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The British Columbia Federationist Mar 20, 1914

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THE/BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
INDUSTRIAL UNITT! STf  S    H.
■  ' .    "!   «t /—
SIXTH YEAR.   / f f_
• =/' / Mm
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 20,1911
EIGHT PAGES
POLITICAL ON******: VSClfOfhft-''
(WoT) fi^ SEE 111*;
SOUT^AFRICAN
LAfiOR VICTORY
Labor  Candidates  Secure
Majority in Transvaal
Legislature
A. SYCOPHANT  PRESS
Importance  of Indemnity
Bill to Workers of
This Country
The workere of South Africa
have given their answer to Botha.
The election for membera of the
. Tranavaal laglalature- took place
Wedneaday and resulted in a
awaeplng victory for tha labor
candldatea who now have a majority In tha aaaambly. Thla haa
bean made possible by the tradee ,
unlona while puraulng their Industrial alma taking action on the
political field. It la pretty,certain that no one now regreta the
Illegal and autocratic behavior of
the government mora than tha
Rand mine-owners who have, aa
alwaya, been the cause of trouble.
Labor will remember them, aa
labor will remember the' ayeo-
phant preaa which hat done lte
best to Injure tha eauae of the
worker.'
Readers of the daily press have
been considerably pussled of late by
the almoat entire cessation of news
regarding the industrial situation |n
South Africa. It appeared that some
concerted action waa-being taken to
prevent publicity and tn the light of
further events this belief amounts to
a certainty. A group of multi-millionaires ln Oreat Britain have circularised provincial newspapers tn that
country offering to supply them with
news affecting labor at no cost. The
specimen to hand Is lying and libellous especially as regards South Africa, and lt Is extremely probable that
legal action will be taken agalnat lta
authors. The history of the trouble
Is well known and need not be recapitulated. The mass meeting held on
Sunday, January llth, was orderly,,
good-humored and self-controlled. Not
a policeman or soldier waa to ba seen
and there was no suggestion of violence on the part of the strikers. Tet
martial law of an unparalleled stringency waa declared at midnight on
the Tueaday. Then followed wholesale arrests and Imprisonments. Entire executives of unions, several lahor
membera, councillors and candldatea
at forthcoming elections were Imprisoned without any charges being laid
or trials held.
Offences Under Martial Law ,
Under martial law tt has been made
an offence to advise any person to
atrlke, to continue to strike, or to
asBist a atriker or his family ln any
way. One man was fined $25 or 14
days for looking "aneerlngly" at a
policeman. Union offices have been
raided, printing machinery destroyed,
news censorship established, espionage exercised on private telephones
and letters and the publlo generally
ruthlessly handled and driven like
cattle. The armed forces of the country are being used, not to suppress
violence, but to terrorise men Into
working. The capitalist press has
been strangely silent over these Incidents and also about the reception
of the nine deportees ln Oreat Britain. These men have been received
with enthusiasm by all shades and
sections of workers. The gathering
In Hyde Park was the greatest demonetisation London has seen for thirty
years. Nothing has up to now united
the British labor movement as Botha'a
action. Although the British parliament has agreed to sanction the Indemnity bill without the Institution of
a Judicial enquiry, It Is possible that
they will be forced by the vigorous
expression ot popular will to reverse
their decision. The workers ln Canada are vitally Interested In thla
struggle,
Indemnity Bill
.In the preamble of the Indemnity
bill the state of martial law which lt
legalises ts described "as understood
and administered In his majesty's do-
FOUR LOCAL UNIONS
ONE BODY
Amalgamated Section of the
United Brotherhood of
Carpenters and Joiners
Officers Elected—President,
J. A. Key—State of
Trade
The Amalgamated section of the
United Brotherhood of Carpentera and
Joiners held a business-like aggregate meeting on Monday evening,
tbere being about 100 members In
attendance. President J. A. Key occupied tbe chair and Seoretary
J. Bltcon was in his place. The principal business of tbe four local unions
waa tbe consideration of tbelr consolidation and merging into one organisation. After a thorough discussion -It was decided to merge Into a
single body and to hold future meetings on the first and third Tuesdays
of each month ln 302, Labor Temple.
The election of officers restilted aa
follows President, J. A. Key; vice-
president, A. Glen; seoretary, Oeo.
F. Read; treasurer, J. Stewart; auditors, J. Fowler, W. Currle, and V,
Wright; cheek ateward, J. Towe;
money steward, Q. Richardson; business agent, H. J. McEwen. Branch
oommlttee and trustees—J. McKlnlay,
J. Bitcon, L. McLean, B. Braithwalte,
and W. Wheeler.. Branoh referee—
J. 0. Smith. The state of trade was
reported still dull, and there were
more men out of work than there
were working.
As to  Legitimate  Union
Labels Versus Illegitimate "Union Labels" .
Case Concerning Garment
Workers—Womanhood
and Manhood
LOCAL BOOKBINDERS
Anti-Mllltary Resolution Voted Down
—Trade Reported Still Dull
There was a 1/uge turn-out of members of local union, No. 105, Brotherhood of International Bookbinders at
Tuesday.night's meeting. Tbe resolution disqualifying unions for representation on the B, C. Federation ot
Labor lt tbey allow membera to belong to the mllltla was voted down
after a brief discussion Owing to
the dull state of business It was decided not to send a delegate this
year to attend the Denver session of
the International union. L. B. Dennlson,: advisory president of the Cat-
ton Apprentices' club, addressed the
meeting in regard to bookbinders' apprentices Joining that body. A movement was now on foot towards the establishment of a technical school for
the allied printing trades. It was decided to support the movement. President Frank Milne, who accidentally
had bis finger smashed ln a cutting
maehlne a few days ago, occupied the
chair.
In 1818 when New York Typographical society was chartered, the
legislature refused to permit the In-,
corporation until the society assented
to a provision prohibiting lt to "at
any time pass any law or regulation
respecting the price or wages of
labor," Wouldn't BUI and Dan have
been happy in those daya?
minions." It imperial sanction Is
given to the 1)111, tbe action of the
South African government Ib accepted
as a precedent for the whole empire.
Never before haa a perfectly constitutional strike been considered a proper
occasion for the proclamation of martial law; if the example set by the
South African government is not
challenged, a strike in Canada can
henceforth be accepted by the governments as a state of rebellion warranting the substitution of military despotism for civil authority. That Is a
grave danger wblch been scarcely
realised and one which the people of
the province would do well to consider.
GOVERNMENT AGAIN ASKED TO PROBE
OKALLA PRISON FARM AT BURNABY
So serious Ib the dissatisfaction felt by organised labor In this
province over the prison treatment meted out to miners alleged to
have taken part in the Vancourer island disturbances tbat tbe first
resolution dealt with hy the recent convention of the B. C. Federation of Labor was one requesting the provincial government to appoint a commission to investigate conditions In Jails and also to Install a'resident doctor In every Jail and penitentiary ln British Columbia. This resolution was duly presented to the premier, and consideration promised. Nothing, however, has been heard of any commission being appointed while the necessity is even more insistent
now than then. Last week another prisoner was removed to the
general hospital, Vanoouver to be operated upon for peritonitis—a
diseast which caused the death of Joseph Mairs. These oases of
serious illness are becoming far too frequent and irresistibly lead
to the conclusion that the present state of affairs ln these 2jalls Is
not conduolve to the health ot the prisoners. The president of the
B. C. Federation of Labor haa again brought the matter before the
government ln the following letter. Surely Sir Richard McBride will
now see the necessity of a strict enquiry. But an Inquiry seems to be
a "bete nolr" to the premier. This time, however, he can scarcely
avoid It aa the public conscience Is becoming shocked by the repeated
scandalous Incidents so often occurring at the Okalla prison farm:
"Hon. Sir Richard McBride, -    .
"Vlotoria, B.C;  '■
"Sir: Borne time ago a committee of the exeoutive of the above
feleratlon waited upon you and, among other requests, one was made
for the appointment of a commission to enquire Into the conditions
ln prisons ln this province, and I would oall your attention to another
case ot peritonitis. A man named John McKenzle is being operated
upon for this complaint, and aB Joseph Mairs died from this same
complaint, and so many of the miners ln Jail are suffering In health,
we are convinced that conditions are not as they should be. We
therefore renew our request for the appointment of a commission, and
further ask that a member of organised labor be appointed on the
commission. Trusting that our request will be granted at an early
date, I remain, respectfully, "A. WATCHMAN.
"Preaident B. C. Federation ot Labor.
'Vlotoria, March Id, 1914."
J. R., ALPINE
Preaident United Aaaoclatton of Plumbers
and Steam Fitters of the United Statea
and   Canada,   with   headquartera   at
Chicago, III.
The "low down," barefaced scheming of Borne politicians ln tbls province to "do up" honest working
people at all hazards Ib only outclassed by the knavery of some merchants who will resort to almost any
shady, despicable trick to cheat the
purchasing public and at the same
time defraud out of a livelihood even
women who must struggle ln an Industrial field already over-crowded by
cheap Mongol workera. The trade
.unions here and elsewhere hare been
endeavoring for years to keep wages
up to tbe living notch, but no matter
what they do, and try to do, they are
often outwitted In carrying out their
best intentions. Labelling goods
made under union condltlona has been
of considerable value in bettering the
conditions of the workera. In order
to protect the union label against duplication and fraud by those having
nb right to use it, large sums of
money hare been spent by the unions
ln legal expenses as well as in advertising. In spite of all this, however,
some manufacturers still endeavor to
hoodwink the publlo and foist upon
them goods with either a "fake"
label, or an Intimation that the articles ao labelled are "union made."
One auch Instance has recently been
brought to the notice of The Federatlonist. A Victor: i firm manufacturing overalls carrying the title of "Big
Horn" uses a label on these garments
stating that they are union made, but
the name of the union is hot specified thereon. Why la not the recognised official label of an International
union used?* If these garments are
made by union labor under conditions
approved by tbe bona fide unions interested there would be no difficulty
In having the label provided for such
purposes. For the benefit of tbe uninitiated The Federationist takes this
opportunity to point out that the
matter of patronising the union label
ta purely one of business aside from
the ethics of unionism. . Herewith Is
reproduced a cjit ot the union label of
the United Garment Workera of America:
HM*oeToeBea»
The foregoing union label when attached to ready-made clothing and
garments, particularly overalls, guarantees that the makers thereof have
a elean, dry, properly equipped, sanitary workshop, union working hours
and living wages. Garments not bearing this label are In most cases made
In sweatshops and sometimes ln
prisons. All wage-earners and others
should demand the union label thereby assisting men and women garment
workers in raising labor above conditions which are placed by keen competition and the desire for gain. Every
honest citizen Bhould help to place
womanhood and manhood above dollars by demanding the union.label.
NO UNI
con HOLD
Ask that City Electrician's
Department Be Enquired Into
Workers Urged To Get on
Voter's List—Commissioners Proposed
The Tradea aad Labor Council held
a well-attended meeting last night,
Preaident Walker being In the chair,
with George Bartley aa aeoretary.
Nothing very important waa dealt with
during the session, which terminated
at half-past nine. A communication
from the building trades council re
gardlng the Jurladictional dispute between the Bricklayers' union and the
Marbleworkera' association was filed.
Prince Rupert tradei and labor council asked for Information regarding
the B. C. Association of Stationary
Engineers, which the council directed
to be supplied. Some discussion took
place over the request ot the social
democratic party that the council
should take part ln a labor May-day
celebration. It was decided that no
steps be taken at present Dr. 'A. F.
Proctor, secretary, B. C, Anti-Tuber-
culosls Society, asked that representatives from the council attend a
meeting of the society. Unfortunately
thia, notification was received too
late, but the council went on record
In aupport of the alms of the society.
For many yeara the council haa takon
the atand that the government should
take over and maintain such institu-
ions, and If the position of the Tran-
qullle sanitarium is as precarious as
represented, they considered that provincial aid should be given. Assistance for the formation of a radium
institute received little encouragement. The proposal of J. H. Burnham,
M.P., regarding tariff on Chinese
goods was ordered flled.
The following resolution regarding
immigration waa passed:
Whereas—Continuous efforts are being made by transportation companies,
emigration agencies and other societies to Induce employers ln Canada to
import Mbor from outside the Dominion, and
Whereas-;These companies and
societies have received, and are now
receiving, government guarantees and
grants of public money, and
Whereas—The arrival of immigrants
pri these shorn during a time ot severe depressiqnsuch ua now exists not
only intenstfler'the/.-'ouB unemployment question, but tends to deteriorate
the already too low standard of the
workers' living, consequently retarding industrial and national progress,
therefore* be lt
Resolved—That the federal and provincial governments of Canada discontinue assisting financially er otherwise
such corporations and societies, and
further take steps to ensure that correct information be given to prospective Immigrants in their own homes;
and be It further
Resolved—That copies of this resolution be sent to Premier Borden, the
federal members and members of the
local legislature, and the press.
Delegate Dunn reported that, with
the president and secretary, he had
Interviewed the medical officer of
health regarding the enforcement of
the .Bakeshops Act. Dr. Underbill
told them that the health authorities
were handicapped owing to various
acts clashing. Del. McVety reviewed
the history of the appointment of a
bakeshop Inspector and considered the
only way to get Improvement in bakeshops was to have the statute strictly
enforced. The co-operation of the city
solicitor will probably be asked for.
Organisation Committee.
The organization committee reported progress and expected further applications before next meeting. The
committee appointed at the last meeting to discuss proposals .as to a civic
centre, has not yet convened. Ihe Label League representative complained
of the meagre attendance at'meetings
and invited the delegates to an entertainment on March 26th. Delegate
Curnock reported that the Hotel West
had signed up. The Garment Work,
era' delegate stated that the difficulties with a local firm had been settled. >
8treet Railway Dlapute.
Delegate Hoover told the council of
the Btate of affairs between the B. C.
E. R. and the union. (Full particulars
of this will be found ln another article on this page.) It was refreshing
to hear that in the building trades
things were showing Improvement, although only slight.   Perhaps that may
PROBABLY END
MINERS' iRIALi
LAWLESS OPERATORS
IN CI REUS
THOMAS a. IURKI
General Secratary-tnuurer United Association of Plumbers and Steam Fit-
tera of the United Statea and Canada,
with headquarters at 411-411 Bush
Temple of Husto,, Chicago, m.
Electors Ought To Be Compelled to go to the Polls
or Be Disfranchised
This Is the Advice of President Watters—Abolish
$200 Deposit
J. C. Watters, president of the
Trades and Labor congreaa of Canada,
appeared laat Friday before the
special committee of the house of
commons to Inquire Into amendment
of tha. Election act, says an Ottawa,
Ont., dispatch. Mr. Watters asked that
election day should be made a general holiday and that voting be made
compulsory. The chairman, Hon. 0.
J. Doherty, said: "Do you mean that a
man ahould be compelled to vote* or
compelled-to go to the poll?" Mr.
Watters replied: "I realize that you
cannot make' a man vote. But he
ought to be compelled to go to tbe
polls so that his name could be struck
from the list of voters and thus the'
risk of Impersonation wduld be reduced." A further plea made by Mr.
Watters was against the putting up of
an election deposit ot 1200. The deposit waa often a restriction on the
candidature of the workingmen.
CITY LETTER CARRIERS
Granted   an   Allowance   for   Strsst
Car Faroe ,
The dominion government haa this
week Issued instructions that, pending a satisfactory arrangement, with
the B. C. E. R„ an allowance will be
made to letter carriers for car fare.
It will be remembered that last January the -atreet railway declined to
carry the postal employees at the
rate allowed hy the post office department. Since then the carriers
have been compelled to pay the tares
out of their own pockets, and, as In
so many cases, lt Is imperative that
they use the street-cars, It has
worked a considerable hardship on
them. This especially applied to the
men delivering the mall tn suburban
districts; ln aome instances this
added expense has amounted to hear
ly two dollars a week. A temporary
solution has now been reached and
the new orden granting a money allowance to the men goes into effect
forthwith. It Is the Intention'of the
federal authorities to shortly bring
down legislation standardizing the
per capita payments and also probably making the acceptance of such
standard compulsory on the street
railways. At present the sums paid
very from $76 per man per year ln
Ottawa to $36 in Reglna and Vancouver. These variations have caused
considerable friction between the
postal authorities and the various
street railways which will he eliminated when a uniform rate Is established; and if the street-oar systems
are compelled to accept the scale
laid down by the government, there
will be no further cases of the letter
carriers having to pay for transportation while on duty.
"The Law Be Damned,"
Say the Mine Owners
ci
"We Are Grfctyr Than th*
Laws, for We Own the
(Special to The Pedfratlorist) .<
DENVER, Colo., March It.—The
congressional investigating committee
has done the people of Colorado a
great * serrlce by exposing the out
rages whieh the eoal operators hare
practiced on the coal .miners for
years. Tbey stand convicted of every
oharge made by the United Mine
Workers: For twenty yeara theee
vultures of greed have picked at the
bones of the eoal diggers whom they
drove Into their "safe" mines Uke
cattle.. For twenty yeara they have
"fixed" coroners' Juries which absolved them from all blame for the
slaughter ot hundreds of their workmen. Since mining became one of
the large industries of the state, the
coal diggers have been robbed of 600
to 800 pounds ot eoal on every ear,
they endangered their Uvea to produce. Lawa were passed String the
men tbe right to employ a checkwelghman to prevent this highway
robbery, but when the men nought to
take advantage of thla law, they were
promptly discharged or given such a
poor room In the mine that they were
forced to quit   "The law be d ,"
said the operators; "we are greater
than the laws, for we own the courts."
The minera faced even a more grave
problem, being able to get nothing
but scrip, good only at the oompany
stores, for their work. State wide indignation at thla Injustice brought Into being another statute - abolishing
the acrlp system. And the operaton
aneered at this effort and kept on
using acrlp. Of theee and many other
outrages the eoal operaton stand
oonvlcted before the people ef the
nation. Revelations of their lawlessness hare proved beyond a doubt that
In their eampa. of where their will le
supreme, the constitution has been
set aside, and a terrorizing reign of
anarchy exists.
BAKERS' UNION
Union Labelled Bread Should Be
Patronized by Working People
"United We Stand, Divided We
Fall" Is the motto placed before every
union man, but lt ia sorry to state It
does not Beem to appeal to them.
They do not appear to realize the
deep meaning and vital Importance
that lt Is to every working man. They
should make lt their business to see
that every article brought to their
house or home should bear the union
label. The other day an Instance occurred where a driver called at a
house with bread, and the person
asked for the label. The driver immediately showed a label, and said
"There It Is." But the -person happened to know what the official union
label looked like, and so the driver
was turned down. It may be edded
that this driver was peddling bread
of a big acab outfit in this city. Now,
if every worklngman In Vancouver
would follow this method, and turn
the scabs down there would soon be
an organized body working under fair
conditions, and getting a living wags.
Trusting that all working men will
follow this plan.
