment. Miss F. Foxcroft and
Miss Viola Bailey presided over the
refreshment tables, while G. W. Curnook brewed the punch. C. F.
Burkhart, president of the league, was
the chairman of the evening, and was
assiduous ln looking after the comfort of those present, and saw that
everyone was entertained.
What League Stands For
The Union Label league Ib composed of delegates from the various
trade unions of this city who are endeavoring to stimulate a demand for
the union label. There are about a
dosen members of the league who are
devoting time and talent to the cause,
but results are slow. Whether, owing
to the slackness of business or no,
trades unionists of this city—and this
is said ln no captious spirit—are slow
ln seeing the ultimate good tbat will
result to all If they take hold of this
movement with a will and resolve to
push the label. Trades unionists
must learn that by demanding the
label on all purchases of manufactured articles they, while helping the
other fellow, are helping themselves,
i Every union man or woman working
Is a help to the movement as a whole.
It helps unionization; tt promotes consumption of union-made goods if the
unionist insists on getting the label
on his or her purchase. If the baker
only asked for union bread, If the
barber only looked for the shop card,
if the tailor only wore union-made
suits, if the clgarmaker only smoked
blue label cigars, If the printer only
asked for the "little Joker" on his
printing, the demand for the label
would be restricted. So each should
help the other to the extent of getting,
whenever possible, the label on his or
her purchase. We need to .become
better acquainted with each other. We
wilt find on longer acquaintance that
our alms and objects are Identical-
better conditions, shorter hours, living
wageB and a.higher standanrd of citizenship. Unionism stands for all
this, and the union label Is the visible
symbol of this worthy ambition. All
unions are again asked to send delegates to the league and help the
cause along.
MASS MEETING
Mrs. Lucy Parson Will Speak Again
To-Morrow Night
Mrs. Lucy Parsons, the widow of
one of the live matyrs who were hanged as the result of the riots in the
Haymarket square, Chicago, will speak
in the Labor Temple, Vancouver, tomorrow night, June 6.
WINNIPEG POLICE
CLUB AND JAIL
THE W0RKLE83
Winnipeg unemployed were
clubbed and thrown Into Jail
last week by the Winnipeg
police. Report had been
spread about that the city
was going to find work for
married men. That brought
a crowd outside the oity hall
and civic employment bur
eau. Some were so confident
of getting work that they had
their shovels With them. No
work was to be had, and the
crowd moved on to a vacant
lot at the corner of King and
Rupert streets. A sort of
Impromptu meeting was held.
The keen disappointment of
the crowd reflected Itself in
the speeches. However,
there was no disorder until
the police came. They immediately proceeded to disperse the meeting, clubbing
right and left. Three were
arrested and held In jail on
a charge of unlawful assembly. They will be defended by
Winnipeg Trades and Labor
council.
IN CASE ASIATICS
ARE UKED
"Business" Interests Want
Local Workers to Start
Something
Agitation Against Asiatics
Spreading to Other Than
Wage-workers
By Jas. H. McVety
"I will give $280 towards a movement te hire a tug, out the ostle of
the vessel with the Hindoos aboard,
and tew the ship outside the harbor
with a warning to Its offlcsrs to depart snd never return."
Sucb was the language ot one of
two wealthy men wbo called on the
writer during the week for the purpose of interesting the "labor people'"
In a demonstration against Asiatics in
general and the shipload of Hindoos
in particular.
"The Impression should be created
that lt Is unsafe for any, Asiatic to
remain in this country, and' Solicitor
Bird should be censured for daring
to assist these men," continued the
spokesmen. That one Hindoo ahould
be allowed ashore, even to die, was
condemned ln equally savage language.
- Seizing the chance of a little quiet
amusement, the writer mildly suggested that such language hardly befitted
a follower of the Lowly Nazarene and
one who was a staunch believer ln
"British Justice.'" This brought forth
the retort: "The country will be ruined If these people are allowed to enter and anyone assisting them should
be boycotted." Why objection should
be taken to the removal ot a poor
sick Hindoo to the hospital while
the spokesman had Asiatics employed in his home and hordes were coming In on every boat, was a query that
required some tall explanation. "Chinese are different. They are a cleaner
and much better people and make excellent servants," was the information
secured.
Labor's View
The writer tried to explain the view
point of the workers by stating that
they had always been opposed to Asiatic labor, but in the days when it
was thought possible to exclude them,
the merchant and capitalist class
were strongly in favor of admitting
them, because their labor was cheap.
Now they were encroaching in many
lines of business and the view point
was changing. In any caae, the loyal
patriotic employers had filled every
possible position with Asiatics and the
only reason other whites are not displaced Ib because there Is more profit in the labor of the white variety.
Besides, the "labor people" would not
care to rob him and bis class of their
very useful Asiatic servants, who evidently perform a very useful function
in many households ot   the rich.
This view of the workers only
served to draw a further stream of violent language that would, If used publicly by a member of the working
class, only serve to secure for him
attention at the bands of the police
or asylum authorities. It was evident that the purpose of the visit was
to get "labor people" to organize a
demonstration, assume the responsibility for it and taken any jail terms
that might accrue as a result of the
programme mapped out for them by
these smug ruffians who as ln industry, risk their dollars "ln order to
give the opportunity to work," and
lncidently jeopardize their lives or
liberty.
Only Catspawa for "Business
Interests"
There is no particular reason why
the workers should become hysterical, either over the ravings of men
who have fleeced labor to the extent
of millions of dollars, or on account
of any injury they could possibly receive through a further Influx of Hindoos, the most useless ot all the Asiatics who are here. Particularly Is
this so when one remembers that hundreds of Chinese are arriving here by
every boat, paying the $500. head
tax ot which the B. C. government receives a handsome portion, and that
the trade Interests ot Canada and the
empire are sucb that the Japanese
are not restricted at all, except at
the pleasure ot the Japanese government, thanks to an arrangement by
Rudolphe Lemleux on behalf of the
great champions of a "White Canada,"
the liberal party.
Labor ln Canada has always been
opposed to the Asiatics, for many
other than competitive reasons, but
doea not, unlike the California workers, boll over with enthusiasm at the
prospect of having a riot merely to
gratify the desires of men wbo are
too cowardly to start something for
/ BUILDING TRADE8 SLUMP
More Figures to Explain Present
Unemployment
In the editorial columns of The Federatlonist last week figures were
given showing that during the first
four months of 1913, the city building
inspector's, department Issued 801
permits valued at 16,179,715. Also
that 568 permits valued at $1,296,604
were issued during the first four
months ot this year. Later figures
are now available. Up to the end of
May this year 720 permits were Issued
valued at $1,820,984. Up to the end
of May last year 1002 permits were
Issued valued at $6,209,372. These
figures explain tbe present Blackness
ln the building tradeB.
Wm. Tomllnson, of New Denver,
B. C, is ln the city. He has been appointed by the federal government to
secure speclments ot minerals of the
province for the Panama exposition
at San Franolsco.   .
B.CE.R. Co. Employees S-ecurejSOCIALISTIC
Majority Report In Their Favor
THE MAJORITY REPORT of the board, which was appointed under the
Federal Industrial pisputes Investigation Act, to inquire into the matters in dispute between the street r&Uwaymen and the B. O. Electric Railway company is in favor of the men. The board consisted of Judge
McDonald, chairman; Mr. Jas. H. McVety for the street railwaymen, and Mr.
John Elliot for the company. The majority report is signed by Judge
McDonald and Jas. H. McVety. They are of the opinion that the common-
sense interpretation placed by^the men upon their present agreement with
the company is in the main a fair and equitable interpretation for both
parties.
Perusal of the reports will show that careful and patient consideration
has been given to all the points in dispute, one of which was very involved
and technical. In view of that, it is to. be hoped that the company will adopt
the commonsense view of the majority of the board, and in the interests of
industrial peace and public polity abide by that decision.
The majority finding does not give either party all ihat was requested,
but it is a genuine attempt to find a way out of the difficulty, which will ultimately be tolerable to each side. In the first place the matter in dispute was
not the drafting of an agreement, but the nlacing of an interpretation on an
already existing agreement. Some have; thought the proceedings rather
prolonged, but to those who were present at the inquiry the technical nature
of it explains any delay.
It will be noted from the reports that on three -Counts, the board was
unanimous in its finding. First publication of the reports follow, being
exclusively in The Federationist.
MAJORITY  REPORT
To the  Honorable  T. W. Crothers,
minister ot labor, Ottawa:
In the matter of the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 1907; and
In the matter of certain disputes
between the British. Columbia Electric Railway company and Its employees:
Sir—The board of conciliation and
investigation under the Industrial Disputes Investigation act, consisting of
the Honorable Mr. Justice W. A. Macdonald, the chairman appointed by the
department of labor; Mr. J. H. McVety, representative of the employees,
and Mr. John Elliott, tbe representative of the company, begs to report as
follows:
The employees, through their authorized officers, declared In their application that a strike would be declared unless certain disputes were
adjusted.
Four matters of dlapute were referred to the board tor consideration.
An effort was made to see lt an amicable settlement could not be arrived
at, and various meetings were held
for that purpose. No result ensued,
and It was found neoessary to take
evidence, and full opportunity waB afforded to the parties of advancing
their various grounds in support of
their position. The disputes arose as
to the interpretation that Bhould be
placed upon certain clauses of an
agreement, arrived at between the
parties in 1913—after a lengthy Investigation had taken place before a
board appointed under the act
Night Car Repairers
1. The flnt point of difference was
as to whether the night car repairers
should be entitled to further earnings
than they were receiving from the
company, it was contended that by
an application of section 97 of the
"working conditions" incorporated ln
such agreement, such employees were,
through not being allowed certain
overtime, receiving les wages than
before the agreement was entered
into, It appears that this question of
overtime, receiving less wages than
previously been the subject of dispute
between the parties, and an arbitration had taken place upon the construction to be given to a clause deal
ing with the same matter In an
agreement executed In 1910, and that
such arbitration had been decided In
favor of the employees.
The representatives ot the employees sought to apply olause 1 of the
"wage schedule" in support of their
contention that this class of employeea, then In the service of the company, were protected by the provision that "no employee now In the
company's service shall have his
earnings reduced by reason Ot this
schedule,, but when such will be the
effect thereof to new men, such present employee shall continue on the
schedule in force till June 30, 1913."
Evidence was adduced to show that
representatives ot employees considered that this proviso should operate ln such a manner that lt any
employee were allowed less for overtime under the "working conditions"
of tbe agreement of 1913 than he had
been receiving under the agreement
of 1910, and thus reduce his earnings,
that he could then revert to the
"working conditions" ,ilnd "wage
schedule" of the agreement of 1910.
MOTHER JONES IS
EXCLUDED BY THE
ORDER OF BOWSER
Mother Jones, of the United
Mine Workers of America was
to speak in Victoria, Nanaimo,
and Cumberland today, Saturday and Sunday. She was also
to speak in Vancouver next
Monday evening. Word was received at the Labor Temple yesterday that she had been refused admission to Canada at
the request of Oolln Campbell,
chief ot provincial police, acting under Instructions from Attorney-general Bowser. U. M.
Wl A. officials ln Washington
have wired W. B. Wilson,
United States secretary of labor,
requesting him to make representations to Premier Borden.
OF
WALES
"Wage Schedule"
■The company on the contrary contended that this construction was
contrary to the ordinary meaning to
be attached to the olause, and as a
matter of fact differed from their understanding when the "wsge sched
ue" was adjusted.
We are quite satisfied that both
parUes were perfectly honest ln their
contentions, but the difficulty Is that
as the "wage schedule" was Intended
to be binding for at least two years
from the 1st of July, 1913, It would,
unless there was a mutual mistake,
be unfair to accept the Interpretation
contended for by the employees and
thus Impose upon the defendant company an additional expenditure, not
contemplated ln the settlement of
1913. We are of opinion that, under
these circumstances, the company Is
justified ln confining the operation of
clause 1 to those old employees who
might have their rate ot wages reduced by the new schedule, adopted In
1913, and that the operation ot the
olause should not be extended so as
to allow an old employee to revert to
the terms of the agreement ol 1910,
even though his earnings have been
reduced by the different manner of
crediting overtime under tbe "working conditions" in the agreement of
1913.
2. The employees, as a second
ground of complaint, allege that
clause 3 of tho "wage schedule" of
the agreement ot 1913, had not been
fully applied to car cleaners, and that
they had not been allowed overtime
for tbe months of July and August.
The company contended that car
cleaners were only Included under
section 97 of the "working conditions" at the time when the agree
ment was actually signed In Septem
ber, and that allowances under that
section should only be applicable
trom that time.
Car Cleaners
We consider the wording of clause
3 of   the "wage schedule" shows a
clear Intention that if an Increase resulted to any of the employees  lt
should be payable from the 1st of
July, 1913.
We recommend that this Interpre-
(Continued on page 6)
Thorns for Christ; Bayleaves for Butchers
#3. PER DAY
From
MIME OPERATORS
Color, ado
Legislature
The Land of Sooial Reform
To Do Wonders for
the Workers
Labor Policy That Commands Wide Sympathy
of the People
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N. 8. W., May 13-New
South Wales, the mother state of the
Australian, commonwealth, Is to have
far-reaching reforms In the near future. Whatever else, may he said of
labor rule there Is this to Its credit,
lt looks after the welfare of the
masses. Shortly the premier wtll Introduce to the parliament bills dealing with health, housing, afforestra-
tlon, railway management, cheaper
food, and many other reforms. Milk,
meat and fruit are to be priced by
the government on a nationalization
basis. The prices of these commodities will be brought within reach of
all. Irrigation areas are to be encouraged, railway rates lowered, cheap
cold storage Instituted to make thla
possible. Oovernment abattoirs are
now being built to take over the killing of meat and the price will be
fixed by the government A Beet of
trawlers will be bought by the government to give a plentlous supply of
fish at a cheap rate. The milk industry is also to be regulated. Milk
will be supplied from the government
dairies for children and for hoslpltals
and will be delivered certified pure.
The "garden city" scheme Is to be followed up and extended to other areas
ln the state other than Sydney, Fair
rent bill will fix rental of house Just
as a Rates Appeal court, fixes the
annual rates of property.
State Industry
State industries are to be carried
out ln a wholesale manner, and as
a beginning the state brickworks,
cement, joinery and timber yards
(whloh have paid handsomely since
their inception) are to be enlarged.
An attractive system ot advances to
home-builders by the state savings
banks will be instituted and materials
offered at cost price from the state
works. A minister for health haa
been appointed and free hospitals,
maternity homes, tree nurses and surgeons to the poor are to form part of
reforms under this head. Free Infant
hospitals for the young are to be
opened and certified pure milk supplied free to those unable to pay tor
same for weak children. Consumptive hospitals and dispensaries are to
be opened free to the sufferers. The
great scourge of syphilis Ib to be
handled with the gloves off. A free
and frank enquiry wtll be made in
the latter direction, and a system of
medical examination prior to marriage instituted. Medical research is
to be encouraged by tbe state that
we may have the best ln this direction at the lowest cost
Industrial Law Reorganized
The whole matter of industrial law
will be re-organized and wages boards
instituted instead of the present arbitration courts. There will also be
a Rural Workers bill to fix the wages
ot all farm laborers and the eight-
hour day will be made compulsory
throughout the state. A huge system
of decentralization will be carried out
to give the farmers of the Btate the
right to ship to the nearest port and
thus get the full worth of their product.
Cross country lines will be carried out
as Boon as possible. Irrigation
schemes will grow up simultaneously
with the railway enlargement scheme
and thus we hope Boon to throw a
large population on to the land that at
present Is only scarcely populated.
A system of prison reform will work
ln with afforestratlon. ThlB has already been started and Is meeting
with great success. It is the intention ot the government to have every
long-sentence prisoner working ln tho
open air in good health and doing
something for the welfare ot the
Btate.
Land for Workers
Land nationalization will be an Important thing of the future and at no
distant date all land near a railway
in the state resumed by the government and leased out to bona-llde
workerB who will make use of It, Instead of having lt locked up as at present. There is much in the labor
policy that commands wide sympathy. It Is a genuine attempt to do good
for the Btate at large. Though to be
sure there will be much opposition
on the part of thoBe who have their
own private interests at stake before
that of the state. Should labor carry
out Its intentions as above tho future
generation will doff Its hat to the man
who as premier of the state (Hon. W.
A. Holman) placed the welfare of his
country before that of himself, and
who has proved himself the greatest
statesman Australia has ever seen.
LOOKOUT
Men Refuse to Accept Reduction
[Special to The Federatlonist]
BORDEAUX, Wn„ June 4—Following the refusal of the men employed by the Mumby Lumber and Shingle
company to accept a reduction In
wages, the company haB locked out
the crew. Over 200 men are affected
by this action of the company. The
men feel that a reduction In wages Is
wholly unwarranted at this time and
are prepared to fight to the last ditch
ln resisting any reduction. The action
of the Mumby Lumber nnd Shingle
company is In lino with tbe actlone of
other sawmill operators ln various
parts of the state who feel that the
condition of the labor market is such
as to make possible a reduction ln
wages. Workers are requested to
stay away trom Bordeaux.
MAY SUFFER
A SHE
WU1 Affect the Roads West
of Fort Williata and
Chicago
A Strike Vote of 85,000
Locomotive Hen Will
Be Taken
Warren 8. Stone, grand chief ef
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and other officials of the brotherhood are at Chlcuo, 111., where
they have been negotiating with representatives ot the railroad companies
during the past three months for a
new schedule of wages. Laat Monday
night the managers' committee announced that negotiations were suspended. Practically every railway In
the United States weet of Chicago, Including the Illinois Central sad all
lines in Canada west of Fort William,
except the Grand Trunk Pacific, are
involved. Mr. Stone assumes aa a
matter of course that a strike will te -
authorised, but not until a referendum
strike vote of 55,000 firemen and engineers bas been taken which wtll require ten days. The result of the ballot however, can hardly be announced
before July 14th next. The strike
yote will affect workman on 140,000
miles of railway who receive about
167,700,000 yearly ln wages. According to a statement issued by the general managers' committee, the requests of tbe men would increase tbe
payrolls approximately 50 per cent a
year.
