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The British Columbia Federationist Mar 27, 1914

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Array Sanitary Conditions Host
Filthy—Confined In Cells
21 Hours a Day
Put In Dungeons Beoause
,, They Refuse to Build a
The almost Incredible accounts ot
brutality and callous treatment—bar-
barlow it you like—meted out to the
- unfortunate prisoners in suoh prison
colonies us the lie du Dlabie, Chinese
oases, or the Siberian muiea have alwaya excited the pity of civilised
peoples, These atrocities have their
eountarpart In British Columbia, and
a measure ol compassion and sympathy may be reserved for some of
the untortunates incarcerated in the
provlnolal prison Inaututlohs-espe-
dally that modern bastile known aa
the New Westminster jail: The Federatlonist was visited the other day
by some of the discharged Vancouver
Island miners from that noisome-hole,
who described the conditions titer*
and told what they sunered at the
hands of the hirelings of Bowser et aL
now directing the attain of this province. The statements regarding the
general conditions ln the Mew Westminster jail are more ln keeping with
the
Shocking Treatment
. bf criminals in tie dark ages when
there was no such thing known aa
prison; reform. The prisoners ln this
instance spend 21 hours out ot tht
14 In the cells, with sometimes three
ln a cell, nine by six feet. For half
an hour each day prisoners are allowed iout for exercise. They ipust keep
walking, a guard standing close by
with a gun in hand, and if they halt
to take.».rest they are Immediately
marched back and locked up in the
cages, The room containing the cell*
Is eighty by thirty-three feet,' with
three tiers of cells, Each tier haa
twenty-two cages—eleven on each
aide—or a total of sixty-six cells and
132 prisoners. There are six toilets
in all. But when it Is Considered that
a number of the Incarcerated men
who: use these'are afflicted with all
kinds of venereal diseases, It can easily be Imagined that li Is unsafe tor
thoae who are free from such complaints to utilise the closets. :'.
Unsanitary Condltlona
They are consequently compelled to
. resort .to a bucket, which, to say the
least, la abominably unsanitary. - Ot
course, the use of soap Is prohibited,
by reason of these diseases. The jail
la filthy, lice and bedbugs aplenty, and
stench almost unbearable. Some prisoners complained of this and asked
that the windows be opened. For this
1 request for a little fresh air the valiant Turnbull ordered them to the
black hole, which Is three and a half-
feet by five, and there to remain tormented by vermin—bugs and rats—
with a diet of inferior bread and
water, Thla la a favorite' method of
treatment ordered by the warden on
the. least excuse. The guards kick if
a life Is taken—other than human, of
course. Prisoners are not allowed to
-read newspapers, J>ut may peruse certain magaslnes, must go to their
bunks at 7 p. m„ and are not allowed
to talk.
> Routine Menu '
Breakfast—Coffee, made of burnt
peas, skilly or very thin gruel, and
dry bread. Dinner—Soup,- made of
carrots and turnips. On Wednesday
a bit of tough.beet and messy potatoes are served. On Fridays a morsel
of dog salmon. Sunday Is mulligan
day.   Supper—Bread and water.
A strong healthy man soon becomes'
a decrepit wreck on this fare, which
is only fit for the garbage can and not
for the stomach of a human being. In
addition' Its nutritive value It is
scarcely sufficient to keep body and
aoul together. No tobacco' whatever
Is permissible. The miners seemed
to be marked prisoners .and were accorded the most cruel and prejudice!
treatment bf. any. , Whenever a prisoner was visited by his friends, he
was vigilantly and roughly searched
- by a guard,
Refused to Build Scaffold
When the time arrived for preparations being made for the execution of
Clark and Davis, who were condenmed
on the oharge of murdering Constable
Archibald, seven prisoners who were
friends ot the doomed men were
ordered to erect the scaffold, Thla was
more than these men could stand, ao
they point-blank refused to obey orders. The tyrannical and brutal warden promptly had the seven men confined to the dungeon or black hole for
alx days on a diet of bread and water.
■ Besides their "good time" was knocked , off, Another miserable man
promptly offered to help^ build the
scaffold solely In order to get some
fresh air. After two days of work he
waa again put back In the oage there
to receive the taunts of his fellow inmates. These few examples of the
methods used ln provincial prisons
ahow the need.for Immediate reform.
NO WORK AT RUPERT
Not a Single Building Being Erected
,..   —Idle Men
(Special to The Federatlonist)
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.,.March 26.
—There Is an unusually large number
of Idle men ln this city looking for
work, some even living on one meal
a day.  There Is not a single building
In course of erection here, and new
arrivals coming in on every boat* The
outlook for work In northern towns
'   this season Is doubtful.
Oeo. McNeil, bartender, Is at general
hospital with a violent attack ot typhoid fever.
Representatives  of  Union
Lose in Action For
' Damages
Court Decides Sleuter Is
Entitled to Wages For
Period i
A cast unique ln Canada and ot tar-
reaching Importance was decided Wednesday in the Supreme Court, when a
plasterer named  Sleuter was  given
damages against members of the local
Plasterers' union,   sleuter sued seven
members of that union on their own
behalf and also as representatives bt
the union, for damages, alleging conspiracy on the grounds that they successfully and Intentionally endeavored
to dictate conditions under which he
ahould work.   It appeared from the
evidence that the business agent of
the union reported that Sleuter's work
was not up to the required standard,
and a committee appointed by the union upheld tha decision, recommending that he b« withdrawn from hia job
for six months.    Sleuter refused to
comply and was subsequently dismissed from his employment!   Mr. Justice
Murphy awarded Sleuter judgment tor
the amount he would have earned In
wages from the time his employment
ceased (Nov. 20, 1913)   until   active
steps against him were discontinued.
In giving judgment his lordship said:
"The law Is clear that a violation   of  legal   rights   committed
knowingly Is a cause of action.
'Every person has a right Under
the law as between, himself and
his fellow-subject to full freedom
in disposing of his own labor or
his own capital according to his
will.'   It follows that every other
person is Subject to the correlative
duty arising therefrom, and is prohibited from any obstruction; to
the fullest exercise of the right
which can be made compatible
with the exercise of similar rights
by others.   Therefore, a combination of two or more persons with- •
out  Justification   to  Injure  any
workman by Inducing employers
not to employ him, Is, if it results
ln damage to him, actionable."    ,
Mr. Justice Murphy found that the
union forbade the plaintiff tb work in
Hagel's shop for six months.   His employer was therefore forced to dismiss
him or else have his own work tied
up. the plaintiff's fellow-employees refusing to work with him ln that particular shop.    The union  rules, his
lordship found, ln no way authorised
the defendants to' take the course adopted.   ■      :   ■
The Importance of this decision, If
confirmed by higher courts, can
scarcely be over-rated. It practically
means that* Unions havo no power to
discipline their members or to insist
on the maintenance of a given standard of efficiency. If such Is the case,
then legislation will have to be enacted to make this possible. Every
step forward ln the progress of trade
unionism has to be vigorously fought
for by organlted labor and this is but
another Instance. Labor In Oreat
Britain has similar troubles, but Is
overcoming them. Some years ago
the famous Taff-Vale decision that
unions oould be sued was given by
the House of Lords. - Tha Tradee Disputes | aat, passed In < 1906, however,
reversed that judgment and decided
that "an action against a trade union, whether of workmen or masters,
or against any members or officials
thereof, on behalf of themselves and
all other members of the trade union
In respect of any tortious act alleged
to have been committed by or on behalf of the trade union shall aot be
entertained by any court. Ih 1909
financial ability of unions and members thereof again came to the front
in, the well known Osborne case. By
legislation again the desired result
was obtained. Ih Canada legislative
action will have to be taken If the
Sleuter decision Is upheld ln the laat
appeal. If, as Is undoubtedly the case,
workers have a right to organise,
then they must be able to enforce
their rules. Labor is tired of technicalities, and this decision goes to
show the necessity of workers taking
a greater share In the making of laws,
J. 0. Wethers, member of the Carpenters' union, Victoria, arrived from
the north the other day. He says the
building trades are very quiet there.
The General Laborers' organization
has levied an assessment of 26 cents a
month on Its members for three
months.
The question of unemployment Is ever present. ' The causes are not merely* Individual, but
are general and, entirely beyond the control of
the worker. And" yet how Is the unemployed man
treated? The police move him on, society Ignores
him; And what do the churches do T tt la to
them that the submerged look, but look ln vain.
Spasmodic charity la not wanted; the real requirement Is support In bettering life. Ministers
of divers faiths ara forever complaining of the
apathy: and sometimes antagonism of working
men and' women- to their precepts.   Their com-
Slain t is true. Probably never before has such
idlfterenoe and distrust to the teachings of the
various churches been shown, but at whose door
lies the fault? Not at tha workers'—that is certain. Men and women bf to-day are not more
Indifferent to high alms and principles than were
their forefathers. . The complacent-attitudes ot
so many modern ministers and the active antagonism to labor of many others are undoubtedly
primarily tb blame. Do they attempt to practice
the teachings ot the Founder of Christianity—the
friend of the toller? Hive they so far forgotten
His precepts that they must ally themselves with
the worldly rich to keep the workers in subjection? Unfortunately, ,t|la so often appeara to be
the caae. A class attitude has been ever present
True,' many noble souls have voiced the cry ot
the workers, and they have followers today. But
they form no considerable part of the whole.
Working men'and woman aee on every hand that
organised faltha* alien, with those who despoil
them of their labor. In all reverence It might he
asked whether the Master would be welcomed
hy moat of the ministers of today. Their plan
too often' li to make friends with the rich, to sit
In high places and to condemn the unfortunate.
Would not His way be to show pity, and loving
care tb the strutglera? Would He hot want to
know what caused poverty, unemployment and
their attendant evils? He never considered an
unfortunate brother aa beneath compassion. He
was the friend and helper of the oppressed. And
the workers of the world are beginning to see
this, perhaps as through a glass darkly, but they
are seeing' lt. With a world In the melting pot
the churches have missed a great opportunity.
i The Master Insisted on brotherhood,: but perhaps
He wouldn't be wanted long in a modern church.
SHEET METAL WORKERS.
Opposed to the "No-Militia" Resolution of the B, C. Federation.
The sheet metal workers of this city
at the laat meeting of their union voted to withdraw their affiliation wlt£
the B. C. Federation of Labor. The
proposed prohibition of members of
the militia from becoming members of
organised labor was the stumbling
block, and the union felt that this action was forced upon them.' The new
by-laws of the Northwest district council came up tor discussion, and was referred to the executive board for recommendation, and will come up for
ratification ln the union at its next
meeting! There Is also a well-defined
rumor that work will pick up materially ln the near future. It haB been
suggested to several members of the
union that their younger members, especially, take a greater Interest in the
drawing classes of the night schools,
Business Agent Joseph Hamilton Is
busy trying to excite greater lntereat
ln the technical classes held every
Monday and Wednesday evenings In
the King Edward high school, Fair-
view. Any member, apprentice or
Junior, Is welcome to attend for the remainder o> this season. Any information at hand on this subject* will be
cheerfully given by calling at 208 Labor Tempi*.