The sixteenth annual ball of the
Sandon Miners' unton hospital waa
held tn the opera house at Sandon last
Tuesday evening, March 17th. A
special train was run from Rosebery,
Denver Siding and Throe ForkB for
the occasion. The affair was a big
success, a large attendance being
present.
CIGARMAKERS     1
Stogie Maker*—Blue Label Bowling
Team Isauea Challenge
"Bob" Craig, the seoretary of the
local clgarmakers, sent a man to
Prince Rupert this week to go to
work. Business there is Improving,
and as soon as a sufficient number of
cigarmakers are employed ln that city
a charter will be taken out, and the
new union will affiliate with the
Prince Rupert Trades and Labor
council, whloh, lt Is expected, will
happen very shortly.
As a result of the late conference
held at Washington, D.C, things look
good for an amalgamation of the
stogie makers with the International
ulgarmakers' union.
The Clgarmakers Blue Label bowling team comprise Geo. Wood (captain), F. J. Brandt, A. A. Reynolds, W.
A. Reynolds, Fred. Carey, and belong
to the Bende and Flanagan alley
league. This "skookum" quintette
were at the head of the league, but
struck hard luck—and fell down—only
to rise again. This team has a standing challenge to meet any "bowling
bunch" In this olty, composed entirely
of members of one union.
JUDGE MORRISON CALLS
PROCEEDINGS A FARCE
The Federatlonist has repeatedly urged that the proceedings at New Westminster
were a farce and this has now
received corroboration from
Justice Morrison. Addressing
tbe crown prosecutor, on the
eecond trial of James Balrd,
the learned Judge said: "What
is the use of forcing a farce on
us, ... I do not propose to
be made a party to a farce and
I Bay this.is a farce." He requested the prosecution to look
up the code saying that If
there was anything In the criminal code which permitted the
course asked for by the crown,
lt woulu be a prostitution ot
Justice. The jury cordially approved.
be a portent that better times are coming soon. One of the most Important
resolutions of the meeting was one
moved by Del. Estinghausen asking
that a committee be appointed to enquire Into the working of the city electrical department. Mr. Estinghausen charged that by-laws are being
violated, union men discriminated
against and partiality shown by the
city electrician. Delegate Trotter's
motion that the matter be brought, before tbe city council by the parliamentary committee was agreed to, the electrical workers being asked to make
definite statements. Vice-President
Pettlplece urged the delegates to see
that the members of their unions were
on the voters' list, and the council recommended that Messrs. Curnock, Bart,
ley, Walker, McEwen, Sully and Hoover be appointed as commissioners
under the Electoral Act. Delegate
Trotter gave some extracts from old
country newspapers regarding imml
gratlon, and called attention to the
"fake" news'regarding British Columbia circulated ln Oreat Britain. After
further routine business the meeting
adjourned at 9:30.
Only Graduating In Canada
Although the average editor of a
labor paper on thla continent has his
troubles, yet It would appear that the
position of editor of a labor Journal in
Germany Is much less Inviting. So
severe Is the censorship of the Ger
man labor press that the editors of
the Erfurt Workers' Journal have
spent nearly 10 yean In prison during the 26 years since the paper was
established tn addition to paying fines
and costs amounting to about $16,000.
As Arranged Between the
Counsel Several Miners
Pleaded Guilty
A BATCH   CONVICTED
Government   and   People
Heartily Tired of V
Costly Faroe
The crown haa apparently tired tt
the special assises at New Weetaeln-
ster and haa dropped the more sort-
ous charges against the mlnen, away
of whom hare pleaded guilty to the
minor count of unlawful aaeeably.
, Several causes hare contributed  to .
. this, not the leaat being the enonaon
cat to tho province. Up to now tto
coat has been over elSO.MO, and aa-
less the government stops proceedings thla-amount will be almoet to-
definitely extended. The coat le ecfll
running on to the extent of nearly
$1600 a day. In addition to this, tha
public Is seeing through the farce aad
tt la evident that the government to
watching the signs. The conservative
preaa of the province haa during the
week made suggestions—doubtless la-
spired—that thoee In prlion should
be liberated and the aaslaee ended. A
few daya will doubtless aee both
theee suggestions carried out
Laat Thursday Henry Martin waa
found guilty of unlawful assembly and
riot the evidence being oa the aame
llnea aa that In the other easee. Sentence waa reserved. On Friday James
Balrd, who waa oonvlcted a month
age with complicity In the troubles en
August llth WW charted with similar conduct on August nth. Defaaee
counael put forward a plea ot prior
jeopardy, which will hare to be Med
by a jury. Should the plea faU a
new Jury muat he aworn to try the
caae. The crown decided to withdraw
accused from trial for the preeent
Pat Mulgrew waa- In the afternoon
found guilty of unlawful assembly
and remanded for sentence. On Monday Robert Salter pleaded nitty—
the flnt one since the special aaslaee
opened—to unlawful aaaambly, the
mon serious oharge of roit betng
withdrawn. On Tueeday a scene
unique In the history of Canadian
courta was enacted. The mlnen were
arraigned In batches of from tour to
eighteen and pleaded guilty to' unlawful assembly, the crown withdrawing the mora serious ehargee.
Following an thoee whose plea was
accepted: Adolph Bagattln, Jack Ben-
askey, Oeorge Bramley, Joe, Burne,
Harkel, Alex. Hunter, Fred Marshall,
T. O'NeJU, Jack) Qulgley, Charles Rlee,
Robert Struthers, Robert Taylor, John
Vanger, Steve Zybschovlz, J, Guegan,
W. Gibson, Ben Millar, O. SchpynaU,
Geo. Toung, F. Parker, s. Connors,
John Dean, W. Hoy, J. Kerelgnskl F.
Rogen, D. Dalpolls. A. Monaldl, and
Thomas Cowler. They were allowed
out on continued bail. R. W. Smith
and James Hodgklnson, wbo refused
to plead guilty, were both found guilty, Smith on the usual two charges
and Hodgklnson on unlawful aaaambly only. Sentence waa reserved. A
stay of proceedings was entered in
the cases ot Thomaa Blakely, Peter'
Dnnerla, John Murdoch, Geo. Murray,
J Shlrwin, Jaa. Watson, William
Watson and Louis Neunthal. These
cases probably mark the virtual end
of the trials.
BU8INE8S AGENTS
Will Hold Weekly Meetinga In Labor
Temple During the Seaaen
It has been deemed advisable tor
business agents of the different onions to hold regular consultations
during the coming season. Therefore
a meeting will be held next Thuraday
morning at 9 o'clock ln the offlee of
the general seoretary of the Tradea
and Labor oouncll, Important business will come before the session.
Wring lta Neck
Customer—Here, waiter, waiter,
take this egg away, get It off the
table, quick. Walter—Tessir, yesslr,
what shall I do with It?. Customer
Do with lt? Do with It? Take lt out
and wring its neck.
B.C
E. R. REFUSES TO LISTEN TO OTTAWA
THE DEADLOCK SHOULD BE AVOIDED
Some weeks ago the street-railway employees In Vancouver were
faced with a serious contention between the B. C. E. R. and the union
on two Important questions. The principal one was that of dismissal
ot men on allegations of wrongdoing without due and proper proof,
the other affected the wages of several hundred men who were in
the employ of the company before the last sward of the conciliation
board. The men asked that the old board Bhould be reconstituted on
the ground that they would be the best Interpreters of their own intentions. This proposal was sent to the labor department at Ottawa
and was agreed to by the authorities. In fact tt would have been difficult for the department to have done otherwise—the suggestion
being so eminently sensible and one that evidenced the wish of the
men to be more than fair In their relations to the company. Tho
federal government asked the old board to accept reappointment and
give its Interpretation of the award. Jud&u Murphy and the other
members agreed to do so, but the B. C. E. R., feeling apparently that
they had no case, rejected this proposal. Their wish appears to be
that the dispute should be decided on technicalities and not on merit-
Such action shown that they do not wish to play fair but prefer to
invoke the aid of legal quibbles to help them out of the false position
they have placed themselves ln. The public, who are vitally Interested
should take cognizance of this. The men have trom the flrat asked
that the Intentions ot the original board should be carried out and
have offered to abide by such decision. In this connection lt must not
be forgotten that their appointee was In a minority on the board and
also that this board Is one appointed by parliament to mete out Justice. But the B. C. E. R. do not want that, they prefer their role ot
a huckster. They would prefer to snatch at any chance and knowing
they can't win they've decided to wrangle., This showns that the
men are confident of the Justice of their claims. J. D. McNIven, dominion fair wage officer, Is at present In touch with both parties and It Is
possible with his assistance a continuance of the preaent deadlock
may he avoided. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY..... MARCH 20, 1914
SCOTCH CLOTHING MOU3E, LB.
I   (Kdnnetlf Orant, Managing Director.)
Two Stores—
ao-as oobdota inm wan   n i
Carpentera' White  Duck  Overall!,
with 12 pocket., union labal 11.71
Man's Heavy Tweed Panta, union
label  11.00 to M.M
Wa aak for your patronage In our   ault   and   Overcoat   Departments, whan wa give value everytlme.
Garland Stoves and RangesS:z»»«
■    MADE AND USED BY UNION MEN FOR FIFTY YEARS
Capital..
THE CANADIAN BANK
OFCOMMERCL
,.$11,000,000        Rest..,
...112,800,000
Main Offices Corner Hastings and Qranvllle Streeta, Vancouver.
CITY BRANCHES
HASTINGS and CAMBIE...
BAST END	
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .....
.FAIRV1EW .
MOUNT PLEASANT .
KITSILANO .
LOCATION
......Cor. Haatinga ana Cambie streeta.
.....Cor. Fender and Main Streeta,
—.Cor. Flrat Avenue and Commercial Drive.
.Cor, Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
...Cor,. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
...Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL  ... .Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road,
Alao North Vanoouver Branoh, cor.   Lonedala  Ave.  and   Esplanade.
Ths only real Washable Wall Finish on
the market. You can strike matches on it.
Yes, then you can wash off the mark.
That's some test, eh?
IT IS MADE IN B.C.
BY aC WORKMEN
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria      Vancouver      Oalgary      Edmonton
BY GEORGE BARTLEY
Steamer Cardiganshire Arrives in Port with Nearly
1 8,000,000 Chinese Eggs
Will Be Held in Oold Storage and Gradually
Disposed Of
More Chinese eggs! These are not
the varieties that are buried in mud
for a few years and then looked on
as a delicacy, but they are eggs. At
least they are said to be. There are
many sorts ot eggs. First comes the
new-laid egg, then the fresh egg, then
ln gradations appear the cooking egg,
the electioneering egg, and then
comes "the egg," What visions of
antiquity are conjured up! How one's
mental eyes goes back Into the hoary
past and thinks of the egg! How
one has at tlmea wanted to wring its
neok! But enough, these are eggs ot
commerce. Perhaps, like the heathen
Chinee, they are dark and peculiar,
but still-they will be used for cull-
nary purposes. Nearly 8,000,000 of
them, too. If all the cackles could
be concentrated Into one loud, proud
strain of triumph how far could it he
heard? How many acres would the
resultant omelettes cover? How
many—but to pursue the subject is
in vain. It Is enough that 667,000
dozen eggs are now ln our midst aggregating 600 tons, and they have to
be attended to, and that without .delay. This week the royal mall liner
Cardiganshire arrived with nearly
8,000,000 eggs. This type of egg is
only about one Inch and a half in
length.
Paelfle Coast Market
With reference to this shipment one
person remarked, "It the -entire 7,992,-
981 eggs were dumped on the Pacific
coast market in-one day it would affect cold storage-prices so seriously
that chicken men would Iobo money
If their hens persisted ln laying. For
that one day at least the high cost bf
living would stand on Its head." The
Cardiganshire is equipped with refrigerator space commodious enough to
handle the 600 -tons without difficulty.
The shipment will be held in cold
storage and disposed of In accordance with market requirements, while
of the cold storage variety, the eggs
are guaranteed as comparatively
young. ,
TREE8, SHRUBS, PLANTS, ETC.
importation of All Nursery Stock
Prohibited by* Law
Gardeners and nurserymen ahould
take notice that' the Importation of
trebs, shrubs, plants and so forth Is
now prohibited by law. An amendment to the Destructive Jnaect and
Pest act, was passed by order-in-
councll last December anu came Into
effect on the first day of the present
month. By this amendment it is enacted that "the- Importation of all
nursery atock, Including trees, shrubs,
plants, vines, grafts; scions, cuttings
or buds, through tbe mails is prohibited, except greenhouse grown florists'
stook, cut flowers, herbaceous perennials and bedding plants, which will
be admitted provided that a detailed
atatement of the contents Is attached
to such parcels." - Local gardeners
will govern themselves accordingly.
the- Orpmgton
Although there are many changes
ln fashion, there la nothing throughout
the whole ot the feathered world to
beat the Orpington. As a general purpose fowl It stands alone, and whatever color is fancied lt can he had In
this variety. 'Host of tbem prove
splendid layers, and* the egg ia ot
good alee and a nice oolor for selling,
the Canadian housewife preferring a
brown .egg to a white, although there
is no actual benefit td be derived from
the color. In America the opposite is
the fact and a white egg la what all
breeders try to produce, hence their
craze for the Leghorn. But the Orpington is the best fowl for the small
breeder Who wants a few eggs and a
good table bird occasionally, tor
Whatever color he fancies.they all
make a big table fowl and a good
roast when properly fed. True, lt Is
rather large ln bone, but when a fowl
Is meant to be big and carry a big
frame there must be plenty of none,
otherwise the lege would be too weak
to carry the body, and then tbere
would be a trouble from this. All
these birds are very docile, and kept
in a four-foot fence will not run away
when anyone goes to look at them.
There Is something majestic about an
Orpington that you cannot flnd in
other breeds. They have alze and
feather, and a stately carriage not
seep ln any breed except the Cochin,
but the Orpington has a clean leg,
which Ib a great advantage on heavy,
dirty soils.
Enterprising Washington fruit
growers will erect a warehouse at
Huntingdon to aupply the Vancouver
market.
RENNIE'S
SEEDS 1*914
I—OUR CATALOGUE—|
Is larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. For *• yes" the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
and Farm Seeds, Plants and Bulbs. You
need it belore you decide what kinds to
plant.  Send lor your copy to-day.
W* RENNIE C°u_M
1138 Homer Street       VANCOUVER
.aleeatlmaavMataal aad Whelm
Civic Committee Holds Session to Decide on the
Amount Needed
Want Peddlers Checked —
Notice To Be Given Council to Amend Bylaw
Uohn McMillan, market manager,
expects the elty market, Main street
will do a larger business this year
than last. He estimates that the running expenses will he less, although
they are already on a rock-bottom
basis. The estimate for last year .was
(12,815.66, but the expenses.ran to
113,645.27 on account of permanent
Improvement tound necessary. The
market revenue last year was $16,736,-
67. The estimated cost to run the
market for thla year Is $12,608.20.
The markets and industries committee ot the olty council met last
Monday and considered the estimates
for 1914-15 and will report to the full
council next Monday. It was also decided to give notice of an amendment
to the trades license bylaw, so aa to
make lt possible to keep a oheck on
hawkers and peddlers. Only a nominal: fee .will be proposed. The object
Is not.to Increase the revenue, but to
compel the peddlers to take out a
license so they may be checked up.
It was reported that some of them
have been selling flsh and vegetables
not fit for consumption. The committee will make to the city council the
same recommendation aa Was made
by the -committees selected to name
an industrial commissioner for the
city. These committees represented
the city council, board of trade, manufacturers' association and industrial
bureau. . Out of twenty-seven applicants for the position, which will pay
1200 a month at the beginning, four
were finally selected for submission
to the counoll. The selection-was by
vote, and Oeorge C. B. Perry, a reporter, obtained the highest vote,
GROWING SPUD8
Mistake to Plant Farm In Potatoea
One Year and None Next.
"Fertilizing for maximum yields
and quality, with smaller /acreages
will Insure profits In potatoes. I am
convinced that potato growing may
develop Into the most profitable Industry we have," states C. E. Eckert.
manager of th'e Farmers' Cooperative
Exchange at Chilllwack, "Larger
yields, uniform seed varieties, better
quality, proper sorting and grading
and cooperative marketing are aome
ot the essentials to success. Our best
Highland potatoea rank well with the
Ashcrofts, but owing to improper
marketing and lack of the essentials
above named, our potatoes sell $10 a
ton under the Ashcrofts, making the
prlcea which we are receiving below
where'there is a profit to the grower.
It haa been proved to be a big mistake for growers to plant their whole
farm In potatoea one year, and nothing for tlie next two or three years,
but by planning a crop rotation which
will Include a few acres of choice
quality, maximum yields will be obtained and prices are not apt to sag-
below a level where there will be a
proflt to the grower."
CAL1FORNIAN  POTATOES
Ottawa Authorities Declare Quarantine to Take Effect at Once
News that a quarantine has been
declared to take effect at once by the
federal government against all potatoes from California- waa received on
Monday at the offloe ot the fruit inspector. ■ News had previously been
conveyed to Victoria to Chief Inspector Thomas Cunningham,: who from
his bed in St. Joseph's hospital had
kept up the campaign to secure the
quarantine order. The order prohibiting tlte importation of potatoes from
California la due to the reports that
the crop now being harvested ln Lower California Is badly infected -with
potato tuber worm, one of the most
devastating diseases which affect the
potato, family. -Not only would the
Infected potatoea prove costly and
wasteful to the housewife, but the Infection from the discarded portions
and the garbage heaps would place
the looal potato In great danger, The
worms turn Into pwths within a few
daya of hatching and would he able
to "hatch out fresh crops of worms
and moths hy the time the local crops
were ready for gathering. The State
of Washington had previously declared a quarantine against potatoes
from the sister state.
Eggs at Bed Rock Prices-
Price of Potatoes
Wffl-JUse
Apples Selling Slowly—No
More Local Supplies
—Current Prices
"The flowers that bloom ln the
spring" are now In. evidence on the
market Several consignments of
golden spur, carnations, sweet peas,
etc, being received from Vancouver
Inland.
New laid eggs are now within the
reach et the worklngman, as the very
choicest localB are being aold from
27 centa to 80 cents a dozen. Thla
price is pot likely to last long as the
large Arms will not start storing for
winter uie.
Potatoes are* now arriving in much
smaller quantities, and, as the dominion government haa placed an embargo on Callfornlan new potatoes, the
pripes will undoubtedly rise from
now on.
-Apples are selling slowly round last
week's prices, and as there are no
more local apples offering the probability Is that there will be a further
rise on the present stock.
Root vegetables are selling at last
week's prices while hay and straw is
also stationary.