Committee's Statement
No doubt thla Is an exaggeration ot
the facts as the committee's statement outline some of the principal
requests of the employees aa follows:
Increase In the rates of pay ln sll
classes of service; reduction of the
number of hours after which' overtime would be paid from ten to eight
In freight service. Increase in tbe
basis of figuring, overtime to time and
a half in freight service and double
time ln passenger service; granting
30 minutes preparatory time for each
trip; allowance for terminal delays;
Increase ln the differentials paid for
running Mallet engines; Increase In
differentials between local and
through freights; employment ot two
firemen on large coal burning engines
regardless of the character or length
of the run.
In.the meantime, the authority to
strike will be. used only after all
other means, Including federal mediation have failed.
FAIRBANKS NEWS
Times Are Bad—Shushanna
a Farce
A correspondent of The Federationist says that the times at Fairbanks, Alaska, are bad at present and
that the outlook for the summer Is
very discouraging. The labor market
is glutted. Groceries and provisions
have increased 25 per cent flat owing
to the high rates of transportation Imposed by the new monopoly—the'
White Pass Transportation company,
successors to the old Northern Transportation company. There are numbers of misguided and foolish workers
flocking bere In anticipation ot work
on the proposed new railroad. Half
of the men beat out of their wages
here at the camps. The Alaskan labor lien law is a "Joke" ln practice.
"I'm an old-timer up here,"< writes
the correspondent, "and I can truthfully say that I have not made a decent living during last three yeara."
The press here Ib contemptibly sycophantic and not at all to be taken
seriously. Its mission seems to be to
beguile the poor slaves and encourage
them to come to Alaska—and the
"business people" do the rest The
alleged new El Dorado, namely Shushanna, Is nothing more nor less than
a "farce." .
To Prepare Half-holiday Bylaw
Vancouver city solicitor  has been
Instructed to prepare a draft of a bylaw enforcing a weekly halt-holiday
In retail stores.
The North Vancouver municipal
council has decided to give the Vancouver Power company the required
year's notice that It Intends to put-
chase the light and power franchise.
BEWARE OF OIL
"WILD CATS"
IN THIS CITY
The announcement that oil
basjbeen struck at Calgary, Alberta, has caused a real boom
in stock selling, especially ln
Vancouver where adventurers
are not a few and are very active. Many of the same old
crowd of brokers that were formerly grafting off real estate
are out again with the glad
hand and sunny smile getting
easy money from the multitude
of "suckers" that are not on to
the game. There will be "wild
cats" aplenty for Bale out of
which, no doubt, handsome sums
will be realized by the promoters, and The Federatlonlst's advice to those of small means Is
to be wary of these "slick
guys." For every one reliable'
company there will be twenty
that are worthless. Thus In
buying stocks It Is a twenty-to-
one shot that the purchaser will
be up against PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY ....JUNE  6,  1914.
ROYAL CITY REVIEW
EDITED BY H. OIBB,  BOX 0_, NEW WESTMINSTER	
Westminster Trust, Limited
capital, Si,ooo,ooo.oo. BMerre Tnat, •MXMXW.00
lutMori-Md, SM1,000.00
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or invested. We act as agents only tor the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
8AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C,
I. 7. Jones, Managing Dinotor
J. A. Bentt, atettttty-tteeamtt.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Sioouson to Out« A Banna, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
ess Colombia iisisi
non ms
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C,
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS
UNION MADE
H«tui« Filled
PREMIER
BEER
Is a Mild Beverage.
Used temperately, lt is highly beneficial. It Is both a food and a
drink, qORDER A CASE FOR
YOUR TABLE.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
PHONE No. L-7S
A. E. SUCKLING & CO., VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKINQ THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU   HELP YOUR  FELLOW  UNION   MEN  AND   BESIDES,  YOU  GET
THE VERY  BEST  VALUE  FOR YOUR  MONEY
Labor Cartoons Labor News
Special Features
R. PARM. PRTTIPIBCE, Vice-President
British Columbia Federationist
Secretary's Office: Box 1874, Seattle, Washington
PAINE UBOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
ANNOUNCEMENT
OustavuB Myers, historian and
socialist, has added another Immensely valuable volume to his
works In
The History of
Canadian Wealth
JUST COMPLETED
There never has been a single
work ot any kind ln Canada giving the real economlo history ot
Canada; not even a bourgeois
history, Therefore lt will be Invaluable to socialists and students.
Mr. Myers writes: "The history otthe Canadian land grabs Ib one
ot the most gigantic ever seen. I spent nearly two years going over
official documents ln the archives, that tell an appalling Btory of the
way capitalism has run Canada.
"The book will detail how the great land, mines and other domains
were gobbled up by the flnanclal powers. Borne portions will be devoted especially to tbe Roman Catholic Church ln Canada.
What This Great Work Contains
347 PAGES
Bine Cloth Binding
Stamped in Gold
The Quest of Trade and New Sources of Wealth,
Ths Ecclesiastical and Feudal Lords
Tha Hudton'a Bay Company
Wars on the Fur Traders and Companies
The Landed and Mercantile Oligarchy
The Landed Proprietors Revolt Against Feudalism
Sovereignty of the Hudson's Bay Company
Passing of the Hudson's Bay Company's Sovereignty
Inception of the Railroad Power
First Period of Railway Promoters
Contest for the Pacific Railway
Era of Railway Magnates
Progress of the Railway Lords
a. C,
Federationlit,
Room 217,
Labor TompU
Vancouver, B.C
Enclosed flnd (1.60
for which please
mall Myers' History
of Canadian Wealth
Address
Extension of Railway Possessions
Appropriation of Cost, Timber and
Other Lands
Distribution of Railway Subsidies
E;
HAVE BEEN
I
Restriction in Trade Is a
Tremendous Drawback
to Canada
What Is Government Doing
to Ameliorate Present
Conditions?
Alphonse Verville, labor M. P. for
Malsonneuve, speaking at a meeting
at Ottawa the other evening, blamed
the depressed times on the fiscal or
tariff policy. The policy of protection he termed a means for a tew to
become rich and the masses to be
Impoverished. His ideas, which the
parties termed radical, were, be said,
always ahead of party. He favored
direct taxation rather than the indirect tax as established by the governments. In part he said: "I am sorry
that the people didn't understand the
question of reciprocity. It It had
passed you wouldn't have the depression you now bave in the country. I
want a direct reduction on the necessities of life. Such conditions as are
now should not exist In a democratic
country like ours. The laboring men
—in them I include,all men who are
trying to make a living—were, I think,
buncoed three years ago. For some
time we had contended that there
should be a reduction in the cost of
living. After coming into power in
1897 the tariff was first of all revised
and then a British preference put on.
Following this, prices in other countries had to be cut to compete with
the British. Prosperity then existed
that we haven't now. Reciprocity
meant just aB much to you as it did
to the farmers. It would have given
the farmers bigger markets and more
would have been produced without
any increase in cost, yet the farmer
would sell more produce and you
would benefit thereby."
Workera Spend the Money
"The pulp and paper industry was
touched upon because there was so
much of lt going on in the Ottawa district. "Realize if you can sell three
times as much paper as you are selling today at better prices. Every
man is going to benefit by this. You
will find all over the world that the
laboring man Ib the man that spends
the money. They buy goods and
spend their money. What Is the present government doing to ameliorate
the present conditions? If there were
free trade ln wheat between Canada
and the States the price ot flour would
be much lower. Thla matter is almost
religion with me. If I had my way
there would be the greatest cutting
and slashing ln the tariffs of the country. I would cut lt just as low as
possible and Btlll produce a revenue."
Restriction in trade is a tremendous
drawback to any country, and Canada
suffers from the effects of restriction
as much as any civilized country. To
encourage people to grow farm products and then shut markets against
the sale of products is nothing short
of suicidal. It Is against the Interests
of Canada at large.
Palntera Hold Smoker
The painters' local of Victoria had
a "rattling" good smoker last Friday
evening ln the K. of P. hall on North
Park street J. Philbrook occupied
the chair and made an excellent
chairman. Tbe local had made provisions for a bigger affair than was
realised, consequently all those enjoyed themselves to the full Many
were present who were not members
of the local. In fact, the purpose of
the smoker waB to bring together
some of those not at present affiliated.
There were many Items of music,
which were of a high order. Refreshments also played a large part in the
event. Alex. Watchman, president of
the B. C. Federation of Labor, and A.
S. Wells the secretary-treasurer, were
present and addressed the gathering.
The success of the event and the happy time tbat was passed showed that
sociability was tbe Victoria painters'
"long suit" Another Item of interest
is that the looal has decided to subscribe tor The Federatlonist for their
members. With apologies to the poot
longfellow, acts of this sort should remind ub.  Others can but do tbe same.
Mrs. O. 13. Cooke, wife of 0. E.
Cooke, printer, employed by Ttmms
& Co., returned today trom Quebec.
She was one of the survivors of the
ill-fated Empress of Ireland.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
FineBt Wlnesap Apples,, 4 lbs.
for 25c
OrangeB, per dozen. 30c
Lemons, per dozen. .....25c
Sardines, 2 for.... .Me
Raw Ham, sliced, per lb 30c
Swift's Premium Bacon, lb 36c
Cooked Ham, per b .40e
Wilson's Royal Ham, per lb,
whole .....27c
Just arrived—Our Import order
of Specially Blended Tea, 3
lbs. for _ .11,00
Our mall order department will
meet your requirements. We can
supply best quality at fair prices,
Note Address: Phone 458
33 EIGHTH STREET
Ntar Corner of Columbia Street
NEW WESTMINSTER
POLLY BRISBANE .
Who resigned as statistician of Vancouver Trades and Labor council at
last meeting and ia succeeded by Fred.
A, Hoover, of the Street Railway Employees' union.
ROYAL CITY
Light, Power and Transportation Council
NEW WESTMINSTER, May 30.-
Considerable disappointment is generally felt and was freely expressed
by many members of the Street Rallwaymen's union at the last meeting
of that organization at the failure of
the board of conciliation to submit
tbeir findings in the dispute between
tbe employees and the B. C. E. R.
company. It is now four weeks since
the board concluded Its sittings, and
from the evidence presented and the
stand the members of the board apparently took ln regard to it, a verdict In favor of the men on most of
tbe mateers in dispute was expected
long ago.
Despite tbe fact that the transportation men have troubles of their
own, they are taking an active interest in the trade union movement in
general, and though the attendance at
the last meeting was not as large as
lt should have been considering the
number of members, a spirited debate on matterB affecting the welfare
of the union was participated in by
most of those present. The proposition to form a Light, Power and
Transportation council was endorsed
with little opposition, and Secretary
A. F, Duncan and Business Agent U.
Yates was appointed as delegates.
On the recommendation of the
executive committee a permanent office and committee room was established at 1308 Eighth avenue. The
phone number Is 1005.
The reports of officers showed tbat
everything is progressing fairly satisfactorily at present, although the
slackness of business Ib still very
keenly felt by the men of the transportation department. Work has improved slightly in the mechanical department, but that branch Ib still on
Bhort time with about twenty men
out of work entirely.
After the usual quota of routine
business had been disposed of tbe
meeting adjourned at 10.30 p.m. The
next regular meeting will be held on
Tuesday, June 9, ln the Labor Temple,
and as several matters of importance
will be up for consideration the attendance of all the members possible is
requested.
LEFT POR ENGLAND
H. A. Kenyon Will Visit Co-operative
Stores and Factories
H. A. Kenyon of the board of man
agement of the New Westminster Co
operative association, limited, left
on Sunday on a four month's holiday
to England. He will visit the Co-operative Wholesale society's various
departments and factories, through
arrangements made by Mr. Wayles,
local manager, with a view to bringing before their notice the development of the Fraser valley, and the excellent wharfage accommodation of
New Westminster. Similar Introductions will be given to anyone wishing
to make good use of their time whilst
on holiday. The Cooperative Wholesale soolety has already five grain
elevators outside of Winnipeg,
Support the Labor Papsr
In nearly all large cities and many
small towns, labor papers devoted to
the cause of labor are published by
enterprising Individuals, stock companies or central labor bodies. It Ib
to he regretted that these publications do not receive the support they
should from those whose eause they
seek to espouse and advance. Of
course, lt Is a well-known fact that
they are not altogether published
from an entirely philanthropic standpoint, but largely as revenue producers for tbelr promoters and proprietors. ThlB, however, should not deter
the members of organised labor ln
the communities ln which they are
published from giving them their unqualified and Individual support, sympathetic, morally and financially. Experience has proven that little can be
expected ln the way of support for
organized labor from the subsidized
capitalistic dally press, and these
weekly labor publications, outside of
the official organs of labor organiza
tlons, are the only mediums of expression for organized labor and the dissemination of Information pertaining
thereto.
CAPITAL CITY BUDGET
EDITED BY JOHN  L. MARTIN, LABOR  HALL, VICTORIA, B. C.	
AI
Not Looking for a Oovernment Job—Painters
Hold Smoker
Recruiting Idle Men—Will
Employ Only Soldiers
on New Drill Hall
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTOJRIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
VICTORIA, B. C, June 1.—In a re
oent lsBUe of The Federatlonist tbe
Victoria correspondent saw fit to publish a copy of a letter ot Introduction
that was shown to him by a longshoremen. It showed how adherents ot the McBride government
are provided with jobB. The Victoria
Bcrlbe would point out, however, that
the longshoreman referred to Is not
by any means a lover of the McBride
government, and would like to point
out also that he is one of those men
the face of lt that he was after a government could buy. This correction
Ib desired because it would seem on
the fact of it that be waB after a government job, and again because it
does him an unwarranted Injustice.
Half-holiday Frustrated
The Victoria shop assistants a
week ago were jubilant in that they
had prevailed on the city council to
pass a by-law providing for a weekly
half-holiday. On Tuesday evening
last their hopes were somewhat
jarred. After months of persistant
agitation on the part of the retail employees they put the proposition up
to the local municipal council and it
was decided that a by-law Bhould be
prepared. Alas for the minds of modern aldermen, swayed about by all
manners of doctrines, the end desired
by tbe retail employees have been
assiduously frustrated. Last January
during the municipal elections all the
27 aldermanic candidates with no exceptions fell over themselves ln their
desire for the votes of those who aro
shut up week in and week out In
stores. They all promised to support
the movement for the weekly half-
holiday. Now, a different spectacle is
seen. The men then so outspoken ln
its favor are now trying to walk the
tight rope between employer and employee. Such is the ingenuity of the
Victoria aldermen. It shows the ultimate value of election promises,
vanishing as the dew before tbe morning Bun when asked to carry them
into effect. The bylaw that was to be
enacted has been held over. Some
of the employees bave been getting
busy of late in an attempt to frustrate
the activities of their employees. Last
week was published an example ot the
brand of intimidation they are capable
ot resorting to. Now they are prevailing over the aldermen to stop. The
aldermen consequently fall between
two opinions—those of the employers
and those of the employees. Which
way they go, like the scum on Victoria harbor, remains to be seen. To
enhance the awkwardness of the aldermen's position, the city solicitor reported that the council had the power
to enact the bylaw. Many of them
displayed a change of front since
election time. Many even repented
for what tbey did at that time. Everything seemed all right until some of
the employers engaged a lawyer to
protest against the bylaw. Then
everything was not all right with the
victims of the promises made at the
election. One alderman even essayed
that at next election he would not
make promises such as he had made
at the last, but promised to use his
best judgment,' which Ib neither here
nor there. To shelve the responsibility he advocated that the provincial
government should pass an aot providing for a weekly halt-holiday. Visitors recently to the city from the
large city of Glasgow told them that
they had the bylaw In force, but when
It comes to a two-by-four burg like
Victoria tbe aldermen dodge the Issue.
The prevailing hard times was one of
the arguments used by one member
of the council. Another admitted that
he had "acted ln haste and repented
at leisure." He did not, however,
state that the "leisure" he was now
enjoying was due to hard times. Many
unemployed workers ln the city can
explain their leisure as being due to
that cause. The result of their dilemma Is that the bylaw has been
shelved for the time being. Maybe
till next election when they can make
a few more rash promises that they
will subsequently repudiate.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
COLDS, ETC.
lAINTING'PROTECTS
YOUR HOUSE!
It's the repeated changes from heat to cold,
from dampness to drought, from rain to
snow, that makes wood rot and crumble
and eventually turn to dust.
To preserve your house INDEFINITELY
from the elements, you ought to paint it at
regular intervals with
Bapco Pure Paint
It covers your house with an impenetrable coating of PUREST white lead, linseed oil and zinc, and shuts out the destructive elements for years to come.
We sell and recommend BAPCO Pure
Paint to our customers, because we have
their best interests at heart.
MADEINB.C. BY THE
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT CO.
LIMITED
VICTORIA VANCOUVER
IE
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial
Will Employ Only Soldiers
The military authorities are taking
the advantage ot hard times ln Victoria. Many men are out of work, and
efforts are being made by those in
charge of the local regiments to line
up Borne of the surplus on the market, presumably to prevent union
labor from getting work on the new
drill hall, it having been decided to
employ only soldiers on the job. A
recruiting sergeant has, therefore,
been placed on the corner of one of
the prominent streets for the purpose
of lining up tbe men (?). He waB
tbere for a week, and was successful
in getting 25 "raw" recruits. They
have also been parading through the
streets with the view of stirring up
tbe ardor of those who love military
display. !Anthnllltari8m is also receiving recruits and without the services of a recruiting-sergeant either.
Of late halibut fishing on the west
coast of Vancouver island has been
distinctly poor, and the attention of
the fishermen is being directed to the
north.
H. R. H. McArthur and C. M. Butler,
two well and favorably known typos.,
have left for Calgary, Alta, It Is to
be hoped that they will become oil
kings,
INSIST
On OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PAPER MfflM COtV
IW1U FEDERATION OF LAMM
SIXTH YEAR.  No. 165.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JUNE 5,1914
EIGHT PAGES
(■cntrtuSr) $1-50 PER TEAM
REGULAR
$1.65 FOR
$1.20
REGULAR
$1.65 FOR
$1.20
Here's a Great Big Bargain
For Readers of the Federationist
A 49-pound Sack of
our "SEALof QUALITY" FLOUR for..
$1
.20
The response that we had (rom our advertisement of
last week has prompted us to offer an even greater one
this week—one that readers of The Federationist will
gladly avail themselves of, for,; besides buying the finest
bread flour on the market, you get a flour that isn't
touched by the hands from the time it goes into the mill
to when you receive it. It's absolutely purity itself, clean,
nutritious, economical and wholesome, We sell it in
the regular way at $1.65 a sack. Readers of The Federationist, can buy it this week only for $1.20.