Alfred Strange, carpenter, haa returned trom his old home at Dublin.
He was among the visitors to The
Federatlonist yesterday, and Bays there
will be a large exodus of workmen this
year from the city by the LIffey.
CONCILIATION  BOARD
FOR B. C. E. R. DISPUTE
The department of labor at
Ottawa laat Friday directed the
appointment of a conciliation
board under the Industrial Disputes act to settle the questions
at Issue between tie B. C. E. R.
and the street railway'men. The
company has selected jobs
Elliot, barrister, aa their nominee, while the union has requested J, H. MoVety to act as
their representative. As these
members have .'been Unable' to
agree on the appointment bf a
ohalrman, the minister of labor
has been wired to and asked to
make the appointment. It Is
expected that the minister's selection will be made known today to enable the board to get
to work immediately.
Amalgamation of Two Unions Will Be a Reality
Xy. -,,-;    ShorUy; .>.- ■
By Overwhelming Majority
Rdid-Murphy Organisation Jojta A, F. of L.
By an overwhelming majority the
unlona of the Pacific district counoll
of electrical workers have deolded
to reafflllate with the International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers,
affiliated with the A, F. of L. from
whloh secession took place In 1908.
The amalgamation promises to be a
reality In the near future, At local
headquarters the situation ia thus
slsed up. This means that the Reld-
Murphy organisation of electrical
workers ln British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona and California will at once become part and parcel of the American labor movement as exemplified
by the American Federation of Labor.
This action *Wss made possible aa the
result of the visit to San Francisco
laat December ot President Samuel
Oompers and the executive board of
the American Federation of Labor at
which time a tentative agreement waa
entered Into, the terms of which have
Just been ratified by the vote of the
unions of the Paclflo District Council
ot Electrical Workers. The transfer
of charters to the International Brotherhood ot Electrical Workers will
be effected within a week or ten days,
when the former Reld-Hurphy unions
wilt affiliate with the central and state
labor bodies of their respective Juris-
dictations on the coaat, they having
always been allied with the Vancouver Trades and Labor council. The
best of feeling prevails among the
electrical workers, and the former
seoeders are being congratulated upon
their return to the International and
the American Federation of Labor.
W. A. Vlckery, of the Printing Pressmen and Assistants' union, who has
met with auch splendid success ln the
olty of Quebec, will make a visit to
the maritime provinces la April,
he wlU engage In organisation work.
BANK CLERKS' UNION.
Whole Staff of a Vanoouver Bank
Will Join.
A Toronto dispatch saya that at the
meeting of the executive of the Bank
Clerks' union, held on March 23rd,
nearly 600 men have forwarded applications for membership. The bank officials are very much alarmed over
thla procedure, but the clerks are determined to stand by their rights and
will organise. In many cases the applications were accompanied by the Initiation fees. The whole staff of a
bank In Vancouver forwarded their
names as prospective members, and a
number of clerks ln different towns
and cities of the west have responded.
BARBER8  MEET.
Secretary Reports Thst Trade Is
"Looking Up"—Applications.
There was a good attendance at last
Tuesday night's meeting of the Barbers' local, No. 120. Two applications
for membership were received, and
Seoretary Burkhart reported that trade
ts "looking up." A "union card" sign
has been hung up ln the Regent hotel
barber shop. Oeorge Fenton, a former
president of the local union, made a
very Interesting speech on the sanitary conditions of barber shops and
general benefits to the craft.
It Is reported that there Is a
Nichol ln Vancouver worth a million
dollars.—The Ledge.
Is this our Walter?
STRIKEBREAKERS NOT
DESIRABLE CITIZENS
Before Sir Richard MoBrlde
left for Ottawa, the mine owners on Vancouver island had an
Interview with htm. Nothing
waa said In the dally press as
to the object of the conference
but lt haa leaked out that the
premier gave them hia opinion
ot the type of man imported by
the companies to take the
place of the union workers.
That opinion was not flattering,
In effect be told the operators
that theae strikebreakers were
not desirable assets to the community and in that event he
presumably, suggested that the
sooner they left the island the
better, It won't be long before
the union men are back to
work.
Many Men Allowed Freedom—Angelo Gets
Four Tears .
. The, governor-general on Wednesday
•Igne* the necessary papers for the te-.
lease.o*twentMwe minera oonvlcted
In connection with the Vancouver Island trouble, aid also directed that tha
tnes Inflicted be remitted. As soon aa
the necessary papers arrive at New
Westmlnater, the men will be set at
liberty., This, Is undoubtedly the result olthd untiring efforta of organised labor throughout the Dominion,
ably augmented by the unoeaalng work
of the Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada.' The executive of this body
have continually approached the mlnliter bf justice and urged the minora'
release. This action doea not by any
meana relieve the government ot lta
responsibility In the matter. Whatever error the men committed—If error there were—has been.fully expiated. Their release Is m accord with
the requirements of bociety, and to
have carried their sentences to the extreme limit would have Ignored public
opinion. TheT have been considered
and treated aa common criminals when
It ts clear that no criminal Intent or
criminal Instinct ever actuated them.
The government's prerogative has been
exercised, and It waa certainly high
time. The names of the men "pardoned" are not yet to hand, neither are
the conditions * under- which they are
to be released. Doubtless the department of Justice haa decided, although
tardily, to do the right thing and that
their release is unconditional.
The official signal of the close of
the Vancouver (aland riot eases at the
New Westminster assise court came
at noon on Monday, March 23rd, when
24 miners marched down the' atreet
to the court house. Among them
were Joe' Angelo, - organiser, Ben
Dominic, and J..W. Place, M. L. A.
The court room waa crowded when
Judge Morrison delivered sentences
as follows:
Tried and Convioted
Joe Angelo, Extension, four years.
R. Haddow, Nanalmo, one year.
W. Wardell, Nanalmo,.one year.
A. Jordan; Nanalmo, one year.
R. Oowland, Nanalmo, one year.
F. Celrello, Nanalmo, one year,
H. Martin, Nanalmo, one year.
R. W, Smith, Nanalmo, one year.
A. Wardell, Nanalmo, suspended
sentence.
A, Qola, Extension, suspended sentence.
C. E. Bartholomew, Extension, time
already served.   I   - ■■" ■
A. Hamilton, Extension, already
served. '>•■ 'Ml
Ben Dominic, Extension, one year,
Balrd, Nanalmo, already served,
J. Storey, Nanaimo, already served.
W. Lee, Nanalmo, suspended sentence.
J. W. Place, M.L.A., already aerved.
J, Hodgklnson, Nanalmo, postponed.
O. Steele, Nanalmo, suspended sentence. -
IA, Murdock, Nanalmo, suspended
sentence.
W. Cummins, Nanalmo, suspended
sentence  - t     * - T   ■ »
H. Melkle, Nanalmo, Suspended sen-
In United State aad Canada 200,000 Workers-
§,000 Organised      *
3. F. Brook, president of tha Iator-
natlonal  Laundry  ***■
rived la thla elty i '
aad la a member ot aMt^JEl
tSUftjiWfi
mmw Tb6d£-6ffiT
« route he will visit Bull	
tta laundry workera ot I
TOtted Statea and Cans *
over JOOOOO, of whom   about  Mi
ware union   membera.   Than wai
leaa than 10 per cent of thta m
total  male   worken.    Tha ava
wages paid. women .. employeea
Hoyere and employees work most bar-
monlously together. An agreement
uaa been entered Into for four yeeril
dating from June 16, 1913. Another
mutual arrangement agreed to la tU
contribution to a fund to flght Japanese competition. Employers pay 11
centa a month for each naaTenU
ployed; the union meela thie amount
with a 10 cent monthly Ian on aaaS
—raber, whits th* Mm roioferUy
'tribute Meant* each. TWtmZu_
to over |«w donated every month
to trail the Jape.   In eight yean 3
swa»,rjaKs
ratal paid to San p-nnclecotaidS
workers aa compared to the everaaa
Vanoouver schedule la aa followa:    r
Frloco   Sight Mean i!
Head markers  ..eUJi
Head washers         lui
Waahen .... -™
Helpers  ....
Mangle Olrla
Sorters  .,,.,
Collar room
Ironers
Guilty Unlawful Aaeembly '
Tom Collier, Nanalmo, six months
from data, °' arrest, been ln Jail four
months.
A. Renaldy, Nanalmo, six months.' -
R. Griffiths, Nanalmo, suspended
sentence.
R. Harkle, Nanalmo, postponed.
From Extension—A. Becky, Fair
hurst, J. Ollmour, A. Qreenwell, I.
Oreenwell, A. Hunter, Marshall, O'Nell
Rice, Qutgley, Struthen, Taylor, Van-
gar, Voyovsky—all on suspended sentence. *    . .   .:.
From Cumberland—W. Naylor, Vag-
gatatlm, Benaaki, Brantley, Barnes-
all on suspended sentence.
From Nanalmo—Dugan, Olbaon, B.
Mills, O. Miller, O. Toung, Shoysky, S.
Barker, 8. F. Connor j. Dean, W.
Hoy, O. Moore, Depaulln, R. Raster-
all on suspended eentenco.   't ■■
 i •' ,,t —u     ;,j
The candidacy bf Mra: Justine Olr-
bert for school trustee has been endorsed by the Victoria Trades council. The labor men recognize the value
of a woman In the education of children.
Wringmen
b piecework.
NoB&WworiT" "••■•$"
Vancouver-Nine Houra
Olrla
,.*U.«0
11.01
11.00
1.00
16.00
1.50
HM
18.00
Man!
$11.00
10.00
16.00
10.00
Thos. McLeod, of the staff of the Atlantic hotel, Is still laid up with heart
and kidney trouble.
Head markers ..
Head washers ...
Washers ,;	
Helpers ....;    f#
Mangle girls     6.00
Sorters  .......    mo    u.oj
Collar room    tMri     5
Ironers     7,jo;
Piecework.   No overtime allowed.
Wringmen  ,..,.'  15.00
Following an rates charged customers:
■Man -Wisoo Van.
Shirts «k ,jo
Shirts, fancy  .16      20
Cuftt  06*      .06
Collan   ,    .02i<   .04
Handkerchiefs  01U   .03
Coata ..,. 16"   .10
Vesta   jo      .26
Overalle  .; «. 40     .ij
Jumpers   10      .15
Combinations .....,.,.., .20     .30
Caps  06      .10
Similar prices, so far as comparisons go, are charged for ladles' work.
