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The British Columbia Federationist Mar 13, 1914

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 •THEv BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:  f   /VGTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR,
SIXTH YEAR./ £{. 153,
VANCOUVER, B. €, FRIDAY, MARCH 13,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
( 'tfgaSo" ) *W0 PER T___
On   Tentative   Agreement
Explained by Vice-President Morgan
Final Action Voted March
10th Will Determine
Future Policy
W. W. Morgan, vice-president first
district, Pacific District council, No. 1,
third district, International Brotherhood Electrical Workers, with headquarters at Seattle, Wash., paid British Columbia a visit this week. He
went over to the Royal city on Thursday, and left for Vlotoria by today's
boat. To The Federatlonist he stated that trade conditions were Improving In the sound cities, and that they
were better at Seattle than anywhere
else on the coast. But by saying tbat
he did not mean that work was by
any means plentiful there, because
large numbers of Idle men were lh
the Queen city. Regarding the referendum vote recently taken by the
Reld organisation of the Electrical
Workers' union, he said lt seems that
tbere was some misunderstanding.
The tentative agreement, as entered
into by the officers of the Pacific district council, Mr. MoNulty and officers
of the A. P. of L., was submitted to
the general president of the Reld
faction. He ln turn submitted it to
the general evecutlve hoard, whloh
decided against tbe proposed agreement. President Morgenthaler and
Secretary-treasurer Wilson of the Pacific district council, took an appeal
from the decision of tbe general executive board, which appeal was submitted to the membership of the Reld
Electrical Workers for a referendum
vote at the same time that the above
referendum was put out by the general ofllce. The Pacific district council submitted the tentative agreement
to be voted on simply ae an advisory
vote. The decision of the general
executive board was sustained hy a
small majority. The vote on the ten-
ta'lve agreement, submitted by the
Pacific district council as an advisory
ballot, was' 1097 votes tor the agreement and tie against lt. As the membership of the Pacific district council
by Its vote has endorsed the tentative agreement, the council- put tbe
agreement out to them for final action
to be voted on not later than March
10, 1914—all votes to be In by March
15, 1914. This vote will determine
the future policy of the Pacific district
oouncll.
P. G. E. to Employ 2,000 Men
Sometime during next month locating parties of surveyors will leave
this city for the country through
which the Pacific Oreat Eastern railway will be extended In the Peace
River district, according to an announcement yesterday by J. Cal-
laghan, chief engineer. A reconnals
ance party, under C. L. Ounn, Is now
working north of Fort Oeorge toward
Pine River pass, through which the
line will go. Grading on the Peace
river line will commence ln May. The
company will try to have the 330-llne
stretch of track northwest from Fort
Oeorge to the Alberta line all ready for
traffic by midsummer 1916. Before
the end of this year It is expected
there will be 100 miles ot line ready.
About 2,000 men will be employed on
this construction.
WOMAN'S 8UFFRAGE MEETINGS
..    Public meeting every Tuesday after-
y noon, 3 p.m., In room 206, Labor Temple.
Members' meeting, B. C. (Women's
suffrage league, every Wednesday evening, 8 p.m., room 206, Labor Temple.
The B. C. Woman's suffrage league
social evening, to which all self-supporting women are Invited, will be devoted to songs, recitations, speech on
votes for women and dancing, Wednesday, March 25th, 8 p.m. Labor Temple.
Organisation Committee
The Trades and Labor counoll ap
pointed an organisation committee at
Its last meeting. Among Its duties
Is to visit unions affiliated with the
council, consider resolutions on organisation matters and to organise unions. The members are: John Sully,
civic employees; J. H. McVety, machinists; W. E. Walker, cooks and
.waiters.
The Union Label league will hold
another social evening on Thursday,
March 26th, at 401 Lahor Temple. A
feature of the evening will be alternate old country and American
dances.	
HEALTH 8HATTERED IN
OKALLA PRISON PARM
It is generally accepted nowadays that, the chief object of
imprisonment Is to return prisoners to society ln a better condition than when they went in.
This applleB to their physical as
well as their moral state. From
the appearance of prisoners released from Okalla prison farm,
the reverse holds true bo far aB
their health Ib concerned, Fed
on the coarsest of food, housed
under. unsanitary conditions,
and denied proper medical attention they become physical
wrecks. Months will be required
in some cases for tbelr restoration to health. Surely It Is time
this Judicial farce was ended
and the men restored to liberty.
L UNIONlThe Mine Owners Are Beaten
IN
Ask for Equal Recognition
With Members of
International     ,
Important Building Opera
tions Projected—Work
Very Dull a
III
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C, March
—Perhaps the Uvest
union elroles at present is the entrance
of the B. C. Association of Stationary Engineers Into- the looal field.
Last Monday night this society had a
delegation present at the olty counoll meeting to aak for equal recognition with the members ot the Inter
national union, and also requested that
some of their members be appointed
to city Jobs; they were not at all
bashful about the men they wished
appointed, either. At about the same
moment a meeting of the Trades and
Lahor council was ln progress, asd a
letter was being drafted to the olty
counoll, stating that the organisations
represented did not recognise the B.
C. Association as a trades union. The
Prince Rupert branch of the International union of engineers had a delegation before the council a tew weeks
ago, asking for more pay tor some of
their members who are employed on
city work, and it looks, very much as
though the formation of the B. C. association here Is the answer to that
delegation's request. However, time
wlU tell.
Tradea and Labor Council.
The last meeting of the Trades
council was the most largely attended
for some time; ln fact, lately lt bas
been impossible to get a quorum much
of the time. It appears tbat more Interest is now being taken, and one of
theBe days this city may have a real
live council. The election of officers
was held recently with the following
result: President, F. W. Chandler
(Engineers); vice-president, F. McLeod (Electricians); treasurer, J.
Verlck (Brotherhood Carpenters);
secretary, F. Salter (Brotherhood Carpenters); warden, J. Nlool (Brotherhood Carpenters). The unions affiliated with the council are as follows:
Typographical Brotherhood of Carpenters, International Steam Engineers, Electricians and Musicians.
At the last meeting all had full representation except the Electricians and
Musicians. The latter have a very
hard time sending a delegate as their
members are nearly all working night
It has been decided that a fine of
twenty-five cents wtll be levied,on all
members who fall to attend, but this
Is not likely to bring many out unless
they can be interested ln the work.
The Trades council secretary will also
send out post cards to union secretaries when delegates fall to attend.
The question of sending reports from
this city to the Labor Oasette came up
and lt waB decided that the secretary
should take the matter up with the department of labor.
Label Campaign.
The Typographical union here Is
getting busy and will institute a live
label campaign. There was a prospect for some time that the union
would have an unfair shop on Its
hands, hut this matter has now been
happily adjusted and everything appears serene, However, prevention
is better than cure, and hence the
label campaign. The members of the
committee are Messrs: Peck, Russell
and Robb. Some of the work put out
hy the city lately has appeared without the union label and lt Ib understood that a delegation from the union
will appear before the city council on
Monday evening next A resolution
ot the -council, passed some time ago,
required that the label should be on
all olty printing, hut this has not always heen observed. Business ln
printing, circles Is fair, but the offices
are small, -and there is no extra work
given out
Important Works.
Business ln Prince Rupert as a
whole Is perhaps better than ln Vancouver and Victoria, hut the field is
limited, and any one coming here
should have something In sight. It
Is probable that this year will see
many important works well under way,
Including the Grand Trunk hotel, post
offloe and provlnolal government
buildings. Excavation Is now going on
for all of these. It looks as though
the day of atone aad brick buildings
has ahout arrived for this city, and
when bricklayers, stonecutters and
other skilled tradesmen arrive matters ln union circles will probably take
on a different color. There are plenty
of men In the city for all the work
now going on, and many are arriving
on every boat For Instance, last
Wednesday the 0. T. P. boat brought
in 105 first class and 60 deck passengers. It Is said that the Orand Trunk
Pacific will he linked up ln May, but
even if lt Is transcontinental trains
will likely not run on a regular schedule before next year.
Organisation Matters.
There are a number of trades In the
city which could perhaps be organised
with little effort, and lt Is probable
that before long the Trades council
will undertake an active organisation
campaign. However, when there are
only a very few men working at a
trade lt Is hard to get them to stick
together and take an Interest ln the
union, so perhaps lt will be Just as
well tt the matter Ib not pressed for
a while.
There ts a certain amount of prejudice ln some quarters against the
unions here, hut it looks to the writer
to be an aftwmath of the I. W. W.
oampaign here some years ago. Some
people do not stop to discriminate between unions—as long as they are
called unlona that Is enough.
The papers of the Interior are still
getting quite a few of those advertisements commencing "Skeena Land
Dlstriot—Dlstriot of—" which means
OR SOME MONTHS PAST, in fact since the present industrial troubles
started on Vancouver island a section of the press in this dominion has
invariably distorted facts in connection therewith and exaggerated others
beyond recognition.    A glaring instance has just occurred.    Exchanges
received by The Federationist this week have contained a collection of the most lying
statements conceivable.   One newspaper,heads the article: "Strike Breaks" and then
proceeds'to stat^ that 700 miners have returned to work, at the same time suggesting
tha'£ the back-bone owthe men's resistance had been broken.   Nothing could be more
false.    Thexmemb9j;si)of the United Mine Workers on the island have had nothing
wha^verj fi do witft ^ny such agreement.   Tney would not agree, to it if it were presented to then*,. \Tbeir resistance is not broken.  They were never more confident of
b. c., Mwch iuV u|tin^*^^^',ltian they are now and the thought of giving up when victory is
sT™the\ntra0noel^88u^«iBir,never occurred to them.   The few defections from their ranks—only a
handful out bf so many thousands—does not affect them. A few black sheep will certainly be found in so huge an organization,
In Spite of Fake Scab Agreement
JOHN W. HAYES
Secretary Treasurer of the International
Typographical Union, wtth headquarters at Indianapolis, Ind., and who IB
a popular candidate to succeed himself
ln May next.
DEMAND FOR HOUSES
Influx of People at Fort George Causes
a Scarcity
(Special Correspondence)
FORT GEORGE, B.C., March 7.—
During the past two weeks there -has
been a brisker demand for bouses
and rooms ln Fort George than ever
before. The Fort George Trust company, and other firms Interested ln
renting houses, state that the demand
has outstripped the supply, and at the
present time there is not an available
house for rent ln town. As soon as
the spring season opens extensive
building operations will be necessary
In order to accommodate the large
number ot new families headed this
way.
Would Reprimand Foreman
"Ward foremen should be reprimanded for not telling the civic authorities what they told the Judge in
the recent action brought by a workman named Fisher against Uie city
tor Injuries received In which the
plaintiff was awarded $1,400 damages
and the city was saddled with the
costs of the action ln addition," declared Mayor Baxter Monday night
in council meeting, when a letter from
the elty solicitor Informed the coun-
ell of the result ot the trial complaining of the reticence of the foremen In
question, ln holding back evidence,
which they gave ln court
that the ruthless squandering of the
resources ot the province Is still going on, and the speculators are still
getting the oream.
Press Misrepresents Facts
The press reports say 700 men went
back to work. They- were strikebreakers still working and in addition
there waa nothing like that number.
Excluding Asiatics, 360 would be a
very liberal estimate. Last week
when the company made special arrangements for ALL Its employees to
attend the funeral ot one of lta victims, considerably leas than 300 were
present. And ot these the majority
are Greeks, Montenegrins and other
non-English-speaking races, nondescripts of all descriptions, picked up
in the highways and byways. There
will probably be about 60 English-
speaking men In the lot. As io the
actual terms of the agreement the
miners would not touch them. They refused a similar one a year or so ago.
Even the strike-breakers themselves
are dissatisfied with it many of tbem
leaving when opportunity occurs. This
is not so easy as It appears, the company using every effort to keep these
men. when they have got them, in
fact cases have been known where
charges have been trumped up against
them ln order to prevent them leaving. The truth is this so-called
"agreement" was concocted by the
company and a few men who have
deserted their union, for the sole purpose of attempting to hoodwink the
public. These very men are the ones
who were formerly discriminated
against by the company on account
ot their failure to come up to the
standard of their fellows. But the
company is glad to get them now, ss,
inefficient though they are, they have
at least an elementary acquaintance
wltb mining which the remainder do
not possess.
Consumers Refuse Coal
. The owners are beaten; they know
It, and the men know i't- The colliery
companies are not getting results' and
sooner or later they will have to come
to terms with their old efficient men.
With the latter, the average output
was two and a half to three tons per
man per day; now lt Is only one and
a quarter tons per strikebreaker per
day. Eighteen montbs ago, Cumberland coal Bold at a higher price than
any other produced ion the island.
Now lt Ib so dirty that concumers refuse io buy it and the company has
its bunkers full. Last week the mine
was only worked one day and this
week li Is reported to be shut down
altogether. In San Francisco, where
It will he remembered that recently
officials of the Western Fuel company
were convicted of defrauding the United States government, the longshoremen refuse Jo handle coal produced ln that company's mines.
Loss of Life
Another Important phase of the
question Is the toll of life and limb
that is being taken. Many accidents
occur that are never made public and
lt Is only at Inquests deaths are made
known. Bast week a Greek, known
under the name of Steve Morris, was
instantly killed by a fall of rock ln
JAMES M, DUNCAN
Who was promoted from the first vlce-
presldeney to that of president, upon
the resignation of Jas. M. Lynch, now
Commissioner of Labor for New York
State.—Mr. Duncan la not a candidate
for re-eleotlon In May.	
I GRAIN GROWERSIMINER B RELEASED
T
the face of the mine. He had no certificate and had he been a competent
miner the accident would never have
occurred. His first duty was to
sound the roof, a precaution which he
neglected to take. This was stated at
the inquest which only lasted about
half and hour. A foreman said he warned the deceased but the warning was
neglected, the man probably wanting
to get his csr full of easy coal snd
took chances. A verdict of accidental
death waa returned. How many similar accidents occur that the public
never hear of? It Is well known thai
aocldents, not Involving loss of life,
are of frequent occurrence, but how
many fatal ones take place? So many
of these men cannot read or speak
English and consequently cannot heed
warnings that they are a menace, not
only to themselves, hut others. Short
as the Inquest was, most of the time
was taken up tn an attempt to prove
that the deceased could understand
English.
Underhand Tactics
One ugly feature in the history of
the struggle is thst rents are being
raised on union men in the area
affected. This Is utterly against the
ethics of fair play. In tact In Oreat
Britain legislation Is being brought
down forbidding such action. It Is an
underhand way of bringing pressure
to bear on the men and one that reflects discredit upon those using such
a weapon. Some merchants are also
assisting the company by similar tactics. When the opportunity arises
this unfair game will not be forgotten
by the miners.
As said before,   the   owners are
Sees Advantage of Co-operation Between These
Bodiee
Withdrawal of Vancouver
Carpenten from Central
Labor Affiliations
L, H. Burnham, a former aeeretary
of the United Brotherhood ot Carpenters In Vancouver, alao an ex-delegate
to the local trades council, writes aa
Interesting letter trom Fee, Sask. He
says that he reoelved The Federatlonist and read that the combined ear
penters of Vancouver had withdrawn
from thr British Columbia Federation
of Labor, Trades and Labor and Building Trades councils. He adds that
without Information as to cause of
snch action, he Is unable to even approximate any condition or reason
that would warrant the severing ot
relations with all the central bodiee.
The withdrawal ot the delegates, he
thinks, was a mistake and Is firmly
convinced that the general membership of the carpenters' organisations
will not he long In finding this out,
and Insisting upon reafflllation; and
hopes tbat this may oome to pass. "If
organising as carpenters Is a good
thing," he says, "how much better
must tt be organising as fellow tradesmen for mutual protection and consultation?"
Grain Growers Organise '
"The sentiment of unionism is fast
taking hold of the farmers on the
prairies," says Mr, Burnham. - "Last
week they formed an organisation
known as the Saskatchewan Grain
Growers' association. When naked by
some doubting parties lt I thought
thst lt waa a good thing I just showed
them the badge of the carpenters I
wear, and thla seemed to be satisfactory answer enough. This association has how ln operation In Saskatchewan 192 grain elevators, is doing some great work for farmers, and
could be enlisted ln a legislative way
to do a pro rata of some solid work
for the trade unlona. Were fraternal
delegates seat to the conventions, the
grain growers would then become better acquainted with the alms and objects of trade unionism. This should
be a matter for tbe next convention
of the Trades and Labor Congress,
whieh body should readily see the
advantage of co-operation between
these bodies."
FROM OKALLA
IN
JOHN PLACE, M. L. A.
And Other Miners Trlsd at Westminster Assizes
Last week at New Westminster
special assizes, Henry Melkle wes convicted on the two counts of unlawful
assembly and rioting ln connection
with "Riot No. 3" at Nanaimo last August. Sentence was reserved. On
Monday John Place, M.L. A., was
found guilty of unlawful assembly at
the same scene, and waB remanded for
sentence. Great interest was taken in
this case on account of the parliamentary position of the accused. Counsel
asked for Immediate sentence, but was
refused, Justice Morrison stating that
he would not distinguish between accused and others who bad heen remanded for sentence. On Tuesday
when the case of Tony Ceirella was
called, the case waa adjourned at the
request of accused's counsel on the
ground that he was not ready to go on
with the defence. On Wednesday
Henry Martin was charged on the
usual two counts, the opening of the
case being the signal for a sharp
brush between Judge and defence
counsel, the latter asking for adjournment. ThlB was refused by his Lord-
ship and tbe case proceeded. It was
unfinished when the court rose, and
waB continued yesterday.
BRICKLAYERS MEET
Meeting Date Changed — Withdraw
from Labor Representation League
The local union of Bricklayers and
Masons met on Tuesday evening, when
President J. Hazlitt waa in the chair.
It was decided In future to hold the
regular meetings fortnightly Instead
of weekly as heretofore. The Jurisdictional question between the stonecutters and masons was discussed at considerable length, and will be taken up
at a later meeting. Upon a vote being taken it was decided to cease affiliation with the Labor Representation League. Business ln the trade
was reported quiet and prospects poor.
One of Judge Howay's Victims Rushed to General Hospital
John McKensle Undergoes
Serious Operation For
Peritonitis
Another pathetic scene haa beea'
enacted in the great melodrama ot
the Vanoouver Island miners' strike.