BRING THIS AD. WITH YOU FOR YOU CAN'T GET
THI8 FLOUR AT THI8 PRICE WITHOUT IT
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND GEORGIA
Shop of
$151
Knowing that the price
is so popular we place
great stress on our Fifteen Dollar Suits, and
we offer lines of suits
that we believe can not
be duplicated elsewhere
Thos. Foster
& Company Limited
*  =514=
Granville
Street
THE WORKINOMAN'S STORE
"LANG'S"   626 MAIN STREET
Everything tor the working man—BOOTS and SHOE8, CLOTHING, HAT8 and CAPS, GENTS' FURNISHINGS, Etc, at prices that
will pay you to come and investigate.
EXTRA 8PECIAL THI8 WEEK: ,
$10.50 Suits $7.50
$22,50 Suits , $15,00
THESE ARE WONDERS,
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
ogging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C.
I
WOULD BE A
Percy Was Victim of Simon
Pure Case of
"Bunk"
Fable in Slang—Moral: Prominence Has Its
Penalties
Once Upon a Time there vas a
Young Man named Percy, who, living
in the Heart ot the Empire, sought to
Better his Condition. He cast his
eyes about him seeking the longed-
for Opportunity, but all too soon he
realized that all the Opportunities
and Good Things were seourely Roped
and Tied and passed along from
Father to Son from time Immemorial.
Every loophole that might he Used
to Advantage by the common Herd
had a padlock on lt.
"Therefore," quoth the Young Man
to himself, "If I would seek advancement, I must hie me to the Colonies."
Thereupon he spent many hours
studying Time Tables, Maps and Picture-Postals, endeavoring to choose
which Colony he would Honor with
his Presence where by Persistency
and Sterling Honesty he could Break
In and make the natives sit up and
realize his True Worth.
He was very regular in attendance
at a centaln Hall where Moving Pictures of the Glowing West were exhibited under the Personal Supervision of the Boosters' Club, The said
Club, by carefully omitting the Snow
Slides, ditching the Weather Reports
and carefully suppressing the True
Conditions as printed in the Labor
Press, were able to show a land flowing with Milk and Honey.
Percy became enthused to a degree
that was very acceptable to the Boosters Club, and he immediately took
steps to get on the list of would-be
Travellers to the Golden West where
Opportunity stalked through the land
holding out the Glad Hand to AU
Comers,
He made a careful inventory of all
his Negotiable Collateral, and by
transferring the same to a merchant
of Hebrew Ancestry who talked with
his hands, he figured that he bad
enough Necessary Dough to take advantage of the Personally Conducted
Trips to the Land of Promise.
In due time Percy found himself
bunched ln with a Motley Crew, but
realizing that lt was All In The Game,
he stood for the Inconveniences and
eventually made hts Grand Entree at
Granville Street Depot.
As he walked down Hastings Street
with a feeling ot elation, he was very
much impressed by the noise of the
Street Cars, the wail of tbe News
Boy with the Fake Extra, and the
multitude of signs announcing Closing Out Sales.
He made enquiries of a few suave
hotel clerks regarding Rates, and on
being told the best they could for
him he hastily grabbed up his Bags
and made a hurried Exit, murmuring
to himself that there must be some
Mistake and wondering If there was
anything in his Make Up that left the
impression that he was burdened with
Money.
He finally secured a room on the
Outskirts, one of those Third Floor
Backs with a Southern Exposure and
an unobscured view of a Coal Yard.
By cutting out Cigarettes and ignoring Street Cars, Percy figured that
he could hold out for two weeks. As
the days flew by without any compensation his Cheerfulness began to
Wane and he finally acknowledged to
himself that both he and a Multitude
of his Countrymen were the victims
of a Simon Pure case ot Bunk.
One day. however, his luck changed
and he secured a position as a driver
of a Wood Cart, the ex-driver being ht
the time confined ln the Bull Pen suffering from an enlarged and Aggravated Jag.
Percy found that his Willingness to
Work met with the entire approval of
his Boss, who was likewise very liberal in the number of houra that
Percy was allowed to work overtime
without remuneration in the pay envelope.
Our Young Man kept posted on the
events of the day. Al lthe dally
newspapers could be secured very
easily by stopping his cart in front of
the old Court House and gathering
up an armful of Extras that had been
discarded by their original owners.
One evening, as he unfolded his
bundle of cast-off periodicals, he was
thrilled by reading a Call-to Arms.
The Country was ln Danger, the Mill
ers were On Strike, the Bayonet was
the only thing to Hold Tbem in
Check. Here at last was the longed-
for opportunity to obtain Fame and
Fortune, Service and Celebrity. He
would rally to the call and go to the
front like a hero to uphold the Old
Flag and perhaps be mustered out
with Honors.
That night his slumbers were filled
with visions of Beautiful Young
Ladies pinning Medals on his breast
and calling him the Logical Successor
of General Kitchener. Everywhere
he went ln Dreamland the people
were throwing Bouquets at him and
following up wltb a Brass Band.
The day following, his resignation
went in to the Wood Yard Boss and
without any loss of time he reported
to Recruiting Headquarters and was
given a blank Application to fill out.
After complying with this Form he
was vouched for by a man whom he
had never before seen. Then he was
sent to the Drill Hall where, with a
number of others that constituted the
Awkward Squad, he was put through
the Evolutions by o cross-looking
man that Chewed Tobacco and issued
orders ln a very supercilious Tone.
After several days of this Nerve
Racking Exercise be waB handed his
uniform, which consisted of a second-
Hand suit ot Kilts, and was told that
they would leave for the Front tbat
night. Marching out of town at night
was not what he had anticipated. He
had drawn a mental picture of the
Regiment In Full Array led by a Band
and taking up tbe Entire Highway,
while the populace waved them a
Vociferous Farewell) on the way to
the Boat Landing, about the midnight
hour, the few belated wayfarers they
met, only paused long enough to give
vent to hoots and cat-calls, and the
next morning they landed in the Fateful City of Disturbance, Nanalmo.
He Boon learned that the soldiers
were as welcome as a Boll on the
Neck. He found no riots to quell, and
as a member of the Corporal's Guard
escorting a Wagon containing a Bale
of Hay or stopping Women and Children while on sentry duty was hardly up to his idea of the Heroics. He
noticed that on nights of Unsettled
and Nasty Weather that he was usually selected for Sentry Duty, while
sounds of Revelry Issued from the
snug and cosy quarters of the Officers.
He was pestered by Mosquitoes to
such an extent that his knees looked
as if he had stopped a Charge of Bird
Shot.
Whenever the steamer landed a
cargo of Good Things to Eat they
never stopped until they reached the
Officers' Mess Room. He had lots of
time for reflection and he realized
that be was too hasty ln choosing the
Soldier's Life, and longed for his own
little room and the peaceful confines
of the Wood Yard.
One day he was told that he might
return to Vancouver and he mustered
out, and he lost no time in getting
aboard the Steamer. As be was creeping up the rear stairway to his room
about eleven p. m. he was halted by
the Landlady, Mrs. MsTavish, who
saw him for the first time In kilts.
"Hoots, Mon!" she cried, "ye're nae
a Scotchman." "My word!" retorted
Percy, as he bolted for his room,
"Who ever said I was."
The next day he reported at the
Wood Yard but was told that his job
had been taken by a Chinaman whose
work was entirely satisfactory. He
now declares that he Is wholly in accord with the labor unions in tbelr
flght for their rights, and is opposed
to the admission of Mongols, Including Hindoos.
Moral: Prominence has its Penalties.
E
Simplicity of Some Working Hen in Financial
Transactions
Incidents of Hen Being Beat
Out of Their Sick
Benefits
MINIMUM WAGE
For  Working  Women  in
State of Oregon
In Oregon there Is a minimum wage
for working women established by
law. For a week of 54 hours a woman
In that state cannot be paid less than
18.64. The woman who started the
agitation for a living wage was Mrs.
Trumbell, who induced the consumers' league of the city to institute at
its own expense a social survey. Miss
Caroline Gleason, a graduate of the
University of Minnesota, was engaged
as tbe director of the survey. This
college girl was determined not to depend on hearsay evidence. When she
went before the legislature to present
the case of the working woman, she
was ready with her facts. She became
a wage-earner herself. She and ber
associates hired out to work. They
rented rooms and lived in boarding
houses, and ate at restaurants. She
took every means to find out on how
small a sum a woman could support
herself respectably. She found out
wbat evils followed the payment of
low wages. Miss Gleason was able to
prove that three-fifths of the women
in Oregon were working under conditions injurious to health. At the close
of the Investigation, a law was passed
creating for Oregon an Industrial Welfare commission, and tbe governor of
the state appointed Miss Gleason secretary. In awakening the public conscience to the wrong done by paying
women and girls less than a living
wage, not only to the women of the
state of Oregon, but to those of the
whole continent.
•p»elaltl.ii
Whole Wh.it Bread
choice Family Bread
Wmdlna and Birthday Cakes.
We Use Union Tint.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink, and Lunch..
All Ooods Fruh Dally.
•M OBAWTO.t.1 SV.
»•*. ley, 7104,
Millions for Industrial Training
Thirty million dollars for Industrial
training and technical education during the next ten years is the suggested expenditure for the dominion government by the labor men of Western
Canada. At last week's meeting of
the Trades and Labor council at Winnipeg, a resolution recommended by
the Calgary Trades and Labor council,
memorializing tbe dominion government to comply with the recommendations of the royal commission on industrial training and technical education and urging the government to
appropriate the sum ot (3,000,000 annually for the next ten yearB in this
conection, was nnnnlmously adopted.
Greatest Damage Verdict
The greatest damage verdict ever
given a workman In New York, $75,-
000, was awarded by a jury at White
Plains to Oscar Fried, who bad
both arms burned off while in the
employ of the New Work, New
Haven and Hartford railroad. Fried,
wbo is thirty years old, touched an
electric wire last year, and 11,000
volts of electricity penetrated his
body, He waa comatose for eight
days, and then both arms which had
been burned to a crisp, were amputated.
Oail Labor Telegram
Tbe Daily Labor Telegram Is a new
evening paper published at Nanalmo,
B. C, under the management of J. K.
Johnson. According to its announce
ment tiie paper "starts out with a
bona flOe circulation of 2034 subscribers.'\ It solicits advertisements
from friends of the working man.
Others nee\l not apply. The Federa-
tlonst extends greetings to the new
venture and Vlshes lt every sucess.
McNIven \it Edmonton
J. D. McNIven,'■ "fair wage" officer
of the department of labor at Ottawa,
with headquarters in Vancouver, is at
Edmonton, Alta. 'Mr. McNIven is
studying tbe situation of the unemployed in that city with a view of recommending to tbe department as to
whether or not lt Is advisable for tbe
federal government to do anything to
relieve the present conditions.
William Lakeland, of Miners local,
No. 22, W. F. ot M„ ot Greenwood,
B. C, has written the following for
publication: It Is with deep regret
that I am continually noticing the simplicity of some working men ln their
transactions, flnanclal and otherwise,
with agents of all kinds, especially
sickness and accident Insurance
agents that are traveling the country
looking tor suckers. I am warning
persons dally whom I come In contact with and through the medium of
your paper I would like the people to
get wise, I don't wish my story to be
too long, so will just mention a few
Items wblch have prompted me to
write this letter. There Is a man here
who paid into an Insurance company
for quite a long time, when he became sick and sent ln his claim for
sick benefits.
Beat Out of Sick Benefits
The reply he received waB to the
effect that they could not reimburse
him on account of the fact that he had
left the house between the time the
sickness commenced and the time he
was discharged from tbe care of his
medical adviser. The leaving the
house amounted to five minutes' walk
to tbe doctor's office and back, because the doctor waB too busy at the
time to go to the man's house. Mind
you, the doctor tn attendance saw no
harm In lt. There is another instance
here of a man who met with an accident in the mine and was refused
benefits for tbe sole reason tbat he
was a few days late ln reporting the
injury to the insurance company, notwithstanding the fact that the records
of the case are on file ln the doctor's
office. Both the above policy holders
are other than English-speaking men
and have not got sufficient business
Instinct to look into these things before parting with their money.
Morally Wrong
Of course, the companies tell you
that they are within their rights, as
these conditions are stated on the
policy. But what Ib technically right
is not always morally so, and, furthermore, you sometimes just receive a
receipt and the policy Is forwarded
about a week later by mall. A slick
agent in a community that is crowded
with men who cannot speak or understand our language is certainly a
menace. The ignorance of the foreigner Is not by any means a general
ignorance, but simply an Ignorance of
the customs of our free and honest
country. Can we wonder at these
people having bitter feelings when in
years to come they realize that they
have been fleeced. Case No. 3 was a
man who paid $14 for a policy to an
agent supposed to represent a company with a good reputation, but on
receiving the policy by mall a few
days later, it was made out in the
name of a company that is not much
heard of.
Fooled on Policy
This man asked my advice, and I
wrote a letter for him to the company, who replied that they thought
Mr. Soand-So would just as soon hold
a policy in the latter company, but if
he so wished they would make one
out for him in the former company.
Needless to say, he quit paying right
there. Of course, the best way to
combat such business is by the men
themselves making It their duty to
get into the ways of the country as
soon aa possible, and thereby be able
to realize when they are making a
bargain or wben they are taking
chances of being fooled. It is not only
the foreigner, though, who Is being
deceived, but people wbo have got a
fair amount of intelligence, simply on
account of the wording of the policy
being ln sucb a manner that you do
not notice it at flrst reading, after
which, ln most cases, tt is pushed at
the bottom of the trunk and forgotten
until sickness comes along.
Against "Slick Guys"
My personal opinion is, that the
legislature is not strict enough ln
these matters; lt should enact laws
and enforce them which will prevent
some of these "slick guys" from fattening on the simplicity and ignorance
of men who work bard ln the bowels
of the earth for their few dollars and
cents. For years we have been grabbing up men all over tbe world to
populate and develop the country and
I think it is our duty to protect them
while they are here. No doubt this
article will be criticized and not having the ability of a press agent I
Bhould be at a lose ln a press argument, but should any one require
proof positive of the cases stated they
can be had from me with very little
trouble.
Calgary Typos. Elect Officers
At the annual election of officers of
Calgary Typographical union last
week, John Pearson was elected president and J. J. Atherton vice-president. Both these officers were alao J
elected as delegates to the Saskatchewan-Alberta typo, conference, to be
held at Medicine Hat in July next.
Berry Bros.
Agents (or
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
Th* Bicycle with the Reputation
Full   line  of   accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 89}
DAVIO SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
HANDY OIL STOVES
ENSURE SUMMER COMFORT
The housewife who has to depend on the ordinary coal or wood stove for cooking looks forward
to hot weather with little pleasure. These small
handy oil stoves are the solution of the problem of
how to maintain a cool house and do the cooking
without discomfort. The running cost of an oil
stove is only slightly greater than coal and wood
burning stoves, and the ease with which the oil stove
is controlled is a decidedly economical factor.
We have the best variety of oil stoves in the
vicinity, and many are inexpensive—
One-burner Oil Stove	
Two-burner Oil Stove	
Three-burner Oil Stove...
Four-burner, double stove	
PERFECTION OIL STOVE—
One burner	
Two burner 	
Three burner	
$.78
. 1.10
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10.00
12.00
OVENS for using on these Stoves-
Single oven  -.
With glass door...
Double oven „.
...ma
With glass door...
. 2.75
. 4.00
.4.50
"BOS" GASOLINE STOVES—
Single burner	
Two burner	
...13.50
Three burner.
. 4.50
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CAMP STOVES
SHEET IRON STOVES—Two holes, 12.00; four holes..83.75
TWO-HOLE CAMP 8T0VB WITH OAST TOP 4,75
FOUR-HOLECAMP 8TOVB*WITH*CAST TOP™:..".::. 6.00
FOUR-HOLB HEAVY STEEL CAMP STOVE 8.00
TWO-HOLE HEAVY STEEL CAMP STOVE.™ 6.00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY 8UIT8 oan be bought at BRUMMITT'8 (rom
810.00 up to 830.00 And thsy ara worth mora
HATS, bearing the union label, at 82.00, 82.60, 83.00.
SHOES, all makes and prices, bearing the label, at "live and' let live
prices, 82.00 up to 86,00
CHIPPEWA SHOE8 at 87.00, 88.00 and 810.00
W. B. BRUMM'ITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools aad all
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Haitingi Street Weit
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, mott scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Cold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and convenience.
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an instant's attention to connecting the cord with the household
socket.
They can do everything In tbe line ot light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You don't
want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances just
meet this demand and make it unnecessary to have a hot fire going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few cents per hour of continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a fraction
of an hour.   They are guaranteed by the manufacturers.
8EE OUR FULL LINE OF ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Hutingi Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
1138 Giniilli St.
Nut Davie PAGE FOUR
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JUNK 6, 18K
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and  Reatrve,   ..  $1,700,000
15 branches In Canada
A ganaral banUtini bualneaa trana-
actad.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
Eait End Branch
160 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvis, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1866
Paid-up Capital • • • 8 11,W0,00
Reserve     12,808,006
Total Aaaata 180^100^00
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will open
tha account, and your
bualneaa will ba welcome ba It large or
amall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
185$
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve 811,176,671
WAGE-EARNERS
ksap your savings In th* Bank
ef Toronto, and watch your deposits and Interut added by th*
bank grow to a moat desirable
bank balance. Th* flnanolal
•trangth of thia long-established, well-conducted Institution ensures safety for your
money, and you will receive
•vary courtesy, and your account careful attention.
Dspeslte
841,000,000
Main Office—
468 HASTINGS ST. WEST
(Near Richard*)
Branches—
Car. Hutlng* and Carrall St*.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED OITY PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
867 HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
818-888 ROGERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER      •      .      B.C.
FIRE, UFE ud ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in onr savings department, subject to cheque.
Afr**m*nte Far Sale purchaHd
Baf* Deposit Vault*
8240 a yur
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federationlit, Ltd.
R, Parm. Pettlplece - - - Managing Editor
,1 W. Wllklnaon - - - Associate Editor
George Bartley    News Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, president; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Glbb; 0. J. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlplece
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple.
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Advertising Manager     -     -     -     - M. C. Shrader
SUBSCRIPTION
11.50 per year; in Vancouver city, 12.00; to unions
subscribing In a body, (1.00
Affiliated   with Western Labor Press Association
"Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
PBIDAY JUNE 5, 1914.