At Seattle the laundry workers have
met with a lot of opposition from the
employers who are members of the
Laundrymen'e Association, an organisation whose wqrk throughout tbe-
United States Is primarily against labor. It Is a wealthy Institution and
Is as unscrupulous In Its disreputable
work of reducing wages and lobbying
the legislatures as is tbe steel trust.
The union workers have been compelled to organise the Seattle Mutual
Laundry company, with an authorized capital of 62*8,000, In shares of
110 each. It Is estimated that the
laundry business of Seattle amounts
to about 640,000 a week, and organised labor' Is determined to have lta
share. The laundry will be opened to
about two weeke. At Taeoma there Is
only one union laundry and that la
owned principally by members of Organised labor who have subscribed
for shares. While Mr. Brock waa at
the city of destiny he was subjected
to all sorts of annoyance and "frame
ups" by detectives In the employ of
the association of employen, Tke
girls working In laundries In that elty
get about 17 a week, but- work eight
houra beoause the law is very strict
in thla matter. Then have heen several laundry .ownen heavily lined for
.violating tha state regulation. While
on his way to Vancouver Mr. Brook
succeeded ln signing up agreements
with the City laundry of Aberdeen,
and also tbe Central laundry of Seattle. Speaking of tke women In the
business, he said that they were very
la* ln looking after their own Interests, not being bold enough to Join
the union, and thus were Imposed
upon by employers who were always
at war with the orkaalslng- faglt>-
itors." In Vaneouvar there war* about
800 laundry worken, of whom'about
100 were males. So far as he win
aware the laundry-listed priose In thla
city were higher than even thue of
Cincinnati, whloh wen the highest
charged the publlo la the United
States, and In both places the average wagee were tar too loj.  »/•
r.,   i.|     ■ < ip't j 111,   \ *■
> "I believe that Prince Rupert will
soon be the greatest flatting'port .en
the coast," remarked P. D. QUI, tke
secretary of the Halibut Fishermen's
union,.tin Ms vl* here tust.Walk. Ho
aavs that many of .tbe Seattle .Ilahlat:
companies wttl locate hire and moat
ot the boats will make this their headquarters providing the American ships
aro permitted-to ship their flsh over
the Grand Trunk Paelfle. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY..... MARCH 27, 1114
Prudential
WALL
FINISH
The only real Washable Wall Finish on
the market. Tou cm strike matches on it
Yes, then you can wash off the mark.
That's some test, eh?
rr is MADE IN B.C.
BY ac WORKMEN
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria      Vancouver      Oalgary      Edmonton
lie Strike
L
in the mining campa of Cumberland,
Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, and all
workers are requested to avoid the above
places as a plague.
BOWSER'S SPECIALS AND THE
MILITIA ARE STILL ON
THE GROUND
at the expense of the government, to
do the scab-herding for Mackenzie &
Mann, who seem to have McBride and
Bowser bought and paid for.
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT
OF WORK IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,
AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A
MAN TO GET A JOB UNLESS HE
GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FEL-
LOW WORKMEN.
KEEPAWAY
FROM
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
COT ill NEWS;
A
Large Shipments of Produce
Arriving From Outside Points
To-day's Quotations Are
Practically Unchanged—
Poultiy Is Scarce
i
Mr. Blook, a wealthy egg exporter
ot China, haa asserted that he could
put good Chinese egge In San Francisco at a coat ot 10 centa a dosen. In
China where>the wagea of egg break-
en are equal to 5 to 7H centa a day.
5 cente a dosen la a high price tor
eggs," says John Stewart, of San Francisco. He had himself heard a guarantee to deliver Chinese egge for delivery next November to January In
quantity up to 50,000 oaaee at 17 cents
f.o.b. Ban Francisco. Laat winter Chinese fresh eggs had sold on a par With
fancy eaetern refrigerator Aprils to 1
cent below. Most ot them went to the
bakers' trade. Orocen, hotels, etc..
etuck to the Fetaluma atock, which
Mr. Stewart described aa the finest
eggs on earth, running 56 to 62 pounds
to the caae and all white and clean.
MARKET NOTIS
Nicola   valley   ponltrymen
formed an association.
Tba largest incubator In operation
In Canada la aald to be at Nanalmo,
Poultry Is still scarce on the market
and making excellent prlcea
Potatoes are at aame prlcea aa last
week, no change la anticipated In the
Immediate future.
The Central Selling agency thla
year will oharge 75 centa a ton for
handling potatoea.
The city market shipped two can
red Dakota potatoes for seed to the
Okanagan laat week.
Miss Livingston gave a ten daya'
course In domestic science at the Far-
mere' institute at Agassis.
The residents of Golden have petitioned the federal government to ea-
tabllah a demonstration orchard than
thla year.
Roads an beginning to dry ont in
the agricultural districts ot the Fraaer
valley, and elty antolata in large numben are been.     •        '
The BurqulUam Farmers' institute
hu built a warehouse In which grain
and other supplies purchased by co-
operaton will be stored.
A mixed car arrived trom Agassis
on Tuesday containing one and a half
tone carrota, three tons white potatoes
and twelve tons rede.
Over the Fraser valley line of the
B. C. Blectric, two milk tralne a day
Instead of one aa now, will be ran,
commencing in April.
Saturday displays ln the producen'
stalls In front of the market, are doing
very effective work In advertising the
market and selling produce.
The small fruits an at pnsent neglected by B. O. growers, yet If properly handled, they will give a better
return per acre than almost any other
crop.
For the flnt time ln history, a shipment ot egge, presumably Chinese,
from the Pacific coaat, aa well aa from
Edmonton, arrived at Toronto this
week.
Mr. Rail, of Mayne Island nurseries,
waa a visitor tb the market on Monday. He atatea that tomatoes an showing up beautifully and promise a record early crop.
On Friday laet the city market re-
ceived ten boxea Golden Spur from
Victoria. Theae wen retailed at three
buachea tor 25 centa, and were all
cleared by evening.
Eggs are now in the height ot the
taaon, large quantities coming tn
from all the farming districts. The
prices are wholesale, 26 to 11 centa,
and retail at SO centa a dosen.  Laat
season larger quantities were coming
ln from the United: States, prices then
being 24 centa a dosen.
Among the Victoria Colonist "Fifty
yean Ago" items Is the following:
"Eggs Is Egge We read that In Oregon they do not count egge by the
dosen since a ship came In with* four
and a half tone, and another with two
and a half tone."
The numben' of vegetable and fruit-
canning factories in each province of
Canada ara aa followa: Alberta, nil;
British Columbia, t; Manitoba, nil:
New Brunswick, nil; Nova Scotia, li
Ontario, 66; Prince Edward Island,
nil; Quebec, 10; Saskatchewan, niL
Total, 62.  .
H. T. Lookjrer, manager ot die
Hudson's Bay Company's Vancouver
establishments, haa donated a prise of
6100 to the Vancouver Exhibition Association for the beet exhibit ot fruits
and vegetables arranged by one Individual from fruits and vegetables
grown In hla own garden and eared for
by himself In his spare time; Profes-
slonala are absolutely barred from thie
contest
A prophecy that by 1917 or 1618,
four yean hence, the apple crop of
tha Okanagan valley will total 3,000
carloads, and that hy that time a oold
storage warehouse costing In the
neighborhood of (200,000 will he a
necessity tor Vernon, wen two of the
features ot the. first of a series of
meetinga held at the courthouse laat
week, under the' auspices ef the
Okanagan Farmers' Institute.
THIS WEEK'S PRICES:
Apple*
Royal Jenette, Ne. 1,
Royal J.'nVtt.,' "So"""i.
Ban   Davis) NoT'"l*	
box  _...-..„......._....
Ban   Davis,   No.    2,
box
Cookers, box- ■■i.'.o.'.l.y.. ........
Vegetables
Potatoes, sack -...—_|  .80
1 Carrota, sack ..».»....».«..»..
Turnips, sack ..............    .10
"■»» Parsnips, sack .„... ■„■ ..„„„
Rhubarb, lb. ... .	
Read Lettuce, dos..— ........
Cut Flowen
Sweet Peas, bunch—. 1	
Carnations, dos. .......... ........
Egge
Local .new laid. dos. .......
Wash., new laid, dos... ........
Poultry
young hens, dos.._._...|10.00
Heavy hens. lb.—...... „.,»..
Pullets, dos. i ».oo
Broilers, dos. ..............   6.00
Ducks, dos. ....■...".;■,'/,■■. 10.00
Peed
Hay, ton  114.00
Straw, bale  .....— »..._.
Oats, ton _.....-.....„..'!._.....
Wheat, ton .... -„....
Bran, ton   „.„
Shorts, ton .................. ........
O SM
o t.oo
0. 1.75
O t.SO
o i loo
A .71
9 •*»
O .It
5 .10
9 ,«0
.06
.90
.10
.17
11.00
t.oo
11.00
* 110.00
■<*
f 11.00
11.00
Sl.00
10.00
T-bOne   and
Beef
Porter-
houae steake, lb.-
Ib	
Round steak.
Pot roast, lb.
Lei and loins, lb..
Shoulder, lb.
Chops, lb. .,
Pork
Lanjb
V
V
Leaa, lb. 	
Louis, lb.  _...._.._ ........
Fore quarters, lb........ ......
Chopa, loin, Ib.  ........
Chopa, lb. „.™.....„_™ . ,
Finest Looal Beef.
Beat cute, lb..™.......— ......     O
Ribs, lb. _        A
Pot Roasts, lb      8
Lamb, lege, lb...........
Lamb, loins, lb ...
Lamb, shoulders, lb...
Pork, legs, lb	
Pork, loins,  lb...
Pork, shoulders, lb..... 	
Sausages, lb	
Fresh Fleh.
Halibut, lb _;  ..... '
Salmon, two lbs      .25
Ling cod, lb..-.-....	
Rook cod, lb »...„	
Bed snapper, lb ....
Soles, lb." .	
Smelts, two lbs...™.-.:......
Herring, lb  ™ ......
Whiting, lb. .................. ......
Skate, lb.  „ ......
smoked Flsh.
Klppera, lb. „™....™™M' HM.
Kippers, three lbs...™ ......
Bloaters, lb. .........™. ......' .
Bloaters, three lbs  .	
Halibut, lb.   .....
Filleted cod, lb  	
Black cod, two lbs.	
Eastern haddle, I lbs. ......
Kippered Salmon, lb...    .10
Shell Fleh.
.10
.15
.21
.16
,MK
.22  '
.20
.14
!!*
.26
.20
.16
.11
.10
.14
.11
,20
.16
-HH
Crabs, two
Clams, lb, ..
!l6
.25
.06
Official notloe la Issued from Ottawa that gill net licenses have been
Increased from (5 to $10; drag seines
tram $25 to $50; puna selnee from
$75 to $100, and trap nets from $75
to $100. This la to be effective from
April 1st The data for the expiry
of all licensee haa been changed from
December 81st to March 81st to eor-
reepond with the' oloalng of the Dominion fiscal year.