Some months ago sturdy aad sinewy
John McKensle was taken from hla
family and home at Ladysmlth by
military thugs, thrown into prison
and unmercifully sentenced by Judge
Howay to the Okalla baatl*e> On
Monday morning the unfortunate Me-
Kensle waa taken to the general hospital, Vaneouvar, where he waa operated upon for peritonitis within tt-
teen minutes after leaving the jail
He waa In a very serious condition'
when his wife aad children arrived
ud now he lies at death's door. How
much longer are men's Uvea to ba
played with In order to satisfy the
greed ot the mine-owners ot Paneoa-
ver Island? It will be remembered
that Joseph Mairs died from peritonitis, although In bis caae It waa ot
tubercular origin, though' doubtless
accelerated hy the coarse and unpalatable food aa well aa the confinement
In McKensls's caae, the tact probably holda true that hla severe Illness
hss been caused directly by the unfit
and unwholesome food supplied him
at Okalla. It Is well known that In
certain diseases wrong diet will causa
peritonitis. Therefore, It would appear to be well within the bounds ot
ordinary reason and oommon sense,
that this Is one of these caaea. When
the absence of a resident physician
la considered, and that only one doctor visits the prison once a week, the
wonder la that there are not mora
deaths, It Is certain that prisoners
released from there are only shadows
of their former selves with ruined
constitutions and that they ara unnerved physical wrecks.
LABORERS MEET '
Csndldates for Membership Special
Meeting Thla Evening In Temple
There was a large attendance ot
members at the regular meeting ot
the Laborers', union laat Prtday evening In Labor Temple. There were ant
new members who signed the roll,
and ten applications were presented
to the secretary tor membership,
which will be considered at a later
meeting.
This (Friday) evening a special
meeting will be held to revise the constitution and bylaws and to transact
other business regarding the further
strengthening of the organisation, A
special effort will be made to organize all the men working on the city
sewers. The officers are: President,
J. Hammltt; vice-president, Geo, K1I-
Patrick; secretary, Chas, Bunco; financial secretary, Geo. Harrison; sergeant-at-arms, Geo. Henderson.
SOUTH VANCOUVER
Five Thousand Dollara for Day Labor
—Pupils Starting
South Vancouver school board hu
appropriated about 16,000 which will
be spent on the day labor system. The
wage patd Is 13 for eight hours. The
work will be divided among laborers
equally as possible. All told there
will be put to work in turns about 16
men a day.
April 1st has been set for the reception of new pupils.
Amalgamated Carpentera
The amalgamated carpentera and
Joiners will hold an aggregate meeting of tbe district amalgamated section to consider tbe question of consolidating the city locals Into one or
two bodies. Election of officers will
also take place. Notwithstanding the
depressing state of trade, the work
of organisation keeps apace by new
members joining the union.
New Union Label
The Journeymen Tailors' unton,
which recently changed Its name to
the Tailors' Industrial Union (International), has adopted a new design
for Its union label. It Is In the form
of a circle.
Labor Representstlon League
There will be a full meeting of delegates of the Vancouver Labor Representation league on Monday evening,
March 16th, to be held ln Lahor
Temple.
J. D. McNIven, of Vancouver, federal government fair wage officer,
spent the week on Vancouver Island
ln the mining districts.
beaten. In spite of all their bragging
and fake agreements, they are not
getting the same equivalent for dollars and cents as they got before the
trouble started. And dollars and
cents mean much to these owners.
Sooner or later they must accede to
the men's demands. The people of
this province are getting tired of paying for working these mines—for this
is what thsy are doing. Mllltla and
special police are costly luxuries snd
the bill for the tender care shown to
the scabs, will be a mighty big one.
The miners don't require them and
conscious of their own strength, and
the Justice of their cause, they are
quietly awaiting their certain victory.
Working at South Wellington.
The following men are now working
In South Wellington mines, while their
fellow workers ln organized labor are
still continuing the struggle: Engineers Richard Bowlaby, Wm. Wilkinson, Robt. Arbutbnot, Jnr., and Alex.
Walker;  Fireman John Arbuthnot,
Widespread unemployment is an essential factor ot competitive production. What are you going to do about
it?
USE ANTITRUST LAW
TO ATTACK THE LABEL
Tbe Allied Printing Trades
label has now become the object
of attack by anti-union publishing houses In New York. The
federal grand jury have ordered
an Investigation into the organization of the Printing Trades
council of that city to enquire
Into alleged violations of the
Sherman anti-trust law. This is
simply in line with a widespread effort on this continent
to strike at the very existence
of organized labor, but lnaa-:
much as the union label stands
as a safeguard for the lives, the
health and the welfare of the
workers, It is scarcely likely the
attack will meet with muoh success. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT MARCH 13, 1314
Prudential
WALL
FINISH
The only real Washable Wall Finish on
the market. You can strike matches on it.
Yes, then you can wash off the mark.
That's some test, eh?
IT IS MADE IN RC.
BY B.C WORKMEN
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria      Vancouver      Oalgary      Edmonton
Vancouver wife-workers can materially assist The Federatlonist by calling or
writing (or a few cards which have just been printed, reading:
I came here because I read your
advertisement in our paper,
THE B.C FEDERATIONIST
Owned and published by organlted
tabor, in our own quarter-of-a-mllllon
dollar Labor Temple, every Friday
morning, and I always give preference
to goods bearing the Union  Label.
When out shopping go to Federationist advertisers, and before leaving leave a
 d where it can be found by the clerks and probably reach the principals.   It Is
an easy .way to help The Federationitt get results—hence more advertising—and a
bigger and, better paper to champion the cause of Labor.
Remember, too, when you are in need of printing of any kind that The
tJonlst accepts orders.   Union paper—union printers.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU •TOM* IN VANCOUVER
4t Haatinge at.     Phone toy. MS        401 GauvUM St
TM Qranvllle at    Phons tsy. MIS
Phone Soy. HIT
VICTORIA STORB, UI VIEW IT.
Mat Avs. and Main at
Phono Fairmont 7H.
ORBBNHOUSBB
Victoria, 1.0.
Hammond, ■. C.
Loni Distance Phons IT
"OFFICE SPECIALTY"
PILING SYSTEMS FOR EVERY BUSINESS.
QFFIOE FURNITURE FOR EVERY OFFICE.
(REPRESENTATIVE OR CATALOGUE AT YOUR REQUEST)
mmo or amount mm etamtro
lFFICESPEClALTYMFO.ft.
soma mem	
NADA
Phones Sey. 2403, 11703
—Moomct wmnM m tniumtm
HOB HOMER ST. (cor Davis)
Garland Stoves and Ranges-i&7.£z»^
-MADE AND USED BY UNION MEN FOR
ges-
YEARS-'
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kennath Orant Managing Director.)
Two Stores—
SO-S4 OOBOOTA MBH WMt    Tf Si
Carpenters' White Duck Overalls,
with It pockete, union label 11.71
Men's Heavy Tweed Panto, union
'ebol ,. n.oo te 11,10
Ws ask for your patronage  In our  ault   and   Overcoat   Desert-
mente, when we give velue everyllmo.
PATENTS
Trade Marks. Deelgns, Oopyrlghte.
FBTHBRSTONHAUOH  i So.
Ths Old letabllohod Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYa
10JS Rogera Bldg., Qranvllle Btreet
City.  Phone Seymour S79S.	
DuANlshtC.il.
Phon. B.,.943
Parian A Chwol
23>SCra»lll.St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Brltlih Columbia
International
<GtHW»TEIIED)
BUY ONLY
BREAD   BEARING THIS LABEL
THIS  LABEL
IS  A  GUARANTEE   THAT
LEATHER
GOODS  ARE
MADE   UNDER
FAIR   CONDITIONS
TOF
Immigrants Are Ignorant of
Farming—More a Nuis
ance Than Worth
Want Production on Farm
More Than Any Other
Kinds
B. W. Nesbltt, M. P., speaking recently ln the house ot commons on
the matter of experimental {arms,
said ln part: "I would suggest that
If the minister of agriculture could
get' some accountant ln his depart-'
ment to devise a simple plan of agricultural book-keeping and have that
copied hy the various agricultural
papers In the country lt would he of
great practical value to the farmers.
I presume that farming, taken as a
whole, Is the only business ln the
country ln which those engaged, do
not know just exactly what the products of the business cost. If a manufacturer were to manufacture hts
goods for a year and put them on the
market without knowing the cost ot
manufacture before he set the price,
I am afraid he would come to an end
ln a short time.
No Idea of Cost
"As a rule the farmers have no Idea
of what their goods are costing them;
they sell for what the market demands. Once the farmer commences
to keep track of what his various
stuff Is costing him,- from pigs to
grain, I know from my own experience of farming, that he will begin
to delve Into the science of agriculture and become in a very short time
a scientific farmer to a great extent.
I only offer that as a suggestion.
When Mr. Ruddlck got the farmers—
to a very small extent I am afraid—
to weigh their milk and to ascertain
whether their cows were paying them
or not, lt was a great step forward.
Those who have adopted that system
I am sure would nevergo back to the
old haphazard
Method of Juat Guessing
whether the cows were paying them.
There Is no branch ot farming to
which that same Idea could not be applied with just as good results. The
minister might get some cheap land,
where Immigrants could be taught the
rudiments ot farming before they look
for farm work. That would probably
be expensive, but I know that the
greater portion ot the men who are
brought here for farm work do not
stay on the farms. It may be because
of the greater attractions of the city,
but the fact remains we are getting
too many people ln the cities and
towns. We are purposely trying to
avoid this'flocking to the city ln our
Immigration branch; at least, so far
as I know, the minister ot the Interior
Is not encouraging that type of Immigrant. Many of the Immigrants
who go on to the farm are so absolutely
Ignorant of Farming
that they are more of a nuisance than
they are worth. If the minister would
establish some place where these men
could be taught the rudiments ot farming, I am sure he would have applications by the thousands trom men
wishing to learn, and lt would be the
means of keeping these men on the
farms. Farm wages, In our section
at least, are Just as good, when you
take board Into account, as the wages
paid ln towns and cities. The city
laborer may get higher wages, hut
after he has paid his board he Is no
better oft thhn the man working on
the farm. The question of what we
are to do with the three or four hundred thousand Immigrants coming to
this country every year Is a very live
one.   We
Want Production
on the farm very much more than we
want other kinds of production. I
am free to confess that a great many
of these Immigrants, are not lit to go
on the land when they flrst oome
here; the farmers will not be bothered with them, and as to taking up
land themselves, tbey would only
starve unless they had means to carry
them over two or three years until
they got some knowledge,"
Poultry Industry Doomed if Publlo
Are Not Aroused.
The 500 poultry raisers of the so-
noma County Poultry Producers' Federation, declaring that tbe local poultry Industry of California is doomed
unless the public can be aroused to
appreciate a few plain facts about
the Chinese eggs now being imported
into San PradsiBco, have issued a
statement whloh follows in part:
"According to the reports of travelers and persons who have resided
ln China, the Chinese eggs are pro.
duced under extremely filthy conditions. China is a country without
the most ordinary sanitation. Tbe
hens are the scavengers. Such facts
certainly mak# the Chinese egg repugnant to the taste. If the reader
Is inclined to doubt this statement
let him simply consult some friend
who bas been in China. We are now
being told that we must sell our eggs
at very low prices because Importers can get plenty of eggs very cheap
ln China. The Chinese egg costs the
Importer about eight cents a dozen
and Is laid down in Pacific Coast
ports for 14 cents. Producers cannot produce eggs at 14 cents a dozen and pay expenses, much less make
a profit. Sonoma county poultrymen
feed their hens the best ot wheat,
corn and mlllstuffs. Everything possible Is done to keep the flocks clean
and healthy. The Sonoma egg Is
large, clean and white. Our plants
are always open to Inspection. The
Chinese eggs sell principally to bakeries, delicatessen shops and rest,
aurants. The eggs are small, dark-
colored and produced under the vilest
conditions Imaginable.
TAX FISHERMEN
New Aet Involves Taxation of All
Classes of Fishermen
According to a new law ot British
Columbia the lleutenant-governor-ln-
council has been given power to require all fishermen in the provinoe to
pay a tax. The taxation applies to
"all persons who flsh or take flsh or
attempt to flsh or take flsh" anywhere
in this province. All persons who ln
any way assist as boatpullers or
otherwise the actual fishermen shall
be deemed to come under the act.
This particular fishery tax act makes
no distinction between the sportsman
angler and the commercial fisherman.
The flrst offence of fishing without
having paid the tax will mean a fine
ranging from 110 to $50. The second
offence will mean a fine of from (20
to $100. Falling payment the term
of imprisonment will be anything under six months.
POULTRY INSPECTION
Provincial Poultry Association For-
I warding Resolutions to Government
i Owing to the efforts of the B. C.
I Poultry Association the authorities at
Ottawa are at last beginning to realise that the poultry breedera of this
province have a genuine grievance.
Several resolutions have been forwarded to various officials at Ottawa,
asking that the Contagious Diseases
of Animals act be amended so that
l the dominion veterinary Inspectors
i could Inspect all live and dead poultry
I entering the province. Considerable
live poultry are being Imported, ostensibly for, the purpose of killing for
the markets, but are however, being
sold to settlers at reduced prices. In
some consignments the majority of
the fowls have been found to be suffering from one or the other of the
contagious diseases attacking poultry.
These fowls have heen sold broadcast
throughout the province, the result being that ln some districts which have
heretofore been healthy, poultry
breeders have had these diseases attack their flocks. Word has just been
received by the secretary of the Provincial Poultry association, stating
that J. H. Hare, of the poultry division, department of agriculture, Ottawa, Is to visit the province and
make an Investigation Into the matter. In the meantime, the provincial
association Is leaving io stone unturned to secure redress, and during
this month the affiliated associations
numbering 28, are forwarding a resolution to the Veterinary Director General, dealing with the matter.
The mid-week trade sale was held
Wednesday °t 2 p.m. It can scarcely
be described as being a success, and
the likelihood is that we will revert
to the morning sales.
Poultry are not arriving ln the quantities that are necessary for the market demand. Yet we bear complaints
that farmers cannot get a market for
their produce.
A.   L.  WOODARD
Died at Kamloops—Funeral Took
Place In Thla City,
There passed away at Kamloops, B.
C„ Saturday, March 7, 1914, A. L.
Woodard, a native of England, aged 29
years. He had been resident In Vancouver for about seven years, and was
a well known and popular bricklayer
here. Contracting that dread disease
tuberculosis, he left the city about
four montbs ago, believing that treatment at the sanitarium of the Inland
City might help to Improve his health.
The remains arrived In this city this
week, the funeral being held on Wednesday from the undertaking parlors
of Green & Merkley, Pender Street,
at 2 p.m. The services were conducted
by Rev. C. C. Owen, The final obsequies took place at the Mountain View
crematorium, in accordance with the
wish of the deceased. There was a
large attendance, the pall-bearers being
Why not give that boy of yours a
loft of pigeons? With a number of
pigeons to care for he Is not nearly
so likely to get Into mischief as he
might be otherwise, It he has latent talent for breeding it will be developed through his work with and
among his pots. Do not give him the
common farm pigeon and expect him
to become a breeder. Start bim with
one or more pairs of some pigeon
that Is worth while. Encourage him
to Improve his strain by careful attention to mating and care ot the
young. The average growing boy
early ln life longs for something he
really oan call his own. A few pigeons may appear a small matter to
you,. but ln the hands of an alert,
"live wire" boy they can be made a
source ot considerable revenue. The
market for fancy pigeons ot quality
or for high olass squabs never
"slumps."
Ten dressed hogs from Eburne, averaging 100 pounds, were on sale Friday and brougbt IS cents a pound.
I WEEK
Potatoes Arrive From All
Parts of Province-
Sell Well
Apples Sell Slowly—Eggs
From Islands—Notes-
Prices
Potatoes are still arriving in large
quantities trom all parts of the province at the city market, Main Btreet,
and the wonder Is that prices are
keeping up so well. There seems to
be a determination on the part ot the
farmers not to be caught napping as
they were in the season of 1913, when
potatoes were held over till the extreme end of the season and then
rushed ln sucb quantities that the bottom fairly fell out of the market, and
very poor returns were the result.
While we are not In a position to say
what higher prices will prevail'later,
it is our opinion that the whole crop
can be marketed around (20 a ton If
the farmers do not rush the market
during the next few months.
Apples are selling slowly from $1.75
to $2.60 a case and last year at this
time they were sold from $1 to $1.25
a case.
Eggs are now arriving ln much larger quantities, especially from the Quit
Islands, and as these eggs are of superb quality and very heavy, they
have maintained the price of las);
week, namely, 30 cents a dozen.
Lettuce from Victoria is selling at
60 cents a dozen while sweet peas from
the same district are making 60 cents
a dozen bunches and carnations 30
cents a dozen.
Root vegetables are selling at last
week's prices with no particular demand.   The following are
THIS WEEK'S PRICES:
Applea
Royal Jenette, No. 1,
Ijox  © 2.60
Royal Jenette, No. 3,
box     9 2.25
Ben    Davis,    No.    1,
box  9 2.00
Ben    Davis,   No.    2,
box    '.  9 1.76
Cookers, box   9 1.60
Vegetables
Potatoes, sack  I   .80 9 I 1.00
Carrots, Back   & .76
Turnips, sack  -...     .60 9 .76
Parsnips, sack   0 .86
Rhubarb, lb  9 .10
Head Lettuce, doz '.  9 .60
Cut Flowers v
Sweet Peas, bunch.  9 .05
Carnations, doz,   9 ,30
Eggs
Local new laid, doz  9 ,30
Wash., new laid, dos  9 .27
Poultry
Voung hens, doz $10.00 9 112.00
Heavy hens, lb  9 .21
Pullets, doz    9.00 9 12.00
Broilers, doz    6.00 @ 0.00
Ducks, doz _. 10.00 9 12.00
Feed
Hay, ton  „f 14.00 e $19.00
Straw, bale   a     ,40
Oats, ton   '...;.... &  28.00
Wheat, ton  ,  f   36.00
Bran, ton  9  28.00
Shorts, ton   @   30.00
Beef
T-bone   and   Porter-
hoUBe steaks, lb  9 $   ,26
Round steak, lb  9     .20
Pot roast, lb  @      .16
Pork
Leg and loins, lb     9 $   .32
Shoulder, lb  9      -16
Chops, lb  ®      .22)4
Lamb
Legs, lb  0$   .22
Loins, lb  fi!      .20
•Fore quarters, lb  9     .14
Chops, loin, lb  0      ,22W
Chops, lb  @      ,16
CITY MARKET NOTES.
Two cars containing over 1,000 sacks
of potatoes arrived from Agassis on
Monday.  The variety is Red Dakotas.
ThlB is juat the beginning of the
Agassis potatoes, as tbey grow the
Red Dakota for the late market.
There Is a big demand for Early
Rose seed potatoes from the Okanagan district
Young hogs made $4.50 on Friday.
This Is an Increase ot 50 cents over
last day.