THE anomalies,   inconsistencies and general   shortcomings    of   the  workmen's
compensation  act of British Columbia
have been a source of dissatisfaction ever since
it became law.   The labor commission which
went through  the province
last   year   accumulated  a
B. C. mountain   of   advice   and
WORKMEN'S suggestions bearing on the
COMPENSATION act. The recommendation
which they have submitted
in their report is as follows:
The proper remedy, in our opinion,
should not be in amending existing legislation but in the introduction of a system
of compulsory state insurance. Your commissioners find the existing system of compensation unsatisfactory both from the
standpoint of employer and employee. It
creates unnecessary friction between
master and servant and is slow and
wasteful in operation. The proportion
who obtain compensation at all is small,
whilst the litigation which is forced upon
them is often protracted and expensive.
The injured workmen has not the same
financial resources to engage in lengthy
litigation as the insurance companies,
which in the majority of instances are
behind the employer. There is also a
waste of funds which are taken out of
varioui industries in the shape of premiums or accident policies on the workmen.
Commissions to agents, salaries to officers, dividends to shareholders, the payment of litigation fees, and other incidental expenses absorb a very large portion
of such premiums. With a view to eliminating this waste, and to enable the workmen to obtain fair, quick and certain
settlement of his claim, we would recommend the introduction of a system of
compulsory state insurance against industrial accidents.
It is not clear from the term "compulsory
state insurance" just what is meant. If it
means that workmen are to be compelled to
contribute some portion of their wages to insure against accident, then it is not satisfactory.
If it means that the profits of an industry are
to be taxed- according to the risk involved in
the operation of that industry then it is satisfactory so far as the principle is concerned.
The wages of the worker only represent the
bare cost of his maintenance, and the profits
derived from die exploitation of his labor
should be made to carry the charges involved
in a scheme of compensation. Industry should
be charged with the wear and tear on its'
workers just the same as on its machinery. The
recommendation does not say whether all
workers or only some are to be included under
the provisions of the scheme suggested. Are
the loggers and such to be left out again as in
the present act? This and a hundred other
questions will need to be very carefully watched
when legislation bearing on the report of the
commission is brought down at next session of
the provincial parliament That work will
chiefly fall to the duties of the executive of the
B. C. Federation of Labor and wc repeat our
warning of last week, that the fullest financial
and moral support of every trade unionist in
the province will be needed by that body if it
is to io its work properly. It may be taken
for certainty that the capitalist interests throughout British Columbia will not overlook any
point calculated to conserve their interests in
the matter.
L
Guaranteed Investment of Fund*
ter Clients
THE DUKE of Sutherland needs a little
money to make a payment on his Canadian acreage.   So he is seeking power
from the courts at Edinburgh to sell some of
his entailed estates.   He says he has to do it
because ihe new land taxes
in Great Britain are unjust,
Hl8 and an imposition on public
GRACE OP spirited    land-owners    like
SUTHERLAND      hin*,elf'     The «fl, of *j»
sweet youth is sublime.   If
Scotchmen would spend
about one-tenlh of the time
they occupy singing and talking about their
country, in learning its history—and particularly the history of- the Sutherland family—it
would not be safe for him to show his nose in
bonnie Scotland again. Nor, for that matter,
in Canada either, if the story be true that one
cannot throw a brick up in the air without it
falling on a Scotchman. The history of the
great Scottish clans is one long trail of murder,
theft, rampage, and brutal oppression of the
common people. And none of them in their
record can outclass for ruthless cruelty, the
Sutherlands. All ancient Scotch law admits
that the clan, or children of the soil, were its
real owners. But they were dispossessed, by
ihe armed force of the Sutherlands, who gradually impoverished the whole county by a
series of abominable outrages which culminated
in the infamous "Sutherland clearances" of
Ihe early part of the 19th century. The duke
of that day deemed huge farms more profitable
than small crofts, and in many parishes the
crofters got notice to quit. The crops were
al standing uncut; the houses had been built
by the crofters or their ancestors; and ihey had
nowhere to go. They had been bom and
raised on the land which, by their patient labor,
had been transformed from a wilderness of
rock and scrub into smiling fields of harvest.
The duke gave them permission to camp on the
barren sea-shore, with the privilege of gathering shell-fish and fishing in the rough seas of
that coast with boats which ihey had not got,
and which they had not money to obtain. They
resisted because they thought they had a right
to the soil which they had made fertile   and
the crops which they had planted.
*      *      *      »
So the duke sent his merry men from Dun-
robin castle. They burned and pulled down
the houses; destroyed the crops and burned
the poor and scanty furniture. In some cases
they did not even wait while sick persons were
removed before setting fire to the thatch.
Women bordering on childbirth were thrown
on the roadside. Cruelties well nigh unbelievable were committed. Smoke filled the valleys and hovered on the mountain sides. The
peasantry which had been the country's pride
were driven, hunted, ragged and homeless, to
a barren sea-shore. In 1884 a Crofters' commission gathered evidence of these matters. On
page 3222 of volume 4 of their report is the
evidence of James Macdonald, a retired revenue officer, aged 81. He was a well-known
tory.   He says in part:
I beg to assure your honors that I have
seen the atmosphere of Clyne and for
many miles around, filled with the smoke
which arose from the burning cottages
from which their inmates had been forcibly ejected, in the Straths of Kildonan,
Brora, Fleet, etc. Other cottages I have
seen in the act of being demolished, and
I have teen the people who had occupied
them for days without shelter, huddled
together at dykesides, and roadsides on
the beach, waiting the* arrival of ships to
carry them across the Atlantic or wherever
they were forced to go. I have a distinct recollection of seeing a notice that
was issued simultaneously with those proceedings, posted upon the door of the
parish church, intimating that any person
who was known to have given shelter to,
or to have harbored, any of the evicted
people would, in turn, without any warning, be summarily ejected from his or her
house, and be compelled to leave the country; and this harsh decree applied irrespective of any ties of relationship what-
The first of these clearances began in Ross-
shire. Later on 90 families were "rooted
out" of the parishes of Farr and Lang. Then
several hundred families were cleared out of
Dornoch, Rogart, Loth, Clyne, and Golspie,
After that, still bigger sweeps were made because the crofters protested. Special constables
were sworn in. The cannon at Dunrobin
castle were trimmed and charged. The Riot
Act was read, and to put the finishing touch
on, a regiment of Irish was sent by forced
marches from Fort George. They found no
one in armed rebellion, but their appearance
gave security to the despoilers. ,The British
Empire had arrived and the clearance game
went on apace. Later on the entire parishes
of Farr and Kildonan were completely cleared
of any who had been overlooked previously.
Donald McLeod, in his "Gloomy Memories of
the Highlands," tells the.story of those evictions which, for fiendish brutality, are not excelled by anything in the whole history of
British land robbery—including Ireland. But
the noble duke to-day is evidently getting
pinched a little, and his howls anent "robbery"
and "confiscation" are heard abroad in die
land which his ancestors have bathed in blood
for his inheritance. This shining ornament of
the British peerage wants to shake the dust of
his country from his feet, even though a century of tears could not wash the blood from
his escutcheon. He has already bought immense tracts of land in Western Canada, where
doubtless he hopes to find the people more
amenable to his exploitations. He thinks
right. But the private ownership of land, or
any other social necessity, in Canada will inevitably repeat in this country the evils which
arise from it elsewhere. When will the people
learn?
LORD  STARTHCONA, who  died a
while  ago, left  a   fortune  of   something like $23,255,000.    He accumulated that during the course of a long life devoted to patriotism and politics.   The  Daily
Citizens, which is the newt-
FORTUNE OF    paper °* t*le 'a'50r P"**   m
STRATHCONA   Bri*,in' refe" «? *« forhme
as an example of what is possible
"to a man who can get on the sunny side
of the gigantic system of private exaction
which society is now organized to maintain."
This has aroused the editorial ire of the
Daily Province, which describes the comment
as an "absolute myth." We are assured that
this immense fortune is due to the frugality,
hard work and foresight of its owner.
«       *       ¥       *
When Stratheona first started out in Canada he was plain Donald A. Smith, a penniless
Scot, assigned to a trading post of the Hudson's Bay Co. in Labrador, where he stayed
for  13 years.    According to Bryce's "The
Scotsman in Canada," he managed to   save
close upon $50,000 during that time.     The
editorial capacity of the Daily Province says:
The knowledge he gained there of Indian
customs and habits proved to be the foundation of his success.
We are not told what happened to the Indians. But Beckles Wiilson. in his "Lord
Stratheona," deals with the miserable cor
tion of the Esquimaux in Labrador at that
bme^ whose only means of subsistence lay in
hunting and trapping for the company and exchanging their fun for supplies. He tells how
in some cam they spent as much as two years
on a hunting trip, and all they would receive
for their furs at the end of it was "a little tobacco and a few strings of beads." Stratheona gained the reputation of being a highly
successful representative of the company in
that region at that time—a reputation which
eventually made him a chief factor of the
company. A select committee of the British
parliament, in 1857, inquired into the methods
ana activities of the company. The evidence
showed the revolting social conditions of the
natives and the ruthless methods of exploitation which were used by the white traders.
1 he story of those early fur posts, is the story
of trickery and cheating, practiced upon the
natives by the whites, assisted by bad whiskey
and worse morals. A truly charming atmosphere in which to lay the foundation of an imperialist s fortune, ,
»     *     ♦     *
By the time of the rebellion led by Louis
Ri.!  n 1869-1870 Smith  had  become S,>
Donald A. Smith, and head officer of the comply.    He was sent by the government as
special commissioner to the Red River settlements at the time of the rebellion, which many
at that time believed was secretly fomented by
the company. In 1871, he was elected as member of the dominion parliament for Selkirk, and
in 1675 was charged in the house, by John
Christian Schultz with having permitted the
papers of the rebel government to be destroyed
by officers of his company. Smith explained
at great length and said the papers vmre of no
value. . No official proof of double-dealing
was established, but it is plain from the
parliamentary records of that time the incident
left a nasty taste behind. Schultz openly taunted Smith in the house with not daring to push
the claim of the company for $ 1,500,000 losses
sustained by them during the rebellion, lest his
complicity as an officer of the company with the
rebels should be established, and that claim
was not settled until the rebellion had become
history. Strathcona's interest in the Hudson's
Bay Co. at the time of his death was over
$1,200,000.
The story of bribery, corruption, and political chicanery connected with the early days
of the Canadian Pacific Railway company, is
closely associated with the name of Stratheona.
His holdings in the company at the time of his
death were $4,112,000. The first move to
build the railway was made in the dominion
parliament April llth, 1871. From then, on
to the final formation of the company, a ferocious struggle of rival politicians and financiers was waged, in which Donald A. Smith
proved his mettle in as choice a piece of "wirepulling" as ever took place. The group of
capitalists connected with the Grand Trunk
railway wanted it. So did another gang, headed
by Sir Hugh Allan. Another railway was in
project at the same time from Pembina to
Fort Garry. Its promoters were Donald A.
Smith, D. Mclnnes, and others. Allan, writing
at that time to Geo. W. McMullen, one of his
group, said: "That is the only one that affects
us," and he conceived the idea of securing the
co-operation instead of the opposition of the
other group, by making them allotments of stock
in the proposed Canadian Pacific railway company. Writing to Chas. M. Smith, February
28th, 1872, Allan said: "It seems pretty certain that in addition to money payments the
following stock will have to be distributed."
Then follows a list of patriots, and the amount
of stock they were to receive. Donald A.
Smith was to get $100,000, and D. Mclnnes
$50,000. All that and a lot mare of its kind
can be found in the "Report of the Royal
Commission, Pacific Railway, with Despatches," which went into these scandals in 1873,
But the whole scheme failed and in 1880 another company headed by George Stephen, with
Donald A. Smith at the back, put the deal
through which practically gave them the C.P.R.
and a land grant of 25,000,000 acres free of
cost and a subsidy of $25,000,000.
*     *     *     *
But that was after Smith had helped to send
his former friend^Sir John A. Macdonald out
of the premiership. The report of the commission of 1873 revealed that the Allan combination had contributed something like $45,
000 to the election expenses of Sir John A.
Macdonald in Ontario, and further huge sums
for the election expenses of other ministers.
These disclosures brought on a fight in. the
dominion parliament. Smith could see Macdonald was discredited, and no further use to
him, so he assisted in throwing him overboard.
The new government, under Mackenzie,
served his objects better. The political muck,
in which the foundations of the Canadian Pacific Railway company, the Hudson's Bay company, and the Bank of Montreal were laid, was
the soil in which the fabulous fortune of
Stratheona was nourished and grew. As an
individual, we need not distress ourselves over
him. It is the political ignorance of the masses
and the innate rottenness of the capitalist system of our time which is to blame. But that is
no reason why we should allow the fulsome
grovelling of hired press editorialists to pass
without notice. Such material may be due to
actual ignorance, or they may consider it fit
mental pabulum for the mass of the people of
this province who, right at this very time, are
being used for the same kind of political and
financial jobbery by McBride and his government But it is no business of ours to allow
them to imagine they are deceiving us.
ONE   OF THE CHIEF difficulties "if
being a. politician—and particularly a
liberal politician—is the danger of telling the truth at one of those awkward moments when it is likely to be noticed.    Lloyd
George   recently  introduced
PRICE OF      '   ,''e nat'ona' budget for the
REVOLUTION    5*eal"'n me British house of
commons.      Part    of    his
scheme for raising money was
a super-tax of one shilling and fourpence  in
the pound on the incomes of very rich men.
They did not like it and told him so.   Then
he let the cat out of the bag,   He said:
"There is a revolt surging up in this
country among millions of men against
,   their conditions, and unless the rich and
opulent people of this country are' prepared in time to make sacrifices to lift
their less favored citizens  out  of  their
wretchedness, a day will come—and it
will come soon—when they will look back
with regret at the days when ihey protested against a one-and-fourpenny extra insurance against revolution."
That is confession for, Which we should be
truly thankful.   It reveals in one sentence the
insidious intent which, lies at the back of the
so called "reform" legislation which the liberals have put forth so plenteously of late for the
purpose of bolstering up their political credit
Lloyd George might just as well have said
to the greedy grumblers: "Now, don't be too
selfish. If you do, you may kill the goose
which lays the golden eggs. I've made a
scientific study of this question, and I want
you to leave it to me, Give me a small portion of your excessive income for my reform
schemes. I will guarantee that eventually you
will find it a very good investment I will
surround the working class with social conditions which guarantee the minimum standard
of living consistent with the maximum standard of productive efficiency. From every
ten cents you spend on social reform you will
reap one dollar in increased profits, because I
will make your workeri stronger in body, better trained in mind, and in every way more
fruitful and efficient wealth-producen for your
service."   That ii practically what it amounts
to. The organization of the producing class
on a scientific basis for the benefit of the non-
producers. It represents the quintesence of
exploitation. The more cunning and sagacious
of modem capitalist economists are coining to
the belief that to allow the workers as a class
to sink into that, poverty which means actual
lack of bread, is not a good thing from a business point of view. It means that their wealth-
producing capacity is reduced. It also means
that the thoughts of an increasing number of
them may be directed to rock bottom facts
which it were better for their masters they
should not learn. Knowing those things, they
realize the ultimate wisdom of making immediate and minor concessions with the object of
conserving the principle of exploitation which
is the vital element in the whole capitalist
system.
* «     w     *
Yet, in spite of the efforts of politicians to
surround the workers of Britain with all the
attributes of the Servile State, it hai not resulted in improving their economic condition.
In the last two decades the aggregate national
wealth has doubled. But the distribution of
it has only made the rich richer, while the poor
remain poor. They have not derived any
advantage from their increased capacity for
producing wealth in the shape of the necessaries
and luxuries of life. During that time also,
science and invention have given wonderful
machinery to industry and have increased the
productive capacity of the individual worker a
hundredfold. But instead of finding himself
better off for that fact, the worker sees himself
reduced to the position of a slave, shackled
to the monster which, instead of being his master, should be ministering to his needs and
making hii daily toil an eaiy task instead of a
grinding burden.
* *     *     w
These facts are slowly but steadily percolating into the minds of the workers of Britain.
They can see that the problem of production
has been solved. They are alto beginning to
see that the root problem of their class life lies
in the fact that the ownership of the product
of their labor is not vested in themselves as its
producers. And that if they are to effect any
real and fundamental change in their economic
status, all their future efforts must be directed
to securing for the workers that wealth which
is theirs by right of having produced it Lloyd
George and a few other long-lighted politicians,
know of these tendencies of working-class
thought in Britain. They recognize, too, that
the movement to consolidate the workers into
large and more powerful industrial organizations is part of the business of putting those
ideas into practice. It is a literally golden opportunity for the. trickery and tinkering. of
modem liberalism, with its policy of compromise and makeshift so generously watered with
its crocodile weepings. There are not wanting signs that the revolution of which this cunning little Welsh lawyer professes such a fear
is coming. And, "clever and artful as he is,
he will not be able to prevent it by purchasing
legislative brooms at the modest figure of one
shilling and fourpence a time, for the purpose
of attempting to sweep back the tide of economic evolution which is hastening the coming of
the day, irrespective of the aspirations of the
workers or the fears of liberal politicians.
Do you ever get an idea?
If you should get one, have you a place to
put it?    Could you carry it out?
Are you too busy knocking your officers to
be able to do something yourself?
Have you contributed a single constructive
proposal to the deliberations of your union
lately?
It is a fair and honest question and we ask
the Nanaimo Herald what form of trade
unionism it would approve of.
Six hundred more Chinese came in this
week. There is no need to find legal quibbles
for the admission of Hindoos.
The chief opponents of the new workmen's
compensation act in Ontario were the Canadian Manufacturers' association, the lawyers and
the insurance men., That should serve as an
early warning to the workers of British Columbia what they may expect
The Mackenzie-Mann interests and the Mo
Bride government are the present-day proto-
"typei in British Columbia of Stratheona and
the politicians whom he used in his day. History repeats itself, and will do as long as
the workers like to be fooled.
Three hundred and seventy-six Hindoos are
trying hard to get into British Columbia to
work.. Twenty times that number of white
men wish they had the price to get out because they have no work. The Hindoos seem
to think they are being deprived of something.
So they are—of the chance to starve.
When the Titanic went down it wai plain
that the cause was due to a desire to make a
speed record for the sake of commercial pres-
tige. In the cate of the Empreti of Ireland
that does not appear to be the reason, unless
the Storstad stood to lose money by delivering
its coals a few hours late. The terrible tale
of the wreck brings out the fact of all men's
equality when confronted by great natural
danger. A bag of gold is not worth a lifebelt, nor title deeds to half the earth of a
thousandth part as much value as a floating
log. Differences of economic and social status
avail nothing. Deatji, the only ultimate democrat it no respecter of persons.