HIGH OOBT OF LIVING/
HATCHING  SEASON y
Have All the Chloke Out at game
Time—Set Average Sized Eggs
The beginning of April is plenty
early enough,' under ordinary conditions, to have chloke ont At that Ume
lt will be possible to secure them ln
goodly numbers. Mora than half the
season's work and worry will be prevented hy having all the chicks yon
intend to raise out about the same
time. An extended hatching season
means a prolonged period of worry.
Chlcke of all- agee mean much additional work right through the summer season. Make thorough preparation pow and when tha weather moderates, go to tt and setae many hens
aa yon oan accommodate at the one
time, or as many eggs la a reliable
Incubator aa lt will hold, and, with
fair luck, yon,will he off to a good
start.
All egge of abnormal .character
ahould be rejected for hatching. They
ahould not be too large nor.yet too
email, neither should they have uneven or extra thick or extra thin
shells, hut should be of average slse,
well shaped and free trom rldgee or
other blemishes. If soiled they ihould
be cleaned by the use of a damp cloth,
STRAWBERRIES
Enough Can Be Grown en City Lot to
Supply Family
Penone living in the city can grow
enough strawberries to supply their
own table on the ordinary olty lot To
obtain the best results, care and cultivation an essential, but the returna
Invariably pay for the labor. Better
strawberries or larger crops are not
produced anywhere than right here In
the west It la juat as easy to grow
them In town aa on the farm. Neglect
la the prime factor in atrewberry failures; and moat strawberry beds suffer
from laek ot attention and starvation.
Proper fertilisation and Intelligent culture insure enormous crops of finest
fruit aad freedom bom diseases and
pests. White grubs, out-worms, crown
mlnen, etc., can all be controlled hy
preventive measures. Never set strawberries in or near olover sod or hay
fields, Suoh ground ahould have at
least two yean' cultivation before using tor strawberries. Remove the
mulch directly after fruiting. Thla
helps to control many evils.
UNIQUE DEAL
Senile pence Company Turna Over
Buelneee to Grain Growers
A deal unique In tta conception waa
completed laat week at Winnipeg,
when the Sarnia Fence company
agreed to turn over Its entire western
business to the Grain Growers' company, which will pay an agreed price
a ton for the output of the factory,
and will retail lt among the memben
of the grain growere' associations of
Manitoba and the United Farmera of
Alberta at a working margin above
oost The agreement goes Into effect
within ten daya. Thla la character.
tied by Vice-president Lloyd Lott ot
the Sarnia Fence oompany, ae the flnt
step In the evolution whereby farmers
will ultimately control and own the
producing sources of their mechanical
necessities.
LADNER NOTES.
Market Manager McMillan of Vancouver, visited Ladner last week and
made quite a number ot calls on regular senders.
Mr. Hutcheson, of Ladner, is busy
preparing land for setting out small
fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, loganberries, etc.
With the Ladner ferry In operation
lt will be possible to have the morn;
lng'e picking on the market at 9 a.m.
FEATHERED FANCIES
Thlt Chicken Haa Fur
Elliott Hirblne, a poultry fancier,
ot Wesson, Mist., hu a freak hen
which le covered with a growth of
flne fur about five Inches long; In lieu
ot feathers. In all other respects the
hen Is of the Rhode Island species.
Herblne will endeavor to breed hens
with fur, The hen when exhibited at
a poultry ahow recently attracted con-
tiderable attention.
Accurate Poultry Account
An accurate account ahould be kept
to find ont whether the poultry la paying a profit and Juet how much. In
doing thla, don't forget to give them
credit for the frying chickens,-, broilers, roaaten and all the egge used In
the home. Quite often thla la overlooked and the poultry receives no
credit for saving raisers what would
be a good deal of expense if they had
to buy fresh eggs and all the poultry
they uied. It poultry la not making
a profit remedy the dlffloulty or elte
keep only enough poultry to supply
the family,
Feeding Poultry
Tom Barron, whose blrdi have
made such high records ln egg-laying
contests during the put year, hu divulged hla feeding eystem. In the morning he feeds a mixture of wheat, oats,
cracked corn with screenings, a few
split peas and perhaps a little Kafir
corn, in a litter compoaed of out straw,
chaff, put mose, eto, At noon, more
of the same mixture la fad, and at
night the following mash: One-third
bran; one-fourth middling, one-fourth
meal,, one-eighth mut mul (flsh or
granulated mut), and ahout one-
eighth clover alfalfa meal, changing
the middlings sometimes for ground
oats, This Is mixed with water from
a large boiler, ln which there Is always a tew pallfula ot whole'wheat
The birds ara fed all they can rat of
the math.
PONT FORGET!
Spring Time is Planting Time
< Love for beautiful gardens, making home eurroundlnge attractive,
with flowen, ehrubbery, ehade and fruit treee, le a natural human
trait Implanted In the heart of men by the Creator of the Unlveree.
Don't dwarf that natural Instinct, but cultivate It to the fulleet, and
make not only your own III* better, but alao that of your fellow eltl-
xen who may not have the opportunity you heve.      J
Now It the time to make your eeleetlone, when our prices were
never lower, and our atock never better to meet the demands of the
cultivated aeethetlo taetee.
In eur eteek of over $100,00040, we have choice flowering plants,
; evergreen and deciduous flowering and ornamental treee and shrubs In
: great vsrlsty; holly, privet, and leunl for hedges, all aim; ehelee
eteek of Shade Treee, arid an Immense stock ef all the most approved
• varieties ef applee, pear*; plume, cherries, and email fruit. The letter
(fruit trau) we ara offering at special low prion to clear tha ground
for additional atock coming In.
pent forget we can meet your neede better, than you ean get
from eteek grown out of our own province.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Suits 710 Dominion Bldg., 207 Hastings St. West
•PHONE: SEYMOUR 6661
Store, 2410 Oranvllle St. Phone: Bayvlew 1026
Greenhouses and Nureerlee at Roya, on B. C. B. Ry. Eburne Line,
about two milee south of olty limits. .Phone: Eburne 4$.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
|       Florists and Nursery Men
THREE aTONI* IN VANOOUVER
40 Haetlnta «.      Phene *ey. W 401 Gaaaa**b St
IM Qranvllle tt    Phene aay. Wl
VICTOKA ITORB*, ell VTJBW R.
OBBBNHOUfU
Hat Ave. and Main M. Victoria, I.O.
Phene Fairmont IN.
Hammond, B.O.
We have them for your garden—everything that grows. Alto a
full line of field seeds, timothy, clover, alfalfa, alto grains. We also
have a full line of fruit and ornamental stock, fertilisers, agricultural
implements, spray pumps, spraying material, bee supplies and all
garden requitites.    Catalogue for asking.
The Henry Nursery and Seed House
A. R. Macdougall, Proprietor.
IMKINQSWAY - ■ • VANCOUVER, B. C.
s RITCHIE'S SEEDS a
Grown from our own personally selected pedigree strains and thoroughly
tetted as to quality and growth, will produce
THE BEST VEGETABLES, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
and THE FINEST LAWNS
CATAIOGCB AMD OUIDB FRBS ON RS0U8ST
RITCHIE BRAND & CO.
723 Robson Street Vancouver, B.C.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mopt Pleasant headquarter! tor Caipenten' Toolt aad all
., , kindt of Builden' and Coatractoh' Suppliet
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fur. 447. 2337 Main Stmt
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Great, naaaalng Dinner.)
Two Stereo
' Carpenters' White Duck Overalle,   II    Ment Heavy Tweed Panto, unlet,
with II pockets, union lsbsl H.lt   ||      lsbel a*» te IM*
We ssk fer year patronage Incur tun and  Overcoat   Depart,
mente, when we give value tvorytlme.
RENNIE'S
SEEDS Ton
—OUR CATALOG!
It larger and better than ever. Several
splendid new varieties. Fori! years the
leading authority on Vegetable, Flower
snd Fsrm Seeds, Plants sad Bulbs. You
need it before you decide what kinds to
plant.  Send for your copy to-day.
W* RENNIE CLw
HM Hamer Street       VANCOUVER |
tarn Siv. 318
Giuirviue Street
VAUDEVILLE
MATINBB DAILY ISO
BVS, PBBTORMANCE 1.11
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Meana
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
tM, MO, 1.10
Season's Prices-
Matinee ice, Evenings lte, lie.
—From SaeramtBto Baa.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
UP-TO-DATE VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTO-PLAYS
Contlnueua Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thurtdayt.
WEEK OP MARCH 80th
MON,   TUBS,    WSD.
CALUOPt TRIO
Featurlnt Ike Hainan Calliope
DOM aad WOLFORD
Slaitaf, Piano, Whlitllns
ROQUI1 aad PINONE
Sins Inf aad Iiutrumental Aet
ALBERT BOH
Veaellen Viollniit
THURS,,   PRI,   SAT.
MAUNA LOA POUR
Karmoaicaa Hating and Muiieal Act
OLIVER aad BLACEWILL
The Oriiiaal Kentucky Blaekblria"
BARLOW* COMEDY DOOI
Mill EMMIE BEEBE
Statist Comedienne
4-REELS LATEST PICTURM-4
10 Osnts-ANT.BEAT-lO Cents
AMATEUR NIOHT-WtDNESDAY. OmOAL PAMt VANCOUVB
THE BRFTISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 155.
VANCOUVER, B. ajgRIDAT, MftBCH 27,19lf~
Mr. Man
THE NEW SPITS IN ALL THE SEASON'S LATEST STYLES ABE WAITING
YOUR SELECTION. THEY ARE MADE
OF IMPORTED TWEEDS, CHEVIOTS,
AND WORSTEDS. BEOAUSE OF THE
EXTRA CARE GIVEN TO THE FINISHING. THESE SUITS WILL RETAIN
THEIR SHAPE TO THE END. IF YOU
• ARE LOOKING FOR A NEW SPRING
" * ** ■
SUIT AND WANT THE BEST VALUE
OBTAINABLE YOU MUST SEE OUR
>- i (. ■ j -. -" ■ -"i *tf .    .. .   .  ,,"
STOCK.
DONT FORGET TO MENTION THAT
YOU SAW OUR AD. IN THE FEDERA-
' .- : ' ''
TIONIST, THAT WILL BE THE MEANS
OF SECURING FOB YOU AS EXTRA
MEASURE OF OARE AND ATTENTION
\ . v..
Prices $15-* to $35-*-
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIB CO., LIMITED
'SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
I Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
" LIMITED
Wholesale
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
JOIEPH N. WEBER
Preeldent American Federation of Musicians, wtth headquarters at It, Louis,
Mc-Elacttd at the Philadelphia convention ln IMS, and re-elected at each
annual convention since that Ume.