- John McMillan, the popular market
manager, begins his tour of the farmers today (Friday). He will start at
Ladner, thence visiting each district
up to Chilllwack.
The shortest supply at the City market last season waa strawberries. A
big effort will be made this season to
Induce the farmers to cultivate larger
areas of this fruit.
Dr. Sawyer and Mr. Easterbrook of
Summeriand, were visitors at the city
market last week. The doctor Is optimistic regarding this year's crop.
Winter rhubarb Is now In sucb demand that the supply falls far short.
Enterprising growers, please note.
Fred Scrimshaw, G. Heslop, A. Nidman
and W. Walton. The late brother being a member of the local union of
bricklayers and masons, the funeral
arrangements were attended to by W.
S. Dagnall, the Becretary. Among the
many beautiful floral tributes sent
were an anchor by the union and a
cross by the "boys." A wife and six-
year-old son, who have the sympathy
of a host of frlendB in their untimely
bereavement, are left to mourn the
death of a devoted husband and father.
Grandvlew Bridges to Cost »10S,000
Permits for the building of two
bridges across the Grandvlew cut were
taken out Monday by the Great
Northern railway. The bridges will
be built on Broadway and Victoria
drive. The latter Is estimated to cost
$35,000 and the former $70,000.
Monument to Joseph Mairs
Editor B. C. Federatlonist:   I am
Instructed by the memorial committal
local No. 2388, dlstriot 28, U. M. W.
of A. to Inform you that we have
started a subscription fund to ereot
a monument to the memory of our
deceased brother, Joseph Mairs, who
died in Okalla prison farm while serving sentence Imposed upon him by
Judge Howay, at Nanalmo, B. C, on
Thursday, October 23, 1913. so that
this monument may stand for all time
a silent witness of the persecutions
of the present powers that be against
the striking miners on Vancouver
island. If any of our brother unionists wish to contribute to the fund, or
any friends of organized labor, all
donations will be thankfully received,
and will be acknowledged later ln The
Federatlonist. Hoping you wtll Insert
this letter ln your valuable paper, I
will conclude with personal regards
and best wishes for success. Yours
fraternally,
ALLAN McDONALD,
Secretary of Committee.
P.S.—All moneys should be addressed to Allan McDonald, P. O, Box 232,
Ladysmlth, B. C.
Ladysmlth, B.C., March 7, 1914,
\
PONT FORGET 1
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for bsautlful gardens, making home aurroundings attractive,
with flowers, shrubbery, shade and fruit trees, Is a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Universe.
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fullest, and
make not only your own life better, but alio that of your fellow citizen who may not have the opportunities you have.
Now Is the time to make your selections, when our prloea were
never lower, and our stook never better to meet the demande of the
cultivated aesthetic tastes,
In our stock of over 1100,000.00, we have choice flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental trees and ahruba In
".r"i v.*"*i!.,yj ■iol•y• prlv,t *nd ,»u^•, ,or h«|fl"i ■« alias; oholoa
stock of Shade Trees, and an Immense stock of all the most approved
varieties of apples, psars, plums, cherries, and small fruit. The latter
(fruit: trees) we are offering at apeolal low prloea to clear the ground
for additional atock coming In.
Don't forget we oan mast your neede better than you oan get
from stock grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Eastings St. West.
'PHONE:  SEYMOUR SHt.
Store, 2410 Granville St. Phone: Bayvlew 1026
Greenhoussa and Nurseries at Roya, on B. C. E. Ry. Eburna Line,
about two miles south of city limits. .Phona: Eburna 43.
We have them for jrour garden—everything that grows. Also a
full line of field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, also grains. We also
have a full line of fruit and ornamental stock, fertilizers, agricultural
imp ementa, spray pumps, spraying material, bee supplies and all
garden requisites.     Catalogue for asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
584KINGSWAY VANCOUVER, B.C.
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains nnd thoroughly
tested as to quality nnd growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
and THE FINEST LAWNS
CATAI.OGU8 AND OUIDB FREE ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robson Street Vancouver, B.C.
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
need*. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation for
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and.we
deliver when wanted.
It Yonr Furniture Showing
Signs of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come, A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot ot
difference to one'a comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture Is selected to
withstand tha round of season
after season, and many of
them. Coma tn and sea tha
new arrivals—they will bring
many hours' comfort to soma
luoky persons,
Hastingi Furniture Co.
Limited
♦1 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Clothing that bum this label Is
made Is sanitary work shops, aaa
UM« food working oonaltlom.
ThlB label la a protection guarantee to you. II it does not bear
this label your clothing may be
made In sweat shops amid unsanitary conditions, and you may contract disease by wearing lt.
^X
RENNIE'S
SEEDS 7»h
t«n»™"""»!Ml
INK* WOT
tmsncimnr n-i. «. **..—..
HI II     " " ' ■-   '    " ■ *- '——
i.N«««..f...,.V'
tlWIII.* II"**
,«awas
'jpBMfiBBV
m-
ALL UNION BUTCHER 8HOP8
DISPLAY THI8 CARD
—OUR CATALOGUE—|
Ii larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. For 40 yean the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
sod Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs. You
need it before you decide what kinds to
plant;   Send for your copy to-day.
WM RENNIE C-L^m
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVER
Alf.it'TirHfe.Miam.liidWIulM
«*».,. OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND UBOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
SIXTH YEAE.   No. 153.
Handsome Nickel Watch
PRESENTED FREE
To Every Boy Purchasing a
Suit of $5.00 or Over
Don't you want that watch*? It's worth
having, take our word for it—and furthermore, it's not given with old stock clothes.
You choose any suit you like at $5.00 or
over and the watch is yours;
' The new Spring Suits are her» now arid
the special values we; show in Navy Blue
Serges, which, by the way, are, to be the
most fashionable this year, are well worth
investigating. Of fast indigo dye, and in
fine twill cheviots and rough irish serges,
these suits come in college and Norfolk,
styles with full bloomer pants> Every suit
is perfectly tailored and the fit and finish
guaranteed. There are all sizes in stock to
fit boys from tj to 18 years of age, at priceB
from
$5.00 to $13.50
Men $ Suit Special, $8.95
Saturday you
have the opportunity of securing a
splendidly made
and excellent fitting suit at this re-
m a r k a b 1 y low
price. Shown in all
Wool Tweeds of
brown, grey and
lovat. The suits
come lined mohair
twill and in single
breasted styles
Trousers are made
with four pockets,
and may be had
with cuff bottoms
if desired. All sizes
in stock up to 44.
SPECIAL PRICE, $8.95
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES'
(laalTHT) $1.50PER YEAB
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wa manufacture every kind of
work ihoe, and specialize in line,
'or minera, railroad construction,
fagging, etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
HOLDS BUSY
Decide to Start Organisation
with Themselves
First
Committees,   Struck    and
Important Business
Transacted
VICTORIA, March II.—The Vlotoria Trades and Lahor council held
lte regular meeting Wedneaday, Preaident Geo, Dykeman In tbe chair. DeL
Perrott reported progress regarding
swimming hatha stating that he had
Interviewed the municipal committee
ot the government and had asked tor
an amendment to the Municipal
Clauses act giving the olty power to
operate swimming baths. Del. Watchman reported that he had Interviewed
the building oommlttee of the Jubilee
hospital relative to the' Insertion ot a
union wage clause In the contract tor
the new building. Nothing had been
done ln that respect up to date, but
he had made arrangements to meet
the full board. Del. Watchman also
reported for the organization committee who recommended that the coun'
ctl should start with Itself flrat. Delegates from looal unions were lax In
their attendance and lt was decided
to write to all unions affiliated requesting them to urge upon their delegates the necessity of regular attendance at the meetings of the council,
It was also decided to elect a statistician to keep a reoord ot attendances
and send reports to the locals. The-
executive committee then oame on the
grill. They were requested to live
up to the constitution and meet previous to the regular meeting of the
council to deal with communications
and to properly perform the duties
appertaining to an executive, It was
also recommended that the constitution be amended by Inserting the or
der of business ln order to facilitate
the work of the council. Considerable discussion took place over the
report,' Delegates Martin, Meed,
Slvertz, Tyson, Adams, Watchman
and Perrott taking part. In the,end
the committee's report was adopted.
Delegate Martin reported that the
Miners' Liberation league would hold
a meeting ln the Variety theatre Sunday night when Kate Saddler would
speak. Delegate Meed, Typographical
union, reported the strike waa atlll on
at Sweeney and McConnell'e and
asked for the support of affiliated
unions. All delegates were requested
to notify their locals accordingly. A
letter from J. H. Burnham, M. P., asking the council to endorse a resolution regarding tariff on manufactured
goods trom China was ordered filed.
A letter was read from A. S. Wells,
secretary B. C. Federation of Labor,
regarding amendments to the constitution ot that body. This was made a
special order of business at the next
meeting. A hall committee was then
elected, the members being Delegates
Perrott, Thompson, Day, Matheson
and Beggs. The president announced
that the hall had been taken for a
D. D'ALMSANDRO
President of the International Hod Car.
lien, Building and Common Laborers'
Union of America, with headquartera
at Albany, N. Y.—Mr. D'Alleiaandro
has been connected with labor organizations Blnce his Immigration to this
country about 20 years ago, HTHTdd
country about twenty years ago, and
he- haa always been a leading spirit
In every labor assembly for years.
While he was FBFBPRFB FRPRWD
While In MassechuBetts, he was a
strong fighter against the so-called
'Padrone system" until he succeeded ln
having legislation enacted safeguarding
the conditions of the working men,
who, on account of their Ignorance,
were driven Into shanties and treated
as slaves. He was so active In his
campaign that the news 'reached his
native country and King Victor the
Third appointed him chevalier of the
crown of Italy.
PARKER WILLIAMS, M.L.A.
MUST SETTLE DOWN
Workers to Fight for Points
of Vantage as Occasions
Arise
Labor Conditions and Fro-
posed Employment in
City and Province
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
further period of 16 months. S. Taylor, of the typos, was given the privilege ot the floor to read a communication from Frank Morrison ot the
American Federation of Labor requesting statistics as to the number
ot union and nonunion men ln the
olty. The secretary was instructed
to supply the necessary Information.
Del. Perrott brought to the attention
of the counoll the unsafe condition of
many fire escapes. This was due to
rust and could be obviated by proper
painting. The council referred the
matter to the legislative committee to
interview the chief of the fire brigade
with a vle\y .to compulsory painting
of these escapes once a year. After a'
lengthy and exceedingly busy meeting the council adjourned at 11
o'olock.
Speaks to Young People of First Presbyterian Church
■VICTORIA, B.C., March 11.—At a
well-attended meeting of the Young
People's society of the First Presbyterian church on Sunday evening,
Parker Williams, M.L.A., gave a
highly appreciated address upon "The
Prevention of Poverty." The motto
on the colored window ln the parliament buildings whloh said (hat there
was no wealth without industry and
that Industry meant wealth waa not
true at present, the speaker stated,
fpr some of those he knew who worked the hardest had no wealth, and
some who did not work at all had
muoh. He pointed out that the crops
of the world were sufficient to feed
all the people, and that with modern
means of transportation, a famine
could not arise ln one locality from
a local crop failure. - The Invention
of machinery meant also that clothing and other necessaries could be
applied ln a sufflclent quantity for all
people to have their needs of this nature attended to.
Poverty therefore was not a neoeaaary evil, It arose from the fact that
the machinery of transportation and
production was all owned by private
Individuals and not by the public collectively, The cure tor the present conditions where the few had mountains
of wealth and the many were In valleys of poverty, he said, was to legislate as rapidly as possible to that end
where this machinery was owned by
the publlo collectively and worked cooperatively.
Mr. Williams drew attention to the
fact that the early Christian oburch
had favored a form of communal life
and that Christianity had strayed
away from that Ideal. The first petition in the Lord's prayer was tor dally
bread, and until people were supplied
SLEUTER CHARGES
Conspiracy By Membera of the Plas-
. tsrers' Union.
It may safely be said that no case
was ever tried ln Canada before similar to this one tried last week' ln this
city by Justice Murphy. A plasterer
named Sleuter charged conspiracy by
members of the union to deprive him
of his work. Sleuter claims that the
Plasterers' union in suspending him
for six months for alleged faulty work
he was unable to secure employment,
always being forced out of his job by
the actions of the seven accused men.
Previous to the trouble with the unton he was a member of that body,
but subsequently retired from membership in the organisation. The
question involved by the action is the
right of union labor to prevent a non-
unionist from working alongside
members of the union. Judgment
reserved.
Dally People Suspends
The Dally People of New York, In
Its issue of February 22, announces
the temporary suspension of the
paper. The suspension Is due to a
deficit which has been carried for
years, and to the fact that the pres-'
ent Industrial depression has made It
Impossible to wipe out this deficit.
The efforts of the Socialist Labor
party will be concentrated on making
the Weekly People a source of revenue to remove the present deficit
against the dally publication.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
-THE strike is still on at the
1 Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. G.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Union .
with this bread it was difficult for
them to think of other things. The
Fatherhood of Ood implied the brotherhood of man, and he urged that
the church to be effective should return to Its earliest position regarding
communal life, A vote of thanks was
accorded Mr. Williams.
BILL  INTRODUCED
Provides Nine-hour Day for All Domestic Employees.
Parker Williams, M. L. A., on Tuesday Introduced a bill in the legislature
at Victoria entitled "An act relating
to the employment of domestic em
ployees." It provides that "wages"
shall mean lawful money of Canada,
and shall not Include any recompense
by way of board and lodging. It shall
be unlawful for an employer to require a domestic employee to work
for more than nine hours a day or
more than 54 hours in any one week.
Every domestic shall be entitled to
recover from his or her employer by
law the whole or so much of the
wages earned by such domestic employee. No deduction shall be made
from the wages of domestic employee
for the breakage or destruction of
any property or chattels of his or hor
employer. As the legislature pro
rogued on Wednesday lt did not get
Beyond committee.
King Gustav Ib by now doubtless
sorry that be provoked the recent constitutional-crisis in Sweden. The present democratic government is opposed to a policy of aggressive militarism, the king is In favor. In a
speech to adherents of the tory faction he did his best to nullify the work
of the present constitutional government in Sweden and has thus brought'
ahout a struggle which may easily be
fatal to the monarchy. Democracy Is
at last going to have the final word ln
disposing of their own lives.
It is but a waste pf Ume to hold
Samuel Oompers or any other labor
official responsible for the snail-like
pace of trade or craft unionism towards industrial unionism. Whenever
the afflliated bodies Identified with
the American Federation of Labor
proclaim themselves in favor of Indus
trial unionism, just so soon will the
A. F. of L. ohange its policy. Again,
the afflliated bodies will not discard
the weapons of craft and trade autonomy until the rank and file of such
affiliated bodies speak loud enough
to Impress the labor official that they
are ready for a change ln the construction of the labor movement. It
is true that labor officials as missionaries among the rank and file can
hasten the crystallization of a sentiment that will bring about the solidarity of labor, and the labor offloial
who falls'to see the necessity of closing up the ranks of labor Ib but a
brake on the wheels of progress, and
lt Is but a question of a short time
until such labor official will be relegated to the Junk pile.—Miners' Magaslne.
Industrial condltlona In Vancouver
continue very quiet During tha
month of February there were only
127 permits Issued, aggregating In
value »262,076, only a few ot the proposed buildings, however, have been
started. The long-looked-for publlo
worka, announced weeks ago by federal government authorities, are not
very much in evidence. The work
whloh Premier MoBrlde laat week
promised would be begun at once, In
and around Vancouver, aa a means
of modifying -the Intensity of the un-
employed /situation, is still anxiously
awaited, while Industrial establishments all over the peninsula ara further curtailing output, reducing staffs
and cutting down payrolls. The
"policy of retrenchment" rules on
every hand: Hundreds ot wage-workers are leaving the city for points
south', and as a consequence the Increasing number of empty houses haa
had the effect of reducing house and
room rents, which la uuly appreciated by those remaining. The only encouraging feature of the situation Is
the Impression that bedrock has heen
struck, and that from now on thlnga
should begin to pick up again.
Propoaed Employment
Some of the railway contractors
announce that they will aoon be ln a
position to increase their working
orews at interior points. The civic
authorities, the park commisloners,
the school hoard, the Point Orey university governors, the adjoining municipalities, and other publlo, semi-
public and employing concerns seem
to be making an honest endeavor to
alleviate the out-of-work problem to
some extent. Naturally enough, the
trade unions have suffered reverses
as a result ot the bump, but as yet
few reductions in money wages have
been recorded,' though the actual
wage or purchasing power Is still
diminishing. After a period of several years of boom times it comes as
a severe shock to workers and business men to have to get back to a
normal basis, but there Is every prospect of both getting used to the new
order of things ln the course of a few
months. The opportunities for mak
.ing "easy money" by peddling real
'estate to each other have pinched out,
—the members of a community cannot continue to exist by taking in
each other's washing—with the result
that legitimate Industry is now receiving attention. In consequence of
these conditions', trade unionists
might as well make up their minds
to settle down to a
Hard and Steady Orlnd
fighting for points of vantage as occasions arise. The Unsettled state
of the labor, market during the past
few months has given wage-workers
both cause and time to do a little
thinking, which in itself may prove a
blessing In disguise. If this state of
affairs helps them to realize the relationship between their "meal ticket"
and their "vote" the experience will
not have been without compensation.
With the exception of a further
wholesale Influx of job-seekers during the season just opened, normal
conditions may be expected before
the close of the year, though doubtless on a smaller scale than heretofore. Meantime the workers must
remain firm and stick to their unions
preparing for collective action In the
political field. Unless this course Is
pursued and every unit of the labor
movement performs its full duty,
much time and opportunity will have
to be recovered later. ■ "Eternal vigilance Is the price of liberty," and
while never was this more true than
at the present time, The Federation-.
1st feels confident that the members
of organized labor throughout British
Columbia will be equal.to the charge
laid upon them.
'Frisco's New Labor Temple
The Hall Association of the San
Francisco labor council has let the
contract for the steel and concrete
work on the new labor temple to be
erected at Sixteenth and Capp streets.
Work on the structure will be started
at once, and lt Ib hoped to dedicate
the building next Labor day. All material for the new labor temple will
be purchased ln San Francisco, as far
as possible,' and the contracts, of
course, stipulate that only union labor
shall be employed In the construction
of the building, which will be one of
the finest of Its kind in the country.
Capitalism Is essentially founded on
violence or the fear of violence, and1
it is somewhat amusing to find capitalist upholders denouncing that,
without the threats of which, their
system could not be upheld for five
solitary minutes.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER.
Shingle Weavers, Sawmill
Workers and Woodsmen
Take Notice
All interested
in organization are requested to at
once call at Room 817, Labor
Temple, or communicate-with
OEO. HEATHERTON
A. F. of I.. General Organizer
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID •PENCER, LTD.