The dominion government it io busy giving
the Canadian Northern Railway and $45,000-
000 to Mackenzie-Mann, and the minister of
labor is so busy trying to prove he is sick, that
there is to be nd labor legislation from the
federal home this session. Delegation! come,
delegations go, and "your humble petitioners"
keep on ever praying—but nothing is to be
done. Mr. Crothers is a very astute and suave
politician. He is there to prevent ai much
working-class legislation as possible from passing. He knows the entire dominion ii filled
with unemployed workmen. He knowi that
thoie who have a job daren't move for fear
it ihould be taken by those who have not More
important, he knows that politically there ii not
enough clatt feeling among the worken to be
any menace to hii party. Why ihould he
worry if the worken do not)
PHONE   SEYMOUR   SOS!
(A TRUST COMPANY)
THERE IS BUT ONE
Sure way of avoiding all anxiety
regarding the safety of your papera and valuablea. and that is to
deposit them ln a
FIRE   AND   BURGLAR   PROOF
8AFE   DEPOSIT VAULT
PRIVATE   BOXES   13.00   PER
ANNUM
PROROT
'ACRFFMI
fwwRGna
'AGREEMENTS^
BOUGHT anA.
ftJU.ECTED>
«K«i
ISKort
Lo&TtS,
M&di
SAFETY DEPOSIT .
•WXtSFORREHTj
DOW, FRASER & CO., Ud.
SMP Gamble stre.tj 2J1I Main
Street, (between 7th and Ith Avsa.)
Vincouver, and McKay station,
Burnaby, B.C.
THE BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In list.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter ln 1M0.
Paid-up Capital    -    M,IM,IM.M
Reserve Fund     -     -    3,017,230,00
H«ad Offlce in Canada:
BT. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE - G.o.r.1 Muw,
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savlnn
Accounts on which Interest is allowed trom date ot deposit.
Opsn ■ Ssvlngi Account and add
to It every psy day.
Drafts and Money Orders aold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manacor.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANOH
J. R. Chapman, Manager.
KERRISDALE BRANCH
D. Nell, Manner.
The Allied Printing Trades
of *the City of Vancouver, respectfully request
Merchants,   Manufacturers,   Lawyers,   Fraternal   Societies,   Clubs,
Unions, Etc, to havo tht
UNION LABEL
Put on their Printing, such aa Circulars, Briefs, Records, Books,
Pollers. It Is a guarantee of superior workmanship. This label Is
endorsed by all trades and labor
unions in Vancauver and vicinity.
VANCOUVER ALLIED PRINT-"
INQ TRADES COUNCIL
P. R. Fleming, Secretary,
Room 212 Labor Tomple
WraORHGASUIT
See that
this Union Label
Is Sewed
In the
Pockets.
It stands
for all
that
Union
Lahor
Stands
for.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
"THE strike is still on at the
•"••.Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Minen' Union
FURNITURE
By sll means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
■    TERMS
tings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTINGS STREET WUT
■ :
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and sulfas
of furniture or Auotlon arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlement!.
ARTHUR  E.  BETCHLEY
Smyths and Qranvllls Streeta
Auotloneer Say an
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FETHSRSTONHAUOH  A CO.  .
Tho Old Istabllahad Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
ISM Rogers Bldg., Qranvllle Strut
City. Phona Ssymour I7N,
MADE
Jeer
AND
Porter
Or America *Q**
I wrnw-rr ____ _____________ FHIDAY JUNE 6, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
A WORD TO THE UNION MAN
The Union Label ahould atand for quality ot material, fit and make-up
ot garment, aa well as ths sanitary conditions ot a faotory,
i wages paid, etc,
A oopy of this guarantee goes with every garment
manufactured by ns.
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacture!* of
MAO'S MOGAL AND BUCK BRAND SHIRTB, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THB MASTER SHIRT
1176 Homer St., Vanoouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831
Thli garment Is guaranteed u to workmanship, quality of material,
fullneii of alie, buttons securely fastened, buttonholes well made.
Anyone wearing one of our garments and finding lt defective will do
us a favor by either returning it to his dealer or mailing It to us to be
exchanged for another.
All our garments bear the label of the
UNITED GARMENT WORKERB OF AMERICA.
Tou are Invited to visit our factory.
WU. J. M0MA8TBR ft SONS, LTD.
For Jas. A. McMaster,
Manaflnr Director.
PAGE
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT SALE OF BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Men's Shoes, Begular $6.00 for $3.96
Men's Shoes, Begular $6.00, for. $3.46
Men's Shoes, Begular $4.60, for $2.96
SEE THE WINDOWS
FRANK NEWTON
Keep the Children Healthy
by sending tbem out in tbo frash air thoae flne days. There's nothing bit*
ter tor keeping them exercised than wheeled goods, ,
Our atock ot WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAGONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAGONS. VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, is easily the flneat and moat oomprehenalva in ths
olty and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
US HASTINOS STRUT WIST
BIST IN THI WIST
VANCOUVER, ■. 0.
■STABLISHID 1IM
EDWARD LIPSETT
FISHING SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
TENT5    *
NING5. FLAGS SAILS '*■*> QBE BADS
OTTDM DUCKALLWEICHT5»*WIDTK5
ARTHUR JAMES' FISHHOOKS. ETC
I
Phones Seymour
6031 and 6032
68 WATER ST.
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
HDPPS&DUKER,
CI/1UO     BUI1T fOR -HOUR
OlVlPO ft\RTICULAR PURPOSE
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phons 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
The Quality of Oar Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
raising Is duo to tho (aet that our busl-
 , ,  _-..     ....   ted the polloy of informing the publlo
through the medium of the preaa aa to what our charges would be fer a
The reaaon our bualneaa Is lneraisln
l polloy la correct.     We adopted
complete funeral.    Including liearie, Cwrliin foVramTly, Care of Remains,
Wagon Servioe, and all our personal aarvlce for
165.00
$55.00
penonal itrvlet for
Complete Funeral
We ar* living up to our Advtrtlnment to tho letter. Thli hu wUbllah-
•d confidence with the publlo In ui, and (or that reaaon alone wa ara nio-
eeaaful, and wa Intend to continue aa wa ara doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ava. and Main Street Phone Fairmont US
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Canter A Henna'a Branch
A. C. Millar, Prea. P. H. Crete, Manager
GO WITH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
B.CE.R. EMPLOYEES SECURE
MAJORITY REPORT IN
THEIR FAVOR
(C ntlmied (rom page 1)
tatlon of the clause be adopted, and
that the company should make payment to the car cleaners (or July and
August, 1913.
3. The third dispute between the
parties was as to whether subsection
"C of clause S o( the "wage schedule"
applied to Interurban trainmen. The
portion o( the application covering
this dispute was not aptly worded,
and upon being corrected the company flled an amended reply submitting that the minimum wage provided
(or In the subsection waB only intended to apply to city and suburban lines,
and that its relative position in the
clause supported this contention. We
see no reason why the subsection
should receive this restricted application, as motormen and conductors on
Interurban lines should be treated in
the same manner as on city and suburban lines. We are o( the opinion
that the subsection referred to is applicable to interurban lines, and that
extra motormen and conductors on
such lines should reoelve a minimum
wage of $10 per week. We recommend that the company apply this
construction.
4. As to the (ourth and most important question ln dispute, namely,
the refusal o( the company to arbitrate a case of dismissal (or alleged
dishonesty, It is to be regretted that
an amicable settlement could not have
been arrived at
Majority Of Board Report
The majority of board report as
follows:
It was contended' by the employees
that ln the event o( a dismissal (or
alleged dlshonety, this was a grievance that came within the provisions
of clause 5 of the "working conditions" ln tbe agreement of 1913. Discussion and evidence on this question
had only been pursued a short time
when the company, in accordance with
its supplementary reply, took the
ground that dismissal, exeept on account of membership In the association or for inefficiency, did not come
within the scope of the agreement.
In other words, that if an employee
were dismissed (or any other cause
except being a member of the association, or being Inefficient, he could not,
nor could the association, Invoke the
provisions of the agreement as to arbitration. It waB pointed out that
clause 5 only provided for arbitration
in case any employee was "suspended" (or cause, and did not cover the
graver result as far as the employee
was concerned, of being "dismissed."
The question as to the right to arbitrate In case of dismissal'thus became broadened, and in view of Its
importance required serious consideration.
Bearing in mind the firm position
taken by the company and the gravity
of the situation that may be created,
we think lt advisable to outline somewhat at length our reasons for arriving at certain conclusions and recommendations.
The employees contended that,
while, strictly speaking, the wording
of clause 5 only covered arbitration
ln cases of suspension, still, that tbe
broader meaning should be applied so
as to Include dismissal. The object
of the agreement, as well as the context and the practice that had been
ln vogue up to the year 1914, ln their
opinion supported tills Interpretation.
Re Non-interference
The company, on the other hand,
submitted that the agreement had
been fully considered, and that the ordinary meaning should be applied to
the wording.
Stress was laid by the company upon the clause providing (or non-interference by the association as follows:
"(2) The ascoclation agrees that it
will not In any way interfere with or
limit the right of the company to discharge or discipline Its employees (or
sufflclent cause except for membership of the association."
It was contended that this provision debarred the association (rom
complaining or having any voice ln
either the discharge or disciplining of
the employees with the single exception.   A similar clause in the agree-
JAS. H. McVETY
Who represented the Street Railway Employees' union on the federal Industrial
Disputes and Investigation act board,
which has Just reported to the Department of Labor, the majority report being favorable to the B. c. E. R, employees.
ment of 1910 provided that the association would not ln any way interfere
with or limit the right o( the company
to discharge or discipline Its employees "where sufflclent cause can be
shown." Considerable discussion took
place aB to the reason (or this change.
At the time change was sought It was
pointed out that the association might
contend that cause had to be shown
to its satisfaction before an employee
could be discharged or disciplined,
and that the amendment would remove any doubt In this connection.
The company now contends that the
clause, as amended, only requires
that the clause should be sufficient In
the opinion of the company, and that
the employees, although a party to
the agreement, have no right to complain or Investigate auch cause. The
officials of the company admit a long-
established practice o( considering
complaints of any nature arising out
of dismissal, but claim that such consideration only resulted from courtesy on Its part, and was not granted
as a right to the employees. We do
not think this position consistent with
the terms of the agreement, or In accordance with such practice, The
agreements of 1910 and 1913 both recognize tbe employees' union or association, and stipulate that all employees
affected by the agreement "should become members of the association" ln
order that all questions and grievances "may be dealt with by one
head."
Stability of Employment
The most important matter affecting an employee Ib the stability of his
employment, and lt can be assumed
that as between dismissal and mere
suspension, the former would be the
more Important feature. If the contention of the company be correct this
would mean that, as to permanency of
employment the only benefit derived
(rom membership in the association
would be the right to arbitrate ln the
event of suspension. Where two parties enter into an agreement, covering
amongst other matters the question
of permanency of employment, the
cause of a dismissal would be one In
which the employee would be vitally
Interested and would likely be dealt
with ln some manner. The company,
apparently admitting tbe reasonableness of this conclusion, asserts that
the matter was not overlooked by the
contracting    parties,    but   Is   fully
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
covered by the noninterference clause
referred to, and the door is consequently closed to a complaint by the
association on the score of dismissal.
This Involves a determination as to
the correct construction to he placed
on this clause.
The board on thla question thought
lt well to gather light (rom every
source. In order to arrive not only
ut the Intention of the parties when
entering into the agreement, but also
the meaning that had been attached
to this particular clause, and how lt
bad worked out ln practice.
As In Equity
The provision o( the act, allowing
the acceptance o( such evidence as ln
equity and good conscience might be
thought fit "whether strictly legal evidence or not" was utilised, to assist ln
this determination.
It appeared that at all times, up to
the recent dispute, the company had
shown the association the "cause" of
each dismissal. Even after the agreement of 1913 was entered into and the
olause was amended, (ull explanation
was offered In respect to eaoh dismissal. In this connection considerable
correspondence was Died with the
board, showing, ln some Instances, request (or arbitration on account of
dismissal. As late as November S,
1913, an official of the association
wrote the company asking for arbitration with respect to two dismissals,
and specifically referred to the agreement as the basis for such application;
On December 15, 1913, the general
manager of the company replied, dealing at length with the reasons (or
such dismissals without ln any way
questioning the right of the association to treat a dismissal as a grievance which should be arbitrated.
We are satisfied that both the company and the employees well under
stood tbat a right existed to complain
in case of dismissal, or In other words,
that lt constituted a "grlevence"
which entitled an employee to Invoke
the aid of the association. We are
confirmed in tbls conclusion, not only
by the practice pursued between tbe
parties ln the case of dismissal occurring, but by the (act that ln the
draft agreement submitted by the
company for the consideration of the
board of conciliation in 1913, It expressly provided for arbitration;-subject to certain conditions, not only
with respect to suspension, but also
as to dismissal, and that If upon investigation lt was found that any employee had been discharged or suspended unjustly, he should be re-Instated and re-imbursed by the company (or all time lost through such
discharge or suspension.
Subject to Arbitration
It so happened that the clauses relating to grievances, submitted by the
employees, were adopted by the
board, and the clause ln the proposed
agreement of the company was not incorporated In the agreement as executed. It Is quite evident that the
company was not at that time contending that dismissal was not to constitute a grievance and subject of
arbitration. The employees on their
part apparently thought they were
fully protected in the matter by their
draft agreement which, ln this respect, was practically a repetition of
the agreement of 1910, especially as
their right to arbitrate (or dismissal,
though often demanded, had never
been questioned. It Is fair to add
that an arbitration had never actually
taken place, but this seems to have
been due either to the cause of dismissal having, on investigation,
proved sufficient, or being found insufficient, then tbe employee being
reinstated.
An additional ground for concluding
that the parties considered that a
grievance within the meaning of the
agreement existed in the event of
dismissal, was shown by the fact that
a olause was inserted In the agreement of 1913 giving the company the
aosolute right to dismiss an employee
for inefficiency, and providing only
for an appeal to the general manager.
ThlB clause was drafted by the board
and approved by both parties, to enable the company to more effectually
control and discipline its employees.
ThlB would not have been necessary
had the company already possessed
the unfettered right to dismiss (or
any cause other than membership In
the association. It la noteworthy that
the company did not, In the first instance contend that the agreement
only provided for arbitration In case
of suspension, but took this ground
In a supplementary reply.
Position Untenable
Under these facts and circumstances, as no suggestion has been made
that the company not only deceived
the board of conciliation in 1913, but
has been pursuing the same course
with respect to its employees for a
number of years, we consider its position is untenable with respect to
both the letter and the spirit ot this
clause of the agreement.
We think in the event o( any dismissal the cause should be disclosed
to the association, and if unsatisfactory then that a "grievance" results
which lt was Intended should be covered by the agreement. The question,
however, remains: What redress is
afforded to the employee through the
association ln that event? If the
practice in the past wholly controlled
the situation, bo that suspension was
construed to Include dismissal this
would afford a speedy solution to the
difficulty. We have no doubt tbat the
employees, ln launching their present application, considered that the
agreement provided for dismissal being a grievance, and permitted arbitration ln that event. They may have
been led to this conclusion and given
this liberal Interpretation to the word
"suspension" by the course previously
pursued.     In the sixth clause the
word "suspended" Is used and must
necessarily Include expulsion. This
Is evidence of a broader meaning being attached to the word "suspension," and also might Indicate a lack
of care In expression. The company
strongly contends that the word
should have its ordinary meaning applied, and this would not Include
"dismissal." If strictness of construction were to govern, then this
contention would be correct To conclude, however, that this was the Intention of the parties would not only
be Inconsistent with the spirit of the
agreement and the surrounding circumstances, but would Import bad
faith at the time to tbe company.
Was An Omission
We think that the company as well
as the employees were, during the negotiation and up to the time of the
execution of the agreement, giving
particular attention to the scale o(
wages and other matters which had
formed a subject of controversy. They
failed to bestow a close, or perchance
any, consideration upon a olause
wbloh had answered all requirements
in the previous agreements. They
were thus not concerned with Its precise wording, and (ailed to observe
that arbitration for dismissal was not
specifically provided (or. It was an
omission common to both parties, and
In our opinion tha oompany Is not
now In a position to take advantage
of It, nor should It attempt to do ao.
During the Inquiry we were Impressed by the absence of any bad
feeling between the parties. It was
repeatedly stated by officials o( the
company that the practice was to
treat its employees with consideration
and fairness; there was no intimation
that the company had any inclination
to abandon this commendanbe course,
but on the contrary lt was declared to
be its settled policy for the (uture.
We, under such circumstances and
"according to the merits and substantial justice of the case" recommend tbat the company agree to an
amendment of the clause In queatlon
so that the provisions for arbitration
would dearly apply to any dismissal
except for inefficiency or for any violation of duty constituting an indictable offence. Such an amendment
would Implement what we Interpret
as the Intention o( the parties under
the agreement
(Sgd.) W. A. MACDONALD,
Chairman.
(Sgd.) JAS. H. McVETY,
Representative o( the Employees.
Vancouver, B. C, Msy 29,1914.
MINORITY REPORT
To the Honorable the Minister of
Labor, Ottawa, Canada:
Sir: 'Re British Columbia Electric
Railway and Employees: After
riving at a unanimous conclusion on
three out of the (our points ln dispute, I regret we are unable to agree
upon the other which is: "Refusal by the company to arbitrate In case of dismissal (or
alleged dishonesty as arranged
for by clause 5 of 'working conditions.'" A reference to olause 5
shows that lt provides (or dealing
with grievances and any employee
suspended (or cause who, upon investigation, is found not guilty shall be
reinstated and paid (or lost time, etc.
It is contended on behaK of the men
that suspension under this clause Includes dismissal. I am unable to give
effect to this contention and bold that
the wording ot the clause la clearly
opposed to such Interpretation. In
order to show that both parties knew
and understood the agreement reference must be made to clause 2 of the
said working conditions: "The association agrees that it will not ln any
way interfere with or limit the right
of the company to discharge or discipline its employees for sufficient
cause except for membership o( the
association." This, ln my opinion,
shows the company was Intended to
have unrestricted control of the men
except ln cases of Inefficiency covered
by clause 3, in which an appeal to the
general manager is provided (or.