THIS WEEK'S PRICES:
Applea
Royal Jenette, No. 1,
box         tf     2.B0
Royal Jenette, No. 2,
box        9    2.25
Ben    Davis,    No.    1,
box  ....:  «     9    J.00
Ben    Davis,    No.    2,
box
Cookers, box 	
Vegetable
Potatoes, sack  .....%   .80
Carrots, sack	
Turnips, sack  60
Parsnips, sack 	
Rhubarb, lb.  «	
Head Lettuoe, doz » 	
Cut Flowers
Sweet Peas, bunch '...
Carnations, dos.-..:.:—	
Eggs
Local new laid,' dos..... ...,....•
Wash., new laid, dos... 	
Poultry
Young hens, doz. ..110.00
Heavy hens, lb  ........
Pullets,  d°     S-0S
1.76
1.50
» | 1.00
» .75
t .76
> .86
» .10
I .to
i roe-
> ..so
) ' .80
i -..rr
I 112.00
Broilers, dos.
Ducks, doa. ...
    6.00
 j 10.00
Feed
....;...-.U4.oo
9   12.
9   >.
0   lt.
Hay, ton ...
Straw, bale
Oats, ton  -  .   ,
Wheat, ton  ..:..*. le
Bran, ton  ...'. 	
Shorts,  ton .—,  	
Beef
T-bone   and    Porterhouse steaks, lb	
Round steak, lb   ■
Pot roast, lb « u
Pork
Leg and loins, lb  	
Shoulder, lb 	
Chops, lb.  ...:	
Lamb
Less, lb H 	
Loins, lb  	
Fore quarters, lb..,	
Chops, loin, Ib ...
Chops, lb.	
Finest Looal Beef.
Best cuts, lb..... 	
Ribs, lb  ......    ,
Pot Roasts, lb	
Lamb, legs, lb,	
Lamb, loins, lb     v
Lamb, shoulders,-lb.	
Fork, legs, lb ' 	
Pork,  loins,  lb	
Pork, ahouldera, lb..;	
Sausages, lb. 	
Fresh Fleh.
Halibut, lb. „	
Salmon, two lba....     .25 -:
Una cod, lb.......	
Rock cod, lb .;...,  ..:.;.
Bad snapper, lb , 	
Solea, lb	
Smelts, two lba	
Herring, lb	
Whiting, lb. „_  ; .,
Skate, lb.     i
Smoked Fleh.
KlpperS, lb ;;...„ „.'-
Kippers, three1 lbs.  ,,....    I
-Bloaters, lb,	
Bloaters, three lbs.	
Halibut, lb	
filleted cod, lb	
Black cod, two lbs ,.
Eastern haddie, 2 lbs .'.
Kippered Salmon, lb...
I11S.00
I -40
I 28.00
I 80,00
I 28,00
P 80.00
.25
.20
,15
Shell Fleh.
.22
,16.
.22 tt.
.22
.20
.14
•:8*
.25
.20
.16,
.22'
;20
.14
.22
£
.12*
.10
.35
JO
.10
.10
.10
...25
.05
.10
.10
.10
.26
.10
.26
.16
.15
. .25
.26
.15
TO  ERECT COLD,STORAGE
Will Cost $260,000—Shipping of Chinese Eggs to Vancouver
According to E. Block, Who la registered at Hotel Vancouver, China
will become a decided factor ln commerce as an exporter of foodstuffs.
On that account he Is negotiating a
deal for the construction In this olty
of a cold storage plant and warehouse
to cost $250,000 for a Canadian-depot
of goods which hia company expects
to ship from the Orient Mr. Block,
on his arrival here recently, brought
wtth him over 2,000,000 Chinese eggs,
and ln the market ln Vancouver and
other Pacific coaat cities, found ready
use for the big consignment He Ib returning to Shanghai on the next
steamer to arrange for another large
shipment ot eggs, and to prepare for
steady shipments i of other Chinese
foodstuffs and Chinese-manufactured
goods generally.
The trees having come through the
winter ln splendid shape, pioneers of
the Okanagan valley and government
experts are predicting a bumper crop.
Many hundreds of aeres will be in*
Searing for the first time.
Crabs, two
Clama, lb. .
POULTRY BREEDERS
The B. C. Poultry association, desiring to encourage the aale of pro-
vlnclally bred stock, Issue a directory
of all breeders ot all kinds of breeds,
which should prove of the greatest
value both to buyers and. also to those
selling. This province can. *suppdy
earlier birds than any other part ot
Canada, and can wltb reason look for*
ward to a time when the east will
oome to the west for winning birds ln
shows and for the best of the utility
classes.
p^mm}
Spring Time is Planting Time
Love for beautiful gardens, making home surroundings attractive)
with flowers, shrubbery, shade and fruit trees, la a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of man by the Creator of the Universe,
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It ts the fullest and
make not only your own life better, but alao that of your fellow citizen who may not have the opportunities you have.
Now la the time to wake your selections, whan our prloea were
never lower, and our atock never better to meet the demands of the
cultivated aesthetic taatee.
In our atock of over $100,000.00, wa have choloe flowering plants,
evergreen and deciduous flowering end ornamental trees and ahrube In
great variety; holly, privet and laurel for badges, all sires; oholce
stook of 8hsde Trees, and an Immense stock of all tha most approved
verletlee of applea, pears, plums, cherries, and small fruit. The latter
(fruit treas) wa are offering at apodal low prloea to blear tha ground
for additional stock earning In.
 Dent .forget we oan meet your nesda better than you oan get
from stock grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suite 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West.
•PHONE: SEYMOUR,RU6.
Store, 2410 Oranvllle St. Phone: Bayvlew 1926
Greenhouaea and Nuraerlee at Roye, on B. C. E. Ry. Eburne Line,
about two milee south ef olty limits. .Phone: Eburne 4S.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORM IN VANCOUVER
40 Hastings St.      Phone Sey. Me        401 Gianllle St      Phone My. IW
TH Oranvllle et    Phone Sey. Mil
VICTORIA STOBB, (U VIEW ST.
OREBNKOUSBB
list Ave, and Main St. Vlotoria, ■. C. Hammond, i.e.
Long Distance Phona lt
Phono Fairmont TM.
We have them for jrour garden—everything that grows. Also a
full line of .field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, also grains. We also
have,a full line of fruit and ornamental,stock, fertilizers, agricultural
implements, spray pumps, spraying material, bee supplies and all
garden, requisites.     Catalogue for asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
5MKINGSWAY .  V    -. - VANCOUVER, B.C.
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains and thoroughly
tested as to quality and growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
aad THE FINEST LAWNS
CATALOGUE AND GUIDE FREE ON REQUEST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robson Stnet
'Vancouver, B.C.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
Tke Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, in-1
eluding SANDS* LEVfetS.FRlSCO MASONS' TAPE.
STALEVS PLANES,': LEVELS, etc.. STARRETTS
FINE TOOLS, SIMQN0S' SAWS. CORBIN LOCKS;
SETS.     -
PHONE SEYMOUR (34
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
PETHERSTONHAUOrt  £ CO.
The Old Established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
leje Rogers aids., Oranvllle Street
City. Phone Seymour I7M.
7 HASTINGS ST. WEST
Der 4 Matt Cab        Pailon A Chatal
Phon. Bar. 040        IMS CramrfleSt;
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Britlih Columbia
Around Vancouver grade dairy cows
are bringing $100 to $260 each according to quality and length ot lactation
period,
Ii Yonr Furniture Showing
Signi of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an eaay couob, a bookcase or rug, oan make a lot of
difference to one'a comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after jrlnter—buy here
where furniture la selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come In and aee the
new arrivals—they will bring
many hours' comfort to aome
lucky persons.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
»1 HASTINGS STREET WEST
PATH H HIE IL ROOM
B. G Electric Irons
The Cheapest
High Standard
Electric Iron
On the Market
By Far the Best
Electric Iron
On the Market
At Any Price
PRICE (to partlea using B. O. Electric current)
$3.00
Every Iran le Gueranteed by the Company for TEN YEARS.
Canallaad
Huliap Stmt
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 6000
1138 dandle St.
' Neei Davie OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNOL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
____*___* mH*_\	
-"■'•■"-". ■'■'■?"!■.'. -**,i'i'7"i!;lTlff^"^i!!-''<ly*-;.: --W
SIXTH YEAB.   No. 154.
THE NEW SUITS IN ALL THE SEASON'S LATEST STYLES ARE WAITING
YOUR SELECTION. THEY ARE MADE
OF IMPORTED TWEEDS, CHEVIOTS,
AND WORSTEDS. BEOAUSE OF THE
EXTRA CARE GIVEN TO THE FINISHING THESE SUITS WILL RETAIN
THEIR SHAPE TO THE END. IF YOU
ARE LOOKING FOR A NEW SPRING
SUIT AND WANfr THE BEST VALUE
obtainable you must see our
stock; -
DON'T FORGET TO kENTION THAT.
YOU SAW OUR AD. IN THE FEDERA^
TIONIST, THAT WILL BE THE MEANS
OF SECURING FOR YOU AN EXTRA
MEASURE OF CARE AND ATTENTION
Prices $15* to $35=!*
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
YANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 20,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
(^rttiT) *1*0PBfclgil
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
Mackay Smith. Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
E
Well Paid Labor Stimulates
Trade — Low Wages
Depress It.
Out the "Gordian Knot"—
Let the People Operate
the Mines
The present owners of the mines
did not put the coal ln the ground,
neither do they take It out! They delegate that Job to labor. - It there were
any creative Intent, the coal waa
atored beneath the earth's surface
for all the people. Irrespective of
oreatlve Intent the people have equal
natural rights to those coal deposits.
If flsh, bird or beast denied their kind
aooess to the natural bounties, without first paying them toll,! we would
be justified In assuming tbat those
creatures were as devoid of common
sense as is man. If all have equal
natural rights to the coal deposits,
none have the right to withhold them
from use. The highest title to land
in Oreat Britain is tenancy ln
simple to the crown. Canada inherits
her land system from Britain. The
reserved right ot tbe people to the
rental value of land muat be construed as a condition of every deed.
The power to tax comprehends the
power to destroy. Tbe rental value of
land may be appropriated by ths people through the power of taxation.
The province of British Columbia may
collect from the present possessors of
the ooal deposits their full rental value, ln which case the operators would
be obliged, for pecuniary reasons,
To Work the Mines
to their capacity or abandon them
and allow them to revert to the public. The people of the provlnolal
eoaat cities are confronted with a
coal famine, notwithstanding there are
Illimitable deposits at their doors, to
which they have equal rights of access with the present possessors.
These people are paying high prices
for Inferior foreign coal, while their
own deposits are withheld from use
and their own people are forbidden
the right to work them. This condition Is anomalous. It Is contrary fo
Justice, to reason, and to common
sense. The island miner receives 66
cents a ton for digging the coal. It la
produced on the surface at the pit-
mouth at a cost of $1 a ton. This
probably Includes interest on the capital Invested—In development of the
mine. Assuming that 20 centa represents the cost of operation In addition
to digging and the other 20 cents represents Interest on the Capital required to develop the deposit, this 20
cents would pay 6 per cent, dividend
on a capitalisation of 12,000,000, or
four per cent, on $3,000,000, on an output of 2,000 tons per day for 300 days
In the year.  Twenty centa then
la Ample Recompense
for the capital Invested. With the
mechanical appliances for loading and
unloading this coal now available, It
should be landed at any of the coast
cities at a cost ot 11.25 a ton, and
should be delivered to tbe consumer
for |2 a ton, instead of $8. These coal
deposits being the heritage of the living people of this political division
(B. 0.), these people should see that
tbey are kept' open foruse. If
operators and operatives cannot
agree as to terms and condltlona of wages, etc., the publlo
as a body should step ln and assume
control, either employing labor on
terms mutually agreeable, or taxing
tha deposits out of the hands of the
"dog ln the manger," and throwing
them open to any body of citlsens
who would pay their rental value to
Bociety, and keep them working. The
coal miners themselves are the most
capable body to do this. They do
the work in any case, while the parasites on society reap all the reward,
pocketing not only the rental value
which should go to society as a whole,
but a part of the just recompense of
labor, and mulcting the consumer besides. AU this Is the result of a
monopoly privilege conferred by soolety and revocable by society when lt
gets Its eyes open.
Took the Bull by the Home
When the ice pool ln Cincinnati shut
down their plants and locked out tbelr
employees, bringing suffering, disease
and death to the citizens, Mayor Hunt
took the bull by tbe horns." He used
the powers conferred upon him by
the people of his olty, seized the
plants, put the men back to work,
and relieved the suffering people.
If the people have power to take
possession of a business whose product la artificial and produced by
man, and rightfully his property, how
much more Justified would they be In
taking possession of a deposit, the
equal heritage ot all, from bountiful
nature. There are other coal deposits In British Columbia whloh are not
yet touched, There are millions of
acres of coal lands still unalienated,
the aoknowledged property of the
people of British Columbia. Tbe coal
miners' union, aa a corporate body,
could doubtless secure possession of
a good coal deposit. If the money
contributed by the international
unions to sustain thousands of strikers through a year's lockout were
used Instead to develop one ot these
deposits, the miners would hot be de-
B.  A.   LARGER
General Secretary-treasurer of the United
Garment Workera of America, with
headquarters at Rooms 111-12! Bible
House, New York, N. Y.
pendent on the forestailers of present
worked mines, but could employ
themselves, and their product would
be their wagea. They could double
their wagea and at the same time enable the people of the coaat cltlea to
secure their fuel at a price not exceeding 13 a ton.
Cut the "Gordian Knot"
If the plan above outlined waa put
Into effect, and manufacturers In Vancouver and other coast cities could
secure their fuel at $3 Instead of $8
a ton, would not that stimulate development and buslneas without reducing
the workers—the only necessary class
In society—to the condition of a dependent serf? Would not highly paid
labor stimulate business more than
poorly paid labor? Is there any man
ln any legitimate, business that readers service for service so obtuse as
to believe tbat hla business Is stimulated by poorly paid labor, and Injured by highly paid labor? To conclude: Let ua cut the "Gordian Knot,"
and quit acting like mental Imbeciles.
We have played the foot long enough,
Let ua demand in the name of the
people, that the eoal mines be opened
and worked to such capacity as to
supply the wants of tbe people. Let
us abolish the monopoly feature of
tbe situation and banish the parasite
from participation in the fruits of
labor.
COAST SHOREMEN
CONVENTION
FORIY
Delegates  Expected from
San Diego Northward
As Par As Nome
Local Union Will Publish
Pine Souvenir Book of
Proceedings
BY THE WAY
(By George Bartley)
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners'Union
The number of lighthouses ln Canada In 1911-12 waa 1,372, and that of
fog signals 289.
* .»   »
"The reason men don't fix their hair
so much as women, le that they
haven't ao much hair to fix."
. • • »
Out of the mouths of babeB and
sucklings—governmental party patronage Is so commonplace In thla province tbat achool children talk about
"dad and hla political pull."
* »   »
' The total value of all goods Imported into Canada from the United States
during the last fiscal year waa 1455,-
332,835, the total amount of duties paid
on same being 868,929,805.04.
«   •   #
"Aa to what may Issue when the
working classes win to. power, thoae
who enjoy speculation have every reason to speculate—but the concern of
the revolutionary aa such Is that the
working classes should win."
* •   •
The ballot of tbe Gnsworkers and
General Laborers union of Oreat Britain, required under tbe Trades Union
act, resulted recently ln an enormous
majority in favor of political action.
For political fund, 27,802; against,
4,339—majority* 23,463.
»   »   «
The latest report on the Alaska reindeer service shows that on June
1912, the total number of reindeer waa
38,476, distributed among 54 herds. Of
these animals 62.5 per cent, are owned
by 633 natives; 9.8 per cent, by the
United States, and 16 per cent by
Lapps. At an average value of 125 a
head, the reindeer owned by tbe natives represent a capital of 1601,700.
The Income of the natives from the
reindeer Industry during the fiscal
year, exclusive of the value of meat
and bides used by the natives themselves, was 144,885.04. The total number of natives affected by the reindeer
enterprise is estimated at about 6,600.
* *   *
"The world Is already burdened
with people who think they are very
radical and even better than that,
very wise; because they have exchanged an old god for a new. Whereaa there Is just one radicalism, there
Is Just one wisdom, one thing that
makes this age superior to all others,
and opens the door for the wings of
hope, and that Is, that intelligence
has been set free. For those who
have courage and self-dependence It
Is possible now, for the flrat time In
history, to dismiss the Absolute in
whatever form it may appear, and
use all things, and all ideas too, as
Instruments and lights merely, for the
responsible endeavors of man."
* *   •
' Hon.J.D.Hazen has been so harassed
since be assumed office by applicants for positions holding strong political claims, that he has discharged
a veritable army of employees for being active political workers, "I do
not think, lt an edifying spectacle to
see men drawing public salaries and
obtaining their livelihood through pub
lie service taking part ln politics,"
said Mr. Hazen, "nor do I think lt a
desirable thing." To remedy the state
of affairs under which political parties appoint to ofllce men who are active suppdrters of the party in power,
he said that "that can only be changed when we come down to saying that
there shall be open competition for
every ofllce, a competitive examination
by Independent authorities, thus eliminating patronage from politics." No
doubt most politicians will put in with
this idea. In lieu of "patronage" committees to provide the "sinews of war,"
the government perhaps has a scheme
to establish an "honors committee,'
following the example of Great Britain,
A Canadian peerage with titles to be
bought at so much per head would be
decidedly unique.
It la expected that the official call
will shortly be Issued for the seventh
annual convention of the Paelfle dlatrlct ot the International Longshoremen's association, to be held In Vancouver, B.C. Delegates are expected
to be present from locale from San
Diego to Cape Nome, Alaska, which
district includes about fifty organizations, and haa a membership ot 10,000.
There are expected to be between alx-
ty and seventy delegates preeent The
convention win be called for tile first
Monday In Hay, and the Ml huelnesa
of the meeting Is the need tor industrial solidarity In the ranka of organised labor. Thla gathering will,be
International ln makeup, will be
watched with much lntereat hy unionists ln thla elty and province, aa the
main queatlon coming before the meet-
Wg—that of Industrial solidarity—Is
arottatng much Interest In the light of
reeent events ln the city.
A Notable Event
Another thing that will make tbe
convention a notable one from the
view point of the waterfront man will
be the presence of tbe delegatee trom
the riggers and stevedores ot San
Francisoo, which organisation eaat In
lte* lot With the longshoremen laat
August, This union la one of the oldest organised bodies of men on tbe
Pacific coast who have to do with
ships and shipping, and haa about
3,(00 members on its rolls. International President P. V, O'Connor, ot
Buffalo, la expected at the opening of
the convention, and will no doubt give
valuable aid In View of hla large experience on the great lakes and Atlantic seaboard, ln settling questions that
will undoubtedly crop up. The local
union will also publish a Una souvenir
book of the proceedings, and would
Ilk* to hear from business agents and
others of all unfair Arms to organlied
labor, aa the organisation doee not
propose to ask these people for business In the way of advertisements In
the proposed souvenir book.