Many State Enterprises In
Full Swing and Are
Profitable
Labor Rule Makes for General Well-being of the
People
[From our Auatrallan Correspondent]
SYDNEY, tt. S. W., Feb. 28.-
It Is not too much to aay that ln New
South Wales we appear to be nearlng
the dawn of tbe social mlllenlum. We
are letting away from, the old Ideaa
of private enterprise. For seme time
put we have had state rallwaya, tram-
l.wayt, paat offices, schools, and ao on.
Of later yeara we have got state brickwork*, metal quarries, lime works, cement quarrlet, state-built homes, Joinery works, tardea cities and shipbuilding work*. We have had great
success with tbem under the day labor
system. And with all this we have
paid onr working men well. A fort-
night'* holiday on full pay every year
I* th* rule tn the state's employ. And
wtth all thla we have done well. All
onr atate schemes are showing good
profits. All have turned oat their product cheaper than "fat" eould—ln the
caae of the brickworks the state-Is
selling t5 per 1000 cheaper than "fat'
Which of course hit* the plute In- the
right place—In the pocket The state
Joinery works are so successful that
over 10 per cent of the work done Is
for private builders who would rather
deal with the atate worke than with
the private mills, beeause the work Is
better done and cheaper. The premier
itate of tbe commonwealth, New
South Wale* baa shown considerable
activity In fighting plute tnd with
some success. Quite recently the
bread combine raised their prlcea ot
bread to the government Institutions.
The state began to Institute enquiries, and found out tbat bread eould
be produced and cold for 2 centa par
pound. When lt waa aeen by the combine that the government were thinking of starting a bakery businsss the
combine climbed down and .offered to
•apply bread at a reduction—In tome
owe* Juit on 30 per eent below tbe
previoui offer. But the government
waa adamant It aald: "We will not
..have combine bread" In effect, and
H bought a bakery business, one of the
but In Nsw South Wales, and right
now it Is hard at work turning out
bread at a cheaper rate than they
were getting It from tbe combine.
Tbe atate le alio erecting abbatolra
for the killing of stock, u lt recognises that pure food la one of tbe et-
sentlals for tbe health of the people.
It will also erect tallow and boiling
down works. Another enterprise It
the state dairy farm for the supply of
fresh and pure milk for Infant Ufe.
Thlt lt a grand thing and only goee to
show the humanitarian principles behind labor rule. Later on we ara to
bave a itate Jute faotory, as. wtll u
a state farm supply warehouse, aad
state clothing factories.
Three Months'Trial
ription Free
With a view to increating the
usefulness and scope df The
Fed. any paid-up reader it. entitled to tend in the names and
addressee of not more than
three persons whom they believe might become intereited.
These will be placed on the
mailing Hit for three monthi
each, free.   Rush in the names.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE itrike ii still oh at the
1 Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Greek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the itrike It settled
Order Ymir Minen'Uiiu
EIGHT PAGES
Grown Haf Beet of the Argument as Against the
Prisoners
Criminal Code Is Two Edged
Sword For Suppressing •
Dissatisfaction
tay tee, H. McVety)
Attention wu directed lut wuk to
tbe nature of the offence necessary to
bring "three or mora Pereou" within
the scope of the lections of the criminal code governing "unlawful assemblies" aad "rlota." With the eon-
n of the ' New Wutmlntter
utile, the writer pay, with propriety,
direot the attention of Canadian work.
Ing men to tbe machinery by which a
large number of the mlnen were oonvlcted and' by which any demonttra-
tlon of workingmen may be discouraged by the authorities. Probably no
series of trial* In the history ot Canada hu done more to cut suapicldb
on the fairness of tbe much-lauded
"Britlah Juitlce" and trial hy Jury,
quite overlooking,- for the moment the
treatment accorded the minera before
trial by refusal of ball, which contributed heavily to the (am* effect
\ Crown'* Prerogative.
To make the reaaon ton the cue
with which the crown secured convictions apparent the sections of the
criminal code dealing with challenges
and their use follow, the quotations
being sections 932-933, Chap. 141, Re-
vised Statutes 1906:
"932—Every one Indicted for
treason or for any offence punishable with duth, la entitled to
eballengex twenty juror* peremptorily.
"Second—Every one Indicted
for any offence other tban twa-
son, or an offence punishable with
death, for which he may be sentenced to Imprisonment for more
then Ave yean, I* entitled to chal-
lenge twelve Jurors peremptorily.
"Third—Every one Indicted for
any other offence Is entitled to
challenge four Juron peremptorily.
"MS—The crown shall have
power to challenge four Juron
peremptorily, and may direct any
number of Juron not peremptorily challenged by the accused to
atand by until all the Juron have
bun called who are available for
the purpoie of trying that Indictment ■•''•••
"Seeond—Tbe accused may be
called upon to declare whether he
challenges any Juron peremptorily or otherwise, before the
prosecutor Is called upon to de-
clare such juror to atand by, or
challenges him either for cause
or peremptorily."
Aa the maximum term ot Imprisonment for unlawful assembly I* one
year and two yeara for riot four challenge* an all tbe defence I* allowed,
except challenges "for cause" which
are very rarely used, and more seldom allowed by the presiding Judge,
who decides In eaoh cue.
Selection of Jury.
At New Westminster, when Juron
ara secured chiefly from the farmer
class of tbe Fraser valley, one hundred and fifty Juron were summoned
for tbe trials and aside from the fact
that farmers are strongly In favor of
eheap labor and high prices, and bave,
u a general rule, Uttle sympathy with
any movement Intended to raise
wages, there Is no criticism to be
made of the panel. With the defence
solicitor compelled to flrat pan Judgment on each juror, until his four
challenges were exhausted, and with
the crown prosecutor In a position to
"stand by" or "Btand aside" Jurors
who might be acceptable to the defence, It will be seen at once that the
crown selected every jury out of
twenty called, assuming tbat It also
exercised lta challenges, which wu,
of course, unnecessary, In that case
the selection being from elxteen. The
actual Jury might be at the beginning,
middle, or foot of the list the crown
merely Instructs all who are objectionable to "stand by" until twelve are
secured who are satisfactory.
At all such trials both sides are
active In their endeavor to' secure Information regarding the opinions of
Jurymen and the crown usually bas
the beet of the argument because of
Its large number of spying policemen
and beoause the court offlcen are
often ln charge of the Juron and
naturally bear them discussing the
cases. Hence any juror known to
bave stood for acquittal In one cue
la alwaya challenged or "stood by" In
succeeding cues, until Anally It Is
almost a foregone conclusion, even In
ordinary assises, where they ara reasonably lengthy, that Juron favorable
to the defence rarely, If ever, slip
put the eagle eye of the Mown ud
lta many splei.
Two-edged Sword.
Under the circumstances, to thoie
who have been fairly close In tbelr
observations, the wonder la not the
large number of convictions, but tbe
large number the defence solicitors
were able to get free. No suggestion
is made or intended that ln any trial
unlawful method* were used, the Intention being to famlllarlte the work,
era with the two-edged* aword provided by the criminal code for the suppression of sny expression ot dissatisfaction with existing conditions.
Neither would the amendment or repeal of the aectlons be altogether an
unmixed bletilng, for la It not the
hope tnd deilre that the-working
clan will one day become lufflolently
unanlmoui to elect men to the poiltlon* carrying with tbem the power
to either enforce or abate a host of
law* now worked only Igalnst member* of the working class, bnt capable of being Interpreted la favor of
our elan Instead of agalnit ltt
OWEN MILLER .
Secretary Auerloan Federation ot I
cunt, with!Headquarters at Mil I
Btreet, It Unto, Mo.
HASDECIDEDGRUD&E
Premier of South Australia
Refuses Reporters Official News
Labor Daily Will Be Published Shortly at Sydney,
N.S.W.
[From our Australian Correspondent)
SYDNEY, N. 8. W., Feb. 18-
The premier of South Australia hu
a decided grudge agalnat labor newipapera. Some time ago he refuted to
allow the Adelaide labor "Dally Herald" to tender for supplying Haniard
to the people through tta columni. Hla
lateat move ia to forbid that paper*?
reporters to eater tbe government
buildings to secure official newe for
lte readers. He has also refused them
tbe right to use the motor car placed
at tbe disposal of other Journals in
following the ministry around on tbelr
travels. This la a healthy alga, for
tt ahow* that plute In South Australia
fear* labor. And when plate shows
the white flag hla deatb-knell le nigh.
8hortly we will have-a dally 'paper in
New South Wales controlled by labor.
Already nearly $480,000 la in and a
further 956.000 ta promlied. The
paper Is to be a morning Journal. It
will bave a certified circulation of eeveral hundred thousand throughout
Australia. Then labor will be able to
do more than at pruent.
MERRITT MINERS
Will
Form  a  Union—Dlsorimlnstlon
In Men and Wagea
(Special to the Federatlonist)
MERRITT, B.C., March 25.—For
some time there bas been considerable dissatisfaction among the coal
minera of thia dlatrlct u a remit of
discrimination among employees of
the Inland Coal A Coke company. It
appears that on the flnt of the
month It was announced that some
thirty or forty minera would be laid
off, when, In fact only three were discharged, namely, John Cheyne, Tom
Fraser and J. Scoble. Superintendent
Andrew Bryden wu uked why they
were singled out, and he replied tbat
twelve diggers, all to be young men,
muet go, and that be told the pit boss
to plok them out This boss bad been
there only about a month, and knew
nothing about these men In quution.
The superintendent wu then uked
how was It that they could not get
work till the services of the othen
were dispensed with. Wu lt because
they got 65 centa a ton for eoal while
the others received but 55 cents? Tbe
superintendent u well u the retained
men denied this, Bryden stating that
he must make a start Altogether in
the district In both mines—Inland
Coal & Coke company' and Nicola
Coal fi Coke company—there are
about 500 men working three days
V week, and prospects are poor. How-
evor, what with discrimination ln
hiring and discharging men and the
uneven wagu paid, the mlaera here
are contemplating the formation of a
union.
Mn. William Altman had the misfortune pf falling down stain recently
and throwing her ankle out of place
and bruising her otherwise consider-
able.—Canton (Kan.) Pilot.        ,
Room and Board
Neat, clean and attractive. Break-
fut only l( desired. Randy to
car-barns and aultable for union
street-railway employees. Ratea
very reasonable.
Apply MRS. E. A. TUBMAN,
40   Fourteenth   Avenue' Wut
Telephone Fairmont 331L
CaSTOr) 11-50 FEB
oavio sranem, ltd.