The evidence ln connection with
this clause (2) shows that the com
pany were to be the sole judges of
what was "sufficient cause" to justify
dlsmlsal and the changing in the
wording of this clause from that in
the former agreement emphasise this
view.
Olve Company Absolute Control
A reference to the unanimous report of the board which sat for several weeks in 1913, and as a result of
whose labors these "working conditions" were drawn and agreed to by
both the men and the company, shows
that the objects aimed at were "to
give the company absolute control of
all features that seemed vital to the
operation and maintenance of their
railway system. The undersigned
consider that the people who furnish
their capital to carry on an enterprise
such as this must have a free hand
in that which vitally concerns Its
maintenance and operation. Per con
tra as far as could consistently with
the acceptance of this principle be
done where the safety and comfort of
the men were Involved, the undersigned have endeavored, ln fixing the
working conditions, to make these features paramount and binding on the
company."
It is further argued on behalf of the
men that this ts the first time the
company has taken the position which
they now assume; on the other hand,
the company argues that this is the
flrst time the right to dismiss for dishonesty has ever been questioned by
the men; and because, In several Instances, the company has investigated cases at the request of the men, I
cannot see that the company bave, ln
any way, waived their rights under
the agreement which both parties
have asked to be literally and strictly construed, a course we bave adopted in dealing with the other three
complaints referred to this board; and
the same course should, ln my opinion, be adopted In dealing with this
one, and as the agreement expires ln
about one year I do not Bee tbat any
useful purpose can be served by
agitating the matter further at present.
(Sgd.) JOHN ELLIOTT,
Company's Representative on Board.
Vancouver, B. C, 30th May, 1914.
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Our Showing of Bathing Garments and Accessories
is now replete and includes various attractive novelties as well as the regulation styles. The best quality
of materials is used in these garments, and all are correctly designed, attractively trimmed and well made
throughout.
Lustre Bathing Suits (or Women at ts.00, 14.50 and IMS.
Silk Bathing Suits for Women at tt.1t snd $11.11.
Girls' Lustre Bathing Suits for ages 8 to 14 years, at
tf.n and tS.W.
Children Lustre Bathing Suits for ages 1 to < years at .
aaso.
Bathing Caps in Rubber, in many smart styles and colors,
. at Mc, 71c. and fl.00 each.
Bathing Sandals, in white or black, in all sizes at tic.
575GtanoaitSt.   Vancouver, B. C.
Phene Seymour 3540
•tors Houra M0 to i p.m.
Saturdays Include*
WHITE STAR ^ZSERVICMARGEST",'^ CAHAPA
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New 8.8. "Laurentlc" (11,000 tons), new 8.8. "Megantlo."
First Class, MM0 Seoond Claas, WJ.7I Third
ONU CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE
Bzprsss 8.8. "Teutonic" (Twin Serow Steamers) 8.8. "Canada"
ltt feet long (100.00 and up), 114 feet long (ird class Ml JI and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
•OSTON GUEENSTOWN LIVERPOOL
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE
8.8. "Arabic" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamera) 8.8. "Cymric"
11,000 tons, (00 feet long (Rate WITS)    11,000 tons, 100 ft long (Rats l
010-ind AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
BraTds
Best
Coffee
""1 KHAII) K <-°   ,
Did You Get Youn
Thit Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIOOAN UNDERWEAR 	
At BOo. and 750. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear—lust right for this warm weather
LIGHT WEIGHT UNION SUITS
From 01.00 per Suit up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 78c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel. Soy, Ttt l»-ltl HASTINOS STREET W.
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA POR M
YEARS AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OP
WHITE
SWAN
SOAP
W. J. PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VANOOUVER PAGE SIX
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY ....JUNE 5, 191*.
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent
GietU
COTTINGHAM k BEATTY
Proprietors
HOTEL   CANADA
C. C. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room. European Plan
TransientlRates, $ 1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518'JRichard* St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C.
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-clans drill in Connection
F.   L.   WALLINOFOBD,   Manager
PENDER_H0TEL suM^^
Rates 11.10 per Dar and Up.
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTELB"ff:.'..5,',gJ'^'y...!"r:.'.,.h'd
76c. upi weakly, 13 up.    656 SEYMOUR STREET tranelenta
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN  (VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
IIZE    |
)M
SECURES B.C.
E
Freight   Cars  Loaded  on
;  Barges at Seattle for
Beilingham
Will Join B. C. Electric Near
Huntingdon en Route
to Vancouver
Continuing its policy ol reaching
Into all tbe large shipping centers of
the north Paelfle coast, the Milwaukee Is about to let the contract tor
constructing a three-mile connecting
track at Sumas, which will link the
big line with the British Columbia
electric railway at Huntingdon, B. C,
and enable the through billing ot
freight from all points In the originally loaded car Into New Westminster
and Vancouver. Plans tor effecting
this connection have been under consideration for more than six months,
and Friday Vice-president H. B. Gar-
ling announced that they had culminated ln   the   drawing   of contracts.
Beilingham to Vancouver
While the passenger angle of the
traffic has not been considered, the
fact that freight cars can be loaded
on barges at Seattle, towed to Beilingham and from there sent by rail
over the Beilingham & Northern to
Sumas and thence over the electric
tracks to Vancouver signals the entering wedge for another transcontinental line into British Columbia. Tariffs covering the new routing are now
ln preparation. For the present the
company will not extend its through
billing and transhipment Into Vanoouver owing to the short curves ln
the tracks of the British Columbia
electric line in the city proper.   Sev
Gentlemen—Last August my horse was
badly cut In eleven places by a barbed
wire fence. Three of the cuts (small
ones) healed soon, but the others became foul and rotten, and though I tried
many kinds of medicine they had no
beneficial result. At last a doctor advised me to use MINARD'S LINIMENT
and In four weeks' time every sore was
healed and the hair has grown over each
one In nne condition. The Liniment is
certainly wonderful In Its working.
JOHN  R.   HOLDEN.,
Witness, Perry Baker.
era) of the outer suburban points will
be reached, where freight shipped by
the new route can be unloaded and
hauled Into the city. This shift will
be but temporary, as the company
will endeavor to reach the business
and jobbing center with its cars.
Join With B. C. E. R. Line
Preliminary work of building the
"Y" track where it will Join the British Columbia, electric line, a short distance west of Huntingdon, has already
been oegun. The British Columbia
electric railway ln 1910 built a standard, gauge, seventy-five pound electrified railway track from Vancouver
to Chilllwack, a distance of seventy-
six miles. For the handling of freight
trafflc twenty-five electric locomotives
and 460 box cars are now in use, and
daily freight trains are operatled between Vancouver and Chlllwack. Milwaukee freight cars will be taken to
the International boundary line by its
own locomotives, and there turned
over to the electric line to be hauled
to New Westminster and suburban
stations of Vancouver, under joint
trafflc arrangements which have been
agreed upon.
ASK LIVING WAGES
Gardeners Cannot Get Them—Oriental Competition
White gardeners are complaining of
the discourteous treatment meted out
to them by certain residents. The former are forced by hard times to ask
for work from door to door. They
naturally ask for a living wage, but
cannot get lt because of Oriental competition. The yellow men can work
for and live on wages upon which
Canadians would starve. The gardeners naturally think they are entitled
to a fair wage, and the householders
naturally think they are justified in
getting the work done for a little as
possible. What is the remedy? Tax
out the speculators who are holding
land and natural opportunities. This
will Bet up a call for labor which will
enable all men to be honestly and use-
fully employed.—-Victoria News.
Will Lecture
Mrs. Lucy U. Parsons will lecture
on "The Great French Revolution and
Its Lessons," ln Labor Temple, on
Saturday, June 6th, at 8 p.m. The
gifted lady is the widow of Albert R.
f arsons, one of the five labor organizers executed at Chicago 28 years
ago because of their activities in the
great eight-hour strike and the alleged Hay Market riot.
Information Wanted
Andrew Milne, native of Dundee,
Scotland; about 28 years of age, dark
complexion, last heard of about nine
years ago, sailed as steward, also
as fireman, Is inquired for by his
relatives. Address A. S. Milne, 1122
Rose street, Grandvlew, Vancouver,
B.C.
War is murder to music—butchery
en masse.
'P
BE
14
The Fourth Annual Outing
To Be a Large Family
Gathering
On North Arm of Inlet per
North Vancouver
Ferry No. 1
The bartenders union, local No. 676,
of Vancouver, B. C, will hold its
fourth annual picnic at Stratheona
park, on the North arm, Burrard inlet,
on Sunday, June 14th, and for the occasion the North Vancouver ferry
steamer, No. 1, has been chartered.
The boat will leave the municipal
ferry wharf at 10 o'clock ln the morning, sailing direct. Round-trip double-
tickets may be had from any of the
bartenders or at the wharf for $2;
single tickets for women, SI, and children free. The outing will be one
ot the best which has taken place In
years. The committeemen having the
arrangements in charge guarantee
that every comfort has been provided
for those who will attend, especially
for women and children. A list of
games, as well as plenty of ice cream,
fruit, candies, etc., for the latter will
be provided. The committee in
charge say: "To union members, families and friends, all of you: The bartenders' local union, No. 676, through
the committee, J. F. Johnson, P.
O'Keefe and F. Funk, cordially Invite
all of you to our test—Just a large
family gathering. We wish all to Join
with us."
War Is wanton destruction of human life.
Diseases of Men
We issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Miters from all other remedies.
Pries S3.00, Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB    OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B, C.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
a O. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention ln January. Executive ofloers, 1114-11: Preaident, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. McEwen, Oeo. Hardy, J.
W. Oray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor. B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1831, Victoria. B, C.	
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRAPES AND
Labor Council—Meets every seeond
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor
Hall. President. D. s. Cameron; flnanolal
secretary, H. Olbb; general seoretary, W.
E. Maiden. P. O. Box 93*. The publlo Is
Invited to attend.	
PLUMBERS' AND STBAMFITTERS Local 405—Meets every seeond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
740 p. m. President, D. Webster; seoretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box 966, New
Westminster, B. C.
tJNITED BROTHERHOOD 3f CAR-
penters, Local Union No. 1119—Meets
•very Monday, I p.m., Labor Templo,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh street
Preeldent, M. C. Schmendt; seoretary, A.
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westmln-
stsr, B.C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784-MBBTSIN
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
corner Seventh strst and Royal avenue,
•very second Sunday of eaeh month, at
1.80 p. m. President, F. B. Hunt; seoretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited,
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets first and third Wednesday, Labor Halt, 781 Johnston street,
at I p, m. President, George Dykeman;
secretary, Thos, F. Mathlson, box 801,
Victoria, B.C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. IN,
Western Federation of MBnere—Ueets
Sunday evenings In Union Hall. Preildent, Alex. Wilson; aecretary-treaaurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
LADTBMITH MINERS' UNION, lOCAh
No. 2311, U. M. W. of A.—Meets Wedneaday, Union Halt, 7 p.m. President,
Bam Guthrie; aeeretary, Duncan McKensle, Ladyamlth, B. G.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
A.—Meets every Monday at 7.80 p. tn.
In the Athletic Club. Chapel street   Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410. Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, Na
ISM, U. M. W. of A.-Meete every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall.
President, Jos. Naylor; aeeretary, Jamee
Smith, Box 14, Cumberland, B.C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMBLTERMEN'S
Union, No. US, W. F. of M.—Meeta
every Monday at 7.80 p.m. President,
F. W. Perrln; aeoretary, Frank Camp-
bell, Box SS. Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Federation of Minera—Meete
every Saturday In the Miners' Union
hall. Addrela all communications to the
Seoretary, Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READING ROOM OPEN
SEVEN DATS A WEEK.
HARRON BROS.
FUNIRAL   DIRECTOR*  AND
EMBALMERS
Vanoouver—Offlce   and    Chapel,
10J4 Qranvllle St, Phone Sey. 1411.
North   Vanoouver —Ofllce   and
chapel, lit Seeond St E.    Phona
CANADA
MILLIONS OF ACRES OF LAND
AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There i» an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestic*, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
| No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor.  It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
g-nropus or land laws
Six monthi' r*»id*ne* upon ud eottavation of tb* land ln Men of thr** yean. A homeiteader may live within nin* mil** of hii homtrtead on a farm of
at leut 80 aer** *ol*ly owned and occupied by him or hii father, mother, ion, daughter, brother or litter. •
In certain district! a homeiteader in (rood standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongiide hii homestead.   Price $3.00 per aer*.   DntiM—Hurt
reside six monthi in eaoh of six yean from date of homactead tntry (including th* time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acre* extra.
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W^ D« SCOTT       Superintendent of Immigration      OTTAWA
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meetg firat and third Thursdays.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, preaident; J. H. McVety, vlce-prealdent; Oee.
Bartley, general secretary, 110 Labor
Temple; wlu H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Mies P. Brisbane, statistician: sergeant*
at-arms, John Bully; O. Curnook, I1.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE! COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. R.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manag-
lng director. J. H. McVety. Room 111.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNTS ciLTM,Ht(l 2Bd Monday lo month.
President, Oeo. Mowat; aeoretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.p. Boi II.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No. 41—Meets seoond and fourth Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President,
H. O. Leeworthy; corresponding seoretary, R. J.
Adams; business agent, J.
Black, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
BARBERS'   LOCAL   No.   120— MEETS
second  and   fourth   Thursdays,   8.80
p. m. President, J. W. Green; recorder, C,
E. Herrltt; secretary-business agent, C.
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Ter   *
Hours: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 676.-OF-
flce, Room 208 Labor Temple. Meets
flrst Sunday of each month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanolal secretary, Oeo.
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS\ NO. 1
'—Meets every 1st and 3rd Tuesday,
8 p.m., Room 307. President, James
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W. S.
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal secretary, F.
It. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dagnall, Room 216.
BOOKBINDERS'    LOCAL    UNION    No.
106—Meets  third  Tuesday  In  every
month, In room 206, Labor Temple. President,  F.  J.  Milne; vice-president. Wm,
Bushman; secretary, George Mowat,
Hazelwood hotel, 344 Hastings Steet E.;
secretary-treasurer, H. Perry, 1130 Tenth
Avenue Eaat.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No, Ill-
Meets first and third Mondays, I p. tn.
President, F. Barclay, 368 Cordova East;
secretary, A. Fraser, 1161 Howe street
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets flrst Friday In eaeh
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. 8.
Walker, busbies representative. OSes:
Room 103, Labor Temple. Hours: I a.m.
to 10.30; 1 p.m. to 2.30 and 6 p.m. to I.M
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 3414.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets seoond and fourth Thursday of
each month, 8 p. m. Secretary, J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby street; business agent,
H. J. McEwen, room 209. Local 017 meets
flrst and third Monday of each month,
and Local 2647 meets flrst and third
Tuesday of each month,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
218—Meets Room 801 every Monday
I p. m. President, Dave Fink; vice-president, M, Sander; recording seoretary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flnanolal secretary and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 207. Labor Temple,
ELECTRICAL WORKERB. LOCAL NO.
621 (Inside Men)—Meeta flrst and
third Mondays of eaeh month. Room 206,
I p.m. President, H. P. McCoy; recording secretary. Geo. Albers; buslneas
agent, T. L. Estinghausen, Room 207.
L0NGSH0REMEN8'   INTBRNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    38 z 63—Meets
every Friday evening, 140 Alexander
street, President, S. J. Kelly; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS,    NO.    182-MEETS   8EC-
ond   and   fourth   Fridays,   8   p.   m.
President, A. R. Towler; recording secretary, J. Brookes; flnanolal seoretary, J. H.
McVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 233, I.A.T.8.E.—Meets every seeond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p. m. President, A. O. Hansen;
secret ary-treasurer, G. R. Hamilton; business agent, H. I. Hugg. Offlce, Room 100,
Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 3046.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.—
Meets second Sunday of each month,
rooms 20-80, Williams Building, 413 Granville street. President. J. Bowyer; vice-
Sresident, F. English; secretary, H. J.
irasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler,
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 80—
Meets flrat and third Wednesday. O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, G. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal
secretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I. Tyson;
business agent, Joe Hampton, phone
Bey. 1614,
STONECUTTERS',       VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets aecond   Tuesday, 8.01
Fi. m. President J. Marshall; correspond-
ng secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047; lln
anclal secretary, K. McKenzle.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 138—Meets every
Thursday, 7.30 p. m. President, Skene
Thomson; flnanclal secretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour Btreet; recording sec-1
retary, George Powell, 1560 Fourth Ave.,
west. Business agent, James Train, room
S03, Labor Temple.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYP?.
ers* Union, No. 88, of Vancouver and I
Victoria—Meets    second    Wednesday  of 1
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. President, Chas. Baytey; recording secretary, '
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser." \
STREET-AND   ELECTRIC   RAILWAY |
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets  Labor   Temple,   second  fourth I
Wednesdays at 2 p. m.,   and   first   and 1
third  Wednesdaya,  8 p. m.      President, I
Adam Taylor; recording secretary, Albert
V.   Lofting,  2038  Trinity street,  phone, f
Highland 1672; flnanclal secretary, Fred.
A. Hoover, 2400 Clark Drive.
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTBRNATION- '
al Local 897—Meets every Wednesday j
8 p. m„ room 204, Labor Temple. Financial secretary, E. Prendcrgast, room 216.
TAILORS'    INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (IN- .
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meetings
held flrst Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording secretary, C. McDonald,   Box   603;   flnanclal '
secretary, L. Wakley. P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL    STAGE    EMPLOYEES,  ,
Local No. 118—Meets seoond Sunday
of each month at Room 204, Labor Temple. President. H. Spears; recording seoretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver	
TYPOGRAPHICAL   UNION   NO.   886— ;
Meets last Sunday each month, t
p.m. President, R. P. Pettipiece; vies-
president; W. S. Metsger, secretary-,
treasurer, R, H. Neelands, P. O. Box 81.
SPEND YOUR SPARE TIME IN
THE LABOR TEMPLE FREE
READING ROOM.
SYNOPSIS   OF   COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion, I
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,]
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-I
rltories and in a portion of the Province!
of British Columbia, may be leased fori
a term of twenty-one years at an annual!
rental of |1 an aore. Not more than I
2,660 acres will be leased to one appll-f
cant. L
Applications for lease must ba made by]
the applioant In person to the Agent orl
Sub-Agent of the district ln which thai
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must L_
described by sections, or legal subdlvls-J
Ions of sections, and in unsurveyed ter-J
rltory the tract applied for shall '
staked by the applicant himself,
Eaoh application must be accompanist.
by a fee of 16, which will be refunded If]
the rights applied for are not aval I a ble J
but not otherwise. A royalty shall bel
paid on the merchantable output of the]
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shal
furnish the Agent with sworn returni-
accountlng for the full quantity of merl
chantable coal mined and pay the royal!
ty thereon. If the coal mining rights]
are not being operated, such retumfll
should be furnished at least once a year!