SOCIALIST UNITY
Corn-
Manifesto Recently lesued to
radee In Great Britain
The international socialist bureau
haa Issued a lengthy manifesto to the
socialists of Great Britain, In wblch
It la pointed out that that country haa
presented to the World the spectacle
ot a nation where capitalist evolution haa taken place more rapidly than
anywhere else. The hope waa Justified that socialism would follow a
similar evolution. But unfortunately, it haa turned out tbat regrettable
differences have arisen, and even today tt seems that In certain quarters
there la more Inclination to cultivate
a sectarian spirit than to march In
common agreement against the common enemy. Such a mistaken policy
mUat not continue. The consequences would be ruinous for tbe class-
conscious proletariat, for more and
more socialists are finding out that all
over the world socialism only playa
a part worthy of Itself when It le
solidly Invited. At the congress of
Vienna, British socialism, the manifesto statea, must speak with one
voice, they must give to the social-
let world a new example of discipline In order to enable them to continue elsewhere the work of consolidation and harmony, on which depends
the ultimate triumph of the movement
LOCAL PRESSMEN
New Scale Sanctioned—Will Hili a
Dance In Near Future
At the last meeting of the local
pressmen the new wage scale for the
press assistants was sanctioned. To
raise Increased expenditures the dues
have been Increased, The union decided to hold a dance In the near future to help In raising funds to aid ln
aendlng a delegate to the convention
at Rogersvllle, Tenn., next June. The
result of the recent elections for International officers resulted In Qeorge
Berry, the present Incumbent of the
president's offlce, being returned by
a handsome majority. Secretary-treas
urer J. C. Orr being elected by acclamation. There are sixteen members
out of work, with many others on
short time.
Benk Clerka Form Union
A Toronto dispatch says that the
Associated Bank Clerks of Canada organized. Recently a meeting waa
held there which was attended by 55
local bank clerks. J. P. Buchlem la I
preaident and W. W. Sydney secretary.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER.
Shingle Weavers, Sawmill
Workers and Woodsmen
Alt interested
in organization are requested to at
once call at Room 217, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
OEO.  HEATHERTON
A. F. ol L. Oeneral Organiser
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, IT*,;
Men's New .Spring Suits
Here to Sell at flgfl 00
Twenty dollars is the price that the men who buys
clothing, keenly usually expects to buy as good a suit
as he wants to wear. As one man confessed and we
thought he put the case very aptly—the extra value
you get for the price you pay in excess of $20.00 does
not amount to much—usually it is only a label inside
the pocket. Well, these 120.00 suits are calculated to
stand the keenest examination. The cloth is good, the
style good, the making good, the patterns up-to-date,
and the value is absolutely the best we know. Lots of
choice among plain browns, greys and navy, also mix-
tures and stripes.
The Display of New Wallpapers
in our Wallpaper Department demonstrates, if it
shows anything at all, a set purpose to harmonize the
color and pattern schemes of the papers with the
drapings, rug schemes and loose cover motifs. Please
do not think there is nothing for the individual,to do
but to choose the papers that look best independently of how they will weave into the entire fabric; you
must choose with care. On the other hand, such magnificent possibilities are opened up to the woman of
taste that we cannot conceive how any such person can
delay her inspection of these new Spring Papers. Price,
usually such a controlling factor in the accomplishment of pleasing results, takes a second or worse place,
for there are papers .here at 15 cents a roll that have
pleased people that we know do not hesitate to spend
large sums on wallpapers. Perhaps this may sound a
little extravagant to you, but, your own eyes and fingers will attest the truth of our remarks. Whether
you want wallpapers immediately or hot you are welcome any time to look over our showing.
"Pa-rex" Waahable Water
Paint—In 20 shades;
suitable for any. room.
No. 5 ............ 60c.
No. 10 ...'! ...ItM
/
"Alabaatlna»-A dry powder, ready tor use tn
bold water; 21 tints;
,Pkt  Ate.
"Mureeco" — Superior to
kalaomlneaj In 17 beautiful tints and white
PW.  4Sc
Boys* Denim Overalls at 50c.
A good strong garment made to protect a boy's clothes
while at play. Has bib, suspenders and two pockets;
In black or blue, for agea 2 yeara to 10. Price 60c.
Seed Potatoes
Spancer'a
(early).
Kidney    Roae
Spancer'a Blue Ball (2nd
early).
Duchasa of Cornwall, Car-
man'e No. 1.
Sutton's Abundance, Ashcroft.
Beauty of Hebron, Ninety-
fold.
The Fietorws fti, «,_.
100 lba. for 12.60
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Heintzman&Co.
PIANOS apd
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLD ON REASONABLE TERMS
IY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Haslingi Street Weit.
Stanfield's Underwear
Blue Label, Suil $3.00     Red Label, Suil $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suil $3.00
Headlight Overalls of all kinds
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Cordon St.. Weit
t&S-CUSHION
CDHPRKJES UrlCER
HUUGULScrrECTAKI
TOW
i-cuJHionwppoRTSjmnn
4 OIVUQH H11S ItOlUNf fUtfi
I STOVES and RANGES I
II EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN §
Mount Pleasant headquarten (or Carpenten' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447.
2337 Main Street PAQE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY  .MARCH SO, 1114
;      THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and -Reserve,  .. $8,700,000
8E branches in Canada
A general banking business transacted,        f
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch   '
150 HA8TINQS BTREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1869
Paid-up Capital ■ ■ -t 11,100,00
Reserve         12,600,000
Total Assets 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE.
POSITS IN OUH
SjAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
business will be welcome be It large or
email
\iFOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER  .
THE
INCORPORATED
I85S
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve |11,176,071
|  Savings Accounts
Barings accounts are conduotre
to provident living. In our
Savings Department they may
be opened In the name of one
Individual or In the names of
two or more jointly, with- the
privilege for each of depositing
or withdrawing money aa desired. The Bank of Toronto accepts Savings Accounts, tores-
pectlve of the amount - ot the
Initial deposit
Assets .,
Deposits
841,000,000
Main Office—
488 HASTINGS BT. WEST
(Near Rlcharda)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinge and Carrall tta.
New Westminster      '
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONET   TO   LOAN. ON   IMPROVED    OITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
Mir HASTINGS 8T. WE8T,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
PnbUehed every Fridaj morning br tht
a. O. radantloalst, UI
R. Farm. Pettlplece -   -
Manager
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, praaldant:
Christian Siverts, vlce-prealdent; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety. aecretary-
treaaurer. and R. P. Pettlplece.
Offloa i Boom 817, Labor Temple.
Tal. Exchange Bar. 74S5.
Advertising Manager   -     M. C. Shrader
Subscription- 11.10 per year; In Vancouver
City. 12.00: to unions subscribing
in a body, 11.00.
'Unity of Labor; tba bops of tbe world.''
FRIDAY MARCH 20, 1014
even employers loathe. And Mr.
Bowser not only shows them that
such is his belief but he "rubs lt in."
UNLAWFUL ASSEMBLY
Ab bo many citizens of this province have recently been convicted on
charges ot unlawful assembly it
might be of Interest to enquire Vhat
such a charge really ia. That It
throws no stigma on a man's cbarac
ter, that It Involves no moral turpitude,
la, of course, self-evident. If the strlet
Interpretation of the law be enforced
lt would appear that practically the
whole population of.the colliery districts might flnd themselves liable
to terms of imprisonment. The criminal code defines an unlawful assembly as "an assembly of three or more
persons who, with Intent to cnrry out
any common purpose, assemble la
such a manner or so conduct themselves when assembled as to oause
persons ln the neighborhood of suoh
assembly to fear, on reasonable
grounds, that the persons ao assembled will disturb the peace tumul-
tuously. ... or provoke others to
disturb the peace." It will thus be
seen that the offence charged rests
on Intention aa to what the three or
more persona may do, and of thla Intention the special police, mine owners and strike-breakers are to be, and
have been the Judges. Although
many accused have strenuously asserted their Innocence and testified
they were present for the sole purpose ol Inducing others to refrain
from acts of violence and were striving to continue a state of law and
order, yet they have been convicted.
In thla conneotlon it should he noted
that the same chapter of the criminal
code defines a riot aa an unlawful aaaambly whieh haa begun to disturb
the peaee. In the great majority of
casea tried the Jury refused to bring
In verdicts of guilty on riot charges,
but convicted the prisoners on
charges of unlawful assembly only.
They, were arrested at a time when
feeling ran high and when passion
blinded the reason of the authorities.
They have been Imprisoned to satisfy
the egotism and cnpldfty of the membera bf the' government. There la
little or' no doubt that the men now
In Jail will very shortly be restored
to liberty, public opinion Is Insistent
upon such a procedure. Publlo opinion Ib also finding ont the uttermost
depths to which British Columbia haa
flunk In Its mediaeval efforts to deal
with the struggle for liberty and decent condltlona of life, In the meantime It must be remembered that
these men who have been convicted
of thla heinous crime of unlawful assembly have committed no offence
against any code of ethics and are
guilty of no action that leavea a stain
upon their character.
IFOR EXPERT   \
Watch and Jewelery
REPAIRING
CO TO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
143 Halting! Street West
DIXON & MURRAY
Jobbing
Offlee aad Baoyi
WHENORDERINGASUIT
Bee that
thla Unloa Label
la Sewed
In the
Pockets.
Itatanda
for all
that
Union
Labor
Stands
tor.
EXIT MILITIA
The Federatlonist has persistently
protested against the use of mllltla ln
Industrial disputes. In common with
all progressive Journals lt deprecates
using militiamen aa aids to strikebreaking, a role they have ao constantly played ln this country. •; The
workers of British Columbia have had
sufficient evidenoe ot this during the
present industrial troubles on Vancouver island. Now, however, it
would appear that the McBride-Bow-
ser government wish to get rid of
this Incubus,. but find lt difficult.
While It Is true these would-be warriors have never for one moment
been In danger of their own hides,
yet the attorney-general says they
took themselves too seriously. They
undoubtedly did, but ln this they were
aided and abetted by Mr. Bowser and
his pap-fed press. Then they were
"gallant heroes," now they are incumbrances. Then they were so Imbued
with martial ardor that a handful of
school-children drilling with wooden
swords perturbed their patriotic
breasts, how, aad to relate, the attorney-general saya he has no further use for them. A few short months
ago they were forming themselves ln
battle array and gallantly attacking
a sohoolhouse, now they are told that
their room Is preferable to their
company and their tails are down accordingly. 'Twas ever thus. Juat so
long aa lt suited the provincial'government to use them as tools for the
benefit of themselves and their business associates, Just so long were
they flattered and cajoled to the full
bent. When the public began to aek
pertinent questions as to who waa
paying the piper, and In any caae
what lt was all for, then the government decided the mllltla must go. It
Is a fitting reward. Perhaps In the
future men will look at this aspect
military service   before signing
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS
One fact that stands out prominently in the'labor movement at present is the ever-increasing number of
women entering the different vocations. Whatever may be the general
Idea as to their political status, lt
cannot be dented that women are an
important factor ln the industrial life
of to-day. The time has now gone by
when women can be told that their
only place is the home. Social and
economic pressure has forced them
outside the home and compelled them
to earn a livelihood in factories, offices and the thousand and one occupations that present themselves.
When women first began working for
wages—apart from the domestic
circle—they only looked upon suoh
work aa a makeshift, a temporary arrangement to eke things out. They
never considered it aa a serious part
of their lives. Now, however, they
have become a permanent part of tbe
Industrial and social organisation of
the community, and tt Is to the vital
Interest of labor that their better
ment and progress should be augmented. This can only be done by
organisation, thoae already organised
must help the unorganized, the latter
muat decrease, the former Increase.
In thla province. there are many
women workers but few unlona. In
the varied and many occupations in
which they work, the' low wages, long
hours and general environment all
tend to efface their Individuality and
consequently lessen their power of
asserting and forcing their fundamental right to have a voice as to the
conditions under which they work.
The time Ib now at hand for this to
be changed. Employen are too prone
to exploit women's labor for their
Own pecuniary lntereat Development
ot transportation and the increasing
use of machinery have centralized Industries, making women dependent
upon their wagea and thus becoming
a further menace to organized lahor.
|No one knows better than the trade
union man the danger of unorganized
women, and no one ahould be more
ready to give a helping hand. It conditions ot Industry for the workera
are more nearly to satisfy their
wants, It the barometer of social Ute
la to move steadily upward then
women must organize. In unions
where women are placed on the same
footing as men there Ib no trouble.
They do the same work and receive
the "same wages aa men. They are
just as eager and Insistent as men ln
asserting and enforcing the claims of
the worker, This is exactly as lt
should be, There are many thousands
of women workers In this province
who should be organized. A mere
handful at present have their unions,
but the majority have not yet realized themselveB as a genuine part of
Industrial life. Unless women organize, the whole mass of workera,
both men and women, will Buffer.
Women themselves must consider this
problem ln all seriousness and forget
the false pride and false standards
which have hitherto held them back.
Men must look at the position aa It
Is to-day equally seriously and do
everything In their power to bring
about and foster organization of working women. In thla connection It la
gratifying to note that the executive
of the American Federation of Labor
have decided to levy an assessment of
one cent on all membera of affiliated
unions, this money to be used In organizing women wage-earners. Such
a movement makes for human welfare
and muat succeed.
quently hla duty to be a help thereunto and not a hindrance.
From January 1, 1908, to December
31, 1910, 1,284,720 acres of provincial
lands were soli", to 144 syndicates, and
none of these acquired less than ten
square miles, or 6,400 acres.
Can the wildest imagination conjure up an excuse for a social system
that keeps honest Industrious workers ln poverty while scheming politicians wallow ln wealth?"
Fancy Bowser talking about "leniency" for the Imprisoned miners,
after two are' dead, two more ln the
hospital and dozens on the verge ot
a phyelcal and mental break-down.
Rot!
Labor organisations tn the Philli-
pines have formed a federation and
will probably Join the A. F. of L. Political action will also be taken by tbe
new body to Improve working condltlona.
The only thing socialists propose to
take away from the capitalists is the
power they now have of depriving
others of the right to live, tbe right
to work, the right of food, shelter and
clothes.
In the future society the private
ownership of natural resources by Individuals will be regarded with the
same distaste-with which we today
regard ownership of one man by another.—Marx.
Can you conceive of a union man,
earning union wages, ln a union shop,
spending his money for anything else-|
but union-made products, or at least
demanding the - union label at any
and all times? .
We all know that war Is made by
capitalists and by certain financiers
who manipulate the stock market.
War is engineered by them and the
poor soldier baa to step ln and do the
work.—Col. Hon. Sam Hughes.
Good morning!
vestlgated"?
Have you been "In-
Hunger   has no
knows no law.
conscience,   and
ONWARD
CHRISTIAN       i
NATIONS
Onward Christian nations,
Making evermore
Costly preparations
For murdering by War
Battleships, Torpedoes,
Armor, Guns and Shells;
Anything for slaying foes
Th^ Promoter Bells.
Newspapen for lying
When the truth costs dear;
Fools to do the dying,
Patriots to oheer.
Rulers, Priests and Preachers,
Hypocrites galore,
Praying to The Prince of Peaee
For Victory In War.
—WILL HERFORD.
REFLECTIONS OF
THE STENOGRAPHER
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED
ll.QO A MONTH
C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention ln January. Executive officers, 1114-16: President, A. Watchman; vloe-presldents, W.
F. Dunn, H. J. MoEwen, Geo. Hardy, J.
W. Oray, H. Kundson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. ' 8.
Welle, Box 1538, vlotoria, B. C.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meets first and third Thursdays.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, president; 3. H. McVety, vlce-prealdent; Oeo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Mln H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Mlsa P. Brisbane, statistician: sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnook, F.
Knowles, W. B, Trotter, truatees.
LABOB TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Dlreotora; Fred A. Hoover, J. tt
McVety. Jamea Brown, Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell. J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing director. J. H. McVety, Room til.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA—Vanoouver aad
vicinity. Branch meats lat and Ird Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir aad
Homer at, room 205. Robert C. Sampson, Pres.,- 747 Dunlevy ava.; Joseph 0). .
Lyon, Fin. Sec, ml Orant at; Ten
Smith, Beo, See, Its Broadway waat
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUNCIL—Meeta Ind Monday In month,
President, Geo. Mowat; aeoretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box 00.
of
aWay their freedom, tt Is about time
they ceased to delude-, themselves
with the Idea that they will see active
service while patrolling a atrlke area,
and that they will be gallant wanton.
Quite the reverse la the case. The
work they have been performing on
the Island haa been that of herding
strikebreakers—a type of men that
If you owned the job you would not
have to hunt and beg for lt.
Stupidity comes high, but lt wasn't
Bowser's own money anyway,
Profit is the amount the worker
pays for the privilege of earning his
own wages.
Anything to head off the publlo demand for a nal Investigation Into the
real cause of the strike.
During the past four years overdue
Interest of land-grabbers and specula-
ton amounts to 12,1130,000.
Each succeeding Industrial "panic"
develops within itself germs of Its
own solution—a revolution.
Aa aoon as the mlnen began digging Into the preserves of Sin Bill
and Dan a halt waa called by Sir
Diok.
Col. HaU failed to stampede the
Hon, Col. Sam. And the miners are
still Intact, save for the bungling of
a few strikebreakers.
The governmental farce on Vancouver Island Is drawing to a close. The
next act will be staged by the memben of the U. M. W. of A.
Ignorance, In one word, among the
propertyleBS masses enables the propertied classes to use for the subjection of—their slaves.—William Morris,
Clubbing the unemployed Is but
haatenlng the death knell of a social
system that produoes suoh absurdities—In a world filled with plenty for
all
Every member of a union la a debtor to his unton inasmuch as he profits by that.membership.   It is conse-
"I suppose the City ot Nanalmo
will eventually have to foot the bill."
—Attorney-general Bowser. Which
meana that there is a third party to
the mlnen' atrlke on Vancouver
island, and one that will be heard
from as the daya go by.
I affirm lt aa my conviction that
class laws placing capital above labor
are more dangerous at thla hour than
chattel alavery In the days of Its
haughtiest supremacy. Labor ts
prior to and above capital, and deserves muoh higher consideration.—
Abraham Lincoln.
"The man who carries a union card
he does not respect, or who makes no
effort to get othen to Join his union,
or who stays away from the meetings
of hla union without a good reaaon,
or who shirks any duty he owea his
union, or who buys non-union goods
when he can get the union kind, la as
useless to hla union as a goose on an
ostrich fapn."
While parliament deserves all the
contempt which the worker haa
showered upon It, on the other hand
It Is difficult to deny that the worklngman deserves the contempt that
parliament has had for him. He got the
parliament he voted for. When the
workers think right they will vote
right and then they will get a right
parliament.   Start thinking.