GROCERY BULLETIN
FINEST IMPORTED STRING BEANS-Tender and
stringless; 15c. tins.   Extra special 2 tins for lie or 4
tins for t.. ||c
Not over 6 tins to each customer, and must be on a
transfer card with other groceries if delivered.
PURE  ENGLISH CANE  SYRUP-Guaranteed  finest
quality; 80c. tins at 11 for Mc; 35c. tins for Wc
Not more than 4 tins to each customer, and must be
on a transfer card with other groceries if delivered.
FINEST PEARL BARLEY-Regular 10c. per lb.
6 lbs. for   Mc
FINEST VERMICELLI-75C
day for 	
boxes.
Wednes-
  Mc
WHITE OR BLACK PEPPER—Wednesday, lb.....Mc.
EPPS' PORE COCOA—10c. tins at S for ....IM,
PURE MILK—Guaranteed finest quality; 2 for 25c. value,
at 3 tins for .\ Mc
READY-CUT MACARONI—15c. pkgs.   Special 3 pkgs.
for   Mc
PURE CURRY POWDER-IOc. bottles..   Wednesday
for    ,  Mc
RHUBARB—For pies, one-gallon tins; 50c. tins Mc
PURE ONTARIO HONEY—Put up in 5-lb, pails;
$1.35 value.   Wednesday special  $1.10
PIJRE CHOCOLATE-Small cakes, » for lc
PUMPKIN—15c. tins for   Mc
PURE ENGLISH STRAWBERRY JAM-Finest quality; 26c. jars for   lie
HUNTLEY & PALMER'S ASSORTED BISCUITS-
Per Ib. 20c.;2 lbs. for Mc
B. & K. CREAM OF OATS—Per pkg.  , Mc
Family size    >  Mc
ENGLISH HARVEY SAUCE-80C. bottles  10c
MALT OR WHITE WINE VINEGAR-Quart bottles,
2 for    Mc
FINEST SOCKEYE SALMON-20C. tins   10c.
10c. tins, 5c; 12 tins for He
PINEAPPLE—Large tins 1 for Mc; 6 tins Wc
Per dozen tins   $1.35
MONK AND GLASS CUSTARD POWDER-
Each pkgs. makes one pint of delicious custard
Wednesday bargain, 2 pkgs. lc; 6 for  10c
SYMINGTON'S TABLE CREAMS—In Lemon,
Coffee, Chocolate, Vanilla, Raspberry, Banana,
Strawberry and Orange; li'/ic. packages. Wednesday bargain, 2 packages for  lie
FLOUR—We have about 90 torn sacks of Five
, Roses Flour which we are putting up in paper
bags containing 10 lbs.   On sale to-morrow, per
10-lb. paper sack ,  Mc
Not more than 3 sacks to each customer. -
PURITY SOAP—Large white cakes; regular .8 bars 25c.
Extra special, 3 bars for  Mc.
SOAP FLAKES—10c. pkgs. Extra special 8 pkgs lie
ROYAL CROWN WASHING POWDER-Large pkgs.
for 81c; 2 pkgs. (or   Me
GENUINE ASHCROFT POTAiOES-
80-lb. sack   flM
MEAT SECTION
CHOICE SHOULDER ROASTS—Per 11.  lie
SHOULDER STEAK-Per lb  lie
LEGS OF PORK—Half or whole, per Ib  17c
RIB BOILING BEEF-Per Ib  10c.
BACK BACON-Per'lb Me
CHOICE BOILING FOWL—3 to 3'/2 lbs. average;
heads and feet off.   Per Ib Me
CHOICE ROASTING CHICKENS-Per lb Mc.
WITH EVERY 50c. PURCHASE of fresh meat we will
sell 3 lbs of No. 1 New Zealand Butler for 96c, or 2
dozen strictly fresh Local Eggs for 65c. or both. Must
. be on transfer if delivered.
RABRITS—Each     Mc.
SLICED HALIBUT AND COD-,3 lbs   Mc.
SLICED SALMON-3 lbs forK... Mc
OOLACHANS—Per lb ,    10c.
SMELTS-2 lbs. for  '.'-i;  jjc.
BLACK COD—Fresh and salted; 2 lbs. for   Mc.
SOLES AND SKATE—3 lbs. for   29c.
SMOKED SALMON AND HALIBUT—8 lbs Mc.
KIPPERS-3 lbs. for   Mc.
SALT COD—2 lbs. for   Me.
SHAD ROES—A pair   j|C.
EASTERN BLOATERS-Each           |c.
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Heintzman & Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLD ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Haitingi Street West.
St an fie Id's Underwear
Blue Label, Suit $3.00     Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight Overalls of all kinds
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Cordova St., West
US-CUSHION
a-::i'S'..:-i.iiiv[.M
TOES
^a'.-mor.■Jn'0^mM<.■M-,
4-cusrDoit tw noum iiv*. i
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleaiant headquarten (or Carpenten' Took and all
kindi of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447.
2337 Main Street PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT .....MARCH 18, 11
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve,  ..  $8,700,000
86 branches In Canada
A general banking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
150 HA8TINQS 8TREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1888
Paid-up Capital
Raaervs 	
Total Aaaata • •
$ 11,800,00
12,800,000
180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE*
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
buslneas will be welcome ba It large or
email
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
IB.C.R
PubUaned every rridsy __.
B. 0. tfederetloalet,
R. Parm. Pettlplece -
.onlay
t, M*
by the
. Manager
DIRECTORS: Jaa. Campbell, preeldent;
Christian Siverts, vlce-prealdent; J.
Kavanagh; J. R. McVety, aecretary-
treaaurer, and R. P. Pettlplece.
Offloa i Boom 817, Labor (ample.
Tel. Bxohanre fey. HSS.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.50 per year; In Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions aubeorlbtng
In a body, 11.00.
'Unity ot labor; the hope of tke world."
FRIDAY MARCH 13, 1914
THE
MC0RPOUTEO
IMS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Rsaerve $11,178,871
Savings Accounts
Savings accounts ara oonduolve
to provident living. In our
Savings Department they may
be opened In the name of one
Individual or in the names of
two or more jointly, with tba
privilege for each of depositing
or withdrawing money aa da-
aired.- The Bank of Toronto accept* Savings Accounts, Irrespective of the amount of tha
Initial deposit
Aaaata $60,000,000
Deposits       ..     ..   $41,000,000
Main Office—
4M HA8TINQ8 ST. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Car. Hastings and Carrall (ta.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONET   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
M7 HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
FOR EXPERT
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
143 Hastings Street West.
Phone leymou area
DIXON & MURRAY
OAaPBimns, bto.
Offloa ud Won Fitting.   Oaaei
Jobbing |
Offloa aad Bhopi
WHENORDERINGASUIT
A  PERNICIOUS 8Y8TEM
Last week The Federatlonist gave
conclusive evidence as to the manner ln which the Canadian Northern
railway and steamship  system  waa
urging employers of labor ta obtain
help, skilled and unskilled, male and
female, from the old country In preference to employing those already ln
this country.     From dispatches received from Oreat Britain this week It
would appear that the immigration
department of the Salvation army baa
already started   operations   and oa
February 21st the flrst complete party
of the year sailed for the dominion.
It ahould be borne in mind that these
Immigrants are coming here at a time
when the labor market ia glutted aa
never before.   Yet there Is no let-up
ln the activity of these profit-mongers.
At present there are far more applications for work than opportunities
therefor, and there must be found
some way to combat the pernicious
statements   and   misleading   allurements held out by these agenclea.
According to the "Liverpool Journal
of Commerce," the Immigration department of the Salvation army states
that
"as far as agricultural labor ta
concerned, the demand tor skilled
and unskilled workers, If anything, exceeds   that  of previous
years .... and that they (the
Salvation army) have always discouraged people from flocking to
the large towns."
It Is quite possible they have dona
so, but tbat la a mere subterfuge. By
bringing out unskilled labor of any
description they are aa surely swelling the ranks of the cltlea' unemployed as tf they dumped them down
In the various city halls. These men
oan doubtless get a few weeks' work
at harvest time, but during the tall
and winter they are compelled to
flock to the towns to get food and
shelter, both of which are unobtainable to ihe penniless man ln country
districts. Once in the cities they are
willing and even satisfied to work under conditions that mean humiliation
and even decadence to the average
member of organised labor. A certain
section of the press both In Oreat
Britain and thla country try to excuse
or explain this by saying that unsuitable emigrants bave been sent out.
"Sent out" Is the term Invariably used
and In Itself suggests servitude and
not freedom. Who sent them out?
Perhaps Messrs. Mackensle and
Mann, the emigration department of
the Salvation army and similar agenclea might throw aome light on tha
subject. This same section of tbe
press periodically publishes leuers
from tbe "successful" emigrant In an
endeavor to show how everyone wbo
chooses can rapidly obtain a competence In thla country. As a rule these
letters are laudatory on the ''successful" man and bitterly denounce the
failure. They are no criterion of conditions here. They fall to recognise
that general or national progress is
conditioned by the advancement of
the great masses of the people and
when a society brings men and women here to place them In a "blind
end" they are not only lowering the
Immigrants' condition, but also that
of others and are retarding tbe true
growth ot the country. Thla ta exactly what these grasping agencies
are doing. They pursue their pernicious tactics regardless of tbe ultimate consequences to nations and individuals. Something must be done
to remedy this state of affaire, and
the most efficacious way would be
to check It at Its source, Let the
governments, federal and provincial,
stop bonuslng Immigration agencies
and steamship corporations, give correct Information to the prospective
Immigrants ln their own homes and
the unemployment trouble would be
mightily assuaged.
ernment, tbey no longer look upon
the administration of justice aa pure.
They are as a voice crying in the
wilderness.
*   *   *
Oreat Britain haa similar troubles,
and la facing them boldly. The
mother of capitalism haa tried every
panacea capital knows but to no
avail. She Is now reverting to ber
role as the mother of parliaments and
Is seeking by enactment of sane laws
to ameliorate the condition of the
workers. As she took the lead In capitalism, so lt would appear she Is now
taking the lead tn collectivism. This
ts almost entirely due to action taken
by trade unions, whloh, while vigorously pursuing their industrial alms,
are at the same time taking a very
effectual part ln the political Held. It
Is not so many years ago when lt was
only with the greatest difficulty a
labor candldateure could be promoted.
Even those who believed ln sucb candidates felt they would be wasting
their votes. But there Is no doubt
whatever that a considerable change
for the better has oome over working-
men within tbe laat few years. An
Increasing number are beginning to
recognise tbat the present political
parties are merely two wings' ot the
landlord and capitalist army, who
may quarrel occasionally aa to their
relative Importance, but who can be
relied upon to unite whenever tbe
rights of property ln other people's
labor are attacked. They are slowly
realising the truth of Eugene Debs'
words; "It is better to vote for what
you want and not get lt tban to vote
for what you don't want—and get tt!"
*   •   •
It Is high time the workers of tbls
province took similar action. They
have their organisations, let them be
used for their primary purpose of bettering tbe workers' industrial condition and alao for any and every other,
purpose likely to benefit labor. It Is
inconceivable that the miners' struggle
on Vanoouver Island would have got
to lta present state—If even lt had
happened at all—had there been a
few more working men in the legislature. Tbe government would bave
been forced to act and aee tbat even-
handed Justice waav meted out. No
one doubts that many ot the accidents
In Industries in this province are preventable, they occur because safeguards cost money and the government does not force employers to use
them. A solid phalanx of working-
men In parliament would Bee tbat
lawa were enforced and tbat adequate measures were taken safeguarding life and limb. They would also
see that acta were placed on the
statute book tbat were not mere palliatives, but lawa which firmly grasped
fundamentals and which would give
to them and their children more of
the fruits of their labor.
An armed man standing over the
body of an unarmed child represents
the conquests of Imperialism.
8USIME88 AQRNT   DIRECTORY
Those who say "violent Is no remedy" are themselves doing violence to
history. '
When lt was decided to start a journal ln the Illinois State penitentiary
it was found that, though there were
plenty of men qualified for the editorship, there was not one printer ln the
Institution.
While the railways, Immigration
agencies and the Salvation Army nre
bringing workers to the west, H. H.
Stevens, M. P., says of South Vancouver: "AIL work Is practically at a
standstill, and-many workers are at
their wits' end to feed and clothe
their wives and little ones." Now,
Mr. Stevens, It's up to you.
The dominion government spends
millions of dollars to erect armories
in which to train men to be legalized
murderers and strikebreakers; and
other millions to erect Jails and court
bouses for fallen humanity, hut what
Is It doing with the question of the
unemployed or the abuse and oppression of the workerB.
There Ib a lofty Idea throughout
the country that at least the news
service Is free from taint. But that
Is not so. And that never was so.
The big Interests control the situation so absolutely by their advertising that they have got the danger
i as well as the Associated
Press In such a position that their
word is law.
When the provincial government
can take three score prisoners into
the woods and put them to work profitable both to themselveB and to the
state, lt would seem that free men
could be given at least an. equal
chance. When prisoners are working on prison farms and free mjn are
looking for work, conditions require
study and drastic change.—Ottawa
Citizen.
The Christian Guardian, organ ot
the Methodist church ln Canada, demands a thorough investigation of
the treatment of the minera ln British Columbia by the mine bosses.
Says the Guardian: "If the facts be
sb stated by the miners, the British
Columbia government has been guilty
of most high-banded and absolutely
Indefensible oppression ln Its dealings
with the men."
"Life and liberty are exact synonyms. There cannot be the one unless the other has tbe fullest expression, and any man wbo controls the
life of another makes the other a
dependent, not a free man. That Ib
an elementary Idea which many of
those who are camp followers ln the
army of capitalism never grasp."
Lahor press Is designed primarily
to make men and women think. It la
tor the education of the workera and
to help Ht them to better serve themselves and others. The main thing
Is to get tbe workers' view-point and
this The Federatlonist wishes to do ln
every possible way. Working men
have now grown tired of a silly optimism which will not look for causes
of distress and they now will brush
aside false teaching and know the
truth for themselves.   Think.
Ask for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7405 (unless otherwise stated).
Bartenders—Room 208; Geo. W. Curnock.
B. a Federatlonist—Room 217; R. P.
Pettlplece.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L. Yule, Room 208.
Brotherhood of Carpentera—Room 304
and 805; Hugh McEwen.
Bricklayers—Room 216; Wm. 8. Dagnall.
Bakers—Room 220.
Barbers—Room 208; - C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1776.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborera—Room 220: John Sully.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 203;
W. E. Walker; Tal. Seymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207: W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 807;
F. L. Eatlnghauaen.
Engineers (Steam)—Room 218; Ed.
Prendergaat.
Labor Temple Co,—Room 111; J. R.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Offlce,
148 Alexander street; Qeorge Thomas;
Tel. Seymour 6168.
Moving Picture Operatora—G. R. Hamilton, Room 100, Loo Bldg. Tel. Sey.
3046.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, rooms 20-80,
Williams Building, 418 Granville Street.
Plasterers—Joe Hampton; Tel. Seymour 1614.
Plumbers—Room 218; Melvln Engolf;
Tel. Seymour 8611.
Street Railway Employees—Fred. A.
Hoovor, Sey. 608.
Trades and Labor Council—Room 210;
Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms 212, 818, 214;
fi. H. Neelands.
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
 CARDS W3ERTED     ii     11.00 A MONTH
C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention In January. Executive officers, 1814-16: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. McEwen, Geo. Hardy, J.
W. Gray. H. Kundson, J. J, Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria, B. C.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meets flrat and third Thursdays.
Executive board: W. B. Walker, preaident; J. H, MoVety, vice-president: Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Mlsa H. Gutteridge, treasurer;
Miss P. Brisbane, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; G. Curnook, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.	
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, Jamea Brown, Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon. R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manag-
Ing director. J. H. McVety- Room 211.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL—Meeta 2nd Monday ln month.
President, Geo. Mowat; aeeretary, F. R.
Fleming. P.O. Bb» 48
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meeta
flrat and third Monday of eaoh month, 8
p. m. Executive committee meeta every
Friday 8 p. m, President. Ed. Meek, recording secretary, Chaa. Soott, 806 Labor
Temple; flnanclal secretary and business
agent. J. Bohurman, 806 Labor Temple.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
THE WORLD'8 UNREST.
It Is Impossible today to pick up
a newspaper without being confronted
wltb tales of violence and rapine,
Every country, civilized and uncivilized, haa the samt story to tell. Qov-
ernmenta and dynasties overthrown,
Internecine strifes, Industrial upheavals, wars and rumors of wars—all
are presented day by day ln kaleidoscopic form. The whole world presents the appearance of a seething
cauldron, bubbling over with toll and
trouble. Here in this province affairs
are rapidly drifting from bad to
worse. Industrial disputes Involving
loss of human life, starvation stalking through the cities, unemployment
rife and growing worse are among
our dally occurrences. Tho fact that
capital is holding them by force and
of ton even by armed force, Is working on the minds of men and women
as a leaven. Tbey all see that something must be done—but what? They
have entirely lost faith in the gov
GETTING READY
Tbere bave been many rumors of
late suggesting that employers of
labor, especially ln tbe building
trades, from Port Arthur to the coast,
are arranging to shortly put Into effect a cut ln wages. Although these
rumors are constantly denied by the
employers' association, It la eaay to
see by their actions tbat such a procedure ts ln contemplation. At the
convention of the Builders' exchanges
of Saskatchewan, held recently at
Moose Jaw, a "schedule of maximum
wagea" for workers tn tbe building
tradea waa adopted. Thla scale does
not ln many cases come up to tbe
standard demanded hy the various unions Involved and consequently cannot be regarded aa final. But the
most significant tact la a resolution
passed deciding tbat any looal exchange making agreements with regard to houra of work, wagea, etc.,
wtth local labor unlona, ahal! have
suoh agreements all expire on a given
date ln order tbat no olty will he tied
up longer than another under existing
agreements. This Is an entirely new
departure. For some years lt has
been the custom of employers ot
allied trades when making contracts
wltb the component unions to press
strongly for agreements expiring at
different periods. The Intention was
obvious. Thsy saw that were all such
agreements to be renewed at the
same time, tbe workers would he In
an Infinitely stronger position than
if they were taken piecemeal. Tbe
employen bave been well used to
playing off one craft union against
another and trusting to the "never
break a contract" cry to gain their
own ends. Now, howevea, they are
changing their tactics and this can
only lead to one conclusion—that they
Intend to force a struggle at the expiry of the agreements. They have
from now to then to organize their
forces and get ready, and, knowing
the desperate manner In which they
are now assailing tbe workers, It Is
reasonable to suppose they consider
they will then be In a position to fight
with an expectation of some measure
of success. What Is labor going to
do? Is lt going to sit supinely by and
watch its opponents preparing for the
fray? If ever there were a time In
the history of labor In this dominion
when the workers Bhould gird up their
loins lt is now. It Is cowardly to shirk
duty because times are bad and the
host of unemployed growing greater
every day.   That Is the very time for
Poverty and the squalid miseries
Inseparable from poverty have proved
Indestructible for tbe very simple
reason that wealth exists on aocount
of it. That Is to say the presence
of the very wealthy and the presence
of the very poor ln society are due
to one and the same cause, the economic system tbat prevails. That Is
capitalism. It ts as clear as the noonday sun tbat if from the producer
four fifths of hla product Ib taken
away, some will be very rich while
others will be very poor. And tbe
environment productive of pbystoal
and mental diseases which poverty itself creates Intensifies the misery of
conditions.—Nome Worker.