1
W.!IIJf
MVW SSCJWSA LTst
1111 ""j^Vti"
BUY MEN'S TROUSERS
\ 11,,
AT SPENCER'S
Tou get the Benefit of the Largest Stook in
the Oity to Select From
TWEED TROUSERS-In i wide rug* of twtedt, .fit
brown end gray Aixturet. Three ta five pocket*; *M*'or
buk itrapi. A good opportunity hit* to match war old
suit or odd coat..................... .(US to SLff
HEAVY SERGE TROUSERS-Thit la. known u *
"Railroad Serge." Aa extra heiyy weight aad * ri*h
dark trade: made with big hipi, tide ttrape aad five poo-
kcti; all thai ,....*Ju»
WHIPCORD TROUSBRS-Made of huvy dark grey
whipcord with plain hottomt, buk ttrapa tad five pocket*:
all tint to 44       .....|MS
CORDUROY TROUSERS-Made of a huvy fawn cor.
duroy in a fine rib. cuffed hottomt, belt loopt, tide ttraps,
five pockctt with dom* futenert; titet 11 to 44.
Price ..'"..' ....(SJS
KHAKI DUCK TROUSERS-Made of heavy khaki
duck, doable tut ud kaeet: four large pocket* with SIM
ud dome futenert; in all met.  "Price SMS
HALIFAX TWEEDS-Thiiii the durable any dl*go*al
cloth. One of the htrdett wearing trower tabrfci; oh—
hottomt; three pocketi; all tint. Jfciei fUS
. \ '
Recommended to the Man WWWaafa
Spring Underwear
The lines that best represent to our idea the
ideal Spring weight underwear are tbe following:
SPENCERIA BRAND, light natural wool, eUttic ribbed
ihirti and drawer*; all iliei.  Price, per garment....|1 JO
STANFIELD'S LIGHT SPRING WEIGHT UNDERWEAR, natural color ihirti and drawen; all sixes. Per
garment   , |LM
STANFIELD'S PURE SILK AND WOOL WHITE
UNDERWEAR; light weight; all sites. Price, per garment  .1  ...... .(NUN
TURNBULL'S LIGHT WEIGHT ELASTIC RIBBED,
natural wool; all sixes.  Per garment  .tlM
PENMAN'S LIGHT WEIGHT ELASTIC RIBBED,
natural mixture; an excellent garment for the money .He,
COMBINATIONS for     (IJS
Everything Ready for Ont-of-Doon
■-Screen Doom, Screen Windowi,
Hammocks, Lawn Mower*, Etc
The handy man will be greatly in evidence this weekend. You will see him on the lawn giving the sward
its first treatment, or with hammer and saw in hand
"tinkering" at a window box or porch seat, If he
visit! Our fifth floor he will find all the requisites for
his job—GOOD TOOLS if he should need them,
SCREEN DOORS ready to hang, SCREEN WINDOWS, SCREEN WIRE CLOTH if there should be
some window that can not be accommodated with the
stock size: LAWN MOWERS, LAWN ROLLERS,
NETTING, FENCING WIRE, HAMMOCKS, etc.
We have the largest stock in the city of aome of these
things, and in all cases our ouying has been on a scale
to ensure the lowest possible prices.
David Spencer limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD,      |     DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Heintzman&Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLO ON IEAION ABLE TUUtl
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Haibnii Street WetL
B. C. Electric Irons
The Cheapest
High Standard
Electric Iron
On the Market
ByFirtheBwt g
Electric Iron      li
On the Muket
At Any Price
PRICE (to partlei utlng B. C. Electric current)
$3.00
Every Iron le Guaranteed by the Company fer TEN YEARS.
mXtm  B.C. ELECTRIC «»■»*
PHONE, SEYMOUR $000
Ne-Da*" PAGJ5 FOUR
THE BRimi* C0^UM#14 FEDKftATXONIST.
PRUJAY ......MARCH 17,
r
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and ftaatrvt, .. W.700,000
SS tranche! tn Canada
X genera} banking bualneaa trana-
aeted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at blgbeet
current rate
East End Branch
IH HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarrls, Manager
IB. t FEDERATIONIST
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1MI
t 11,600,00
1MOW00
•1|
I Paid-up Capital
Reurve 
Total AtaeU • -
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
S]AVING5
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
buelneee will be welcome be It large sr
entail
FOURTEEN BRANCHES ,IN
VANCOUVER
Ithe
HC01POUTED
1155
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve SII.ITWTS
Savings Accounts
Barings aooountt ar* conducive
to provident living. In onr
Barings Department they may
be opened In tbe name of one
Individual or la the aamea ot
two or more Jointly, with the
privilege for eaeh of depositing
or withdrawing money aa de-
tired. Tbe Bank of Toronto accepts Saving! Account*, irree-
pective of tbe amount ot the
initial deposit
VnMlahee erery Friday meralag Or **
~   0. fadaratloaiat, SI
R.'Parm. Pettlplece •
DIRECTORS: Jaa. Campbell, preeldent;
Christian Blverta, vice-president; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, aeeretary.
treaeurer, and' R. P. Pettlplece.
ment approach tlie entire subject, ln
a statesmanlike manner, take over
and administer hospitals and sanitaria, help in the provision of open
spaces ln thickly populated areas and
stop the nefarious work of the Jerry-
builder and food faker. By so doing
they will promote the well-being of
the province. '
Ofleei Boom HT, Baler Teaiple.
TeL Szehaagc an. MM.
Advertlalng Manager
M. C. Hinder
Subacrlptlon: 11.10 per year; la Vaaeeavw
City, 12.00; te unlona aubaerllmg
la a body, 11.11.
"Salty at Labor i IM lap* of tke wed*."
FRIDAY ..MARCH 27, 1114
JUSTICE!
Miners are now released from prison
cells, Not at liberty, "suspended sentence" still bangs over their heads.
They are bondmen, not free. British
courts of "Justice''—law courts—have
said so. Damocles' sword still hangs
by a thread. Dogberry says: "Speak
false, plead guilty and go." "Tell the
truth, refuse to lie, and—baok to Jaa"
Waa there ever suoh a travesty of
Justice? Is Justice to be bartered,
trafficked Int Is It to be weighed, ln
tbe scales wltb dollars and cental
Tet the people are told to respect
the "majesty of the law" and the
Judges who administer It. Contempt
of court Is an awful offence. Nearly
as bad as belittling the German Emperor's moustache. No, we must not
show any contempt for the courts.
We must be law abiding citlsens and
wonder who holds the club.
nawm*f t*e greMoh-it'* «*t<bi*g.
Demand the union label when
spending union wages.
Every man who Is employed at starvation wages is throwing a member
ot organlted labor out of work.
Deposits
WfiOOflOO
Main Office-     ■
4M HASTINGS ST. WEST
(N*«r Rloharda)
Branches—
Car. Hading* and Carrall St*.
'   New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRAHCO-CANADIAN
MONET   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITT    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company1! Office
Sir HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Swloe Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakes.
Wa Vat vale* Heat.
BELYEA?BAKERY
ALL KIND! Or
CAKE*. PABTRV AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink* aad Lunohes
AU Ooods Fresh Dally.
City Auction and Com.
minion Company
Cash nald for houses and suites
cf furniture or Auction arranged.
SatlataoUon guaranteed, prompt
aettlemento.
ARTHUR E. BETCHLEV
Auctioneer ,    ley tm
_______ =====
Shingle Weavers, Sawmill
Workers and Woodsmen
Tike Notice
All intereited
in organization are. re-
quested to at
once cill at Room UT, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
OEO.  HEATHERTON
A. F, of L. General Organiser
OOVERNMENT AID
Last week the annual report of the
directors of the B. C. Antituberculosis society announced that "it ts a
question whether we will be able to
keep thli Institution open unleu
something Is done to aid ua financially." When every country In the
world is lavishly spending money to
flght this fearful scourge, lt Is Impossible to think that British Columbia, a province so rich in natural resources, will see Tranqullle sanitarium
close Its doors on account of lack of
funds. It la rumored that the government has declined to. help, but
many though tbe faults of the administration may be, yet lt Is Impossible
to discredit them with such a decision. Surely, out of the many millions
taken from thla province, a few paltry
thousands can very easily be provided. Large sums of money are spent
ln Inducing Immigrants to come to the
country, but when once here, nothing is done to conserve their health.
Aid'la glren freely to ensure the
health of property In the shape of cattle and other animals, but nothing to
preterve human llvet. Thli It a
strange anomaly. Tuberculosis Is not
spectacular, therefore means for lta
prevention and cure are passed by.
• «   »
The government   haa   taken over
oharge ot the mentally afflicted.
Would lt not be consistent to take
over the care of tuberculous patients?
Other progressive countries have al
ready done so. Germany bas ettab-
llehed sanitaria aa a business proposition to keep tbe. members of the
state Insurance Institutes off the slok
list The friendly societies of Greit
Britain approved under tbe Insurance
act, are taking similar steps. Working men and working women are peculiarly Interested ln thla question a*
they suffer most from overcrowding,
Insanitary dwellings, malnutrition and
the many causes conducive to the
prevalence of tuberculosis. The death
rate from thla disease. Is. In many
tradei, tour times as high ae thit In
^the more leisured classes, and In gen.
oral beara a direot ratio to occupation
Ind density of population.
* »   •
This Inevitably lead* to tba conclusion that the whole eystem of hospital provision should be administered by tbe government ao that
proper aid would be accessible to all
who require lt It Is not a .question
of charity, Voluntary aatoclatlona
have done,- and are doing, their but,
but the whole queitlon Is too big for
private enterprise. It properly belong! to the state. Sickness ts an
economic waste and affects the entire
community. The above-mentioned report states that the earnings ot the
patient* dltcharged from the sanitarium during tbe few years of lta
existence would pay the eost of running tbe Institution. This fact alone
more than Justifies lta existence and
shows that the money spent is giving
good returns to tbe province. Apart
from other considerations It Is sound
commonsense and good business for a
community to restore the health of lta
citlsens—all are interdependent one
on the other. If hospitals are efficient, the more certain In a human
sense Is the chanoe of prolonged life
and health of every Individual.
*   •   «
The prevention of tbe disease ihould
also be taken Into consideration.
While letting apart reserve! for future generations Is sound policy, yet
at present on account of the spine
population, the whole province Is oae
huge park. Instead of spending money
on developing these reserves, lt would
be far better to uee some of the provincial revenue to provide breathing
spaces la the cities. Strict building
lawi should alao be enacted and rigidly enforced. The number of dwel
llngt lo Vancouver without fresh air
and sunlight la a menaoe and disgrace
and la doubtless deteriorating the
stamina ot the people. Adulteration
of foodstuffs Is rife and helpt thli
lowering ot health.   Let the govern-
CITV PLANNINQ
Three weeks ago the Trades and
Labor council appointed representatives to confer with the Vancouver
Planning' and Beautifying association
relative to the general development'
of a city planning scheme and civic
centre. Th* vital Importance of such
schemes Is to-day everywhere* acknowledged and there are few progressive
cities which have not already undertaken constructive work along theee
lines. The objects to be sought tor
arc many, principal among them being perhaps health, convenience and
beauty. Proper light and air mutt
be allured, recreation spaces muit be
provided to secure as far as possible
a maximum of good health to the cttl-
tens. Adequate facilities for transportation must also be studied with
a view to the movements' of the people
between their work, their homes and
places of recreation. In respect to
all changes, aesthetic consideration*
muat ever be kept ln view, element*
of beauty are Important factors of
lite.