"The worken have no money because their wages are atopped; their
wages are stopped because the factory
Is shut down; the faotory la shut
down because there Is no market for
Its product; there la no market for
Its product because the worken are
unable to buy; the worken are unable to buy because they have no
money. That la. a panic or the
wages system on a dead centre.
Making up for poor wages, hy establishing a system of old age pensions, Is simply evading the problem,
and widening the growing class distinction.. In a land where production
Is free, where the land la not held hy
privileged monopoly, old age pensions
should be unnecessary, But the privileged Interests wtll not get oft the
backs of the worken, so long as tbey
are encouraged to stay on.—Ottawa
Citizen.
A Montreal mayoralty .candidate
suggests that elections be held on
Sundays In Canada. "There Is no
better time to cast a vote than when
he (or she?) Is a free agent and on a
day when one ts Inclined to take a
serious view of things." The Idea Is
not a new one, being already ln practice In France and Switzerland, and
such a system might well be adopted
as an alternative to a general holiday, which would Interfere with profit-making. "The better the day, the
better the deed."
The Indictments agalnat Max Bait-
man and Art Young, editor and artist
of "The Masses," tt socialist monthly
of New Tork olty, will be dismissed.
This was the announcement given out
by District Attorney Train. Young
and Eastman were oharged with libeling the Associated Press. They had
secured a great mass of evidence to
prove the Associated Press had suppressed, and distorted news ln a great
number of cases. It Is thought the
Associated Press feared to have this
evidence made public.
.  , Please find my renewal for
the little Fed  It Improves
with   every   issue. —From   Sandon,
B.C.
Here's four* new names and a renewal of my own sub. for another
year, for which I enclose 17.50."—A
Victoria enthusiast. i
Over 700 new namea have been ad.
ded to The Fed.'s mailing list ln the
last two weeka, That's going some.
What are you doing?
. . Can't you make The Fed.
a dally? That's what we need in this
province; a paper that sticks with us
when we need It,"—A Riondel, B. C,
miner.
"The Fed. has certainly put up a
plucky and vigorous flght for the
miners and we'll remember lt when
we return to the mines, aB membera
of the U. M, W. of A."—A Ladysmith
coal miner.
. That market page has saved
us quite a bit of money, . , , Never
knew one could buy farm produce so
much cheaper at the city market until,
you added that feature a few weeks
ago. Success to your efforts."—Richards Btreet reader.
"I read with pleasure and Interest
your weekly market reports aB I can
thoroughly rely upon their being correct. Another thing is Imperative, if
workingmen ever expect to get better
value for their money, they must buy
their produce direct from the producers'—Housekeeper, Steveston.
"As food Is necessary for the individual, so la a live labor paper to
solve the riddle of tbe great social
problem. I hope every Unionist ln
this province will be on your subscription list. The editorials of The
Federatlonist have the right ring and
alone are worth the price of. subscription."—Ex-alderman, Vancouver.
"Enclosed please flnd post office or
der for six subscriptions to The Federatlonist. Would say -I have for
many yeara patronized the labor preas
and that I know of no better work-
Ingmen's paper on the continent. The
great service you have rendered the
minera on Btj-ike on Vancouver Island
should be ample proof that the labor
movement cannot advance without a
robust labor paper."—L. Sharpe, olty.
"The workingmen of British Columbia, bo far aa the support ot a
first-class labor newspaper Is .concerned, are better off than any other
province. It seems to me that all
labor organizations should subscribe
ln a body for The Federatlonist Merchants pay for advertisements because they have goods for sale, and
under present social conditions the
working class must advertise and
criticise through the labor press themselves against the encroachments of
capital ln the labor market"—Mechanic, New Weatminster.
BROTHERHOOD     OF     CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Looal No. 117—Meets
flnt and third Monday of eaoh month, S
p. m. Exeoutlve oommlttee meets every
Friday S p. m, President, Ed. Meek, recording aeoretary. Chu. Soott SOS Labor
Temple; flnanolal secretary and business
agent, J, Bohurman, 80S Labor Temple.
BAKERS'  AND CONFECTIONERS LO-
j> CAL No.  41—Meets aec
ond and fourth Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. Preeldent,
H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding seoretary, R. J.
Adams; bualneaa agent, J.
Black, Room 210, Labor
Tempii
PAINTERS', PAPSBHANOBRS' AND
Deeorators', Local IM—Meet every
Thursday, 7.M p.m. Praaldant Skene
Thomson; flnanolal secretary, 1, Freckelton, Sll Seymour strset; recording sscretary, George Powell, MM Fourth ave.
weat. Business agent, James Train,
room SOS, Labor Temple.
BARBERS'   LOCAL,   NO.   110—MEETS
seoond and fourth Thursdays. S:I0
i.m. Preaident, 3. W. Green; recorder, C.
-.   -«...,„  owui  eve.
Hours: ll tol; S to t am.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 471—OF-
flee Boom 20S Labor Temple.   Meata
flrst Sunday of eaoh month.   President
F. F. Lavlgne} flnanolal seoretary, Geo.
W. Curnock, Room MS, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' Altt> MaS6nS', NA 1
—Meeta. every Tueeday, I p.m., Room
sis. .     y.
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION No.
105—Meets third Tuesday In every
month. In room 206, Labor Temple; Preaident, F. J. Milne; vice-president, Wm.
Bushman; secretary, George Mowat, BIB
Dunlevy avenue; secretary-treasurer, H.
Perry,'1130 Tenth avenue east.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
„. „o  1M_
s™31 "i"fc "'■"  imru nonaays, S p. m.
President, F. Barclay.SM Cordova Bast;
gj Anisrwa, Vancouver Lodge No.
"* idaya
Meets flrat and third Mondays,
President, F. Barclay, 388 Cordova Hal
seoretary, A. Fraaer, 1181 Howe street
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 887-Meets
flrst Tuesday eaoh month,, 8 p.m.
President, Walter Hoaklna; vlce-prealdent, F. 3. Brandt: secretary, Robert 3.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, 8
W. Johnson.
COOKB, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meats flrst Friday tn eaoh
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple, W. E.
Walker buafnea representative. Offloe:
Room 202, Labor Temple. Houn: I a.m.
to 10.80; 1 p.m. to 2.80 and 8 p.m. to 8.00
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice., Phona Bey: 8414
In "Free" America
The American Sheet and Tlnplate
company at Pittsburgh have ordered
their employees to withdraw from the
Moose, Elks, Eagles,-Owls and similar fratenral aocleties. Six thousand
men are affected, and lt looks aa
though a strong fight would he put
up.
To Organize Women
The Newspaper Solicitors' Union of
San Francisco was the, first organization to pay Its assessment to the
American Federation of Labor toward
the work of organizing -the women
wage earners of the United States and
Canada. At last meeting of the executive counoll of the A. F. of L. lt
was decided to levy an assessment of
one cent on all membera of unions
affiliated with the A. F. of L., this
money to be used in organizing women
wage earners.
Typo. President Dead.
Archibald Bates Collins, president
of Bakerefleld (Cal.) Typographical
union, No. 439, died on March 5th. The
Immediate cause of death was blood
poisoning.
Herrit't; ae'oratary-bwfnese^aaVnt,' C.
 "  " "or Temple.
wB.i.„,     .™oiB,y.pM,nWI    B.
Burkhart, a Room _20S, Ubor
COMMERCIAL TELEGRAPHERS
Britlah Columbia Division, c. P. System, Divlalon No. 1—Meets 11:80 a.m.
third Sunday In month, Room 884. Looal
ohalrman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 482,
Vanoouver. Looal secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 481, Van-
couver.	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
818—Meets Room 801 every Monday
8 p. m. President, Dave Fink; vice-president, M. Sander: recording aecreury,
Roy Blgar, Labor Temple; flnanclal aeoretary and business agent. W. F. Dunn,
Room 287, Labor Temple.
MUSICIANS'   MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Unlod, Local No. 148. AF. of M.—
Meeta seoond Sunday of. eaoh month,
rooms 29-80, Williams Bldg., 418 Oranvllle atreet Preaident, J. Bowyer;
vice-president, F. Ettglieh: aeoretary,
H. J. Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTBRNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 88—
Meeta flrat and third Wednesday, O'Brien
HaU, 8 p.m. President G. Dean; corresponding aeoretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal aeoretary, D. Scott: treasurer, I, Tyson; bualneaa agent Joe Hampton. Phone
Sey. 1S14.
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branoh—Meeta aecond Tuesday, 8:88
p.m. President, J. Marshall: corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1847;
flnanolal seoretary, K McKensle.
STEBOTYPRnS' AND BLECTROTTP-
era' Union, No. 88, of Vaneouvar
and Vlotoria—Meets seoond Wedneaday
of eaoh month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple.
President, Chas. Bayley: recording aeeretary, Chris Homewood, 848 lttb Ava.
Eaat.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employeea, Pioneer Division No, 181
—Meets Labor Temple, sscond and
fourth Wedneadaya at 2 p.m., and flnt
and third Wednesdaya, 8 p.m. President
Adam Taylor: recording, eecretary,
Albert V. Lofting, 8888 Trinity Street
?hone Highland 1873; flnanolal secretary.
'red. A. Hoover. 3408 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS. INTBRNATION-
al Looal 887—Meets every Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 384, Labor Temple
Financial   aeoretary,    ~    —
Room 818.
B.    Prendergaat
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal), Looal No. 178—Meetinga
held flrat Tueaday in eaoh month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund: recording aeoretary, C. McDonald, Box 608: flnanolal
aeoretary, K. Pateraon, P. o. Box BM.
TYPOGRAPHICAL  UNION   NO.   388—
Meete laat Sunday each month. 8
p.m.   President R. P. Pettlplece;  vlce-
?resident, W. S. Metsger, aeeretary-.
reaaurer, R. H. Neelands, P. O. Box M.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES
Local No. 118—Meete aecond Sunday
of eaoh month at Room 284, Labor Temple. Preaident H. Spears; recording saoretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver	
NBW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
831 (Inside Men)—MeeU flnt and
third Mondaya of each month. Room SOB,
8 p.m. President H. P. McCoy; recording secretary. Geo. Albera: business
agent F. L, Estinghausen, Room 807.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—MeeU every second
and fourth Wednesday at.8 p. m. tn Labor
Hail. Preaident, D. S. Cameron; flnanolal
secretary, H. Glbb: general secretary. W.
B. Maiden. P. O. .Box tit.  Tbe public Is
Invited to attend.	
PLUMBERS' AND 8TBAMFITTBR8 Local 486—Meets every aecond and
fourth Friday of month in Labor Hall,
7.80 p. m. President, D. Webster: seoreUry, A. MeLaren.    P.O. Box 868, New
Westmlnater, B. C.	
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
penters, Looal Unton Ko. 1888—MeeU
every Monday, 8 p. m„ Labor Temple,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh street
President M. C. Schmendt: seoretary, A.
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westmln-
ster, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784-MBBTSIN
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
cornier Seventh stret and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of eaoh month, ai
1.80 p. m. Preaident, F. 8. Hunt: aeeretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
LONOSHOl
ASf--
.   'S'   INTERNATIONAL
(ON,    No.    S8xE3-Heets
Friday evening, 148 Alexander
atreet. Praaldant P. Peel; eecreUry,
Geo. Thomas.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meeta flrst and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 781 Johnaton street
at 8 p. m. President, George Dykeman;
secretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box 303,
Victoria, B.C.
MACHINISTS, NO. 1!8—MEETS BEC~
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. m.
President A. R. Towler: recording aeoretary, J. Brookes; flnanolal secreUry, J. H.
MoVety.
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners—MeeU every Tuesday,
8 p.m.. at Labor hall, 731 Johnaton St.
President, A. Watchman; recording secretary. n<wv  T.   n«t.»«.««. ».«-.    -	
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 838, I.A.T.8.E.—Meets every second Sunday of eaeh month, Labor Temple, S p. m. Preaident A. O. Hansen;
secretary-treasurer, O. R. Hamilton; bualneaa agent H. I. Hugg. Offloa, Room 188,
Loo Bldg,   Tel. Sey. 8MB. 	
IS*'«™ .*■ ■"""'"■nan; nuslne
and flnanclal aeoretary. w A
eon. Box 838,
WANTED—A few reliable trade union-
UU, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for  The   'Ted.     *""
commission!
Temple.
Apply   Room"
Liberal
tit   Labor
Time Changes r
Tbat a bill haa passed the house of
representatives excluding from the
shelter of the United Statea immigrants guilty of violence ln a political
revolution, Is a grave sign for those
who think that our country waa founded upon the principal of human liberty. It must seem to them that the
thing most precious to us is dying out
of our hearts. But to those who think
lt was human liberty hut the liberty
of property-owners against kings and
nobles, upon whloh our country was
founded, the sign Is not so grave. The
love of liberty Is growing, and the
torch of revolution Is more and more
menacing these property owners themselves as kings and nobles, and that la
why their representatives ln Congress
are less eager to weloome that torch
from over tbe seas. There Is something here that lt can kindle.—The
Masses.'
Fed. Advertiser's Offer
W. J. Pendray A Sons, Limited, offer
a prize of 3)25 to the person who sends
them what they consider the most
suitable pen and Ink aketch of a swan,
10 Inches high, for advertising purposes. Drawings must be on paper
15 x 18 inches and have the name and
address of sender on the back. Closing
date, Monday, March 23, 1914..    *#*
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS.
tp.daltl.ei
Whole Wheat Bread
.   Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakes.
Wa Dae Ualon Tint.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES/PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks aad Lunehea
All Goods Fresh Dally.
Yet. Bey. 7104.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSB
Printers of B. C. Federationist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
1 and Homer. Phone Sey. 4490
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper ln
Canada. Price SO centa per
year; ln cluba of four, 25 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVILLE, P.Q.
KTMBBRLEY MINERS' UNION, No. 100,
Western Federation ot Minera—MeeU
Sunday evenings ln Union Hall. President,  W.   Fleming;   aecretary-treaaurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. C.     	
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 3388, V. H. W. ot A.—Meets Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m.     President
Sam Guthrie: aeoretary, Dunoan McKensle, Ladysmlth, B.C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
A.—MeeU every Monday at 7.30 p. m.
In the Athletic Club, Chapel street,   Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   LOCAL   UNION,    No.
2288, U. M. W. of A.—Meeta every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall.
President, Jos. Naylor; secretary, James
Smith, Box 84, Cumberland, B. C.
TRAIL    MILL    AND    SMELTEBMEN'S
Union, No. 106, W. F. ot M.—Meet)
every Monday at 7.30 p.m.    President
F. W. Pen-in; seoretary, Frank   Camp- .
bell, Box 36, Trail, B, C.
GET   ACQUAINTED   WITH   HIM
WHO?
THE WESTERN COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magaslne,
breathing'the spirit of our Great
Weat. Emanuel Julius and Chester M. Wright Bditora. |1.00 a
rear; alngle coplea, 10 oenU. M3
New High St, Los Angelea, Cal.
E. BURNS & CO.
13S CORDOVA 8T. B,
HARDWARE,   FURNITURE  AND
SECOND-HAND   DEALER
Goodi uld on Commluion. Stoves
and Tools our Specialty
Phone Sey. 1679.
Berry Bros.
Agenti (oi
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full  Una  ot  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
Do You Have Your
PRINTING
Done in Vancouver?
If you have the above label on
your printed matter It will be
an absolute guarantee that It
waa made In the elty.
VICTORIA, B. C.
^. iniuciii) «.   woiuiiiiian; recording «,«.-
tary, Geo. L. Dykeman; bualneaa   agent
„_   .—   —    .    p^|Br
. MINERS' UNIONS
SANDON    MINERS'    UNION,    No.    II,
Western Federation of Miners—Meeta
every  Saturday   In   the Miners'  Union
hall.   Address all communications to the |
Seoretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
DEMOCRATIC. PARTY—Public meetings In Dominion Theatre, Oranvllle St,
Sunday evenings. Seoretary, J. Adams,
Room 804, Labor Temple.
SYNOPSIS   OP  COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and ln a portion of the Province
of Britlah Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of tl an acre. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlstriot In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must bt
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and ln unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
, staked by the applicant himself,
- Each application must be accompanied'
1 by a fee of $5„ which will, be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghta
are not being operated, such returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—30090.
^^KSi^
Of America JEt**
anting SIMM Hm.IS.tTt.IQ ISO FRIDAY .MARCH UD, 1914
TBE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.   •
The New Fancy Waists Are Here From Paris
These waists were personally selected by our representative, on his recent visit to the French
Capital. Tliat the models are French is apparent
at first sight—the materials, designs and exquisite
little touches of trimming at once marks them as
being imported. It would be a very difficult mat-,
ter to describe these waists in detail and impossible in the space available here. We will not attempt description, but would ask that you visit
the department where you can really appreciate
the charm that these Parisian waists possess. See
these new French models to-morrow and take particular note to the prices which demonstrate the
advantages of our purchasing direct.
LIMITtD
575. Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
WE ARE
SOCIALISTS
Because we believe in equal treatment for all.
Whether your purchase amounts to dollars, nickels or dimes
you obtain the same EQUAL care, individual attention and consideration if you deal with us.
FAMILY SHOE STORES
823 GRANVILLE STREET
ud at Cedar Cottage
Look for the lAbel.
FRANK NEWTON.
We keep the largest and moat
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prloea which cannot he .duplicated.
Everything Is to he found here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada'a Snap Speciallat
104 and 10t CORDOVA ST. W.
THE' MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE  STORE   IS  THE   SPOT  FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
Thia la a gift that will be appreciated In any part ol the world.
Tastefully bound In three bindings.   Cloth, (1.60; Ooae Calf, IsMO;
Burnt Leather, £.71.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
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for ihe office
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largest users of office equipment
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Dressing Robes and House Coats
We are ehowlng a beautiful line of Bouae Coats in Wool, Silk and Velvet:
also Dressing Bobee In Wool.   All sises from M to tl.
PRICES OF HOUSE COATS RANOI FROM 15.00 to WM
DRRSSIND ROBES FROM 17 to SIS
These make handsome Christmaa gifts for Huiband, Son or Friends.
Call and Inspect our atook.   By paying a deposit we will lay one aalde for
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MEN'S HATS ONLY 5
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
CLOSE ORGANIZATION
IN
Process  of  Centralisation
Not Tet Beached
Culmination
Powers and Privileges Possessed by the Oreat
'. Trusts
T. Ai RICKERT
Preeldent United Garment Workers   of
America, with headquartera at   New
Tork, N. y.  .
At this time of appropriation of
public lands (better known aa land-
grabbing), distribution of subsidies
to the favored few and the rapidly
growing concentration of Industrial
concerns the issue of a volume entitled the "History ot Canadian
Wealth," by Gustavus Myers, Is of
more than passing interest. The following preface explains the aoope
and alma of the work.