If only men would set clearer
Ideas upon these elementary questions
of freedom there might be something
achieved. As long as men feel that
they are tree when they are not free,
when they think they are independent
when they are still slaves, there Is
mighty little hope for the future.- But
when tbey know that they are not
free and are determined to be free,
the future Is full of promise for all.
And that Is the situation today. Men
everywhere are beginning to demand
industrial freedom, knowing that they
are far from being Industrially tree,
and lt Is only a matter ot time and a
short time at that will they atand up
and demand, If need he, fighting, for
real Independence.
Owing to the press and cable censorship at present prevailing ln South
Africa It is absolutely Impossible to
disseminate reliable Information regarding the position In that country.
News In the ordinary capitalistic
preBB Is being treated wltb the average capitalistic bias and must be regarded accordingly. It Is Impossible
at the moment to state what the actual position Is, as the papers of
South Africa have Instructions not to
publish anything calculated to give'
the workera the Impression that they
have the slightest hope of success.
Censorship in Itself Is absurd, suppression of truth never has paid the
suppressor, and never will. Truth
will out and when the workers discover as they must, how they have
been befooled by Inanities posing as
rulers they will exact a stern retribution. Armed mobs will not keep
the people ln subjection for any
length of time.
In every union there are a few
workera or "leaders." They may bo
self-appointed or they may have responsibility thrust upon tbem for
tbelr capabilities. At any rate these
few workera get the work to do, and
sometimes—very often—all they get
for their work Is criticism. Tbls Is
one of the most cowardly things to
which tbe human tongue can give
voice. However, the willing worker
need not care. Tbe progress of the
world has been accomplished by the
few. Criticism endures for a moment
but the results of work are endless.
A real union   man   should   perform
Allied Printing Trades Council—F. R.
Fleming, P. o. Box 86.
Bakers—J. Black, Room. 220, lAbor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Geo. W. Curnoch, Room
808, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 616 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1161 Rows St.
Brewery Workers—L. E. Day.
Bricklayers—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenters District Council—Jas. Bltcon, Room 209, ' Labor
Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses — W, E.
Walker, Room 203, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside)— W. F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 107;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Room 116,
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Miss McRae, Labor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles Roberts, Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's Union (I. B. E. W.)— R.
MoBaln, care of B. C. E. R.
Horseshoers — A. C. MaoArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Lettercarrlers—Robt. Wight, District 81.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick, 1188 Homer street.
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway, 1083
Paelfle.   Tel. Soy. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomas, 146 Alexander Street. »
Machinists—J. H. McVety, Room 111,
Labor Temple,
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-30,
Williams Bldg., 413 Granville atreet.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown, 442 Broadway Wast,
Moving Picture Operators—A. O. Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Engravers—A. Kraft, Dominion
Engraving To., Empire Block.
Pn Inters—J. Train, Room 303, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 216 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1808
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 848 Broadway west.
Quarry Workers—James Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A, E. McCorvllle,
Box 248.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural  Iron  Workers—W.  L.   Yule,
Room 208, Labor Temple.
Monecuttera—James Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C Dougan, No.
6. Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2630 Trinity Street
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. pepptn, Box 482.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Lahor Temple,
Typographical—H. Neelands. Box 66.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 608.
Theatrical    Stage    Employees—Gordon
Martin, 667 Prior 'strset
Tllelayers and Helpers-
Upholsterers—A. Duthle, 1068 Homer St.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No, 46—Meets seoond and fourth Saturdays. 7.80 p.m. President,
H. G, Leeworthy; corresponding aeoretary, R, J.
Adams; business agent, J.
Black, Room 220, Labor
Temple,
BARBERS'   LOCAL.   NO.   120-.MEETS
second and fourth Thursdays. 8:80
P.m. President, J. W. Green: recorder, C.
E. Herrltt; secretary-business agent, C.
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
Hoars: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m,
MUSICIANS'   MUTUAL   PROTECT!1
Union, Local No. 141, A. F. tt tt
Meeta second Sunday ot ■ each mon
rooms 29-30, Williams Bldg., 418 Ore
Villa street. President, J. Bowyi
vice-president F. English: aeoretai
H. J. Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTB
. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 81
Meets flrst and third Wednesday, ffBrl
Hall, 8 p.m. Praaldant O. Dean: «
responding secretary, F. Sumpter; Una
elai aeoretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I. T
boo; buslneas agent, Joe Hampton. Pho
Sev. 1614.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE C
, NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver SJ
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and Ird Fi
days at Labor Temple, Dunamulr ai
Homer st, room 206. Robert C, Bam
son, Pres., 747, Dunlevy ava.; Joseph
Lyon, Fin. Sec., 1781 Orant ot; To
Smith, Rec. Sec, 141 Broadway wasl
STONECUTTERS', VANOOUVB
Branoh—Meeta second Tuesday, 1:1
p.m. President, J. Marshall; oorrespon'i
Ing secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 164
flnanclal secretary, K. McKensle.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AN
Decorators', Looal 181—Meet evel
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. Preaident Sktr
Thomson; flnanolal aeeretary, J. Free)
elton, 111 Seymour street; recording sei
retary, George Powell, 1660 Fourth av
weat. Business agent, James Trail
room 308, Labor Temple.
MTUIHiTVPKRH' AND ELECTROTV1
ers1 Unton, No. II, of Vancouvl
and Victoria—Meets seoond Wednesds
of each month, 4 p.m., Labor Tempi
President Chas. Bayley: recording ae<
retary, Chrla Homewood, 141 lath Avi
East.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 671.—OF-
flee Room 808 Labor Temple. Meets
Jrst Snnday of eaoh month. President
Ft F. Lavlgne; flnanclal seoretary, Oeo.
W. Curnook, Room 208, Labor Temple,
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', Nft. I
.„, —*••«*■ svory Tuesday, I p.m., Room
307.   President, Jamea Haslett: corree-
61: flnanclal   aeeretary. F.  fi. Brown:
business agent. W. ft Dagrall, Room
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWA'
Employeea. Pioneer Division No. II
*rM!Sto-.Iia'"1; Temple, second an
fourth Wednesdays at I p.ra., and flm
and third Wednesdays, 8 pm. Presldan
.?.?m. JFWli    recording    seoretarj
—*&&3r*t2*imlut Vtin,ir a"*™"
phone Highland 1672: flnanolal secretarj
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATION
al Local 887-Meeto every Wednes
day, 8 p. m.; Room 304, Labor Tempi,
Flnanolal aeoretary, H. Prendergaal
Room 611. ,
106—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, In room 206, Labor Temple. President, F. J. Milne; vice-president, Wm.
Buahman; secretary, George Mowat, 616
Dunlevy avenue: secretary-treasurer, H.
Perry, 1130 Tenth avenue east
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Belpera
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. HI—
Meets first and. third Mondays, 6 p. m.
President, F. Barclay, 868 Cordova Bast:
secretary. A, Fraser, 1161 Howe street.
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 867— Meets
flrat Tuesday eaoh month,, 8 p.m.
President, Walter Hosklns; vloe-nresr-
dent, F. J. Brandt; secretary, Robert 3.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson.
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets flnt Friday In each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker buslnea representative. Office:
Room 80S, Labor Temple. Hours: I a.m.
to 10.80; 1 p.m. to 1.80 and 6 p.m. to 6.00
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
C O MM BRCIAL TELEGRAPHERS
British Columbia Dlvlalon, C. p. System, Division No. 1—Meets 11:30 a.m.
third Sunday In month, Room 204. Local
chairman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 432,
Vanoouver. Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Wlthera, P. O. Box 431, Van-
BLECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
218—Meeta Room 801 every Monday
8 p. m. President, Dave Fink; vlce-prealdent, M. Sander; recording seoretary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flnanolal seoretary and business agent, W. F, Dunn,
Room 207, Labor Temple.
ROOMS-LIGHT, WARM, COMFORT-
able, with breakfast. Apply 40 Fourteenth avenue west.
CABBY
TSXE
STAMP
You opportunity to do good
ud make the world better: Insist
that yonr laundryinaa produce-
this Label when delivering yonr
paroeL
some good work every day for the
labor to be up and doing, perfecting j privilege of having lived that day,
their organizations, gathering In
those outside the movement and
above all, remaining firm and putting
Borne enthusiasm, some life, Into their
unions. It means hard, steady work,
but lt means victory In the end.
The shooting down of the unarmed
by the armed Ib what Is meant by
"strong measures,"
No one can hurt tbe workers but
themselves. Willing worker, If you
are sitting under tbe juniper tree,
brooding over some unkind remark or
criticism, just remember, that tbe
people wbo are busy accomplishing
tblngs do not have time to criticise
and watch what the "other fellow" Is
doing, The one who criticised your
well Intentloned work Ib more to be
pitied than censured. Take heart and
begin again.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO
611 (Inside Men)—Meets flrat and
third Mondays of eaeh month. Room 206,
8 p.m. President, H. P. MoCoy; recording secretary, Geo. Albera; business
agent, F. L. Eatlnghauaen, Room 207,
LONOSHOREMENS' INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No, 28 X 62-Meels
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander
atreet. Preaident, P. Peel; aeoretary,
Geo. Thomu.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION' (IN
.. .J,trn?tte",1i- lVxl No. 178-Maetlng
held flrat Tuesday In eaoh month. 8 p. is
Preaident, H. Nordlund: recording aeon
*"▼-. C. MeDonmld. Box 603: flnancls
eecretary, K, Pateraon,.P. O, Box f"
TYPOGRAPHICAL  UNION   NO.   311-
Meets last Sunday eaoh month. I
p.m. Preaident, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vice
preaident, W. S. Metsger, secretary-
treasurer, R, H. Neelands, P, O. Boxft
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES
Local No. 118—Meets second Bunds]
of each month at Room 894, Labor Tem
ES: J*!?w*—- H: Spears; recording seoretary, Geo. W. Allln. P.O. Box 711. Van.
couver, '    w
NEW WE8TMIN8TER, B. C.
NEW  WHBTMINSTER   TRADESTAND
a-Wffi. Council—Meets   every   seoond
HSl'*,p2.'iiye?nS',?,y 5,' 8 "■ m- '" Labor
.%.M%?:!^r.^M
%*£_<__*!«____ Th^*""'«"
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTERSLa:
»„„..?? ol'i""MeJ" ev?'y ««cond and
fourth Friday of month In Ubor Hall,
J;.*2. "'.•"'« ^""'dent, D. Webster: secret
____s_n.p- °- B« -*-• n«
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR^
-™^.<"1«",%L"c<lJ ""'"n N»- 1439-Meela
™£L »t"",,l'y' " "m- ^"or Temple,
p2J„R.05w WS ,n1. Sevm'h street
President. M. C. Schmendt: secretary, A.
«er, B'O TcmP"!-  "ew Westmlif.
BARTENbFSFleoCAL 784-MEETS IN
n»riS Sr 'Jmple. New Westminster,
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue
every second Sunday of each month" at
!;'^,,'o,nWft?"!?'""' p- s- *unt! "sore-
Invited J*""***"-   Vlaltlng brothers
VICTORIA, 8. C.
VTCTOHTA TRADES AND I,AHOR
Cminelt—Meets flrst and third Wednesday. T*bor Hall. 781 Johnston street,
f'.1.•'•'"• President. George Dykeman:
VWoSTb C.°8'   R  Ma","",n'   5°* m'
MACHINISTS, NO. 182—MBBTS SEC-
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. m.
President, A. R, Towler: recording aeeretary, J, Brookes; flnanolal seoretary, J. H.
MoVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 233, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month, Labor .Temple, 8 p. m. Preaident, A. O. Hansen:
secretary-treasurer, G. R. Hamilton: business agent, H. I. Hugg. Offlee, Room 100,
Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 8046. .
WANTED—A few reliable trade unionists, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for The "Fed." Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSB
Printers of B.C. Federationist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer. Phone Sey. 4490
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper ln
Canada. Price 50 cents per
year; ln cluba of four, 25 cents
for 40 weeka.
Address, COWANSVILLE, P.Q.
GET   ACQUAINTED   WITH   HIM
WHO?
THE WESTERN COMRADE
The Soolallst Monthly Magaslne,
breathing the spirit of our Great
West. Emanuel Julius and Chester M. Wright Edltora. 11.00 a
Biar; single copies, 10 cents. Ml
ew High St., Loa Angeles, Cal.
BROTHERHOOD     OF     CARPENTERS
and   Joiners—Meets  every   Tueaday.
!±m"-?-.H£°!: Js"' ™ Johnston St.
President, A. Watchman; recording secretary, Geo. L. Dykeman; business   agent
JS?, STlll! WCnUTr' W' A'  ****»
MINERS' UNIONS
K3MBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. 160,
«..«J?*"*rn federation of Miners-Meets
fui'.*,,'L,T<a,lna? '» "nlon Hall. Presl-
Sr'S Si. ^mlng: aecretary-treaaurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B.C.
LADp^rT^SNEpniNlSNTLOCAL
„.J1?' >JW U' S'.W-«" A.-Meeta Wed-
5S!r*X' .U",,on H*"- 7 P-m. Preaident
Sam Guthrie: secretary, Duncan McKen-
ale, Ladysmlth, B. C.	
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
i_ .6'*—??£?'?. every Monday at 7.30 p. m.
n the Athletic Club, Chapel street. Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B.C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No'
2299, U. M. W. of A.-Meets   every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall
President. Jos. Naylor: secrett
Smith. Box 84, Cumberland, B.
TRAIL MILL AND ~SMELTBRMEN'S
Union, No. 106, W. F. of M.—Meete
5,T'S, "ondsy »t T-80 p.m. President
F. W. Perrin: aeeretary, Frank Camp-
Mi, Box 26. Trail, B.C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Federation of Minera—Meets
SS17 Aaiurd,!',.In ,h" Miners' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
, DEMOCRATIC PARTY-Publlo nSfet-
Inge'In Dominion Theatre, Qranvllle St,
Sunday evenings. Seoretary, J. Adams,
Room 304, Labor Temple.
•pedaltlaal
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakes,
We Vss Dillon flout.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinke and Lunohet
All Goods Freah Dally.
IM OBAWYILLB IT.
Tal. Bay. 7104.
E. BURNS & CO.
131 CORDOVA 8T. E.
HARDWARE,   FURNITURE  AND
SECOND-HAND  DEALER
Goods aold on Commission. Stoves
and Tools our Specialty
Phone 8ay, 1670.
Berry Bros.
Agents for
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full  line  of  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
- Phone. Highland 895
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL  MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Province
of Britlah Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of It an acre. Not more than
2,660 acres will be Icasod to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to tho Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated,
Do You Have Your
PRINTING
Done in Vancouver?
If you have the above label en
your printed matter It will be
an absolute guarantee that It
wae made In the cfty.
n surveyed territory the land muat be
Beriberi by sections, or legal aubdlvin-
lons of -fictions, and in unsurveyed   ter
ritory   the tract   applied   for shall   be
staked by the applicant himself.
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of |6, which will .be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine ahall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the ooal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease wjll include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—30690.
fijiJijsSHBrfJjs
^KA> Of America  ri&r
corrsuHT mn n»»MKimmp isos
■       ■
■ H
ssmaaaaal
FRIDAY............MARCH U, till
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FBDEBATIONISTi
The New Fancy Waists Are Here From fans
These waists were personally selected by our representative on his recent visit to the French
Capital. That the models are French is apparent
at first sight—the materials, designs and exquisite
little touches of trimming at once marks them as
being imported. It would be a very difficult matter to describe these waists in detail and impossible in the space available here. We will not attempt description, but would ask that you visit
the department where you can really appreciate
the charm that these Parisian waists possess. See
these new French models to-morrow and take particular note to the prices which demonstrate the
advantages of our purchasing direct.
SOME OF THE NEW FRENCH WAISTS ABE
SHOWN IN THE WINDOW TO-DAY
RONWORKERS IDLE
IN
Over One Million and Quarter Men Out of
Work
575 Granville Street
LIMITIO
Vancouver, B. C.
Fiajt Authoritative Figures
Compiled by Responsible
Trade Paper
WE ARE
SOCIALISTS
______mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Because we believe in equal treatnjent for all.
Whether your purchase amounts to dollars, nickels or (Jiities
you obtain the same EQUAL care, individual attention and consideration if you deal with us.
FAMILY SHOE STORES
823 GRANVILLE STREET
•nd at Cedar Cottage
Look for the Label.
FRANK NEWTON.
Last monday the Dally Iron Trade
of Cleveland, Ohio, printed a statement showing that there are 1,270,000
men on the Idle list with a wage loss
the equivalent of (50,000,000 a month.
These are the first authoritative figures complied by a responsible trade
publication aa to the extent of the
ravages of Industrial depression that
swept tbe country ln the last halt of
last year. The toll of the unemployed
was taken hy correspondents at various industrial centers during the past
ten days. According to the figures
given 123 blast furnaces are on the
Idle list These have an annual capacity for producing 12,958,000 tons
of pig iron. On March 11,1013, there
were 306 blast furnaces ln active operation. Today there are only 188
furnaces active. In the blast furnace
division alone, the curtailment In operations lt is figured would amount
to 8146,129,800 a year. United Statea
steel corporation plants are working
at 60 per cent, of capacity and have
laid off between 40,000 and 50,000 em-
?loyees. In the Pittsburg district,
5,000 have been laid oft by ateel trust
and Independent plants. In tradea
allied to the steel, Iron and metal Industries, the dally Iron trade figures
that reduced shop forces have probably thrown out of employment or put
Into effect reduced time to the equl
valent of another 1,000,000 ot unem
ployed.
HE IM
COAST HILL
FRED. KNOWLES
"iwi1,^.lei?* exmu"*'« oommlttee member of Vanoouver Trades and Labor
CounollTDelegate from the LettSJ
Carriers' Assoolatlon.