The lease will Include the coat mlnlnsj
rights only, but the lessee may be perl
mltted to purchase whatever avallablf
surface rights may be considered neces|
sary for the working of the mine at f
rate of 810 an acre. .
For full information application shoull
be made to the Secretary of the Depart!
ment of the Interior, Ottawa, or to anl
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landi
WH. CORY, \
Deputy -Minister of the Interiol
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thl
advertisement will not 1» paid for—Sfflf FRIDAY JUNE 5, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
DONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love tor beautiful cardans, making heme surroundings attractive,
with flowers, shrubbery, ehade and fruit trees, Is a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Universe.
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fullest, and
make not only your own life better, but also that of your fellow citizen who may not have'the opportunities you have.
Now la the time to make your selection,, when our prloea were
never lower, and our atock never better to meet the demanda of the
cultivated aesthetlo tastes.
In our atock of over. $100,000.00, we have choice flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental trees and shrub* In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for hedges, all sizes; choice
atcek of Shade Trees, and an Immense etock ef all th* moat approved
varieties of applee, peara, plume, cherries, and small fruit Th* latter
(fruit trees) we are offering at epeclal low prices to clear the ground
for additional atook coming In.
Don't forget we oan meet your neede better than you can git
from (took grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West.
'PHONE: SEYMOUR 6556.
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayvlew 1926
Greenhouses and Nureerlee it Roy*, on B. C, E, Ry. Eburnt Lln*,
■bout two mllee south cf olty limit*. .Phone: Eburne 41.
BY GEORGE BARTLEY
PRODUCERS OF Mi
•-A   POULTRY
•Sgb-   NOTES
Plans Perfected for Handling Product Direct to
Consumers
Quarter of a Million Dollars
Capital with Half Amount Paid Up
EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN
BEDDING PLANTS In Great Variety
LAWN MOWERS AND ROLLERS,
ABOL INSECTICIDE and SPRAYERS
and All Garden Tools
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
SEEDSMEN, NURSERYMEN AND FLORIST8
723 Robson Street Vancouver, B.C.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU (TORI* IN VANCOUVER
M Hastings *t.      Phone ley. HI 401 Granville St
Tit Oranvllle It.    Phone ley. *S11
Phone toy, sttn
VICTORIA STORB, UI VIEW IT.
ORBBNHOUSBB
list Ave. and Main tt Victoria, B. C. Hammond, I. C.
Phone Fairmont TH. Lon* Distance Phene IT
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. O.
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $6.00 Down and $5,00 Per Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situate In th* fertile Bella Coola Dlstriot, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
M Basilars atreet Beat
TASCOUTO, B, O.
Without  obligation,  please mall me
particulars of your ten-acre farms.
Name   ....
Address
The organization of the milk producers of the Fraser valley into a cooperative company for the purpose of
handling milk from the producers
direct to the consumers without the
aid of the middlemen Is now on a fair
way to become realized, says the
Chilllwack Progress. The flrst meeting of the shippers was held early ln
May and the organization meeting will
be held early ln June. The provisional
board of directors have their plans
sufficiently formulated to float the
new company which will be known
as the Fraser Valley Farmers' Milk
company. There is to be nothing
small about the new company, for the
capital stock is to be a quarter of a
million dollars, which will be placed
among the farmers of the lower mainland of British Columbia. Under the
Agricultural Societies act the provincial government may assist such 'organizations by an advance of 50 per
cent, of the value of the subscribed
stock. When a sufficient amount has
been subscribed—not necessarily
fully paid up—the government will be
asked to assist the company under
the act.
Direct to the Consumer
It Is intended, when the company
is properly formed and ready for
business, to divide the cities Into districts, in each of which a dairy depot will be established, from which
deliveries will be made, greatly, shortening the haulage which under the
present system is a cause of a great
deal of extreme expense, the many deliveries overlapping each other and
travelling, over territory for a scattered custom trade. Under the new system the consumer will be able to
purchase fresh, clean, cold sanitary
milk within a block or two of his
home. Another point strongly emphasized by the promoters of the cooperative company Is that much can
be saved by the organization through
the ability of a large selling concern
to profitably utilize every ounce of
surplus milk. This is impossible under the present system. In the many
Independent city dairies, each with
more or less milk left over every day,
there is very considerable waste. In
fact the avoidance ot waste—waste of
milk, waste of expensive energy ln
distribution, and waste in business
execution—Is the keynote of the new
company's plan. The men behind the
scheme are reliable farmers deeply interested ln the dairy trade of the
provinoe. All have large interests at
stake and leading ln the work of improving the trade. What is of interest and proflt to them should be of
Interest and profit to the others engaged ln the same work.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER
•3tf£&
HAS THE FLAVOR
THAT SPELLS
QUALITY
We use better hops and a finer
grade of pale barley malt than
any other brewery in the West.
CASCADE stands first among
Western beers. It's the pride of
British Columbia, and every dollar spent for it helps British Columbia grow.
ORDER CASCADE FROM
YOUR DEALER
6 Pints for 50 cents
3 Quarts for 50 cents
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
Soft food Increases egg production
Tou cannot offend the hen hy giv
ing her a dish of buttermilk.
The month is hot and sultry—aim
to keep the stook comfortable.
There is not much danger of over-
fattening the laying hen.
The smaller the poultry quarters,
the oleaner they must be kept
Don't let the hot weather wilt your
ambition.
Don't let chicks run on cement For
leg troubles put then on the ground
and out out forcing food.
Where the dry feed system is
adopted, the fowls should be watered
at the time they are fed.
June is a good growing month, bnt
the youngsters must have shady spots
to shield them from the burning rays
of the sun.
Too much bran tn the mash bas a
tendency of loosening the bowels,
while an over-supply of middlings will
bring on costiveness.    .
If the stock, old and young, can get
outdoors at daybreak, they can se
cure much needed exercise before the
heat of the day arrives.
June chicks, If kept growing rapidly,
will be matured before winter; the pullets should be laying on or before
Christmas, and this is very good
work ln the poultry line.
While the hen cannot tell you how
much she appreciates your care and
good feeding, she will reciprocate by
shelling out big, fresh, sweet eggs, and
such actions speak louder than words.
A cheap thing so many times scantily furnished or not furnished at all is
sharp grit. It would seem that a
thing so easily provided would be in
constant supply, but quite often
these are the very things left undone.
Fill rat holes with plaster of paris
mixed with powdered glass, or set
dishes of meal and plaster where the
rats will flnd and eat it, always placing a dish of water near by. The plaster will harden ln the stomach when
they take a drink, and that is the end
of the rat.
Don't think because you haven't a
drove of chicks by the middle or last
of April that it will be useless for you
to try chickens this season. May and
June are very good months in which
to have chicks come off for the ordinary farm wife.
Water ln fresh and constant supply
is a thing that must be supplied if
chicks do well, or if eggs are furnished as they should be. An egg contains quite a large per cent, of water,
hence water must be supplied In
plenty.
Fresh buttermilk is recommended
for diarrhoea ln chicks, some saying it
will cure bad cases. That lt Is fine
tor growing chicks and laying hens, I
know, and as it Is a supply usually on
hand on all farms,-it should be given
freely.
Watch the chicks closely and mark
the ones making the most satlsfectory
growth. Select the ones that are
plump, full breasted and ln good proportion. You will not care to keep
those that grow leggy and have thin
breasts.
Where small flocks' are kept charcoal may be easily provided by filling
the cook stove with hard wood then
shutting lt up closely. Take the coals
out as soon as charred through, put
them into sack cold, and break by
pounding with the flat side of an axe
The dust may be utilized ln chicken
bread with good results.
It is more important having the
chicks well hatched; then give the
right sort of feed and care to induce
a vigorous, steady growth. Poultry
that has stamina enough to withstand
all ordinary and some extraordinary
ills is the kind ot poultry that pays.
To get this kind there must be a vigorous parent stock.
Quite a good many depend upon the
old 'hen as incubator and brooder.
Usually the old hens are wiser on this
subject than their owners, refusing to
sit until it seems terribly late; but
don't worry. The medium hatches
will not have much bad weather to
contend with and will be able to grow
as fast as weeds, they will be worth
more than earlier hatches that have
become stunted.
CITY MARKET
Improvement This Week-
Poultry in Demand
The city market, Main street, was
busy this week—a big improvement
over last Consignments of farm produce from Chilllwack and Hatzlc
Prairie were features. Poultry arrived ln large quantities, but not
enough to meet the local demand.
Prices were unchanged, excepting
potatoes, which rose $2 on the ton.
Hen Laying Record of World
The pen of barred rocks, owner H.
Dales, of Fiftieth avenue west, Vancouver, In the international egg laying contest at Victoria, beat all the
worlds' official test records for May.
His six birds produced forty six eggB
ln eight consecutive days, beating the
former Australian records of thirty-
six eggB in six days.
Feeding the Chicks
Proper hatching, proper brooding,
and proper feeding are all Important
In raising strong chickens. We are
told that the egg, when laid, possesses
everything needed to develop the embryo fully and to sustain the chick
for two or three days after hatching.
Of course we knew the flrst of the
above statement, but how many of ns
regarded the second part—that of sustaining the chick for two or three
days after hatching?
Since the newly hatched chick has
sufficient food to supply lt for the
flrst thirty-six or forty-eight hours tt
Is very unnecessary and quite Injurious to put feed and water before lt
earlier. It should be fed regularly
and sparingly after the first feed Ib
given until five or six days old. The
yolk ln the chick's abdomen must be
absorbed and not delayed by feeding.
Early feeding causes white diarrhoea.
For the first food give one-third of
stale bread crumbs, one-third of
rolled oats, and one-third of hard
boiled eggs. Add a small amount of
sharp sand or flne grit to this mixture and moisten with sweet milk,
making tt crumbly but not sloppy.
Water may be used to moisten the
mixture but sweet milk Is more valuable, The rolled oats may be
crumbled finer by rubbing between
the hands. The eggs should be boiled
fifteen or twenty minutes to become
mealy and should then be crushed,
shell and all, very fine. The bread
must also be crumbled very fine. A
meat chopper is flne to run the egg
and bread together.
THI8 WEEK'S PRICES:
Apples
Royal Jenette, No, 1.
Royal Jenette, No, 1,
box ......... .............     fi
1.50
. 1.75
Ben   Davis,   No.   2,
1.60
1.15
Vegetables
1.00
Parsnips, **ok „      fi
Rhubarb, box       9
.76
1.00
Head Lettuce, dos     <c
.60
Radishes,  ner  doz     &      .40
Special Hot House
Tomatoes,  lb -..     9
Egg*
Local new laid, doz....      fi
Wash., new laid, doz... „     fi
.35
.16
.28'
Poultry
young hens, doz........._|10.00     1
112.00
.21
Pullets, dos    9.00     1
12.00
Broilers, dos    5.00     fi
9.00
11.00
Feed
.50
wheat, ton      fi
28.00
80.00
28.00
80.00
Beef
T-bone    and    Porter
house steaks, lb      <
1   .11
Round steak, lb      fi
.10
Pot roast, lb. ™.      g
.15
Pork
Leg and loins, lb.........       fi
1   .22
.15
.22 %
Lamb
Lege, lb      (
1   .11
Loins, lb      fi
.20
Pore quarters, lb      fi
.14
Chops, loin,  lb      fi
.22%
Chops,  lb _         |
.16
Finest Local Beef.
Best cuts, lb.        i
.11
Ribs, lb        i
.10
Pot Roasts, Ib.„        i
.16
Lamb,  legs, lb       i
.11
Lamb, loins, lb  	
.10
Lamb, shoulders, lb.....          i
.14
Pork, lege, lb       i
.11
Pork,  loins,  lb       i
.10
Pork,  shoulders, lb       I
,11
Sausages, lb. _      <
•11H
Fresh Fish,
Halibut, lb      e
.10
Salmon, two lbs 26     I
List cod, lb.....       S
.10
Rock cod, lb        1
.10
Rat mapper, lb       1
.10
Soles, lb           j
.10
Smelts, two lbs       2
Herring, lb.                 ,  .        I
.06
Whiting, lb        J
Skate, Tb       \
.10
Smoked Flsh,
Kippers, lb.             fi
.1*
Kippers, three lbe.......        i
.11
Bloaters, lb.        1
.1*
Bloaters, three lbs.        i
Halibut lb         i
.16
filleted cod, lb:         !
.16
Black cod, two lbs „■ •       i
- .26
Eastern haddle, 2 lbe..         f
.25
Kippered Salmon, lb...     .10     i
.11
Shell Fish.
.11
.05
Clams, lb. .„       |
Notes on Feeding
In using salt ln the mash, allow an
ounce for every 100 head of stock.
A too liberal diet of corn will bring
on Indigestion and liver troubles-
conditions that are so frequently
taken for cholera.
Do not simply throw the water out
of the drinking vessels, and put ln
fresh water, but wash the vessels
thoroughly every time you change the
water.
CHOICE 10-ACRE BLOCKS
AGASS1Z VALLEY
CLOSE  TO  TOWN AND RAILWAY
LONG TERMS AND NO INTEREST
LATIMER, NEY& McTAVISH, Ltd.
419 PENDER ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
ONTARIO LABOR CONGRESS
Educational Assoclstlon Condemns
Lemlaux Aot, Mllltla, Police
The ninth annual convention ot the
Ontario Labor Educational association
was held In St. Thomas, May 26th.
Hon. Thomas Crothers, minister of
labor, addressed the convention and
was handed some very pregnant
suggestions re his proposed amendments to the Industrial Disputes Investigation aot A resolution calling
for the repeal of the act was referred
to the Trades and Labor Congress ot
Canada. The views of the convention
on working-class political aetlon were
embodied ln the following resolution:
"That we endorse Independent political action on the part of the working class, and urge municipalities and
provincial constituencies to work towards the clearest expression of
working-class opinion in the election
of working-class representatives." <
The convention resolved to ask for
federal legislation making lt a penal
offence for employers of labor ln Canada to engage armed deteotlves or
other armed parties in strikebreaking, and making it a criminal offence
for steamship or railway companies
to carry weapons of any kind to he
used ln strikebreaking.
The following resolution dealing
wtth the militia was adopted:
"Resolved that the Lahor Educational Association of Ontario ts unalterably opposed to the Jingo methods being used to Induce the youth of
Canada to Join the mllltla, and the
use of the said mllltla ln defence of
property rights.
Farmers' Co-operative (Association
Scattered throughout the province
of Saskatchewan about thirty farmers' co-operative associations have
come into existence during the few
weeks that have passed since the director ot co-operative organization
commenced to register the new marketing, purchasing and producing
bodies. With one exception all of the
associations have acquired full powers
to purchase farm supplies and to
market farm produce.
Keep dust for bath, whole corn,
fresh water, good grit and either cut
fresh grass or clover or alfalfa shat-
terings in reach of the setters.
8cene Shifts to Winnipeg.
The arrests for unlawful' assembly
tn Winnipeg last week arose from the
same cause as those in, Vancouver
two winters ago. Workless worken
had gathered to discuss their plight
Then followed the usual police offlci-
ousnesc, either Inspired or otherwise,
and what might have ended In nothing
more than a few strenuous speeches,
becomes a matter for legal reprisal.
It la the olu story of the police ready
to violate a principle for whloh tha
fight was waged years ago, rather
than allow the hapless victims of modern Industrialism to gather for the
discussion ot their mutual misery.
"Phil," Is Non-committal
Vancouver la going to make a big
bid for the 1915 convention of the
Dominion Trades and Labor congreu,
which will be held the present year
In St. John N.B. The British Columbia Federatlonist, the official Journal of the Vancouver Trades and Labor counoll, proposes to prepare a
special issue for distribution at the
forthcoming congress, setting forth
the reasons and attractions which justify Vancouver's claims for the 1916
convention, and the Vancouver Trades
and Labor counoll will also take energetic means to secure the convention
for that city.—Phil Obermeyer, Hamilton Herald.
Olympic Sailed
A New Tork dispatch states that
the Atlantic liner Olympic sailed
from New Tork on Saturday for Liverpool with 600 first 600 second and
1100 third class passengers. In addition to the 2,300 passengers there te >
orew of 880. About 75 passengers are
from Pacific coast. Colonel Roosevelt
and Mrs. Nicholas Longworth were on
board en route for Madrid to attend
marriage of Hermit Roosevelt also
seven hundred Salvationists for London to attend great international congresB.
Leads ths World
In proportion to population Australia is Bald to lead the world In
trade union membership. Of every
100,000 individuals In the population,
9,152 are trade unionists.
Keep the little fellows warm and
dry for thirty-six hours, and don't give
teed or water until then.
JOBSEEKERS EVERYWHERE SHOULD
REMEMBER THAT THE STRIKE ON VAN-
COUVER ISLAND IS NOT SETTLED
PAY NO ATTENTION TO PHONEY DAILY
PRESS REPORTS SENT OUT BY THE COAL
COMPANIES. WAIT UNTIL OFFICIAL NOTICE HAS BEEN GIVEN THROUGH THE
LABOR PRESS.
Help the Coal Miners to win the right to organise by
remaining away from Vancouver Island.
S=a
. M'    ■
IrMAKESTllEMOUNTAINStmE.
RAINIER BEER AGENCY
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent
236 CAMBIE STREET PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
***MDAY JUNE 6, 1914.1
L
When Doubt
Vanishes
No longer is there any question
of the supremacy of the Edison. If you'll step in and hear
Mr. Edison's latest achievement, his
NEW TONE
 DISC	
PHONOGRAPH
You'll realize that you are face
to face with the first talking
machine you have ever heard
that reproduces all music absolutely life-like and natural.
We'll gladly arrange _ terms
wlth"*you—on-any" Edison~we
have in stock. Hear an Edison
today.
THE KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
IH   ORANVILLE   STREET
P
[ HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA STREET
One Block west of Court House.
Use  of Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral  Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
Thtt Sty. 221
DayerNlfM
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
SM aUetret it.        Vaaceatsr, S, C.
PerionAChapel
IMSCranUbsl
P
H MACK BROS.