The rapid concentration of wealth
in Canada la no mere fancy. Already,
lt la estimated, less than fifty men control $4,000,000,000, or more than one-
third of Canada's material wealth aa
expressed in rallwaya, banks, factories, mlhea, land and other properties
and resources. To say that thla amall
group of Individuals control ao vaat
a wealth and the agenclea of lta production does not Imply that they own
lt all. Between ownership and con
trol there la a difference, yet the reverse of that commonly auppoaed. By
meana of their control of financial
markets and distributive systems, a
small number of men may effectively
control sources of wealth which still
may not remain under Individual ownership, aa witness the caae of the
farms, of which x control farmera
throughout Canada are bitterly complaining. Also lt Is not necessary
for magnates to own all of the atock
of railroads, banks, factories, and
mines; much of that ownership maybe
distributed among amall shareholders,
yet by their predominantly large holdings of stock, and through their power
of directorship, those magnates can
and do control those diversified, and
often financially Interconnected,
sources of wealth.
Formation of Trusts
The process of centralisation of
wealth has been steadily going on for
nearly thirty-five years. The removal
of unrestricted competition was flrst
evidenced ln the case of the rallwaya
of Canada. Beginning It about the
year 1879, a considerable number of
smaller and formerly Independent
rallwaya (some of which had already
amalgamated) were abaorbed by the
large systems such aa the Grand
Trunk railway, and later the Canadian
Pacific railway, and other rallwaya.
Ot more than 140 separate and privately owned railways chartered and
constructed at different times, a large
number are now integral parte, either
by purchase or by lease*; of the .main
and'great railway systems in Canada.
The highly centralized character of
the Canadian banks la well known; the
branches of the Important banks extend over an Immense territory;
twenty-six of these institutions have
2,888 branches; the Royal Bank alone
has 338branches, and the Bank of
Commerce 367. Perhaps nowheje in
the world can be found.so Intensive
a degree of close' organisation as
among the bank interests in Canada.
In the United States there are no less
than 18,000 banking Institutions, of
which about 6,000 are under federal
charters, the remainder under state
laws. While a small group of financial
Industrial magnates exercise a preponderating control over the large hanks,
and in turn practically away many of
tbe small banka ln the United States,
and thereby concentrate In themselves
the powers of a financial trust, still
the control there Is nothing like, In
compact centralisation, that existing
ln Canada. The Immense capacity
of this concentration ln controlling the
finances, and every sphere of activity
dependent upon finance, la ao obvious
that it requires no explanation. To
these ramifications of power Ib added
another huge power possessed by the
Canadian banks. This Is their privilege, allowed by law, of puttifig out
enormous quantities of their privately-
issued money, or, lh other words, hank
notes—a power far exceeding even the
great power held by banks ln other
countries.
Rapid Growth of Mergers
Of the rapidity of concentration of
Industrial concerns in Canada much
less Is generally known. From January, 1909, to January, 1913, there were
66 Industrial mergers or amalgamations which absorbed 248 Individual
companies. The total capitalisation
of 206 of these individual companies
waa about $167,000:000; this amount
waa Increased with the amalgamating
process. The authorised capitalization, Including bonds, of these 66 Industrial mergers was almost $457,000,-
000, or, to be precise, 1466,938,266.
Many of tbe large individual companies thus absorbed were themselves
the outgrowth of previous combinations. Aside from the consideration
of native Canadian.capital, the amount of British capital put Into Canada has been stupendous. In 1911,
Sir George Palsh, one of tha editors of
the   London Statist,   estimated that
£372,641,000 of British capital had
gone to Canada, chiefly In the form
of investments; of that sum £223,-
740,000 was 'represented by investments In Canadian railways. Since
1911, at least £120,000,000 more of
British capital has been placed ln
Canada. The total of British capital
in Canada" Is.i therefore, more than
$2,000,000,000. f Capital ln Canada
from various continental countries ot
Europe Is computed at about (140,000,
000.   Of the (600,000 ot United States
CANADAATA6LANCE
IN BRIEF N
Interesting Labor Items
From Alt Over the
Dominion
Condensed From the Exchanges and Special
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing,. Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
capital active ln Canada, (180,000,000
la represented in 200 factorlea whieh,
to a great extent, are branches of American trusts.
Dangers of Centralisation
Thla process of centralisation is, Ills needless to say, atlll continuing and
has by no meana reached lta culmination. Economic forces are more
powerful than atatute laws, particularly ao, seeing that what la called the
machinery of government la administered at all tlmea either directly by
the beneficiaries or by the represen-
tatlves of those ruling forces, no matter by what political name they may
be pleased to call themselves, In such
an era, with fundamental economic
questions—that Is to say, problems of
existence itself—pressing harder and
harder upon the. attention ot those
that produce the wealth, auch a work
aa thla la essential as a meana of diffusing information. Since the control of ao vaat an aggregation of
wealth is centred In so few hands, the
questions of whence came these over
awlngly great private fortunes and of
the evolution of this centralised
wealth become of paramount lntereat.
What was the origin of so much of
these mighty masses of capital? What
were their particular sources? By
what meana waa this Immense
material wealth extracted, by what
methods possessed. To give a vital
survey of these developments ia the
purpose of tills work. Necessarily,
the Investigation takes us hack to
remote times, for the aggregations
of wealth that we see today are not
In essence a sudden appearance but
are the result of cumulative methods,
processes and transactions extending
through centuries.   .  V_
Progression of Wealth
It will be Been that from the earliest
searchlngs for wealth ln Canada to
the present time there has been a
vital, definite connection, the developments of each auccesslve period bearing a close relevancy to those preceding. From primitive powers conferred,
and from fortunes amassed ln fur
trading, land and commerce, came the
wealth often invested later ln mercantile establishments, land companies,
banka, railway -projects, mines and
factories; and all for these pyramid'-
cally reproduced atlll other accumulations of wealth progressively In-
vested and reinvested. Did we not
trace thla wealth to lta primary
sources, and give a continuous depletion of Its development, the narrative
would be headless, unfinished and disconnected, and leave some of the
most Important facts enshrouded ln
mystery. Although long ago It waa
recognized that they who control the
meana by which a dependent class
must live, control the livelihood and
conditions of that class, yet It Is not
inordinately astonishing that thus far
no economic work tracing the sources
of these accumulations of private
wealth ln Canada has been heretofore
published. The reasons for tbls
deficiency are not obscure. One
reason Is that the general attention
haa,hitherto been focussed on other
subjects and Issues, Ignoring the economic factors, and all-Important significance of which was not adequately
understood. With the growth of general Intelligence and the accompanying-great pressure of economic considerations, this understanding haa
been Intensified, and Is becoming still
more so.
personalities Merely Accidental
Another reason has been that the
sources of Information such as his.
torles, upon which the general public
has had to depend for knowledge,
have been absurdly and erroneously
made to revolve around personalities
Instead of social and economic forces.
Various arid volumes bave come
bulkily from the presses, but thoy
either give no account of the currents
of these successive economic forces, or
they but Incidentally mention only a
few, vague. Isolated. facta. In the
mistaken aim to present personalities
aa tbe determiners of events, these
writers have far subordinated or Ignored the realities, unconscious of the
fact that such personalities are but
the creatures of distinct and often
sharply contesting economic forces.
Hence It Is that to get the underlying,
authentic facts as much as possible,
at least, from the available original
sources, it has been necessary to dig
laboriously Into the Canadian archives, and tediously explore great numbers of official documents, Great as
Is the mass of facts, it can be well
understood that the entire range of
facts covering all the multitude of
transactions of centuries can never be
given ln full. Many of them never
found their way into official documents, and In other cases Important
governmental papers and returns,
embodying certain definite valuable
facts and connecting links, were never
published.
Mass of Information
, Nevertheless, a myriad of documents have been accessible to anyone animated by an aim to make a
sincere quest for the facts. That
many, if not most of them, have never
heretofore been consulted is a striking commentary upon the character
of conventional, so-called history.
Studiously or mlslnformlngly avoiding
the basic facts, and Interpreting human progress and activities by the
light of such superficialities, these
products (whatever their motive) had
the result of conserving outworn traditions and perpetuating fallacious
conceptions. Expanding Intelligence,
however, Is not content with narratives obsolete In treatment, misleading In substance and spiritless ln
character. No longer la the diverting,
obscuring or glossing of the facts accepted; actualities, not appearances,
are demanded. Having a knowledge
of the fundamental facts we can he
prepared to reject old standards and
New Wage Scale
Quebec Typographical union haa
successfully negotiated a new scale,
whloh weat Into effect on the flrat of
March.
Montreal Clarke Organise
A local of the Retail Gierke' Inter
national union waa formed In Montreal recently, through the assistance
ot O. R. Brunet, who la acting as A. T.
of L. organiser ln the Montreal district.
.   Complains Labor Oasette '
Claiming that Medicine Hat has
been misrepresented In several ways
In former Issues of the Labor Gazette,
the board of trade of that elty took
the matter up at a recent meeting,
and will at once take action to flnd
ont the Cause.
New Socialist Hall
Work waa,commenced on Tueeday
on the excavation for the socialist
hall, Nanalmo, BC. The proposed
building will contain a club room for
the members of tbe party, with reading rooms, lounging room, eto. The
alte Is a good one.
Changed Their Mlnda
The Toronto Power company and
the Westinghouse company notified
their carpenten tbat wages would be
reduced 6 cents an hour. Several conferences resulted In a withdrawal of
the announcement and unionists In
Niagara Falls, N. T., are using thla
Incident among the unorganized to
prove the value of trade unionism.
Calgary Charitlea
The associated oharities of Calgary
provided for 201 adults and 271 children during February. At present an
average of 80 men are being cared for
ln the bunk house. Rev. McKUlop
says that many applications are now
coming In for farm hands and there
are nearly aa many Idle men In want
during the present month. -
Five Thousand at Work
A Montreal dispatch states that the
Grand Trunk Pacific reporta that
work in .the mountain section la proceeding day and night now with
gangs of men now aggregating 6,000
ln number. There is a gap ot aome
91 miles to be filled up. Thla will be
accomplished, lt Is believed, by the
end of April, . *
Weekly Half-holiday
Commencing with March 11 the
atorea of Mission City, B. C, will close
on Wednesday afternoons beginning
at 11.80. W. W. Elliott Is father of
the movement and all the storekeepers signed an agreement to try the
plan for alx months, and If it is satisfactory, the business men will continue lt.
Earl Park Passes Away
Earl Park, aged 20, of Cranbrook,
B. C, who met with an accident while
working on a logging train >t Wyn-
cliffe on Thursday, died of his Injur
les on Saturday. He was a member
of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and also of the Knighta of
Pythias.
Labor Temple Clear of Debt
The Labor Temple company of Toronto, Ont., announcea that the labor
temple ln that city Is, now free from
debt, and the home of Toronto trade
unionists Is free of all encumbrances.
Wagea have been Increased and many
Improvements have been made during the past year, and the ledger
shows a balance on the right side of
(4,622.09.
Union Wage Clause
A -letter was read from the Tradea
and Labor council at a recent meeting of the Edmonton, Alta., school
board, asking that lt adopt the union
wage clause and schedule approved
by the city council. Mr. Blake, who
represented the Bricklayers' union,
urged the board to accept this schedule and stated: "It is no use cramming children with knowledge If they
are not well fed and- clothed; you
cannot expect them to be If you do
not help us to secure a living wage."
Presbytery and Minera
At the meeting of the Presbytery of
Macleod, held at Lethbrldge last
week, the following resolutions were
passed and ordered to be forwarded
to the provincial government of British Columbia, and the dominion house
of commons. "That the PreBbytery
have observed with deep regret the,
long continuance of the unhappy dispute In the coal mining industry on
Vancouver Island with its disastrous
consequences. They regret also that
neither the provincial nor the dominion governments have appeared to be
able or willing to deal with lt ln such
a manner as to convince the people
that they have been anxious to see
justice done. And they further place
upon record their conviction that the
interests of the men engaged in the
beneficial and dangerous occupation
of coalmining should be watched over
with special care."
forms and unsatisfactory systems. We
can then also rightly comprehend the
nature of the processes that have resulted ln conditions as we know them,
and can directly apply that knowledge toward the obliteration of all
that stands in the way of the full, unshackled social, Industrial and Intellectual development of mankind.
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNA^Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Straet,
one block west of Court House.
Use of Modern Cha pelandFuneral
Parlors free to all patrons
>:am om.'a aai'+a,,
THI INRI TB1I HRVH TOtf WlU,
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AT 33* OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
POR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THI WINDOW SHAM
*    DEPARTMENT
We purpose making window shades to your own measuretHBts.
aad guarantee the work to be first-class In every particular.     -      t
OPAQUE SHADS CLOTH ON HARTSHORN* SPRING ROLLERS
Patterns of material* displayed In department, second goer. The whole
continent knows tha quality of HARTSHORN'S SPRINO ROLLERS.
. It'a necessary to bring your measurements.  W* do no Stting.  We Mir
guarantee eorreotnese In executing your orders.
Thla la an exceptional offer and will prove a saving to all heusahildsra
with window shades to bur-Dent lit this opportunity gaiety any maaaai
meaaure up the window with-tha kroken ehaae new.
CHOOSE VOUR MATERIALS PROM DEPARTMENT PATTBRNsV-
Bollands, Imported Lancaster, Daly aad Korea's Faeries* Shads Came.
Opaque Window Shudes jf**^!*-!*	
^Hartahorn spring   sea £;::::::
Rollers Reg. *L» for...:......
1
,,4
1
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Best Flour, 49-lb.
sacks     IMS
Rolled Oats, (reth milled
8 lbs.       .25
Butter. Finest Creamery.
3 lbs.     1.00
Cora Starch. Johnsons,
3 packets      .25
Lard,   Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each........      .35
Hami, by the whole beat
perlb.	
Bacon, machine diced,
perlb...	
Ens,   absolutely   local
new laid, per dog....
Apples, Wineiaps, 5 lbs.
Castile Soap. 35c. bars.
Ham-mo   Hud Cleanlier, per tin .......
M
M
.55
.25
.20
.05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. S301, SS02
1275 ORANVILLE STREET
HOMEOPATH1STS
We carry a full atock of
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.      \
LET US SUPPLY YOU <
MARETT & REID
187 HASTINGS ST. W.
WHITE STAR
DOMINION!
CAN0OI6N1
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New S.S, "Laurentlc" (15,000 tone), new 8.8. "Megantle."
Flrat Class, SSS.M Second Class, S53.75 Third Claaa, MtSO
ONE CLASS (B.) CABIN SERVICE
Expreaa S.S. "Teutonic" (Twin screw Steamers) 8.8. "Canada"
682 feet long.(S50.00 and up). SU feet long (3rd class SS1J9 and up)
WHITE STAR LINE
BOSTON * QUEENSTOWN LIVERPOOL
ONE CI.A8S (II.) CABIN SERVICE
'S.S. "Arable" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamera) 8.8. "Cymric"
16,000 tons, 600 feet long (Rate SSS.7S)    13,000 tons, IM ft. long (Rata SS1.H)
S1S-2nd AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
ffm -  '    ' agWWJ ToolSpedabt
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware aad
Spertnf Coeds
111 Hastings St, W.
I0I-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Haitingi Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operate! by the latest, moit scientific and painleu methods
Specialiat in Crown, Bridge, Plate end Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A M. TO 6 P. M.
LET IT RAIN
LET IT HAIL
Let It Snow if it will,
Royal Crown is Supreme
And is easily still
The Best Sosp in the West
for the Laundry, and
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
CLEANSES-PURIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY... MARCH 10, 1»14
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER PAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent COTTINGHAM k BEATTY
Guests Proprietors
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room. European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.   Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
GAUER k DUHARBQ, Preotiatera
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The lading Hotel.':: Auto Parties catered to.
European and and. American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
—■————^^^^^^
Corner Fourth Street and River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.  L.  WALLINQFORD,   Manager
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKING THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU  HELP YOUR  FELLOW  UNION   MEN  AND   BESIDES, YOU   GET
THE VERY  BEST VALUE  FOR  YOUR  MONEY
EVERY UNION
HOTEL WILL
DISPLAY THIS
SIGN IN THE
BAR.
LOOK FOR IT.
■I/vqpgsg ■mropeaa wma, turn wm mat if
••     ••       HI 11 HI.     "      ••    Up-to-Date    Flrat-Claee    Dining
ae      ••       llVflaUli      ea      ..       'Boom and Cafe In CoeneeOta
C0NNAUGHT R^&s&*s
HAY A DEPTFORD, Propa.
PHON*** ggTMOUR TOM-TOM.
Room—Elevator  Servlcea; _	
and Shower Bathe oa all Floors.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Keen $3 par week
D.
SMS HASTINGS STREET WEST
■aa S3 aat weeki _        . I Teleakeae, Het aai
UpT Good Service Throughout     cm w.t« i. .«k
F. Paaaeaera, Pre. I ' »•*••
VANCOUVER, B. C.
GO WITH THE BUNCH T°THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout Hot ana Cold Water In Bverr Room
Haaat Oafa aaa (MU Boom ea ttu BaaUo Coast la OomsaSaea
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. B. HARSH, Manager.
Bateai »1.00 and np   Bpaotal Weekly Bavaa.
anenu nam lar-ias ttAtsttmaa at
DAI1UIFR HsTTFI European—Kates il per day.
KAlllldlx. n.\J A EjL- lBtKilaaB cafe ln connection.
Rooms rented by Day or Week. Special rates to permanent guests.
Flretolass Liquors and Cigars, Every comfort and convenience.
JOHN SINDAR, Prop. Corner Cordova gnd Carrall 8treeta.
PENDER HOTEL >«HS»'
mom  *■■■*»>■*>  mrmnk%a~Wm  mT—-9 AklAB 11 KO DAP DftV And Ud.
STATE OF SANITARY
IN
o  Recognised  Universal
Standards of Plumbing
and Ventilation
Multiplicity of Laws and
By-laws Adopted by
Cities and Towns
John W. Bruce, of Toronto, formerly
of this city, general organizer for the
plumbers and steamfltters, regarding
the aubject of the present chaotic
atate of sanitary law ln Canada, and
the need of Its unification, In a recent address used these words: "In
the Dominion of Canada we have no
recognised universal standards
garding sanitary plumbing and ventilation, but are governed by multiplicity of lawa and by-laws, adopted by
the governing bodies of our cities and
towns and enforced according to their
own Interpretation." Mr. Bruce emphasized the Importance of sanitary
plumbing ln lta relation to public
health. He compared Montreal wtth
a death rate of 20 per thousand, with
Toronto, which haa a death-rate of
12.8, and attributed the difference ln
large part to the more lu enforcement of sanitary regulations In the
former.
Insufficient Accommodation
In many hotels, he said, there were
not enough conveniences, neither
were they kept properly clean. In
apartment houses, conservation of
apace waa such an Important Item
that ventilation was sadly neglected.