UNOFFICIAL ADVERTISING
New Schedules Are Standard Rates for This
Territory
About Eleven Hundred and
Twenty-Five Men
Affected .
We keep the largest and moat
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', (URLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices which cannot ba duplicated.
Everything Is to be found here.
HENRYD.RAE
Canada'a Snap Specialist
104 and 104 CORDOVA ST. W.
"Jim" Snowden, carpenter, of San
Francisco, Is here visiting his sister,
Mrs. Fan-ell, Hastings. On Tuesday
he was shown through the Labor
Temple and expressed his surprise at
such a grand labor headquarters,.
Workers should give 'Frisco a wide
berth these days, he said, as there
never, were known more idle men
there before.
In Kansas a new union of the old
type has been started to. spilt up the
workers. As usual lt Is financed by
the bosses. Its objects are "to oppose
strikes, uphold arbitration and have
graduated rather than uniform wagea."
It has been christened the "Fink Tea"
union and wtll soon require the services of the undertaker.
'A 8ouvenlr Hletory of tha Brotherhood of-Railway Carmen."
Organiser   Qeorge   Heatherton  of
the A. F. bf h. In this olty, haa. reoelved a letter from General Secretary B. Wm. Weeks, of the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America,
of Kansas City,'Mo., disclaiming the
above as unofficial.   In part It reads:
"We are In receipt of a publication
entitled:' 'A Souvenir History of the
Brotherhood ot Railway Carmen for
1912,' the cover of which conveys
the Impression that lt was published
by and under the auspices of the joint
protective board of the Brotherhood
ot Railway Carmen on the Canadian
Pacific railway, which consists of representatives of our organisation, employed by that* road from every important point on Its system, whose
exclusive duties are to meet with the
officials of the Canadian Pacific at
stated Intervals and negotiate, terms
and conditions of employment for the
men of our trade employed by this
road.   As we note you have contributed to the support of this publication
hy a liberal advertisement, evidently
secured   through   misrepresentation,
we take this method of advising you
that the Joint protective board of the
Canadian Pacific rallway^or any other
subordinate   organisation,   connected
with our brotherhood in Canada has
not authorized the publication of this
souvenir book or review, and as the
one.ln question, Judging trom the Introductory article in the front thereof,
Is one of several previously published,
and anticipating that the parties re
sponsible therefor may he contemplating the publication of others, we
beg to advise you that all such publications are fraudulent add unauthorized, being specifically prohibited by
our laws."
On February-2 the teachers pf the
Herefordshire (Eng.) public schools
struck for a minimum wage of 8500
per year Instead of the present scale
ot 8450. The educational work of
the county was stopped and Inside
three weeks their demands were compiled with. How was the victory obtained? At the commencement ot the
strike the National union of teachers
guaranteed every striker full pay for
five years. The teachers' union
pays good dues, sttoks together and
the first fight they have ends ln victory.   Congratulations.
As the result of negotiations ln progress since February 18th, announcement haa Just been made at Portland,
Ore., that an Increase In- wagea haa
been granted to the train operatives
of the united railroads and Oregon
electric systems owned by James 3.
Hill and associates. The new scale
Is said to be the highest on ths Pa
olllc coaat for electric roads. At pres
ent conductors On the passenger
trains received from 8105 to 8151 a
month. Commencing March 15th
they will draw, from 8166 to 8202.50 a
month; brakemen now earn from 876
to 8110 a month and their minimum
will be 892.95, with the maximum
8106.
On freight trains the existing scale
is for conductors 83.50, for brakemen
82.90. Under the new soale the minimum for conductors la 84.24, tor
brakemen, 82,90.
Work train conductors will be paid
84.35; brakemen, 82-30; yard service
conductors and brakemen wRl receive 84 and 83.70, respectively. At
present their pay Is 83.50 and 82.90.
These new rates, lt la explained,
are the standard steam ratea for Hill
lines In this territory. Tha. Inorease
will affect approximately 1125 men.
Co-operation at Hamilton
The Hamilton Cooperative soolety
Is now ln a position to seek lettera of
Incorporation. It ia the Intention to
open a grocery store ln the near future. There are now nearly 300 members.
Smith's Falls Barbara Organiie
Leon Worthall, the Barbers' commercial traveler for Ontario, reporta
that1 he haa succeeded In putting ln
a local tn Smith's Falls.
JOHN BURNETT
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline. Johnson
This Is a gift that will be appreciated In any part of tha world.
Tastefully bound in three bindings. Cloth, tl.80; Ooxa Calf, ffJO;
Burnt Leather, $8.71.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32S HASTINGS STREET, WEST
CVQTFMS   Scarry everything
JI J I L^lTilJ        for the office
The mott tucceiaful butinett men are the
largest men of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunsmuir Street Phone Exchange Sey. 3526-3527
Dressing Robes and House Coats
We are showing a beautiful line of Houee Coata ln Wool, Silk and Velvet:
also Dressing Robes In Wool.   All sises from 14 to 41.
PRicia op Houae coats ranqi prom ij.oo to mmo
DRM8INQ ROBE8 PROM 1/ to ttt
Theae make handsome Christmas gifts for Husband, Son or Friends.
Call and Inspect our stook.   By paying a deposit we will lay one aside for
you for a reasonable length of time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel, toy. K» SM-IH HASTINOS STREET W.
"flesf Three Dollat Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
HOW IT'S DONE
How Is it kings and emperors
Are worshipped by the crowd?
The noble-born are stiff with scorn
The bishops slick and proud?
How is it that the working class
So meekly drag their chain,
And scarce dare call-their soul theii*
own.
Await! and I'll explain.
The facts are very simple, thus:
The "lower class" we take
When very young, and in their heads
Some Uttle holes we make;
And pump Into their orantums
A substitute for mind—
We call lt "education,"
Though it's nothing of the kind.
To hypnotize their Intellect
Is easy.   In their youth
We fill their heads with specious lies,
And scraps of garbled truth;
We teach them to abase themselves
Before the rich and great,
For meekness and humility
Bents their humble state.
We bid them be Industrious,
For idleness is sin;
And only thrift—and godliness
True happiness can win,
But If they toil contentedly,
And live on "humble pie,"
And do as they are told, they'll be
Rewarded—when they die!
We teach them not to covet wealth,
For poverty's a crown;
That the meek shall be exalted
And the mighty ones cast down;
We bid them reverence the great,
For Heaven wills it so—
Which Is slightly contradictory,
But the beggars never know.
We frighten them with bogles,
And we. threaten them with hell,
Unless they do as they are told,
And do. it very well,
We bid them not with reasoning
Their humble brains to fuss,
But love the king, obey the laws,
And leave the rest to us!
And then we Bend them out to work,
Poor chaps, they think It's fine
To earn a scanty living
In a factory or mine.
And some are sent to plow the land,
And some to plow the waves,
And some are clerks and counter men.
But all of them are slaves.
We flnd them with opinions,
And they learn 'em off by rote,
We tell them whom they ought to
cheer,
And how they ought to vote;
We praise their "independence,"
And their "sterling common sense,"
And they seem to think we mean tt
For they're innocent and dense.
Sometimes they cut up rusty
But they never make it pay,
For they have'nt Bense or courage
A determined game to play.
They cannot ruBt each other,
So their efforts come to grief,
And they quail before a bully
And pay homago to a thief!
So by dint of careful training
We can feed them—upon chaff,
Till they kiss tho hand that strikes
them
And adore the golden calf.
Why the scheme should work for ages
All exploiters hope it may—
But If our dupes begin to think
There'll be the deuce to pay.
—3. MILTON BLOOGS.
An Old-time British Tradea Unlonlat
Passed Away Recently
A famous old British lahor unionist haB passed away with the death of
John Burnett. Born ln 1842, he became an appreniiee and eventually a
fully qualified man ln well-known
Northeast Coast engineering and
armament works. He came into great
prominence In 1871, when he led the
Northeast coast workmen for a nine-
hours' working day. This was successful, although the men were then
hut little organized. He became
eventually general secretary of the
Amalgamated Society of Engineers,
and was the flrst labor leader ln Eng.
land to enter official life. When ln
1886 Charles Bradlaugh, England's
once famouB republican and free
thinking politician, succeeded in persuading the government of that time
to establish a labor bureau, Burnett
was appointed as official correspondent. Five yearB later he waB made a
member of the royal commission of
labor, and In 1893, when William
Ewart Oladstone established a labor
department of the board of trade,
Burnett became chief labor correspondent.
Winnipeg Marble Setters
A report from Winnipeg statea that
the Independent union of marble setters ln that city has gone over In a
body to the International unton of the
craft.
Toronto Typos' Banquet
The 70th anniversary banquet of
Toronto Typographical union was held
recently ln that city at the Prince
Oeorge hotel. Michael Powell, Ottawa,
and Hugh Stevenson, Toronto, both
International officers, were present
The speeches of Messrs. McKay, Atkinson and Fleming on behalf ot the
Publishers' association and Master
Printers, were felicitous, and the recital of Incidents connected with tha
history of old No, 91 by other speakers waB interesting and entertaining.
President James Watt of Toronto
District Trades council paid a high
tribute to the work of membera of
Toronto Typographical unton In behalf of the general labor movement of
the city. The Ontario Provincial
conference was represented by Philip
Obermeyer, of Hamilton.
Ferry Restaurant.
Within the course of the next few
weeks, travellers who have occasion
to uBe the ferry from Ladner to
Woodward's Landing will be enabled
to ensconce themselves In a cosy
reading and rest room at the wharf
at the latter place and In addition
they will be able to procure a hot
lunch at all hours of the day. Permission to erect a building on the
wharf landing has been granted J. O.
Lemon by the Richmond council, and
the lumber for the building is already
ordered.—Delta Times.
Address Wanted
The address and whereabouts of
John P. Nelson, miner, aged 63 yeara,
and very tall, Is wanted by his
mother, Mrs. Clara Nelson, Carlson
Oregon City, Ore.
The
Wash.,
Spokane Labor World
Labor   World,    of    Spokane,
has  been  enlarged  to  eight
In his announcement, Editor
H. L. Hughes says that "there is no
thing too good for the labor movement with the general advancement
all along the line."   This is axiomatic
and will be shown more clearly each
and every day.   Labor now holds the
key to the crucial questions of the
world and the hope of the world is
that everyone is now realizing it.
"Just let the workere learn that he
who controls the job controls the lite,
that life and liberty are practically
the same thing, That only by giving
man's life the fullest room for expansion undeterred by the uncertainty of
this man or that man's action which
may cut off their means of subsistence today or tomorrow, and* men
will be ready In a very short time to
Btrlve for the goal of industrial Independence, Today the economic discontent that prevails Is a sign of the
times. It is a sign that tho leaven
is at work everywhere throughout the
world, and that men have come to the
conclusion that if they are to be free
men in the highest and indeed in the
only social sense, they must control
absolutely the means of their subsistence, subject only to the restrictions
of the rights of others in a collcctivc-
istu such^as is tinman society, naturally and from motives of self interest
must first, last and all the time impose,"
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
GARGET IN COWS.
Parliamentary Committee
At the last meeting of tke local
trades council the following delegates
were named a parliamentary committee: T, G. Crombie, cooks; J. Brooks,
machinists; J. Hazlett, bricklayers;
O. Bartley, printers; A. J. Malacord,
muBcicians; W. W. Burroughs, street
rallwaymen; R. P. Pettlplece, printers; O. A. Kilpatrick, laborers; H,
Davis, bartenders; Q. Mowat, bookbinders; A. R. Cook, letter carriers;
W. F. Dunn and H. A. JoneB, electrical
workers. This committee will attend
to municipal, legislative and governmental matters and consider kindred
resolutions and affairs of Interest to
wage-earners, and report on same at
regular council meetings.
TO  THE  WISE—A   BARGAIN
I.
Said the slum child to the wise-
To the people of place and power
Who govern and guide the hour,
To the people who write and teach,
Ruling our thought and speech,
And all the captains and kings
Who command the making of things:
"Olve me the good ye know,
That I, the child, may grow,
Light for the whole day long,
Food that Ib pure and strong,
Housing and clothing fair,
Clear water and pure air,
Teaching from day to day,
And room for a clld to play!"
II.
Then the wise mado answer cold
"TheBe things are not given, but sold.
They shall be yours today
If you can pay."
"Pay?" said the child, "Pay you?
What can I do?
Only In years' slow length
Shall I have strength;
I have not power nor skill,
Wisdom, nor wit, nor will—
What service weak and wild
Can you ask of a little child?"
But the wise made answer cold:
"Goods must be bought and sold;
You shall have nothing here
Without paying—paying dear!"
And the rulers turned away,
But the child cried to them, "Stay!
Walt!   I will pay."
IH.
For the foulness where I live,
Filth In return I give.
For  the  greed   that  withholds
right,
Greed that shall shake your might,
For the sins I live In and learn
Plentiful sin I return.
For my lack ln home and school,
Ignorance comes to rule.
From where I sicken and dlo,
Dlseose ln your homes shall He.
Mv all uncounted death
Shall choke your children's breath,
Degenerate, crippled, base—
I degrade the human race;
And the people you have made—
Theso shall make you afraid!
I ask no more.   I take
The terms you make,
And steadily, day by day,
I will pay!
—THE FORERUNNER.
my
PAGE vmt
JAMES STARK feSSS
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AT 33, OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
'     FOR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE WINDOW SHADE
DEPARTMENT
We purpose making window shades to row own measurements,
anl guarantee the work to ba first-class In ovary particular.
OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH ON HARTSHORN'S SPRING ROLLERS
Patterns of materials displayed In department, seoond doer.  The whole
continent knows tha quauty of HARTSHORN'S SPRINOi ROLLERS.
It's necessary ta bring your measurements,  We do no flttlng.  We only
guarantee correctness In exeeutlng your orders.
. This Is an exceptional offer and will prove a earing to all houaeheMan
with window shades to buy—Dont 1st this opportunity pass by aay weasel
measure up ths window with the broken shade now.
CHOOSE  YOUR   MATERIALS  PROM  DEPARTMENT PATTIRNfc-
Hollands, Imported Lancaster, Daly and Moron's Peerieee Shade Cloths.
Opaque Window Shades ?<«^"»e:j* •—•*•*•'
on HarUbom Spring    jg-- |ft %;::=-£
Rollers Ret. $1.35 for..... ...90c.
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Best Flour. 49-lb.
sacks. $1.43 '
Rolled Oats, fresh milled ,
01ba. 25
Butler, Finest Creamery,
3 Ik. ....... ...    1.00
Com Starch, Johnson's,
3 packets. 25
Lard,   Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each      .35
Hans, by the whole haa
per lb.  ..
Bacon, machine sliced,
perlb	
Em«,   absolutely   local
new laid, per doc.'.'.
Apples, Winetaps, 5 lbs.
Cathie Soap, 35c. ban.
Ham-mo   Hand Cleanser, per tin  ;.
.2}
.55
.25
.20
.05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 8301, 8308
127S ORANVILLE STREET
A. M. McNeill
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender Street, West
We specialise ln
Moving Furniture  (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and
Storage.   Trucks and Wagons for all description ot work.
Estimates cheerfully given.
Telephones: Seymour 620, 6620 and 1705
Night Calls: Fairmont 2614R.
HOMEOPATHISTS
We earry a full atock of
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US SUPPLY YOU
MARETT & REID
167 HASTINGS ST. W.
J. A FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
BANK
Hardware and
Sporting Goods
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA FOR 39
YEAR8 AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
U8ED IN THE  MANUFACTURE OF
WHITE
SWAN
SOAP
VICTORIA
W. J.  PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VANCOUVER PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY... ....MARCH 13, UU
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent
Gaeita
COTTINGHAM ft BEATTY
Proprietor!
HOTEL   CANADA
C. a MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every
Water in every Room.
room. Hot and Cold
European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day np.   Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 1130 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bua
S18 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
GRAND CENTRAL HOTE
CAUER A DUMAIESQ, r»prieteri      a
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Leading Hotel ti Auto Parties catered to.
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Comer Fourth Street and River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.  L.  WALLINGFORD,   Manager
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
ASK FOR THEM, SUB THAT TOU OUT THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS FLIM-FLAM TOU WITH CHEAP TRASHT SUBSTITUTES
EVERY UNION
HOTEL WILL
DISPLAY THIS
SIGN IN THE
BAR,
LOOK FOR IT.
:: ::   HOTEL ::  ::
C0NNAUGHT
HAY A DEPTFORD, Propa,
PHONE SEYMOUR 70S7-70II.
auepeaa Plan, fl.00 Wat nay Up.
Up-to-Date    Flrst-Clau  ' Dining
Room and Cafe ln Conneotlon
120   BOOMS:   10   ROOMS   WITH
PRIVATE BATHS    _
Steam Heated—Phone In Brew
Room—Elevator  Services;    Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
>■     »« •***» r g^j ^n-Kt Xhronchont
D. F. Feaaabera, Fre. I :	
SMS HASTINGS STREET WEST
Telepaese,   Het aal
Cold Water ii each
_HH      Rooai.
VANCOUVER, B. C,
GO W|TH THE BUNCH T0THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout. / Hot and Cold Water In Brarr Room
finest Oats and Orlu Boom oa tha Mails Coast la OoiMoUon
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MAKSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager.
Bateai ttJOO ud at—Spoolal *WeeMj Bates.
BtmoriAS TAAm ut-ia:
RAINIER HOTEL
European—Rates 11 per day.
     lst-class Cate in connection.
Rooms rented by Day or Week. Special rateB to permanent guests.
First-class Liquors and Cigars. Every comfort and convenience.
JOHN SINDAR, Prop. Corner Cordova and Carrall Streeta,
PENDER HOTEL HaSSsHF"
Rates 11.10 per Day and Up.
ail mm sraaax was*
New, Modern. Flrat-Cliss
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL .j™ SHEKEL
naadiomaly Tarnished
686 Seymour St.
Centrally Moated
CLARENCE HOTEL
Comer PENDER and SEYMOUR STREETS
SBABOI.D ft McBI.OROV
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CLIFTON ROOMS    S'^^S
m5C™.lll.S!,,.l      rtjm. Sem^r 4tttU  ___ _?___?____, S""r
The Home ot Contort
baited, let k caM water la every reoa
EVERY  UNION   MAN    IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR  TEMPLE   CLUB   AND  POOL  ROOM
Says  Commissioners Were
Too Timid in Their
Recommendations
OF
The Conditions in Construction Camps Described
as Hell
VICTORIA, B.C., March 11—Rev.
William Stevenson, preaching at Emmanuel Baptist church on Sunday evening, dealt with the report of the
royal commission on labor, presented
to the provincial legislature laat week.