I     FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
I EMBALMERS
| Vancouver British Columbia
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO.
Phon* Sarmour 3537
Rotera' BulMfas    470 Granule Street
DOEL HOSPITAL
Bring your broken Dollies and get
them made like new
DOLL  HOSPITAL
WUAI * COE    120 Hut-sgi St. W.
Allied Printing Trades Council—F. R.
Flemlnjj, P. o. Box 00.
Bakers—J. Black, Room 220, labor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 201, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Oeo. W. Curnoob, Room
208, Labor Temple.,
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 616 Dunlevy
avenue.
Rnllermak.r*—A. Fraser. 1161 Howe St
Brewery Workers—L. B. Day.
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenters District Council—Jas. Bltcon, Room 209, Labor
Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurts
Clear Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses — W. B.
Walker, Room 202, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside)—W. F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 207:
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Room 216,
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Miss McRae, Labor
Temple,
Glassworkers—Charles Roberts, Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's Union (I. B. B. W.)—R.
McBaln, care of B. C. B. R.
Horseshoers — A. C. MacArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Lettercarrlert—Robt. Wight, District II.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1014.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick, 1186 Homer street.
Loco. Engineers—A. B. Solloway, 1011
Paelfle.   Tel. Sey. 8S71L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomas, IM Alexander Street.
Machinists—J. H. McVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple,
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217. Labor Temnle.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 19-20,
WIlllamB Bldg., 413 Granville street.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janet Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown. (42 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—A, O. Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Bnirravers—A. Kraft, Dominion
Engraving Co.. Empire Block.
Painters—J. Train, Room 802, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 211 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Bdward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1809
Eleventh Ave. Bast.
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 141 Broadway weat.
Quarry Workers—James Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—O. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A. B. McCorville.
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural Iron Workers—W. L. Yule,
Room 208, Labor Temple.
Stonecutters—James Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, Ho.
6, Fifteenth Ave. West.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting. 2026 Trinity 8treet
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 411.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands. Box 66.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 608.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Gordon
Martin, 6S7 Prior street
Tllelayers and Helpers—
Uph'outerers—A. Duthle, 1063 Homer St.
Sake tbat watch to Appleby, soe
mtn Wait, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nlgh-olass watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
THIS  LABEL
IS  A  GUAR-
ANTEE   THAT
LEATHER
GOODS  ARE
MADE   UNDER
PAIR   CONDITIONS
5      BUY ONLY
i     BREAD  BEAR-
•     I NO THIS LABEL
COTTON'S   WEEKLY — Beat
Socialist propaganda paper la
Canada. Price (0 cents par
year; In dabs of four, 25 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVILLH, p.q.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
BUSINESS AQENT  DIRECTORY
Congress Convention To Be
Formally Invited Here
For 1915
Federal Government Asked
To Open Up Public
Works
The regular meeting of the council
convened last night with President
Walker and a fair attendance of delegates present. A few new credentials
were received. H. H.. Stevens, M.P.,
wrote saying that the council's views
on the representation of Vanoouver
In the federal house had been before
the house committee which Is dealing with this matter. Brewery workers wrote favoring monthly working
card, but preferred the monthly button. They also sent C. Austin to the
parliamentary committee. Patternmakers did not favor monthly working card. Delegate McVety reported
the action of the authorities concerning Mother Jones as mentioned elsewhere In our columns. Mrs. Lucy
Parsons was given the privilege of
the floor and spoke briefly. The secretary was instructed to write H. H.
Stevens, M.P., and Premier Borden re-
question that federal government
work be opened up on this coast to
relieve unemployment. Also to write
Hon. W. Ross, provincial minister of
lands, urging that provincial government clear public lands and split
them into small holdings to be sold
on easy terms, assisted by govern
ment loans at a low rate of Interest.
Fort William trades and labor council was congratulated on the comple
tlon of their new labor temple. The
secretary was instructed to forward
the formal invitation of the council
to the Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada to hold its 1915 convention in
Vancouver. The council decided to
again appear before the license com
mlssioners urging the removal ot all
Asiatic labor from hotels. After a
brief but busy meeting the council ad
journed at 9.30 p.m.
Ask fer Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7496 (unless otherwise stated).
Bartenders—Room 208: Geo. W. Curnock.
B. C. Federationlit—Room 317; R. P.
Pettlplece.
Bridge and Structural Iron Worken—W.
L. Tule, Room 208.
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room 809;
Hugh MoEwen.
Bricklayers—Room 111; Wm. 8. Dagnall.
Barben—Room 201; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1771.
Hod Carriers, Bulldtm aad Commoa Laborers—Room 220; John Bully.
Cooks, Walten, Waitresses—Room 201;
W. E. Walker; TeL Seymour 1414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207; W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Worken  (inside)—Room MT;
F. L. Estinghausen.
nglneen    (Steam)—Room    111;    Ed.
Prendergaat
Labor Temple Co.—Room 111; J. H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Ofllce,
146 Alexander street; H. Hannlng; tel.:
Seymour 6869,
Moving Picture Operaton—O. B. Hamilton, Room 100, Loo Bldg. TeL Bey.
1041.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, rooms 29-80,
Williams Building, 418 Granville Stnet
Seymour 2690.
Plasterers—Joe Hampton; Tel. Seymour 1814.
Street Railway Employeea—Fred. A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Trades and Labor Council—Room 810;
Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms 812, 818, 114;
a. H. Neelands.
Olothing that bean this label la
made la sanitary work shops, aad
under good working oondltlons.
This label Is a protection guarantee to you. If It does not bear
this label your clothing may be
made in sweat shops amid unsanitary conditions, and you may contract disease by wearing It.
^X
•'H7il)HATIO»,U
UNKHQURKEf
LnmiST0((iiTiFrn.-L^tf«MWMMMHiv
Kaamamao wtamaitmtetm ta—amatM aaa mm
•Jj_tmmug\^
@
ALL UNION BUTCHER SHOPS
DISPLAY THIS CARO
ALL   UNION   STORES   DISPLAY
THIS CARD
Tow opportunity to do good
aad make the world better: Insist
thai yonr Lanndrymm prodaoe
•Us babel warn delivering yonr
pareeL
ALLAN STUOHOLME
The unbeatable Labor man, who represents Bast Hamilton   ln   the Ontario
Legislature and will go back again unopposed.
BILL OF HS FOR
No Injunctions Shall Pro
hibit Strikes or Peaceful Picketing
Primary Boycotts and Payment of Strike Benefits
Are Lawful
ACT AS STRIKE
Purpose of a Citizen Militia
Force Is Defence of
Country
Political Labor League of
Australia Pass Significant Resolutions
MAKE YOUR WILL
Have You Made'Your Will?
If not, you should do so now while you have an opportunity to consider fairly what disposition you will make
of your estate. By naming this Company your Executor
you will be assured of having the provisions of your
Will carried out in accordance with 'your Instructions.
If your Will is already made, it Is a simple matter to
appoint us yonr Executor. A codicil making this change
will insure the careful administration of your Estate
Consult our Legal Department
Canadian Financiers Trust Comp-anx
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C
Patrick Donnelly-General Marv&fei?
SINGLE TAX
Effects of Taxation of Land
Values
It Is claimed by the advocates of
the taxation of land values ln Oreat
Britain that the advantages ot this
reform will be:
(1) To take tbe burden ot rateB off
dwelling houses, factories, mills, work
shops, plant and machinery, mining
works, shops, warehouses, offices and
all Industrial and business premises,
and all farm buildings, drainage, fencing and other agricultural improvements.
'(2) To break down the barriers
wblch land monopoly now opposes to
municipal, Industrial and agricultural
development and enterprise, and thus
to cauae the land everywhere to be
used In ways more advantageous to
the workers;
(3) To make lt possible for more,
better, and cheaper dwelling to be
provided in towns and villages, to
make small holdings and allotments
obtainable on fair terms, and generally to free industry of all kinds-
agricultural, mining, forestry, building, manufacturing, engineering, public works, transport distribution—
form burdens and restrictions, and
extend the field for the remunerative
"employment of labor and capital in
town, suburb and country;
(4) To secure for the agricultural
industry a genuine measure of relief.
(6) To make national service a national burden, and thus give effective
relief to rural districts from the excessive burden of rateB which now
falls on them ln providing for wbat
are largely national requirements;
(6) To cheapen the cost of living
for the mass of the people, and take
away the only plausible argument for
tariff mongering and tbe pretence
that protective taxes can be Imposed
which will not Increase the cost of
living.
Good Logic
"If the railroad company may enlist armed men to defend Its property, the employees may enlist armed
men to defend their persons."—Roger
A. Pryor, justice of the supreme court
ot New York, congressional committee Investigating the Homestead
strike.
Oeo. A. Tracy, former first vice-
president of the International Typographical union, has been elected to
the presidency of San Francisco
Typo, union No. 21. The 'Frisco delegates elected to the Providence, H.I.,
convention are: F. J. Bonnington, J.
W. Kelly, James V. Tonkin, D. S.
White. All are well-known to Vanoouver printers.
The International Stereotypers' and
Electrotypers' union of America will
open Its annual oonvention at Newark, N. J„ on Monday,
The Ontario    provincial   elections
will be bold on Mandoy, June 29th.
Builders and others purchasing
Hardware, see that the Machinists'
Union Stamp la oa the artlole purchased,
Close restrictions on tbe use of Injunctions ln labor disputes are the
feature of the section of the Clayton
anti-trust bill reached Tuesday ln the
house of representatives, says a
Washington, D. C„ dispatch.
It also provided that no such Injunction Bhall prohibit strikes, peaceful picketing, peaceful persuading ot
persons to work or quit work, primary
boycotts, the payment of strike benefits or peaceful assemblage. An amendment proposed by the judiciary
committee and agreed upon by representatives of organised labor and administration leaders proposed:
"Nor shall any acts specified ln this
paragraph be construed or held to be
unlawful."
With this amendment, Representative Henry, of Texas, declared that
the provision became the "bill ot
rights of American organised labor."
ONTABIO LABOB
Approves of New Work
men's Compensation Act
The new Workmen's Compensation
aot In Ontario will be administered
by a commission In much the same
fashion as the act now In force  in
Washington state.   The labor movement of Ontario has spent many thousands ot dollars and a mountain ot
labor ln getting this act on the statute
books of the province.   It Is admitted to he one of the best pieces of
legislation of its kind tn the world,
The question which Is now execlslng
the minds of tbe labor people in Ontario ts bow to secure direct representation for labor on the commission
which is to administer tbe act.    It
is being freely rumored around  the
province that commlsslonershlps are
to be used as political sugar plums
for supporters   of  the   government.
Whether thnt he truo or not, tho organized labor movement does not In
teud Io be caught uopiiing.   At  Uio
convention of the Labor Educational
association,   recently   beld   ln   St.
Thomas, Ont,, the following resolution was unanimously adopted:
That the Lsbor Educational association is thoroughly of the opinion that a representative of the
workingmen should be appointed
on tbe Workmen's. Compensation
commission, -and that the interests of the workers and the good
faith of the government requires
that this course be pursued.
Not only has tbat been decided on,
but so far as the labor men of Ontario are concerned, they have already
by universal approval chosen   Fred.
Bancroft the   vice-president   of the
Trades and Labor Congress of Can
ada as their nominee for a commts
sionership.     From   tbe very begin
ntng of the agitation, which has re
suited In tho present act being passed
Bancroft has led the flght for lt.
Justice Meredith was the chairman
of the commission whloh took evld
ence on which the act is based. Fred.
Bancroft literally followed the commission from place to place assisting
the local labor men with his previous
experience. His work ln tbls respect
brought him compliments from both
Justice Meredith and also F. W. Weg-
enast, the attorney of tbe manufacturers' association, wbo was fighting bim.
His untiring efforts having been
brought to a successful Issue, It ts
no more than natural that labor ln
Ontario Bhould seek to avail Itself of
the exhaustive knowledge and information of Its needs, which he has
gained, by securing his appointment
to tbe board ot administration.
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N.S.W., May 13.—At the
annual conference of the political
labor league ln Victoria held recently
the matter of Australian defence
came up for discussion, and the tol
lowing resolution was unanimously
carried:
"Resolved—That a safeguard should
be Inserted In the Defence act
against the continental practise of
calling to the colors the men out on
strike, thereby compelling them to return to work under military penalties.
"Resolved—That the Defence act
should be so amended as to clearly
set forth tbat the object of creating
a citizen defence force, based upon
universal military training and ser
vice, Is tor the purpose of defending
'the commonwealth against possible
foreign aggression, and, therefore,
under no circumstances should any
person so enrolled be compelled to
Interfere with workers engaged in an
industrial dispute.
"Resolved—That all drills be held
on Saturday mornings, and no deductions allowed therefor by any employer.
"Resolved—In times of peace no Infringement of the defence act or regulations shall be tried before a court-
martial, and In times of war the decision of the court-martial shall be
subject to an appeal to civil courts.
"Resolved—That no state government be allowed to raise, arm, or use
any force against tbe workers in time
ot an Industrial dispute."
In this direction Is may be stated
that the Austra' an Defence art was
never intended to operate in industrial upheavals and Indeed tbe labor
prime minister at the time of the
great Brisbane strike, told the governor of that state, who applied for
soldiers to put it down, that the Australian militia were for the defence of
the commonwealth against foreign aggression and were not to be used for
the purpose of murdering workers of
the commonwealth ln cold blood. But
unless the position be clearly defined,
the soldiers will be used by the Plute
governments of Australia for settling
strikes. That has been done before
and lt would have been done again
had they been In power when the
Brisbane strike was on. That is
shown by the fact that the Plute party
passing a vote of censure on the labor
government for not sending the soldiers. On that occasion Andrew Fisher, the democratic uncrowned king of
Australia, told tbe Plute state governor of Queensland tbe equivalent of
"go to ," and waB censured by the
Plute opposition In parliament be
cause he refused to murder Australia's workers, and drench the streets
of Brisbane with the blood ot lnocent
men and women.
100-Piece Dinner Sets for $19.50
50-PIECE SET, $8.75
The regular price of these 100-piece sets is $20.00. Get one now
and save $6.50. Samples mailed to out-of-town customers on request.
Union Is Business Institution
Anyone who has given thought to
the necessity tor trades unions as a
barter to protect tbe workers from unscrupulous employers, especially the
man who Is a member of a trade union, must admit that a trade organisation is flrst of all a business proposition, and to be successful In oar
rylng out the purposes of those who
are enrolled as members, must be conducted upon business principles,
A Word of Acknowledgment
Labor organisations throughout the
world have always fought the battle
of better hours, and have conferred
a blessing upon mankind through
their persistent efforts.—Calgary Albertan.
Labor Temple Club
The handicap billiard  tournament
held in the club room came to a close
last week.   Owing to the interest displayed In English billiards by members of the club, it has been decided to
hold another tournament commencing
Wednesday, July 1st.   The results of
the tournament are as follows:
Semi-finals-
Win Lose
S. Boden   F. Sayers
D. Campbell  J. Johnston
Final-
Win Lose
S. Boden  D. Campbell
High break—
D. Hood, 20; J. Lowe, 26 (tie).
CONTINENTAL CONVENTION
Ninth German Trades Union Congress June 22nd to 27th.
The nine German trade union congress, whioh takes place ln Munich,
June 22nd to 27th will occupy Itself
with the following questions ln particular: Propaganda among the workers of another language, mutual assistance ln the case of great labor
struggles, regulation of frontier institutions, administration of the Btate
insurance act, protection of workers
and terrorization on the part of the
employers, legal regulation of the tariff agreements, Influence of tbe Increase in the cost of food upon the
economic state of the working class,
etc. Representatives of the English
federation ot trade unions and the
British trade union congress will be
present for the first time.
The Social Democrat
This new monthly Ib the official organ of the Social Democratic party
of BrltlBh Columbia and is published
at Victoria, B, C. In its initial number It states that "lt is not Intended
as a propoganda builder, ln tbe sense
tbat term Is usually understood. Its
first purpose Ib that of a party builder." ThlB Ib a laudable purpose and
tbe 11,500 members of the party no
doubt will become subscribers—it they
don't, why they should. An organ of
tbat kind cannot exist on wind and
must have the liberal support of Its
real friends If lt is going to be a
Buccess. The Federatlonist wishes
the hew undertaking erery success.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES GARGET IN COWS
PANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILV
2.41, 7.20, 1.1$
Season's Prices—
Matinee lie, Evenings lie, lie,
R. G. Buchanan & Co.
Phone Seymour 2021
nae robson* street
VANCOUVER'S
SELECT
CHINA
STORE
We L. Milk, Proprietor EUROPEAN PUN        Frederick A. EaslU., Hanaser
HOTEL EMPRESS i
Sgrag" asih*«.5i,i„v„rom,i,c, HSUSftS
. Hot and Cold Water In
Every Room, 1 SO Rooms
Connected with Baths.
Named Shoci are frequently made in 1„_
Union Factories-Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless it bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
Ut Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   C. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treaa.
BASEBALL
Vancouver vs. Taeoma
June 8, 9,10,11,12,13
WEEK DAYS. 4:00 p.m SATURDAY. 3:00 p.m.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. to II p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF JUNE 8
MON.,    TUE8.,    WED.
AL SACE
Refined Novelty Musical Act
DEIHL  AND  CARSON
High-class Entertainers
JESSIE  LIVINGSTON
Comedienne
THE  MORRELLS
Comedy Sketch Entitled "Wanted
a Nurse."
THURS.,   FRI,   SAT.
MLLE, DE ROSA'S TROUPE OF
TRAINED CATS AND PIGEONS
The   most  novel  Animal  Aot   In
Vaudeville
MAX FISHER
The Wop ViollnlBt
ED. R. KEITH
Singing Comedian
DUFIELD  AND  INQALLS
High-class  Dancing
♦-REELS LATEST PICTURES-4
10 Cents—ANT SEAT—10 Cents
AMATEUR NIGHT-WEDNESDAY.
Union-made C  r „   j
, Jim (InMirt i«,o<!i«a<M<>nM«>a»>MK.rialkslma
I   t*w.oimfawn,MUm<mmi*>mH.,'tgmm '	
S~ il^s^icl  www.urmso«iuiii»iwwitiUciwwiFA«oftw»vrifi
V4SC*V"/    Wl»C«»i,.t. MM,MWN m.
f.WtiUie-i.
aea
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Ser. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too amall. First-clan workmanship, good ink and high-
grade atock have given our
Printers a reputation for
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.

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