He blamed speculative building for
the unsatisfactory condition tn many
private houses. The speculative build,
er considered outside appearance
more than proper sanitation. In-
apectlon was very necessary ln
worklngmen's houses, as these men
were less able to protect themselves
agalnat the negligence of unscrupulous builders. A great' need, very
much overlooked In Canada, waa
public comfort stations. These should
be ereoted not merely ln parks and
pleaaure resorts, but In the busiest
portions of onr cities, where the need
was greatest.
Publlo Conveniences
As it was, hotels and public buildings had to bear a burden that the
cities themselves should shoulder,
with the result that the conveniences
ln these places. were sadly overtaxed. Sanitary drinking fountains
should also be provided at public expense. In conclusion, Mr. Bruce
pointed out that satisfactory conditions would never obtain So long as
each city or town had Its own regulations. Plumbers travelling from one
place to another had to familiarise
themselves with new examlnattona In
every place. Moreover dwellers ln
rural districts, beyond' the reach of
urban influence, were not protected by
any legal standard. The solution, he
believed, could only be found In a
dominion law, setting up a uniform
standard from coast to coaat, leaving
each municipality free to supplement
such standard by by-laws designed to
secure adaptation to special local conditions.
New Organisation
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: This
morning a new organisation sprung
Into being. It Is called the Victoria
Unemployed association. For a number of months now the unemployed
situation here has been chronic. There
are i,400 men registered at the civic
labor bureau, and while the elty
council keep promising to start work,
the men without the Job atlll keep
searching for the "Invisible," There
are, ln addition, something like 1,800
skilled workers Idle. Of course, we are
not the only ones tor Vancouver haa
also. Its quota of sidewalk polishers.
At this time when workers are passing through these experiences, It Is
well to use the psychological moment
to get aome Ideas of organisation Into
the unorganized. Inasmuch aa the
unemployed are ever on the Increase,
It Is well that an organisation be
formed. Better for them to aet aa an
organization than aa a mob. ■
JOHN L. MARTIN,
Sec. of the Victoria Unemployed Asso.
Labor Hall, Victoria, March 11,1914.
I consider MINARD'S LINIMENT
the BEST Liniment ln use.
I got my foot badly Jammed lately.'
I bathed lt well with MINARD'S LIN
IMENT, and lt was as well aa ever
next day.
Tours very truly,
t. o. Mcmullen,
FaeaaSey. 221 D., er Night
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Ricbarda St.       Vaaeaaver, B. C.
per Day and Up.
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL '-___j_^SSSSL-
■anaaomely mrnlBhed BBS Seymour Bt. Centrally Looatad
CLARENCE HOTEL
Career PEWPER aad SEYMOUR STREETS,	
SEABOI.D ft McBLOROV
Proprietor!
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CLIFTON ROOMS   JS^Wrif £l
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
HARRON BROS.
FUNBRAL   DIRE0TOB8  AND
■MBALMBRS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St, Phone Sey. till.
North Vancouver — Ofllce and
chapel, 116 Seoond St. E. Phone
114.
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from all other remedies.
Prloa 13.00, Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordovs St. W.
Vancouver, B. C,
^ FAKp
Editor  B.  C.   Federatlonist:    The
mountain    travailed ' and    brought
forth    a    mouse.      Another    joint
committee   haa   shuffled   Itself  Into
position,   at   the   precious   suggestion of the management of the Western Fuel company. It has been born
aS one nut of due season presenting
Itself unto the misled whether agreed
to or not. - The unfortunate few presently trying; to help the company to
defeat   trade-unionism,   must   now
yield to a joint committee approval
of things they dare not disapprove.
One would hive thought at least that
some of these poor dupes would have
been well satisfied with past acts of
joint committees. This latest development points most clearly to the fact
of the unwillingness of this company
to agree to any form of organization
among lta employees, also lt further
sets forth the conception the company
has of the unfortunate men who have
been compelled to accept same.  This
joint committee business is certainly
a last unavoidable undertaking, both
for the men and the company at this
Juncture of the fight  It Is known that
these men are not satisfied with such
a aad repetition   born  of a forlorn
hope.     The affair Is simple a huge
Joke, and one which no-sane   man
would stand to have played upon him
a second time.  Think of it!   A company committee and one big official
of the company to decide alone who
shall be paid the minimum  wage.
Dream Agreement
There is no organization to demand
a just carrying-out of any clause of
the whole dream agreement.    It la a
rich clause for the repetition of the
same discrimination   and   favoritism
that has heretofore been so prevalent
under this company.   All men  who
understand   their   true position   as
trade unionists will agree how fool
Ish the endeavor Is. to attempt to
compel or to expect a company to live
up to any agreement unless backed by
a strong union.   The Herald ought
to have a good memory as It seems
to have all the qualifications.    Wae it
not alleged   by the company, ln Its
last attempt to foist an agreement
upon the men providing an increase
of five per cent, that such increase
was all lt could concede. Futher, how
silly for the Herald to talk ot the men
refusing said, agreement.      This Is
simply cheap claptrap.   The truth is
the men have refused for ten months
persistently to acknowledge any such
illusive and unfair method of treating with  the company, and tf the
Herald doea not know this lt is a
case of not daring to know. One oause
contributing to the inception of the
strike at Nanalmo was a similar joint
fake agreement, and one reason that
has Induced a small body of local men
to   attempt   strike-breaking   against
their fellow unionists and to place
themselves lh a position of helpless
ness Is the dope these men have been
gulping down the last nine months
from the columns of the Herald.
Out-of-date Scheme
The Insurance scheme wtth its locks
of white hair, showing that its youth
Is a thing of the past.  The same Idea
was brought to the attention ot the
miners of this place some nine
more years ago, and born of the same
source, but was* not thought at the
time to be worth consideration. Take
olause "A" which conflicts with all
methods of modern procedure, prohibiting as it does the laying of the mine
Idle on the day of the burial  of
brother killed in the mine. Miners and
other workers the world over follow
the humane and most respectful usage of escorting en mass the remains
of a departed brother who loses his
life when engaged as his work. This
has been the sane and commendable
course pursued by the miners of Vancouver Island for many years, and no
explanation attempted'ean make the
minera think this scheme has not
been  foisted   uppn  the  few unfortunates at work, Practically the whole
frame-up la simply worse than useless,
as It Is another attempt at making
these   already   duped believe   they
have something when In reality they
have nothing any more than that of
life when engaged at hia work.   This
organ states than "the men how at
work ahould have been able to negotiate such a contract Is a crushing
blow to the few men who caused and
directed all the trouble here."    This
statement is goods cut from the same
Cloth.   No few or many men of the
U. M. W. of A. ever asked such a
frame up," but   have   persistently
tried to relieve  themselves  of any
Buch corporation  Ironclad agreement
arranged to soften the troubles of the
employer In compelling perfect obedience to every slavish request.
Company Paya Expenaee
The next point mentioned ln  the
Herald's  statement   Ib "The   agreement concedes material, advances ln
wages, which never formed an Issue
In the present Struggle."   This may
assuredly be fittingly placed to the
credit ot the presence of the U. M. W.
of A. as Intimated by the Herald also.
The Joint committee will meet   the
company at least once-a month and
the expenses will  be  borne by the
company ln case of loss of time by
Its members   ln   the transaction   of
buslneas.      This    arrangement,    of
course, does evidence one exceptional
feature,   namely   that  the  company
pays  the  toll.     The   magnanimous
provision ought to stimulate the ex
presslon of grievances, for assuredly
the press committee knows of no such
parallel case.   The cry of no ballot
leave the witness box ln a beggared
condition compared with the condition of ballot ln this company's Iron
clad agreement, which states that all
men working at the time of the agreement, and who continue to work shall
approve or be considered to approve
of said agreement.  If a man disagrees
he must lose his Job to prove it, the
rake-off for an Insurance fund is to
De made   by the   company,   of one
dollar per month ln case of fatal accident     Where is our friend Tully at
this stage of the game, for he's great
on such a topio, and especially  '_"
this true when referring to relief arranged for the men ln the Wellington
strike,   This Iron-clad agreement was
secured by holding a meeting at the
mine head,  where the meeting had
been arranged under the eye of the
company.    A miner who had been
killed In the mine waB to be burled
this same day.   It was held at  the
time of the men coming off the night
shift about 7 a. m., with  a request
that all the men would turn out to
the funeral ln the afternoon, it is alleged  the company would pay   tho
men their day's pay.   It certainly Is
a helpless fake, apparently brought
Into being after serious reectlon and
SMELIERMEN STRIKE
AGAINST CUT IN
At RuBton, Wash., Smelter-
Owned Village, 400
Stop Work
Employers Utilise Limit of
Their Political Powers to
Crush the Strikers
Four hundred employees of the Taeoma Smelting and Refining company
of Ruston, Wash., have been on
strike against a reduction of wages
and ln Increase of hours, since the
flrst of January, 1914. Aa a result of
an agreement between the smelter
and Its employees, entered Into In
July of 1912, the work day was
fixed at nine hours. This condition
obtained until January 1, 1014, when
the smelter arbitrarily reduced the
wages ot from 125 to ITS men (smelt
er helpers) from $2.40 and 12.55 to
$2.25 per day. By the same order, the
houra of about 225 smelter helpers
were raised from nine to ten per day.
Refusing to accept thia change, the
men went out ln what was virtually
a "lock out," and the atrlke has since
continued with unabated vigor.
Smelter-Owned Village
Ruston is, a small fourth-class
town with no post-office and Is situated In the environs of Taeoma. It Is
named after W. R. Rust, the local representative of the Guggenheim Interests, It was formerly a part of Taeoma, but through political manipulation, lt was divorced from the larger
olty and la now a amall smelter-owned
village. The three Oouncilmen and the
mayor are favored employees of the
Guggenheim plant, and, since the
strike begun, have utilized to the limit
their political powers to crush the
strike. Several stringent ordinances
against "loitering" and "parading'
have severely hampered the activity
of the strikers, and the streets ot this
corporation-owned town are paraded
day and night by bands Ot armed' deputy marshals, deputy sheriffs and
"special police." One hundred armed
men ln and about the streets of this
little town, with only 118 voters, gives
the place a decidedly warlike aspect.
At night several searchlights play over
the whole town. These are looted in
steel-clad towers on the roof of the
smelter buildings.
Objecta to Prleon Labor
Medicine Hat, Alta., Tradea and
Labor council Is protesting with other
bodies In that province agalnat the
proposed building a jail by prison
labor at Fort Saskatchewan.
under   force   of   impelling   circum
stances.
PRESS COMMITTED,
Nanalmo, B. C.
Nanalmo, March 17, 1914.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
COLDS, ETC.
-L
SANDS
Funeral Furnishing Co.
LIMITED
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
LADY ATTENDANT
TELEPHONE 3S0S
1B1S QUADRA 6TRIET
Near Pandora Avenue
VICTORIA,  B.C.
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISERS
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RlfZ
'   VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MaR. FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B. C.
. Enlarged and  Remodelled too BOOMS 100 BATHS
Comfort    without    Xxtravaganoe
Amorlean Plan   -   SS.00 Up European Plan   :  11,00 Up
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor,
SB
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA, B.C.
NWORKERS UNION/
Nunetl Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what lta name, unless lt bean a
plain and readable impression or this stamp.
AU ahoes without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.   ' '
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Haas.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.    0. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treaa.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres. ■
For further information apply to ,
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C
Secretory, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
Reasons Why
You Should Use
Only the VERT BEST B. 0.
HOPS are used in brewing it—
with just enough imported Bohemian Hops to give it that delicious
taste and fragrance in the glass.
We're mighty careful about the
Hops that go into CASCADE.
We employ an expert Hop Buyer
to select them each season—we pay
from 26 to 60 cents a pound for
these Hops, and use over 110,000
pounds a year.
And then CASCADE is "MADE
IN B. C."—and every doien bottles you buy helps to make British
Columbia grow.
CASCADE BEER costs $1 the dosen Pints—$2 the
dosen Quarts.
Ask ANY LIQUOR DEALER for
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited FRIDAY.
.MARCH 20, MM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
a. j. BRAie
General Secretary-treaaurer of the Tailora' Industrial Union (International),
formerly the Journeymen Tailors' Union of America, with headquartera
at Blooming ton, 111. Mr. Brala, who waa a recent vlaitor ln Vancouver,
ia Inatllllng new lite and aolldarity Into the clothing tradea of thia eon-
1     tlnent.
FEDERATIONIST WESTMINSTER ADVERTISERS
r
Westminster Trust, Limited
Beeerre Teat, 0000,000.00
■aasemed, esoi.000.00    .    - ->~0 vTEvfl
We have MONET TO LOAN on improved property.
Estates managed tor out-of-town and olty clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We aot as agents only for the
purchase asd aale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
.  Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Wsstmlnster, B. C.
». a. tenet, Haaaglag Mtootor
t, A. Beanie, leaataiy-Cnaawrer.
THE S. BO WELL COMPANY
■noeeaseis to Oaaler a laaaa, Lt*.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
SJ^ SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS &i_\
NEW WESTMINSTER UNIONS
gDIT«D BY H.-OIBB, BOX S>4, NSW WI8TMINSTEH
NEW WESTMINSTER
S
Brewery   Workers-   Label
Used by Local Manufacturer of Seer
Vice-President Morgan of
Pacific District Visits
I Electrical Workers
NBW WESTMINSTER, March 18.—
At the regular meeting of the Brewery Workera' looal union ot this elty,
held Monday, March 16th, besides the
regular1 routine the matter of pushing the recognition of the label of the
craft waa considered. It was claimed
by eeveral speakers, and apparently
with ample Justification, that the looal
brewery waa receiving little consideration at the bands ot their brother
unionists, and ln consequence work
ln that Institution was very slack, resulting In very few of their members
being employed steadily.
This condition of affairs eould be
vastly Improved If the people of this
oommunlty could be Induced to call
tor the1local product Instead of the
Imported article. The produot of the
New Westminster brewery, owned by
•Nels Nelson, is equal, if not better,
than much of that manufactured elsewhere. Mr. Nelson ships quite a large
amount to other sections ot the province, and why lt la not good enough
for home people who are more or leas
directly Interested ln the upkeep of
the establishment, passes all understanding. The main reason ts laid to
the fact of negleot, rather than dealre
to alight the looal beer, and lt Is the
Intention ot the local brewery workers' union to bring the matter to the
notice of the members of the unions
of this olty by the visitation of a
committee to the various organisations, also bringing the matter up lu
the Tradea and Labor counoll. The
names of the brands of beer manufactured by the Westminster brewery are
the Premier and Welnwelser.
President E. J. Holbrook occupied
the chair, and with H. Jacobson, see.
rotary-treasurer, and Fred. May, constitute the office-bearers for the current term. The union has a membership of 15 Snd Is 100 per cent organised and Is worthy and ahould receive
the support of organised labor Interested ln building up the Industries of
this city.
Electrical Workers No. 158
The local union of Electrical Workers were honored with a visit from W,
W. Morgan, vice-president of the
Pacific district counoll, laat Thursday
evening who gave an interesting address on -the proposed amalgamation
of the two , factions which' have
divided the workera in the electrical
Industry in all parts of the country
for several years. It will be several
months yet before the result of the
referendum vote on the consolidation
of the,two branches will be known,
but it is believed generally that the
war among the electrical workera
will soon be a thing of the past
Tbe attendance at the meeting waa
small though/there are at present 67
membera ln the local. Many of the
membera are employed out of town,
thus-being unable to attend regularly.
Quite a few have left the dlatrlct being unable to secure employment, but
it Is expected that it will not be long
before business will be baok to lta
normal oondltion. The officers of No.
651 are: Preaident, Wm. Esklns; vice-
president, Thos, Kelly; financial secretary, A. J. Evans; recording secretary, J. B. Mcintosh.
Engineers Local No. 643
One of the real live wires ln the
labor movement of New Westminster,
alao one of the latest organised, Is
looal No. 549, Steam and Operating
Engineers. Starting late last fsll with
a membership often, they now have
thirty-eight on the roster,- and are
adding new membera at every meeting; While the progress of the union
haa been very aatlafaotory to the
membenhlp, they are fully alive to
the possibilities that confront them.
It Is the Intention ot ths organisation
as soon aa the conditions warrant lt
to place a business agent In the Held,
with the objeot of gathering every
ORGANIZE
00 OPERATE
Invest your capital ($5
shares) and support by
your patronage the local association.
Quality Best
Prices Right
Service Efficient
TRADE UNION LABOR ONLY
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
LIMITED
K. OF P. BLOCK, 8th 8TREET
Branch, 1007 ejth Ave.
NEW    WESTMINSTER,   B. C
eligible worker in their trade Into
tbelr ranks. The personnel of the
membership Is of the best, and under
the leadership of their energetic and
progressive officers a large and useful
future ln the labor movement Is opening up before this new organization.
The offlce bearers" for the current
term are J. R. Flynn, president! Robt
Lee, vice-president; W. C. Saunders,
aecretary-treaaurer.'
Clgarmakera, No. *M
A large number of the membera of
Clgarmakera,,, local No. 486, New
Weatminster, attended the regular
meeting (March 4th) to welcome a
sew member, and participated In; an
Impromptu banquet, whieh took the
form of a Dutch lunch, furnished by
the new member. While work la hot
•eery brisk, there Is apparently enough to go around, and all seem to
get three "aquarea" every day, The
roll of membera shows thirty-three on
the list, which Is about the aame as
laat year. While several have departed tor other parts ot the country,
others have taken their places. Outside of the routine order little took
plaoe ot general lntereat The preeent offlolals of the union are: President Jos. Halter; vice-president Abe
Koohel; secretary-treaaurer, .Herman
Knudson, who Is also label custodian;
sergeant-at-arms, Jos, Feeney.
Hod-carriers, No. 888
With but few members at preeent
working In New Westminster, International Hod-carriers, Building and Laborers' union of America, looal No.
S59, are holding their own, and when
the building Industry revives from Its
existing lethargy, which la expected
In the near future, a prosperous season Is looked forward to; While few
members, are employed locally many
are working In various points of the
district and are busy scattering the
gospel of tradea unionism wherever
located. Aa soon as the* building Industry revives lt Is the Intention ot
the officials to carry on ah energetic
campaign to strengthen their organisation in every way possible, and
they look forward to a closer affiliation of the building trades unions as
the b.est means to that end. The officers at present are: President, John
Lonsdals; vice-president, James Hackle; financial secretary, Wm. Beattle;
recording secretary, Oeorge Rodgers;
treasurer, Wm. Crick. The membership at the present time Is twenty-
five.
UNION  LABEL LEAGUE
Will Hold Social Evening In Labor
Tomple Thuraday, March 26th
The Vancouver Union Label league
will hold another social evening next
Thursday, when the following itema
will form part ot the' programme:
Mlae Viola Bailey has kindly consented to render a pianoforte solo. Songs
will be given by Miss Montgomery and
MlBB Gillespie. The cigarmakers' orchestra will enliven the gathering with
talented selections. Among the
speakers wtll be R. P. Pettlplece, president of the typographical union, who
will discourse on the value bf. the
union label. S. T. Hamilton has promised a recitation. The dancing will
begin at 10 o'clock p. m. A email admission fee of one dime will be
charged.   Everyone la welcome.