The social service commission, of
which be la aeeretary, gave evidence
before the labor commission. "When
I flrst read the digest ln the newspapers," he Bald, "I was elated and
delighted, but when I came to read
the document I found lt really disappointing. I think the commissioners threw away an opportunity Tor
doing a magnificent service to the
workers of the country. I think they
were altogether too timid in their deductions and recommendations. Before many years pass tney will regret
they did not take a firmer stand on
matters ot vital importance to the
well-being of the workers of the provinoe."
Terrible Plight of Workera
After stating why he would commend tbe report ln some respects, he
drew attention to the following conditions disclosed thereby: "Firstly,
the report bears testimony to the ter
rlble plight of the workers ln many
parts of the province. It gives us a
glimpse of a long-drawn-out story of
plunder and oppression on the part
of the employers of labor. Take the
workers in the railway construction
camps. The report says that the system of Bub-contracting is responsible
for the condition of men with the plok
and shovel. A gentleman friend of
mine described the conditions In the
campa aa hell—he would not send a
dog to them.
No Protection.
'Secondly, the report shows the
utter inadequacy of the government
to give protection to the workera. One
of the most commendable things In
the report waa the recommendation
of compulsory state insurance against
accidents, and that lt put Into legislation, will remedy a crying evil."
Referring to the remarks In the report as to the miners' trouble on Vancouver Island, the preacher said there
were two ways ln which to deal with
the situation, either that suggested by
H. H. Stevens, M. P., who declared
that the government should nationalize the mines and work them In the
Interests of the country, pr on the
other hand that religious people
should endeavor to apply
Christ's Ideals
to all labor problems. Continuing his
argument be Bald, "thirdly, the report shows that the Christian conscience must be awakened as to the
treatment of women and girls who
have to earn their own living. I am
disappointed as to the attitude of the
commissioners with regard to the
minimum wage. The plea that is put
forward that the business of the country will be seriously affected by a
minimum wage for women and girls
is, in my opinion, a hollow excuse. It
means that the-business prosperity of
the country may be upheld at the
price of the .enslavement ot the women and girls in the stores."
Made Enquiries
The commissioners had not seen
their way to recommend a change.
The social service commission had
made extensive Inquiries as to the
number of widows and deserted women who go out to work, and the
preacher quoted figures to show how
widespread was this compulsion to
obtain work. What we should do
about this Is first to realise our Individual responsibility. Secondly, the
employers of labor Bhould try to mitigate the bard conditions of labor, and
thirdly Christian men should work
for the reformation of society and Its
reconstruction on a Christian basis.
The position in this as ln every
Christian country, is: Is lt going to
be mammon or Is it going to be Christ
and bis ideals?"
consider MINARD'S   LINIMENT
the BEST Liniment ln use.
I got my foot badly Jammed lately.
I bathed It well with MINARD'S LINIMENT, and lt was as well sb ever
next day.
Yours very truly,
T. O. MCMULLEN.
Flume Sey. 7SS3 Day er Night
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Richard! St.       Vaocoarer, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. MSI.
North Vancouver — Ofllce and
chapel, 111 Second St. B. Phone
1!4.
Diseases of Men
We issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from all other remedies.
Price $3,00, Post Paid,
McDUFFEE BROS.
THE   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova St W,
Vancouver, B, 0.
Editor, B. C. Federatlonist: It is now
time to comment on the plea of the
dally morning faker in aid of strikebreakers. To say the least, like all
other articles emanating from the
same pen, It Is a weird attempt to say
something. He does not seem to know
the difference between a striker and
a strike-breaker. Astute logician
though he imagines himself this is still
the rock be hits, against, and twist
matters as be may no one could be
surprised at the Impossible solution he
arrives at. "The term strike-breaker is
more properly applied to men imported into the district where there is
trouble," says the faker. Continuing
still further he states tbat men come
In such districts as a rule without
knowing or caring anything about the
strike. Now let us see how milch
reason or truth haa been displayed ln
the composition of such a statement.
Scores of men have been shipped Into
this district from different points all
over the country by tbe employers and
labor employment agencies to fill the
place of strikers, and numbers of these
have been shipped back after finding
out tbat a strike was on. Every sane
and honest citlsen of this or any other
country - always endeavours to avoid
going into a dlatrlct where trouble Is
on, and this is Hie reason employment
agencies are called upon to help and
are paid by the employers' associations of the district in which the
trouble Ib. Men have been shipped
into Nanalmo from Vancouver and
other employment agencies, advised
that no strike waa on and that there was
plenty of work. They have also been
shipped from England to this Island
and a case Is point Is that of the
miners who were shipped to Cumberland some time ago by the Metropolitan employment agency of Vancouver,
and in the Investigation of that office
it was found that the Canadian Collieries waa at the time Interested.
Speaking of the tew men who have
thought fit to pursue a course of strikebreaking against the interests of some
16,056 loyal unionist brother's on
atrlke, the faker avers that they did
so after finding out how bitterly they
had been Imposed upon. Now the
faker creeps a little farther put of his
shell and • states the professional
strike-breaker waa the result of the
professional strike-makers. Tbls is
worthy of notice by all sensible people, because this statement of the
faker at once'announces unmistakably
the true relationship of himself to the
strike now proceeding. If only thlB
organ'a creed can be assimilated by
the men at work so that it will lull
their consciences to. Bleep and induce
them to believe they are right, why
of course the faker will be satisfied.
The, next premise, says the paper, Is:
"As a rule it is not a hard matter to
make trouble," to which we heartily
agree and in the editorials of that
paper we hl}ve tound an exemplary
case. Continuing still further he says:
This is why so many loafers drift
Into tbe ranks ot the paid agitiuor."
This we think is, where he gives the
whole case -away. A .man .who discusses questions in public gatherings,
who seeks to establish an healthy
public spirit, or endeavors to help his
fellows to a common understanding
of the oneness of life's wide interest,
may be looked upon as a pure type
of agitator. The world has always
been dependent upon such characters
for progress. Even the Nazarene belonged to this type, and his class
was termed "the people who turned the
world upside down." Of course the
same class of men who today denounce the agitator or leaders of the
poor alike denounced the Nazarene
and all who dare ally themselves with
him upon the side of those who toil.
Of course preachers are also paid agitators if they dare espouse the working class cause but If only they stand
to serve the ungodly system that is
killing more peopie by slow starvation, and by a denial of a lust opportunity to live than the epidemics that
have ever visited this earth they are
then accounted godly. Tha next
point of the taker is that he states
that strike-making became at one time
so successful tbat the shrewd eye of
a business man was caught. All business men are looking for business as
you know, and loglcallv their business
Is not the business of the other fellow at all. It's a business that knows
no friendship. Questions of brotherhood, of a common humanity are not
to be found upon its books, for all
such things, although very beautiful,
are rather sentimental and not yielding profits cannot of course be entertained. The next item worthy of a
passing remark Is the statement that
"the law should be so arranged as to
prevent a third party from getting In
on an industrial dispute." The Herald
Is a case ln point. Not one step In
advance has been secured for the. men
of this district looking to an eliding
of the present dispute by the despicable schemes and tactics Imposed upon
the men by the morning dally. Had
even a half decent case been made out
by theBe columns in detailing impartially matters concerning the miners' struggle, Instead of the policy of
bitter opposition, things-might have
reached a successful termination .ere
this. Further, we are all able to win
thlB battle nnd will do so over all the
silly stupidity exhibited. Right Is
bound to triumph, and there is no
doubt respecting the case of the men
on Btrike in this regard.
PRESS COMMITTEE.
Box 21S5 Nanaimo, B.C.
Old-Timer. Talks About Radium Curo
J. W. Bennett informs us that he
has heard from Jas. Roberts, at one
time secretary of the W. F. of M.
local at Moyie, and who is.at present
ln England, to the effect that be is
taking the radium cure for cancer,
and although at present no marked
improvement is noticeable, Roberts is
very hopeful and, trusts to derlvo
much .benefit from the treatment-
District Ledger.
A Russian Paper.
"Novlz Mir," published at 140 Eas!
4th Btreet, New York, Is the only trade
union and socialist newspaper ln the
Russian language ln America. Its
purpose Ib to spread the Idea of trade
unionism and socialism among the
Russian immigrants. The recent
strikes in Michigan and West Virginia, as well as the strikes of the
previous years, have shown the lir.
portance of educating the foreigners
In the idea of class consciousness and
solidarity. They must be taught not
to "scab," to join the unton and to be
oome loyal members of the union.
Workmen in British Columbia are re
qtested to draw this to the notice of
Russians of their acquaintance.
PAY DAY ON CM
AN EVENT OF
I MONTH
Company Pays Out Over
Six Million Dollars
In Wages
Total of Hundred and Twenty Thousand Separate
Cheques
Pay day on the C. P. R. Is an eagerly looked-for evi-nt by a great industrial army. Each month the
company pays out over $6,000,000 in
cheques, distributed over Its entire
Bystem. By actual count the cheques
reach the tremendous total of 120,000.
Thla number, with the growth of the
system and the consequent need ol
more men, keeps on increasing, "We
do everything in our power to ac
commodate our employees," says H.
B, Suckling, C. P. R. treasurer, recently to a reporter. "There is a great
deal of time and work associated with
the monthly pay day; and it we had
to have lt twice a month, as is the
case ln certain of the states—well, It
would mean a lot more trouble, and
doubled staff, and considerable more
expense. We have to do lt In Vermont and Maine, which we pass
through, and which have the bimonthly payments, and I can tell you
lt Is work, In several of the states
lt Is the same. Our people have not
sought for short term payments; and,
ln fact,' seeing that they know for
a certainty that on a certain date,
without fall they will get their money
they are perfectly satisfied. The
single monthly payment works well;
lt is a certain fixed date which does
not vary; there Is a fixedness which
gives security, and it suits all the
people with whom they dealt Branch
banks will be found all over the system, close to the place of work and
payment, so that there Ib no trouble
In getting the cheques cashed anywhere. The wages list Is constantly
increasing on the C. P. R. A decade
ago the total number of employees
waa something like 66,000. Today lt
Is over 120,000 in all grades of activity. It might be said that over 600,000
persons are directly Interested ln, and
look forward to the monthly pay day,
while, If we consider the allied interests, the indirect relations sustained
one way or another, the commercial
and Industrial affiliations of the company outside the regular list of employees, we get over 1,000,000 people
more or less directly concerned ln
the issuance once a month, of these
seemingly Innumerable bits of paper
which are bo eagerly transmuted Into
bread and butter, ,
Mr. Green, of Kootenay, says the
British,Columbia government has always been noted for Its fairness—
Whew! and yet some people don't believe ln the whale that swallowed
Jonah!
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
COLDS, ETC.
SANDS
Funeral Furnishing Ca
LIMITED
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
LADV ATTENDANT
TELEPHONE 33M
1515 QUADRA STREET
Near Pandora Avenue
VICTORIA,  B.C.
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISERS
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B. C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
Enlarged and Remodelled _•        no ROOMS l*» BATHS
Comfort    without    Extravagance
American Plan   •   11.00 Up European Plan   •  11,00 Ua
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor,
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in tne drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA, B.C.
Named Shoes sre frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what lta name, unless It bean a
plain and readable Impression or thla stamp,
All shoes without tha Union-Stamp ara
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOI WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Hasa.
J. F. rtbln, Pres.   0. L. Blaine, Bee.-Treaa.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splefldid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information,
Reasons Why
You Should Use
*fieer
Only the VERT BEST B. 0.
HOPS are used in brewing it—
with just enough imported Bohemian Hops to give it that delicious
taste and fragrance in the glass.
We're .mighty careful about the
Hops that go into. CASCADE.
We employ an expert Hop Buyer
to select them each season—we pay
from 25 tf 50 cents a pound' for
these Hops, and use over 110,000
pounds a year;
And then CASCADE is "HADE
IN B. C."—and every dosen bottles you buy helps to make British
Columbia grow.
CASCADE BEER costs $1 the
doien Quarts.
Ask ANY LIQUOR DEALER for
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited ■■■
■I
FBIDAT.
....MARCH 11, 1114
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAOESBVKN
T. ,V.  O'CONNOR
Preaident ot the International Longahoremen'a
Asaoelatlon,  with  headquarters at  Buffalo,
,N. V.—Mr. O'Connor has been International
J resident of the association since Deoember,
101, and during his regime the greatest prosperity In the history of the organisation has
been witnessed. Through his efforts was
brought about the re-afflllatlon of all the
Paelfle coast locals: locals In the Hawaiian
Islands; St. John, K. B.i Boston, Mass.; Providence, R. I,; Greater New Tork; Philadelphia, Pa.; Baltimore, Md.; Newport News,
Vs.; Jacksonville, Pla.; New Orleans, La,;
Mobile, Ala.; Savanah, Oa.; Oalveston, Port
Arthur and Texas City, Tex,
stmuc;
Union-made Cigars.'      ^_
31w Gnliiiri, iwMc4«>MwM«i.,i«iMtM'Ni>^.ret*lasmiaa
iimtiwiM(btiniMii<a-,iii>ui,swu<«CM«*M... ,-nm.mit..<,ti,fi„t
w»innrim»i«iurai»i,«imiiucM«iKioMio[i» Mrtiirtm •.,«»»««
lm_^^ZWt£&
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
Westminster Trust, Limited
capital, gi.ooo.ooaoo.
Beserre Mad, eeoo,000.00
■shsortbed, SSOI.OOO.OO
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients.   Payments collected and forwarded or Invested.   We act as agents only for the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C.
J. 7. Jonas, Managing Director
J. A. Mamie, Seentary-Tnasnxsr.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
aatteteete te Center a Maiaa, ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
NOW WESTMINSTER, B, C.
NEW WESTMINSTER UNIONS
1PITIP »V H. OIBB. BOX SM, NEW WISTMlNSTgR
TRADES AND LABOR
Tl
Building Trades Section
Considered—Amend Constitution and By-laws
Aati-Asiatic—Delegates Report Members Idle—Removals to Coquitlam
NEW WESTMINSTER, March 12.—
While the attendance at tbe regular
meeting of the Trades and Labor coun-
oil laat night waa not up to the uaual
standard ln numbers, nevertheless a
large proportion of the afflliated unions
were represented by at least one delegate, and the matten that came before
the body being out of the usual routine, much interest developed and considerable discussion took place. Most
of the evening waa spent ln further
consideration of the amended constitution and by-laws and as considerable
new matter wss Introduced by the
committee having the work of revision
ln charge, rapid progress was hardly
possible. The part that produced the
most discussion was that relating to
the formation ot the Building trades
object of securing closer affiliation and
a unanimity of action In bettering the
condition ot the unions both individually and collectively.
The Idea of the committee was based
on the working rules ot Building
Trades councils ln various parts of the
country, with- the exception that the
unions comprising the building trades
committee must be affiliated with the
Trades and Labor council until such
time as they would be ln a condition to
support a council of their own. The
matter was gone into at length, but
the final passage of the amended constitution was deferred until the next
regular meeting of the council.
Application for affiliation was made
by the Sheet Metal Workers Local No.
259 of New Westminster. The credentials of Messrs. Parr, McArthur and
Holllngsworth of this new union were
accepted and the delegates seated.
Delegate Olbb as representative of
the counoll on the executive of the
progrssive association, reported that
only one meeting had been held since
his election. The only matter of lntereat to the council was the endeavor
of certain people to secure the abrogation of the anti-Asiatic clause ln the
city property leases of Industrial altes.
One application to that effect was
now before the council and the municipal committee was Instructed to vigorously protest to the city council against
any elimination of the clause.
Chairman Knudson of the organiza
tion committee asked further time in
regard to retaining the affiliation of
the Letter Carriers, as no meeting of
the organization had been held since
the matter waa referred to his committee.  The request was granted.
The reports of delegates as to conditions ln their various locals were far
from encouraging, moat of them reporting a large proportion ot their
membership idle or working on short
time.
Delegate Kenyon of the Street Rallwaymen was elected as proxy for the
council in tbe Lahor Temple company,
limited, and Instructed to cast the
vjte of the council ln favor of allowing
other than membera of unions to purchase shares bf atock In the Labor
Temple oompany.
The matter of the employment of
Asiatic labor In the Royal Columbian
hospital was brought up by President
Cameron, and on motion the grievance
committee waa Instructed to take the
matter up with the board of truatees
ot the hospital and endeavor to secure
the employment of white labor In the
kitchen and laundry. Delegate Yates
of the street rallwaymen was elected
to ths grievance committee, vice 3.
Hogg, resigned.
tn the matter of the Importation of
a saw filer by the Brunette mills from
the other aide of the line, the grievance committee reported that the
party had secured the Job, but on returning for hla toola was stopped at
the line by the Immigration officials
and thus any action by the council to
secure his deportation was obviated.
Delegate Tyler of the Typographical
union was elected a member of the organization committee Vice Delegate
McWatera, resigned.
Delegate Tatea brought to the attention of the council the matter of the
removal of the C. P. R. headquartera to
Coquitlam, stating that lt affected five
families and twelve single men. On
motion the municipal committee waB
instructed to lay the matter before
the city council, calling their attention
to the fact that under the railroad's
lease of city property they were obliged to maintain an engine under steam
In New Westminster all the time and
secure (If possible a rescinding of tbe
order.
The petitions in regard to the release of the miners now In jail having
been mislaid the aeeretary was Instructed to write the secretary of tbe
B. C. Federation of Labor and secure
new ones.
Bills to the amount of $4.25 were
ordered paid. Receipts of the evening
were 15.00.
Progress consists ln cutting out the
bad and in preserving and fostering the good.
Sals of Shingles
Most of the shingle mills ln British
Columbia are said to be shipping almost their entire output to the United States. Eighty per cent, of the
shingle mills ln BrltlBh Columbia are
now ln operation, and the provincial
product la being the preference in all
parts ot the United States, lt Is declared. The spring trade has hardly
really opened yet, but the demand Ib
looked upon aa auguring well for the
Industry during the summer and the
shingle weavers are hopeful of better
times ln 1914.
Sll
Dispute With Oompany Discussed—Vice-president
' D. Mclvor Resigns
Will Patronise Co-operative
Store—Continued Slackness of Won
New Westmlnater, March it—The
meeting ot Street Railway Employeea,
Division No. 114, waa poorly attended
Tueaday, March 10th, considering the
membenhlp ud the matters new before the union. Besides the regular
routine work, tha matter of the dispute between the B.C.B.R. company
waa discussed at length. The Department of Labor at Ottawa hat been
called upon to establish a board of
conciliation, under the Lemleux act,
to settle the matters In controversy.
n early reply la looked forward to.