»  «   »
A scheme Is now being put forward
by the planning association which
should receive the hearty support and
co-operation of the wage-earner. To
give details Is unnecessary only the
main outline of the Idea need at pres.
ent be discussed, The scheme is to
expropriate all land not owned by the
city lying between Pender, Beaty
Robson and Homer streets and on
that site locate all buildings ot a public character ln such a manner that
they will be eeen to the best advantage and generally represent publlo
activities. These building* will necessarily be of such Importance that they
will be ot the highest standard of
architecture and taken together form
a civic centre.   They will consist of
olty hall, public library, museum,
art gallery, municipal theatre and
others of a similar nature. A flnanolal estimate goes to show that the
scheme will pay for itself Inasmuch
aa that part of the site between Hamilton and Homer streets will so appreciate ln value owing to its proximity
to the centre that no expense will be
entailed on the city.
#   •   *
Suoh a scheme haa muoh to recommend lt. It would not only be of
ultllltarlan value, but would lnculate
a love ot the beautiful which, in Itself,
would be of Immense educational
value. It would not be restricted to
the centre but would ot necessity
make tbe entire city healthier and
more attractive, Its beneficial effect*
would reach trom Stanley to Hastings
park* and would make Vancouver one
of the finest cities ln the world. A
plan of this description would, of
course, deal with housing tnd faotory
problems and would be conducive to
prevention and abolition ot alums,
would encourage the provision ot the
best health conditions for labor and
would, ln short, be a vital factor ln
the betterment of the lives of workers
and their families. Aotlon should be
taken before lt Is too late to remedy
mistakes and before the cost Is prohibitive. Health and enjoyment of
life, being of paramount Importance,
members of organlted labor should
do everything ln their power to promote tuch a scheme,
Unemployed "armies" bodes no
good for the toelal system that produced them. Better an "army" than
a mob..
Where yon bear I card man- boosting of wbat a "square man" he himself Is tighten np. The worst Is yet
to eome.
The BowserMcBride regime will be
remembered aa one noted for commissions—to do nothing as Intelligently
aa possible.
The ruling class in British Columbia is establishing some mUjhty
handy precedents tor the workers to
use later on.
Did you attend the last meeting of
your unlont Or are you one of those
who remain, at home—and bellyache
on the Job ever after?
Free and eaey access to tbe earth
li aa necettary to man't exlttence aa
la acceti to the air, Why should one
be free and the other denied?
A paid-up union card la the belt
dividend-payer any worker can possess. Strengthen your policy by increasing the number ot policy holden.
Doei *ny sane person believe the
present-day turmoil, strife, induot-
trial anarchy and Jobless thousands
can go on Indefinitely? Surely the
birth-pangs of a new civilisation.
Ever try putting up a dollar for a
labor temple share; or a labor paper
sub.? Or are you one ot those who
never peddle anything but advice—to
the other fellow?
Let the worken of Brltlih Columbia emulate the example of the workers of South Africa by giving the
hired help of Sin Bill and Dan an
unqualified dismissal on next election
day.
Union offlcen are Invariably a
reflex of the membenhlp which elects
tbem. If you like your offlcen, dig In
and help them. If not, go on to the
floor of your union and elect better
ones.
There are at least three
tic servants" available for every "situation" ln Vancourer. Mistresses are
afraid to advertise for tbem. So
plentiful tbat the applicants are a
nuisance.
The releasing of Imprisoned union
mlnen, who never were guilty of any.,
thing more than A desire to act like
men, and the trafficking In "Justice"
witnessed last week at New Westminster, doe*, not "settle" (he atrlke. Not
by any mean*. Tne V. M. W. of A.
will remain* on the Job until every laat
coal mine la thla province la manned
by union coal-diggers.
Vancouver Trades and Labor Council welcomes delegates from the local
Newipaper Writen' union, No. 13,
chartered by the 1.1. V. '• The new
union includes at least »0 p*r cent,
of th* news-gatherer* of V'anceuipr,
North Vancouver and New Westminster, with Victoria coming up. Affll-
letion with the Allied Printing Tradei
CouncU hai alio been effected.
The Federatlonist regret* the valedictory contained lh laat week's Issue
of the' Eutern Labor New*. Editor
Percy Ayer had been giving tbe worker! of eutern Canada,* better paper
tban they were Paring for. The loss
of a link in tbe chain of Canadian
labor papen will be keenly felt It
la to be hoped the suspension will
only be temporary. The Industrial
Banner will take over the News' mailing list
It seems that Vancouver's bakery
Inspector can "Inspect" all he pie****,
but v*ry little power Is given him by
the' lawmakers and practically no
penalties for violation of tho act are
provided. Might as well save the
wagea and cute fooling thoee who
eat bread under the impression that
It Is produced under decent condition!
Meantime take no risks—demand the
baken' union libel oh your bread.
When the boss makes you pay him
for the privilege of earning your
own wages, kelp quiet When the
boss hires an attorney to advise ways
and means ot keeping you quiet, don't
wince. But If your union should
happen to elect a business agent, to
do tor you what yon are unable to do
for younelf, don't fail to get your
hammer out and denounce bim aa a
grafter and a scoundrel who Is living
off the labor movement
The governmental executive committee for Sirs Bill and Dan have
plainly and bluntly shown their contempt for the mllltla scab-herders on
Vanoouver Island. Onion mea will be
Inclined to feel that the militiamen
are getting Just what's coming to
tbem, A member of the working
class, with nothing to lose but an
empty stomach, who volunteers to do
the dirty work for the coal barons, Is
scarcely worth the CO centa per 24-
hour day, paid for such treachery.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
_ Meets ant, and third .Thursdays,
Eiecutive board: W. E. Walker, president: J. H. McVety, vice-president: Oeo.
Bartley, general secretary, 110 Labor
Temple; Bias H. Gutteridge, treaeurer;
Mlae P. Brlabane. alallellclan; sergeant-
ns,   John   Bully!   Q. Curnock, T.
lte. W. B. Trotter, trustees.
at-armi
Knowl,
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Dlrecton: Fred A. Hoover J. H.
MeVety.Jamea'Brown. Edward Lochia*.
'Jamea Campbell. J. w. .Wilkinson, B. P.
Pettlplece. John McMillan, Murdr — *--
Kensle, F. Blumberf. H. R, F—
ljig director. J. H. McVety.
ALLIED PRINTING  TRADEB   COW-
:   CIL—MeeU lad Monday la month.
Preaident, Oeo. Mowat; aeeretary, F. !U
Fleming. P.O. Box It, ■
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Jolnera, Local No. MT—Meata
flrst and third Monday cf each month, I
p. m. Executive oommlttee meats every
Friday I p. m. Preeldent, Ed. Mack, recording aeeretary. Chaa, Scott, IH Labor
Temple; flnanolal aeeretary and bualneaa
agent J. Bchuraan, Wt Labor Temple.
AND CONFECTIONERS LOOM. No. 41-Meeta seeond and fourth later-
daya, T.M p.m. Preeldent,
? tf. 0. Leeworthy: eorret-
Vpondrag seoretary, R. J.
Temple.
BARBER!' LOCAL, NO. lit—MEET*
seeond and fourth Thursdays, lilt
p.m. President, J. W. Green; recorder, C.
B. Herrltt; eeeretary-bualness agent, C.
F. Burkhart, Boon) 101, Labor Timple.
Hours: 11 tol; I to 7 p.m, r
POVERTY.
In these days of turbulent movements for loclal regeneration and uplift, It la comforting to reflect upon
tbe acrlptural auurance that "the poor
ye have alwayi with you." For, without the poor, chioi would prevail In
the place of many now wpll-eitab-
Uihed customs and institutions. What
would become of the churchei and
thoie dependent upon them for a living lt fundi could not be collected for
the occasional relief of the poor? The
abolition of poverty would be their
abolition. The Salvation army and
charitable bodlu of all kind* would
likewise ceue to bang tbe big drum
of self-advertised virtue, In the interest* of suffering humanity, for there
would be no profit therein, humanity
having ceaaed to euffer. The stump
speeeb, robbed of the "downtrodden
masses," would be hushed ind still,
and speech-making be confined to
thoie who eould produce th* flowen
of rhetoric, ind those who had something to uy. The capitalist, th*
banker, and the money-lender would
no longer be able to ipend their daya
in money-grubbing, conioled by the
thought that their declining yean
would be spent In purchasing a reputation for charitableness. So it la
but not to ruth headlong toward destroying poverty, lest tbe shock prove
too great tor all the generous people
whose kindly spirit moves tbem to
cultivate and perpetuate poverty in
order that by them It might be relieved.
Organise!     Organiie!
Workers, unite I
Organiie!
The man who thinks ahead I* the
man who get* ahead.
Ie yonr nam* on th* voten' Hat?
Court of Revision April Mb. Get
busy.
A reproof entereth more Into i win
man than a hundred stripes Into
fool.—Proverbs.
"For every cent ot publlo money expended ln thue prosecutions the
attorney-general Is accountable to the
public."—Mr. Justice Morrison, Vei,
but what about railway grants, land-
grabbing, eto.?
All expenditure on armament! la
waste, as much waste as If the money
were ipent ln employing men to dig
a hoi* and employing othen to fill lt
up again—Rt. Hon. H. Samuel, Brltlih
Postmaster-general.
Nearly thirty yeara ago the superintendent of the Vancouver Coal Mining and Land company testified before
a royal commission that "we accepted
the Chinese ai a weapon to tettle the
■trike."   True, history repeat! Itself.
Social condttloha arising out of unemployment beget crime—not the
least ot which la an ever increasing
number ot "street-walkers," wltb all
its attendant vices. The sooial evil
haa sure been driven out—Into public
view.
Sire BUI and Dan may be able to
'buffalo" the moving spirits ln the various governments of Canada, but tbey
never will make a dollar out of coal
mines ln British Columbia until they
concede their mlnen the right to organiie under the banner of the U. M,
W. of A.
Many workmen ar* fond of bawling
thslr buds off over "rights" they
never possessed. Look out for the
fellow who le always looking for
"Juitlce." When workingmen unite
sufficiently they will hive the power
to enforce. Their demands will be
right, and "Justice" will be done.
The profit-grabbing proclivities of
the Salvation Army emigration department It largely responsible for
the strong position now held by employen ln tbl* province. And* to
further tdd to the criminally of auch
methods of getting money several
more "shipments" of human cargo
are scheduled for the next ilx monthi,
Clvillied communities are now coming to a new understanding of thingi.