PAGESEVX
BIGDISCOUNTS
STILL PREVAIL A1^ BUCHAICAK'B
SPECIAL REDUCTION  SALE
HERE IS A SAMPLE PRICE PROM OUR DINNERWARE
..    '  . DEPARTMENT
Englleh'Seml-Percelaln Dlnnerware
100 Piece Seta, pale blue border with white rasa ' j '
Regular 828.70.  Rednced to..r..,. ..mM
R. G. Buchanan & Co*
1128, ROBSON STREET
Juat reur exert Slock. Weat ef Oranvllle Street
Take Rebaon or Davla atreet Cars
ANNOUNCEMENT
Oustavua Myers, historian and
socialist has added another Inh
mensely valuable volume to hat
worka In
The History of   . j
Canadian Wealth
JUST COMPLETED i
-There never has been a single
' work of any kind In Canada g*r-!
Ing the real economic history of
Canada; not even a bourgeois
History. Therefore It will be Invaluable to socialists and atu-
denta.
Mr. Myers writes: "The history of the Canadian land grabs la oae
of the moat gigantic, ever seen. I spent nearly two years going over
official documents In the archives, that tall an appalling story ot the
way capitalism has run Canada.
'The book will detail how the .great land, mlnee and'other domains
were gobbled up by the financial powers. Some portions will be devoted especially to the Roman Catholic Church in Canada.
What This Great Work Contains
347 PAGES
BheCktkBUtat
StemH" fce-U
The Quest of Trsde snd New Sources of Wealth.
The Ecclesiastical and Feudal Lordo
The Hudeon'a Bay Company
Ware on tha Pur Tradara and Companlea
The Landsd snd Mercsntllo Oligarchy
The Landed Proprietor Revolt Agalnat Peudallam
Sovereignty of the Hudson's Bay Company
Paaalng of tha Hudson's Bay Company'a Sovereignty
Inception of the Railroad Power
Flrat Period ef Railway Promoter*
Contest for the Paelflo Railway
Era of Railway Magnates
Progreae of the Railway Lorde
Extenalon of Railway Possessions
Appropriation of Coal, Timber and
Other Landa
Distribution of Railway Subsidies
Federatlonlat
Room 817,
Labor Temple
Vancouver, 0. C
Enclosed flnd 11.50
for which pleaae   -,
mail Myera' History
of Canadian Wealth
Address
OF ACRES
^rmjHands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
v to a Competency for Later Years
>»
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm help and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, -who has no capital and saves his earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for his energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge, giv-
ing specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for such classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for'mechanics or skilled laborers.
f
(.'■■,.
I SYNOPSIS OF LAND LAWS
Six monthi' residence upon and cultivation of the land in eaoh of three yean. A homesteader may live within nine miles of hii homestead on a farm of ,
at least 80 aorei solely owned and occupied by him or his father, mother, ion, daughter, brother or sister.
In certain districts a homesteader in good standing may pre-empt a quarter section alongside hii homestead.   Prion $3.00 per acre.   Duties—Must
reside six monthi in eaoh of six years from date of homestead entry (including the time required to earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra.
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPLICATION TO
y
W«©. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY.. MARCH 10, 1M«
ANNOUNCING THE OPENING OF VANCOUVER'S NEWEST DRY GOODS STORE
NEWCOMBES
LIMITED
In the heart of the retail shopping district
We are now showing for the first time a brand new stock of
Dress Goods, Silks, Wash Goods, all lines af Prints, Ginghams,
Sheetings, Towels, Hosiery, Gloves, Underwear, Corsets, Laces,
Embroideries, Ready-to-Wear Garments, Millinery, in fact a
Complete Line of Dry Goods. , OUR PRICES WILL BE
FOUND THE LOWEST CONSISTENT WTIiH GOOD
QUALITY.
Our Opening Values Should Interest Every
Woman Reader
MUSLINS, worth up to 35c. yd.
Opening price 15 centi
600 yards of tho very newest white
Dress Muslin and hair line strip
Persian Lawn—all good designs-
regular values up to 36c. Opening
price, per yard   15 cants
ME88ALINE SILK at $1.25
This  beautiful  quality silk  ln all
the latest shades of purple, saxe,
sky, tan, grey, navy, cream, black,
etc.   Special opening price....$1.25
RAJAH FOULARD8 at 15 cents
300 yards of the best 26c. Rajah
Foulard, guaranteed fast color.
Comes ln a big range of color.
Special for opening  16 cents
8COTCH NAIN800K, worth up
to 20c. and 25c. at 12^c. and
15 cents.
These are the best 20c. and 26c.
values, just the wanted (,'oods for
ladles' and children's gowns, etc.
Opening price, yard..12^2c. d 15c.
CRIB BLANKETS, pair 60c.
65 pairs of Crib Blankets, Teddy
Bear and other designs, in blue, regular $1.26 value. Opening price 60c
fABLE OIL CLOTH  8PECIAL
6-4 White Table Oilcloth
per yard  20 cents
6-4 White Table Oilcloth
per yard   30 centa
Crepe Cloth Dressing Jacket
Made of splendid quality crepe, in
all shades, satin ribbon trimming.
Opening price, each   $1.00
CORSET COVERS at 50c.
200  Corset   Covers,  in   three  designs; these are good value at 86c.
Opening price   60 cants
EMBROIDERY at 15c. a yard
350 yards of very fine Embroidery
In assorted designs and widths;
values 20c, 26c, and 35c. Opening
price   15 centa
Valenciennes Lace at 25c. doz.
1,000 yards of flne ta). lace, ln assorted widths and designs. Values
up to 10c. a yard. Opening price,
per dozen   25 cents
Ribbed Cotton Hose, 2 pr. 35c.
All guaranteed fast dye. In black
and tan rib cotton Hose. This la
a regular 26c. value. All sizes, 2
palnrfor   35 centa
Corset Cover Embroidery at
17$^ c. per yard
200 yards of corset cover embroidery, values 25c. to 30c      Opening
price, 2 yards   35 cents
White Shaker Flannelettes   at
12$£c. a yard
600 yardB of extra heavy white
Flannelette, 27 inches wide, very
special for opening, at yd....12>4c.
Crums Print, the best make, also
Ginghams.   Opening price, yd.. 14c,
, COUPON
Cut this coupon out, bring
it to the store and secure an
extra discount of 5 per cent.,
on all purchases amounting
to $1.00 or over.
NEWCOMBES, LIMITED
860 GRANVILLE STREET
in the mining camps of Cumberland,
Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith on Vancouver ; Island, and all
workers are requested to avoid the above
places as a plague.
BOWSER'S SPECIALS AND THE
MILITIA ARE STILL ON
THE GROUND
at the expense of the government, to
do the scab-herding for Mackenzie &
Mann, who seem to have McBride and
Bowser bought and paid for.
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT
OF WORK IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A
MAN TO GET A JOB UNLESS HE
GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN.
KEEP AWAY
FROM
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
RESOLUTION BV SOCIAL
SERVICE  CONGRESS
Ht Coal Minera' Strike
"Whereas—For many months
has existed ln the Vancouver
Island coal mining districts;
the peace of the communities
has been broken, untold sufferings caused, and the whole Industrial and commercial life of
the country Injured; as public
opinion to which the appeal Is
made Is not sufficiently Informed to exert its influence;
Resolved—That this Social
Service congress urgently requests the dominion government to appoint a royal commission to examine Into the
whole dispute from Its very beginning; to bring all the facts
to light, and thereby to bring
the full pressure of public opinion to bear upon the parties concerned In order to effect a settlement of the dispute."
STRIKE AVERTED
Malntenance-of-Way Men Reach
Agreement with C. P. R.
dent McNIcholl
It was announced last Saturday at
Montreal, Que., that as a result of
negotatlons that have been conducted
the past few days between represen-
of the malntenanceofway employees
engaged on the Canadian Pacific railway, and D. McNIcholl, the vice president of the C. P. R„ a threatened
strike has been averted. James
Stokes, of Calgary was one of a delegation of five authorized by the union
to appear before the Canadian Pacific
railway and demand on behalf ot the
section men from coast to coast an increase In wages equivalent to about
thirty cents a day. In an Interview
with A. B. Lowe, of Detroit, International president' of the organization
and leader of the men's delegation It
Is learned that as a result of the conference It was mutually agreed to accept that part of the recent award
which recommended that each body
should withdraw Its claims for the
present. Mr. McNIcholl further agreed
to meet the delegation at any time on
or after May first, that they may deem
expedient, owing to Improved condl-
tlons of trade, and further agreed to
consider the negotiations as merely
adjourned.
UNION LABEL LEAGUE
An Experience Buying Union Hon
and Union Garments
The Vancouver Union Label league
Is a very active Institution these days.
During the pas', six months there has
been more demand for goods bearing
the union label than at any previous
period ln this city. The other day
a novel experience happened to one of
the members who entered a downtown store and asked for "union-made
hose." The lady clerk said that the
firm did not keep them but had only
"union" undergarments. She was
somewhat surprised when lt was explained to her that hose made by
union labor was what was wanted.
Another lady resident of Vancouver,
who had not heretofore looked upon
labor organisations with favor, Is now
buying only union-made bread. It
was pointed out to her that when
she bought the "staff of life" made
by union bakers she supported better
and cleaner conditions for the bakeshops, got superior bread for her
money and helped to Improve labor
conditions. Some store-keepers
cently said that they never heard of
union-made collars, but during the
past few weeks they have been forced
to place them In stook. The league is
certainly doing good work. It Is
their Intention in the near future to
hire a moving-picture theatre and
have all union labels arranged on the
films, thereby educating the publlo as
regards the movement and demonstrating that what food Is to man for life,
so is the unton label a bona fide
trade unions. A series of social entertainments have been arranged by
an active committee of the league at
which all working people are cordially Invited to attend. This body
comprises Misses Outterldge and Foxcroft, C. F. Burkhart- Oeo. W. Curnock, M. Merkle and O. A. Kirk-
Patrick.
OFFICIAL  ORGAN  COMPLAINS
Upholds Uie of Chinese Eggs and
Oleomargarine
The Pacific Coast Oasette, official
organ of the Pacific Coast Master
Bakers! association and the Amalgamated Restaurant an'* Hotel Keepers'
association, complains because Coast
poultry raisers object to the use of
Chinese eggs and oleomargarine. The
editor thinks people ought to be selfish enough to reduce the cost of living at the expense of health and decency. He evidently sees no difference between Chinese and white people, except white bakers. If the Cln-
ese should enter into competition
with the master bakers, then, ot
course, lt would be time to protest,
but as long as the Chinese serves the
master baker he Is all right.
WOULD JOIN A UNION
Col. Theodore Roosevelt Approves
Unionism
"If I were a factory employee, a
workman on the railroads, or a wage-
earner of any sort, I would undoubtedly join the union of my trade. If I
disapproved of its policy, I would
join tn order to flght that policy; if
the union leaders were dishonest, I
would join in order to put them out.
I believe In the union and.I believe
that all men who are benefited by the
union are morally bound to help to tbe
extent of their power ln the common
Interests advanced by the union."
MU3T 8ERVE SENTENCES
U. 8. Supreme Court Refuses to
' Reylew Cases of Ironworkera
The supreme court of the United
States refused last week to review
the cases of President Frank Ryan,
Business Agent William E. Reddln,
and 22 other members of the Bridge
and Structural Iron Workers' union
on charges brought against them by
the steel (rust oat\_ National Erectors'
association. This decision exhausts
the last resource ot the accused and
means they must-now serve their
sentences ln a federal prison. Red-
din was given three years.
I. W. W. View
Bdltor B. C. Federatlonist: This Is
to Inform your readers that local
unton No. 322, I. W. W. has nothing
to do with the Associated Enforced
Idle or Unemployed Association, and
we look upon tt as a scab layout.
R. SULLIVAN
Sec'y. No. 322.
34 Cordova street west.
CHEAP HOUSES
Say Workers Can Buy Hornet For 112
a Month
A Toronto, Ont, dispatch states
that the local board of health decided
to constitute itself a housing commission for the city this afternoon with
the object of demonstrating that lt Is
possible for the workingmen ln the
city to own a home of their own and
pay not more than S12 per month. The
question was brought forward on the
report of Dr. Hastings, who stated
that there are 3,000 more people ln
the lodging houses than there Is proper accommodation for.
Pioneer Printer Paasea
H. L. Hackett, familiarly known as
"Shorty" all over the jurisdiction
of the I. T. U„ died last Thursday at St. Joseph's hospital, Taeoma,
Wn., after an Illness ot several
months. He was suffering from a
complication, of liver and kidney
troubles and had not been expected to
survive for over a month. A host of
friends everywhere will mourn his
dealth.—Seattle Union Record. The
late Mr. Hackett, many years ago
worked as a compositor on the World
and News-Advertiser in this city and
was well and favorably known to the
old-time printers here.
Poems to Miners
The Federatlonist has received a
tasteful brochure composed by Ethel
Imrle Cuthbertson, 632 Broadway
east. This small book of poems Is
dedicated to the striking miners and
is not without merit The verses on
Liberation breathe a spirit of Justice,
one stanza being
"The miners must be free
From jail and tyranny
Ere peace abound."
It should be obtained as a memento
of   the historical  tragic   events   of
Vancouver Island.
Harry Clapton, secretary laundry
workers, after being laid up with
rheumatism for six weeks, le able to
be around again.
GRADING CARPENTERS
Thia is the Thin Edge of the Wedge to
Reduce Wages
The editor of the labor page of the
Reglna Leader prints the following
last Saturday: An effort is being
made by the Builders' Exchange in
Winnipeg to have carpenters graded
into three distinct classes, finishing
carpenters, ordinary carpenters, and
form carpenters. It Is needless to
state that the carpenters' unions of
Winnipeg are putting up an active
fight against grading the members of
their trade. They fully realize that
grading of this description is the thin
end of the wedge and would tend to
reduce the wages of their members.
But what muddle headed chumps the
non-union men ln the city must be to
help the Builders' Exchange In their
effort to reduce wages. No wonder
union men sometimes get bitter
against non-union men, when they realize that lt Is the non-union men
who are the cause of the continual
struggle to uphold a decent standard
of living. The non-union man cannot
shirk the responsibility. If there were
no nonunion men the employers
would have no option but to act decently and fairly with their employees.
Why don't the nonunion man get
wise?
Fraudulent Coal-Owner*.
The public in. this province have
heard so much talk about tbe Iniquities of the miners on Vancouver island
and the intervention of unions with
headquarters ln the United States, that
they have been almost afraid to go to
bed o' nights for fear of alien invasion. They can now sleep ln peace.
The Western Fuel company; who have
been the bitterest opponents of the
miners, now has Its principal officials
given jail sentences in San Francisco
for fraud. Vice-President and General
Manager J. B. Smith gets eighteen
months and.a fine of $6,000. Others
get sentences ranging down to one
year. Unlawful assembly Is not quite
so bad.
MINARD'8 LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA.
An Educational Toy
Develop your boy's mechanical
talent with a set of the American
Model Builder. Most unique and
practical.   12 per set upwards.
MILLAR tCOE    120 Haitian St. W.
ARE YOU TIRED WHEN
EVENING COMES?
She Sits While Working
You cannot realize how many miles
of steps you take every day in your
kitchen preparing three meals and
clearing up after them.
Hundreds of women have found it
possible to save an enormqus amount
of energy by makjng their kitchen
work systematic.
TRY THIS PLAN-SIT DOWN AT
WORK-SAVE STEPS
You will find it veyy simple to do
that by arranging your kitchen wotk
systematically., Have
THE HOOSIER CABINET
Delivered At Once for $1.00
Merely deposit $1.00 membership fee; enroll your name in the Hoosier Club; the Cabinet is
delivered immediately; balance payable $1.00 weekly for a few weeks. By joining the club you
get a cabinet at*"the cash price.
The low price is fixed. everywhere by The Hoosier Company to give you full benefit of
cost saving from enormous manufacture.
Enroll your name now. Have a Hoosier Cabinet working for you to-morrow. Send your
dollar by mail if you can't come in. Mail orders are given special attention. We have sold hundreds of Hoosiers that way, and every owner is highly pleased. Seize your last opportunity to
have one of the famous Hoosier Cabinets before the club is filled.
Club Limited to 600—131 already taken in Eight Days
Special terms to residents outside of Vancouver.
THE "HOOSIER" STORE
1067 Oranvllle Street Vancouver. B. 0.
STORE  OPEN  EVENINGS TILL 9 O'CLOCK.
City Auction and Com-
misiion Company
Cash paid for houaea and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction . guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR  E.  BETCHLEY
Auctioneer ley UTS
oranville Street
VAUDEVILLE
MATINBB DAILY 2.30
EVB. PERFORMANCE 8.15
PANTAGES
Unequalled  Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.46, 7.20, t.li
Season's Prices—
Matinee 16c, Evenings 16c, ICC.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAVS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
Week of March 23rd
MON.,    TUBS.,    WED.
LINK BROTHER8
European Comedy .Acrobats
ROSS AND DALE
Singing snd  Musical  Entertainers
BOOTHS AND BOOTHE
Singing and Novelty Juggling
DOROTHY   BENTON
Dainty Comedienne
THURS,,   FRI.,   SAT.
HARRIS   AND   RANDALL
Rural Comedy Aot entitled "Fifty
Miles from Nowhere"
LA  DON  AND VIRETTA
Comedy, Talking Acrobatic
Dancing
MARK AND PHILLIPS
Comedy-Singing and Piano Act
GORDON  BERRY
Singing Comedian
8PECIAL
See Vancouver's Fire Department In Action; one of the best In the worid.
See yourself and friends ln the Movies
10 Cents-ANY SEAT—10 Cents
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The roason our business ia Increasing is due to the faot that our business policy la correct. We adopted the policy of informing the public
through the medium of the press aa to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service for
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This haa established confidence with the public In ub, and for that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue aa we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co:
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 189
Commodloue Chapel Free to All Patrona
Formerly Center A Hanna'a Branoh
A. C. Miller,. Prea. P. H. arete, Manager
An Impartial
hu been refused the striking union coal
miners of Vancouver Island under the
McBride-Bowser-Mackenzie & Mann regime in British Columbia and the federal
government has done worse than nothing.
SCORES OF UNION MEN HAVE
BEEN RAILROADED TO PRISON
—AND TWO TO DEATH—
FOR THE CRIME OF DARING
TO ORGANISE	
The strikers are backed by over 400,-
000 members of the United Mine Workers of America, and they WILL win because they MUST.
The coal barons, backed to the hilt by
the government, have spent thousands of
dollars in scouring the labor markets of
the world for SCABS, with meagre success.

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