The resignation of Vlce-prealdent
D. Mclvor waa accepted on account of
leaving tne service. The vacancy will
be filled at the next regular meeting.
The advantage of patronising the cooperative atore waa discussed at
length, and the members were urged
HARRY  OIBB
The Federatlonlst's representative In the
Royal City—B. c. Federation of Labor
Trustee for Federatlonist, along with
Messrs. Kelly and Doherty.  -
JOHN J. JOVCI
Secretary-treasurer of the International Lonphoremen'e
Association,   with   headquarters  at   Buffalo,   N. T„
since INT,
WHITE STAR SrZISERV'CE IARGH
:; CANADA
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New 8.8. "Laurentle" (16.00S tons), new 8.8. "Megantlo."
First Class, 182,50 Second Class, SSJ.75 I Third Claaa, StMO
ONE CLASS (II.) CABIN SERVICE ' - •
Express 8.8. "Teutonic" (Twin Screw Steamers) j        S.8. "Canada"
682 feet long (H0.00 and up).1 Bit feet long (3rd class Ml JS and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
QUEBNSTOWN
ONE CLASS in.) CABIN SERVICE
8.8. "Arabic" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamers) 8.8. "Cymric"
16,000 tons, 000 feet long (Rata W3.75)    13,000 tons, M0 ft. long (Rata S5J.B0)
61S-2nd AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
BOSTON
LIVERPOOL
to give It all Uie -support possible,
thereby benefitting themselves as well
as assisting an Institution which wu
a credit to the organized workera of
the community, The matter of the
best meana of supporting the B. C.
Federatlonist was also considered,
and while lt waB thought impossible
to subscribe aa a union owing to the
condition of the treasury, the membera realized the necessity ot a journal devoted to the cause ot labor and
were urged to aid lt by every meana
In their power. Reports from the different departments ahow a continued
Blackness ot work, 185 ot the membera being out of work, and to per
cent ot those employed working on
short time.
The meeting adjourned 11 p. m. and
the hope la expressed that tha neat
meeting will make a batter showing
In the way of attendance.
Printing Peddlers Pay
Clothing and prlnten' solicitors who
come here from the eaat to sell their
goods, will, ln future, be obliged to
pay a tee ot $50 per week before then
are given permission to do business.
This waa the decision of the finance
commission of the city council laet
Friday. It waa stated by several of
the aldermen that solicitors came
from Montreal and Toronto and took
away with them thousands of dollara'
worth ot orders, thus depriving local
men ot work. The merchant tailors'
association asked that the fee be fixed
at $1,000 a year instead of $100, aa at
present, but tt waa considered that
this would be prohibitive.
Ur. and Mra. Sam Morris and child
bare returned trom a trip to California. He la on the staff of Ute hotel
Cordova,
i.
TiJ
wo,
bee
cidi
of
aln
'wit,
ser
ir
f
fAMAHA  MILLIONS OF ACRES
V./\ll/VU/\ OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giving specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
Six monthi' reaidenoe upon and cultivation of the land ln eaoh of three yean. A homesteader may live within nine miles of his homestead on a farm of
at least 80 aorei solely owned and occupied by him or his father, mother, son, daughter, brother or sister.
In certain districts a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside his homestead.   Price $3.00 per acre.   Duties—Must
reside sis monthi in eaoh of six years from date of homestead entry (including the time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra.
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY    MARCH 11, 1114
The Quality of Our Service, tbe Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our business is Increasing is due to the faot that our business policy is correct. We adopted the policy of Informing the public
through the medium of the press as to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$56.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This has established confidence with the public ln us, and for that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue as we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 119
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrona
Formerly canter A Hanna'a Branch
A. C. Millar, Proa.
P. H. Orate, Manager
President Walker of Trades
and Labor Council
Interviewed
ALL   UNION   8TORE8   DISPLAY
THI8 CARD
Phons Seymour NI.
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
Tit ORANVILLE STREET
; Orphaum Theatre Building
Mrs. Genevieve Contl
Mrs. Frances Lohrmsn
Cold Fish Bowls
MILLAR* COE    UeHsMsnSt. W.
have all sizes of flsh bowls, Wo.,
75c, $1.00 and 11.25, also selected
gold flsh, 3 for 26c.
SEE   OUR   WINDOW    DI8PLAV
ReaMwl AeMtBtceweat
CENTER&HANNA^Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, st 1049 Georgia Strsst,
one block west of Court House.
Use of Modern ChapelaudFuneral
Parlors free to sll patrons
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Picttta and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
, The House with ths 120,000 Ventilation ayetem
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Continuous Performance 'torn 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
MON,
TUE8.,
«■■ OOLL»m TBIO
"The Kubellska of .Vaudeville."
Classy Violin and Piano Act.
comr aas coot
Singing and Dancing Act
sunn Am esawjjiT
"Nifty Entertainers."
w. o. rouse
WEEK Or MARCH 16
WED.
THUR8,,   FRI,   SAT.
edwabd main
"The Man In Front of the Camera"
- Kalem's popular comedian.
tabt, lormu in tab
"The Fashion Plate Trio."
butmbb in LTom
Cowboy Fiddlers and Dancers.
ansa wa locbb
Singing Comedienne.
Aerial Contortionist
4-REBLS LATEST PICTURES-!
10 Oents-ANY SEAT-10 Cents
AMATEUR NIGHT-WEDNESDAY.
B. C. Electric Irons
The Cheapest
High Standard
Electric Iron
On the Market
By Fat the Beit
Electric Iron
On the Market
At Any Price
PRICE (to partlea using 8. C. Electric currant)
$3.00
Every Iron la Guaranteed by tha Company for TEN YEARS.
Cattail sad
Hastii|iStieet
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
mSOasrilleSt.
Near Davie
PATRONIZE UBOR TEMPLE PI ROOM
Must Organise All Branches
Then Consolidate in
Central Body
In an interview this week W.
Walker, president ot the Vanoouver
Trades and Labor counoll, has thla to
say on the solidarity of the local lahor movement: "Individually man la
weak; collectively he is strong. The
aame applies to organizations, and
more especially to labor bodies. In
the flrst Instance, the Individual aaw
that he could not demand the price
he desired for his labor power, for
the number of hours that he had to
work, and decided to call his fellow
men together for the purpose of securing the desired amount that he
required for the betterment of himself, and formed themselves Into an
organisation known aa a craft union.
This proved to be an
Advantage to Himself
as well as to his fellow workers tor
the time being, but still did not have
the desired effect Then the different
craft unions tound it necessary to
have tbe support of eaoh other, and
formed wbat is known ln different cltlea as central councils, or
tradea and lahor councils to better
their condition still further. Thla
proved to be a decided advantage, but
the members of the different craft
unlona/ appear to be Inconsistent ln
their support to their sister unlona,
and for this reason they do not accomplish the same degree of perfection aa is necessary for the better
ment of their organization.
Regard to Ralation
"Now, ln regard to the relation ot
one organization to another, we can
compare it to the human body. Take,
for instance, the stomach aa tlie central organ. It is the main organ,
through which the different organs
derive their nourishment for the sustaining of life. But If one of these
organs suffers, it affects the other
organs to a great extent, and retards
their growth and development. Even
the stronger ones are bound to have
a set-back. If the central organ Buffers lt affects all the other organB, as
it.
Requires Co-operation
ot all' the other organs to bring lt
hack to' lta natural state. So it requires the co-operation of every or
ganlzatlon to keep the central council ln lta natural state for the purpose
ot fulfilling the functions, for which
lt waa created. The central counoll
la Juat what the varloua organisations
make lt, If the membera of the organisations are alive and active, and
take a keen Interest ln their own welfare, aa well as the welfare of their
sister organisations, I have no hesitation ln stating that we could have one
of the beat organised cities on this
western coast"       <
The labor movement knowe no
frontiers.
The Canada and West hotels have
union cards" hung up ln the bars.
Phil Hannifin, member of the bartenders' union, has arrived from Fort
Oeorge and way stations.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA.
WHEN IN NEED
,-OF-
'PRINTING!
OF  ANV   DEICRIPTION
PHONE THE  FED.
Seymour 7491.
kFIR8T-CLA88 WORK^
ONLY
J. W. McMAHON
Phone Sey. 4320
R. E. JOHNSTON
McMAHON & JOHNSTON
SUCCESSOR TO
SAMUEL A. WYE
Heating and Sanitary Engineers
TRY US ON REPAIR WORK OR ON ANY CLASS OF PLUMBING AND
STEAM OR HOT WATER HEATING INSTALLATIONS.    TWO THINGS
WILL BE RIGHT:
WORKMANSHIP and PRICE
"We aim to give Satisfaction and we are Dead Shots."
748 CAMBIE ST. VANCOUVER, B. 0.
NATIONAL ANTHEM TO DATE
Audience Will Kneel.
Ood save Kings Dan and Bill,
Long may they prosper still,
Exalt their throne.
Lords of the ship, and mines.
Woods, fields and railway lines,
Even the sun that shines,
All things they own.
Hall them our sovereign lords,
All that the earth affords,
Unto them give.
All that we've had as yet,
All that we still may get,
So they be pleased to let
Some of us live.
Banned of the world are we,
Forbanned by land and sea,
Not men, but things.
What if we starve and die,
Think not to question why.
But proudly join the cry,
Ood Save Our Kings.
Humble our hearts, "Oh Ood,"
Humbly to kiss the rod,
E'en though it stings.
Let thoBe who'd dare rebel,
Rot in a dungeon cell.
While we the Anthem swell,
Ood Save Our Kings.
—3.Q. DAVIDSON.
Violated Solemn Obligation
To Their Fellow
Unionists
Listened to the Guile and
Pie-crust Promises of
the Coal Barons
NANAIMO, March IS.—The men
whose names are given below drew
the amount of relief shown opposite
their names trom the United Mine
Workers of America and then deserted their fellow workers and returned to work while the miners are
yet on strike:"
1. H. Edwards  $ 91.00
12. R. Capstick       96.01)
3. W.  Baird   ..  301.28
4. T. McArthur  279.00
5. J. Seggte       32.00
, I. J. McMeekin   393.00
7. P. Flynn, sr    55.00
8. P. Flynn, jr       72.00
9. W. Flynn       80.00
10. R. Good       55.00
11. J. Nimmo   386.00
12. J. Dorin    168.00
13. J. Patterson   182.00
14. H. Patterson   312.00
15. A. Patterson   104.00
16. James Patterson     104.00
17. J. Reid (Mush)     182.00
18. D. Scott      48.00
19. J.   McKin  Young    96.00
20. J.  Hynd     156.00
21. A. Knoa   14.00
22. R. Houston      28.00
23. A. Honeyman    220.00
24. R. Honeyman     60.00
25. G. Seggie        4.00
26. Jno. Dean, jr      4.00
27. A. Thompson    102.00
28. W. Hamilton     210.00
20. J. Adams      28.00
30. J. Alexander    117.00
31. D. Cook, jr.   ;.   70.00
82. T. Davidson     88.00
83. J. Miller   240.00
34. W. Brodie      76.00
85. T. Turnbull      36.00
86. W. Thompson     181.00
37. J. Dick      48.00
38. W.  Wilson     413.00
39. J. Scott  220.00
40. J. Gourlay      60.00
41. R.  Martell        16.00
42. J. Aitken, jr    64.00
43. V.  Muir     140.00
44. H. Killeen        8.00
45. C. Kileen      28.00
46. F. Tattery   102.00
47. H. Weeks       32.00
48. A. Weeks  100.00
49. J. Combes    28.00
50. H. H. Morrow  120.00
51. H. Morrow    180.00
52. H. Devlin ...."...    84.00
53. G. Devlin      30.00
64. C. Rowbottom   201.00
55. R. Yarrow     76.00
66. P. High   ...         84.00
57, O. Morgan   168.00
68. J. James    288.00
59. L.  Jones     150.00
60. A.  Golby     366.00
61. Alb. Keeba     16.00
62. R. Thompson   102.00
63. J. Carr     240.00
64. R. A. Battle   192.00
65. I. Bewlek     96.00
66. R. Potter    240.00
67. Fred. Dawkin  136.00
68. Fred. Dresser    278.00
69. R. H. Bamford   100.00
70. Joe Radcliff     32.00
71. R. Bateman    365.00
72. I.  Bateman     244.00
13. F. Vincent  372.00
74. G. Vincent   128.00
75. W. J. Moor     150.00
76. T. Ridley   243.00
77. R.  Booth     250.00
78. Joe. Dixon   242.00
79. J. Willis    168.00
80. J.  Laverick       24.00
81. J. G. Curry   217.00
88. J. Rollo  112.00
83. H. Fletcher   175.00
84. Joe. Carruthers       21.00
85. P. Macham     140.00
86. F. Dix      ,.   30.00
87. W. Dean  ...'..:.... 248.00
88. Jno. Kneen    '. 175.00
89. T. Rowbottom    220.00
90. H. Macham    140.00
91. J.  Edwards     100.00
92. G.  Jackson     168.00
93. T. Parkinson, sr 144.00
94. F. Green     52.00
95. N. Stephlnson   192.00
96. S. Welsby       88.00
97. G. Ramsell     56.00
08. J. Grey    104.00
99. C. Wallbank  ..-  124.00
100. T. Wallace     112.00
101. Abe Hickman '  136.00
102. Ed. Lythgoe  190.00
108. J. Partrage   224.00
104. J. Hackwood   293.00
105. T. Mawhlnney   171.00
106. J. Nichelson     84.00
107. H. J. Curry   296.00
108. Ed. Clements      28.00
109. R.   Muir     850.00
110. Fred.  Cooper       40.00
111. All. Jcnklnsor    879.50
I"- J. Carr      84.00
118. J. McGlennan   180.00
114. Joe Talt  ,  308.00
!
T
OF
Conference Held at Seattle
—Organising Campaign
Will Be Started
District Card Adopted—Officers Elected—Delegate
Beariault President
The first conference of the Paelfle
Northwest Dlatrlct Council of Lathers convened ln the Labor Temple at
Seattle, Wash., on Tuesday, March
3rd. Oeneral President MoSorley
presided and there were present following
Delegates:
iftias Krlstwlck, local No. 77, Everett,
Wash.; R. H. Flndorf, local No. 93,
ttpokane, Wash.; J. H. Tipton, local
No. 54, Portland, Ore.: A. F. Mann,
local No. 155, Taeoma, Wash.; W. F.
Callow, local No. 332, Victoria, B.O.;
J. S. Beariault, local No. 104, Seattle,
Wash.; Victor R. Mldgley, local No.
207, Vancouver, B.C. Ellas Kristwiok
acted as seoretarjr pro tem.
Organization Work
A constitution and by-laws were
adopted by the conference for lta
guidance. The organisation committee's report waa adopted, ln whloh
the opinion was expressed (1) that
there should be an organizing campaign started and carried on simultaneously In the jurisdiction of the
district counoll, commencing April
1st next. This proposition was left
with President McSorley for a certain period. It waa further suggested
and agreed to that the appointing/of
organizers for this proposed campaign
be left to the local unions. (2) Requested that the international union
use lta Influence to secure the affiliation ot all looal unions not affiliated
and located ln the territory ot thla
district council. (3) That the International be requested to provide some
literature to assist this organizing
campaign, setting forth why lathers
Bhould organize.
A motion waa passed to the effect
that' the secretary be Instructed to
deBlgn a district council card which
Bhall be carried by all membera ot
affiliated unions.
Officers Elected
Following officers were elected for
ensuing six months: President, J. S.
Beariault; vice-president, Victor R.
Mldgley; secretary-treasurer, J. H.
Tipton.
President McSorley installed the
newly-elected officers, after which he
addressed the conference, touching
upon the benefits to be derived from
the new district council by the affiliated unions. He advised the officers
and membera ot the different locals
to give their hearty aupport and cooperation to the council.   He felt
Sura of Suceess
by the time the next district council
convention was held.
Delegate Mldgley made some interesting remarks along the lines of educating the outsiders upon the principles of trades unionism.
Delegate Flndorf assured those
present of his. earnest efforts and cooperation to make the organisation a
success.
Delegate Mann waa sure that the
council' would promote a better feeling among the membership of the unions in the northwest
Delegate Callow stated that No. 332
had always favored the formation of
a district council.
Delegate Krlatwick believed that
the movement would better condltlona
among lathers In the northwest generally.
Delegate Tipton said that his union, aa well aa himself, had always
favored a dlatrlct council
Delegate Beariault felt convinced
that local No. 104 would be found In
the front ranks fighting to build up
the new organization.
A vote of thanka waa tendered
Preaident McSorley for his able services. Adjourned till flrst Monday in
August, 1914.
Viaduct Contracta Awarded
The Union Contracting company
was on Monday night awarded the
contract for the four east end viaducts on Harris, Hastings, Pender and
Keefer streets, by the olty oounoil,
the firm's price on the four structures
being 1299,830 and the lowest
115. J.
116. S.
117. S.
118.
119.
120.
121.
122. H
123. G.
124. J.
125. A.
»' h.
9. T.
I0'l
11. T.
W.Shipley  388.00
K. Mottishaw   208.00
Wallace   .'      8.00
A. Lee     86.00
McCourt     16.00
Bolton    234.00
Smith   888.00
Taylor   191.00
Dawson   . i  228.00
Mackintosh  164.00
. Waugh, 6 acres  384.00
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE,
Andrew Dean
Thorn. Thompson,
AmniSiv.318
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
MATINEE DAILY 2.30
EVE. PERFORMANCE 8.15
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Meana
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.41, 7.20, 9.15
Season's Prices—
Matinee 16e, Evenings 16o, Ho.
An Impartial
has been refused the striking union coal
miners of Vancouver Island under the
McBride-Bowser-Mackenzie & Mann regime in British Columbia and the federal
government has done worse than nothing.
SCORES OF UNION MEN HAVE
BEEN RAILROADED TO PRISON
-AND TWO TO DEATH-
FOR THE CRIME OF DARING
TO ORGANISE	
The strikers are backed by over 400,-
000 members of the United Mine Workers of America, and they WILL win because they Af UST. ~,
The coal barons, backed to the hilt by
the government, have spent thousands of
dollars in scouring the labor markets of
the world for SCABS, with meagre success.
The Strike
Is Still On
in the mining camps of Cumberland,
Nanaimo, South Wellington and Lady-,
smith on Vancouver Island, and all
workers are requested to avoid the abovj
places as a plague.
BOWSER'S SPECIALS AND THE
MILITIA ARE STILL ON
THE GROUND
at the expense of the government, to
do the scab-herding for Mackenzie &
Mann, who seem to have McBride and
Bowser bought and paid for.
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT
OF WORK IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A
MAN TO GET A JOB UNLESS HE
GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN.
KEEP AWAY
FROM
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
<

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