They are eeeing clearly that human
rights cannot hold their own agalnat
wildly organised property lnteruti
unleu they themielvei organiie and
uie their organlutlon in shaping the
laws. The aim of every worker
ahould be to make human right!
dominant
Religion hu been the cauae ot more
wan and bloodibed than all other
plaguei combined, if the worken of
Ireland insist on shedding more gore,
toy.the purpoie of commemorating a
rellglout liberty already attained,
rather than lighting legislatively for
an industrial liberty, they do not poi-
■ui, then let them go to It The remaining onu will probably know
better.
BABTENDiR-r Lpfl!AL NO. I7I.-OF-
flea Room tot Labor Temple. Meeta
flrat Sunday of eaoh month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanolal seoretary, Oeo.
W. Curnook, Room HI, Labor Temple.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS |
C. FEDERATION OF LABOR-
Meets In annual convention tn January. Executive ofllcere, ■ 1114-11:. Proal-
dent A., Watchman; vioe-prealdenta. W.
F. Dunn. H. J. McEwen, Geo. Hardy. J.
W. Oray, H. Kundaon, J. J. Taylor, ~
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A.
Willt. Bos nil, Vlotoria. B. C.
New wiitminitir, a. e.
NEW   WESTMINSTER   TRADES
Labor Counoll—Mee'a every 	
and fourth Wedneaday at I p. m. In Lab..
Hall. President, D. 8. Cameron; flnanclal
aeoretary, H. Glbb; general aeeretary. W.
E. Maiden. P. 0. Box IM. The public Is
invited to attend.	
PLUMBER*' AND STBAMFTrTBRI LO-
cal 411—Meets every seeond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Bali,
7.10 p.m. Preeldent D. Webster: eecretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box til, New
WMtmlnattr, B. C.
UNITED
Of Cab;
lltf-Mer
_ — -Jests
every Monday, J p.m., Labor Temple,
corner Royal avenue and Seventh atreet
Preeldent. M. c. Schmendt; secretary, A
Walker, Labor Temple, New Westmln-
ater, IC, ■' ■' ./•'•'.       5
BARTENDERS' LOC,
Labor   Temple;
* Seventh.etret
714-MEET8 Ii?
3
corner Seventh atrot and Royal avanua.
every second Sunday of eaeh month, at
l.tt psja. President, F.J. Hunt: eecretary. F. W. Jameson.   Vultlng brothers
 victoria, b,
VicWrIA   *radi
Council—Meeta
needay, Ubor Hall
e.
Irst and third ' ...
JM.Johnaton street
-*«*■
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'. NO. I
—Meeta every Tueaday, I p.m., Room
107.    Praaldant Jemaa Haal.tt: eorrje-
Kndlng aeeretary, W. B. DajpalL B
: flnanclal   aeoretary. F. ft. Brow
.._. aeeretary. W.
...flnanolal   aeoretary,
bualneaa  agent W.  *
*_DusjelirBox
F. 11 Brown:
Daarall, Room
at I pi m, ~ Prealda'nt',"(WigV'Drkamani
lecretary, Thoa. F. Mathlson, box ttt,
Vlotoria. B. 0. ■■ . . 	
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPBNfRlKfl
, and Jolnera—Meete every Tuesday,
t p.m., at Labor hall TII Johnston It
Preeldent A Watchman; recording store-
—T, Oeo. L. Dykeman; bualneaa agent
flnanolal seoretary, W. A, Parkln-
eon, Box lit.
BOOKBINDERS'   LOCAL   UNION   No.
Hi—Meeta third Tueaday In every
month, In room 101, Labor Temple. Preeldent F. J. Milne; vlce-prealdent, Wm,
Bushman; aeoretary, George Mowat Sit
Dunlevy avenue: aeoratary-treeaurer, H.
Perry, 1130 Tenth avenue out ■     	
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vanoouver Lodge No. itl—
Meets flrat and third Mondaya, I p. m.
President F. Barclay, III Cordova But;
seewtary. A. Fraaer, Ull Howe street
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. MT—Meeta
flrst Tueaday eaoh month,   * —
Preeldent   "~    —  "
dent F. J.
■esday each month,,  I p.m.
Salter  Hoaklna; vlce-proel-
randt; aeoretary, Robert J.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treaeurer, g.
W. Johnson.
COOKB, WAITERS
      AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets flnt Friday In eaoh
month, 1:10 p.m.t Labor Temple. W. ff.
Walker bualnee rapreaentatlve. Offloe:
Boom tot. Labor Temple. Hours: t a.m.
to 10.10: 1 p.m. to MO and I p.m. to I.N
p.m. Competent help furnlahed on ahort
notice.  Phone Bey. 1414,
COMMERCIAL TELEUKAPHBKS
Britlah Columbia Division, C. P. System, Division No. 1-Meeta 11:10 a.m.
third Sunday In month, Room 104. Local
ohatrman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 411,
Vanoouver. Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 411, Vancouver^	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
IM—Meeta Room sol every Monday
I p. m. Preeldent, Dave Pink; vlce-prealdent M. Bander; recording eecretary,
Boy Blgar, Labor Temple; flnanolal aeeretary and bualneaa agent W. F. Dunn,
Room 107, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERB, LOCAL NO.
Ml'(Inside Men)—Meets flrst and
third Mondays of each month. Boom 101,
I p.m. Preeldent, H. P. McCoy; recording seoretary. Geo, Albere; bustneeo
agent F. L. Eatlnghauaen, Room »7.
LONGSHOREMBNS'   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No. _ 11X M-Meele
Six weeks ago non-union printing
and publishing houses In New Tork
set In motion the machinery ot the
Sherman antl-truat law, charging tbe
Allied Printing counoll ot that elty
with many violations ot the act Tbe
federal grand Jury brought In a true
bill. Attorney-general MoReynolda
baa, however, Instructed the dlstriot
attorney to abandon all charges except one of alleged boycotting. Tble
Is only a minor point and can easily
be remedied If the caae complained
of le actually a violation of the law.
In any event there will be no criminal prosecution.
Rports from Oreat Britain during
the week state that many offlcen of
the British army have resigned their
commissions owing to a disinclination
to take part In the factional disputes
ln Ireland and that many of the rank
and file are also disaffected. Without
entering into the merits or otherwise
of the controversy sucb a state ot
affairs is exceedingly noteworthy. The
army hu always been regarded as a
bulwark of the government ln both
foreign and domestic disputes. Apparently this Is no longer the case.
The result will probably be that the
army will now be democratised and
this Is a very signlflcant fact to labor.
Tbe experience of Vancourer Island
union coal mlnen should open the
eyes of workingmen who still believe
that courts were eitabllshed tor the
admlnlitratlon of Juitlce. Courts are
maintained for one purpose only. To
protect _ the ruling elan Interests
against "the conflicting Interests of tbe
working clus. It is not a quution of
Justice, but of power. If the worken
would prevent tbe courts being uied
agalnit them,' they muit lncreue
their power through organisation, economle and political. When the political power of tbe workeri hu Increued to iuch an extent that tbey
control the courts, then and thin
only, can they expeot Justice from,
thue institution!,
Big buiineu ln Brltlih Columbia
would like to drive union labor out,
or, failing that, to reduce lt to beggary. They hive tried to do It before
and are trying bard again, although
their effort* will not meet with even
a meaiure ot success. For some yean
the mine ownen and railway corporation! have exploited Oriental!. They
pre now trying a mixture of Oriental!
and illiterate Southern Europeans.
The latter are oheaper and they dare
not call their souls thilr own. Organised labor standi in the way and demand! thit worken in thla provinoe
have decent oondlUoni under whloh
to work end enjoy more of the product
of their labor, Consequently It is an
object of hatred to the big corporation!, Organiie and keep on organising.
Alexander
secretary,
Friday   evening,  141
street   Preaident   P.   Peel;
Geo. Thomu. ,	
MACHINISTS, NO. IM-MBBTS SB?
ond and fourth Frldaya, t p. m.
Preildent, A. R. Towler; recording secretary, J. Brookee; flnanolal aeeretary, J. H.
MoVety.
 MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLBT MINERS' UNION, No. IN,
Weitern Federation of rtnera—Meeta
Sundayevenlnga In Union Hall. Preaident, W. Fleming; secretary-treasurer,
M. p. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. O.
LAi-fSMPfK MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. IIN. U. M. W. of A.-Meets Wedneaday, Union Hall, 7 p.m.    Preeldent
Sam 'Guthrie; secretary, Duncan MoKen-
■      -    IvHnlth   b n
afe, LadyaniithTBrc. '
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
A.—Meets every Monday at T.tt 'p. m.
In the Athletic Club, Chapel atreet Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo. B, C.
CUMBERLAND   LOCAL    UNION,    No.
till, U. M. W. ot A.-Meeta  every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. ban.
Preaident Joa. Naylor; saoretary, James
Smith, Box 14, Cumberland, B. C. __
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMBN'B
Union, No. lOi, W. F. cf M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.80 p.m. Preaident
F. W. Perrtn; aeoretary. Frank  Camn-
■yaJffTraM***'**' ^
Perrln"
IX
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Weatern Federation of Minera—Meeta
every Saturday ln the Miners' union
hall. Address all communication! to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.O.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
DEMOCRATIC PARTY—Publlo meetinga in Colonial Theatre, corner Oranvllle
and Dunamutr Btreeta, Sunday evenings.
Seoretary, J. Adams, Boom 101 Labor
Temple.
8VN0PII!  OP  COAL   MININO  REQU-
LATIONI
Coal mining rlghta of the Dominion,
In Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Provinoe
bf British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of |1 an acre. Net more than
3.6*0 aorea will be leaaed to one applicant.
Applications for lease muat be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlatrlct In which the'
rlghta applied for are eltuated.
In aurvayaf ' —
leaoribed by ..   	
Ions of seotlona, and In unsurveyed ter
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 213, I.A.T.S.E.—Meeta every aecond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, t p. m. Preaident, A. O. Hansen;
aecretary-treaaurer, G. R. Hamilton; bualneaa agent H. I. Hugg. Offloe, Room 100,
Loo Bldg.  Tel. Sey. 1045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVI
Union. Looal No. 141. A F. ef M.-
Meets second Sunday of each month,
noma 11-10, Williams Bldg., 411 Oran-
-""             1    J,    Bowyer;
villa   atreet.   "President'
vlce-prealdent F. Engliah:  'seoretary,'
H. J. Braafleld: treeaurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE   	
NATIONAL ASS
PLASTBRKRR' INTBR-
 Ji ASSOCIATION. No. It-
Meets flrat and third Wedneaday. 0*Brlea
Hall, t p.m. Preaident O. Deea; cor
reapondlng secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal eecretary, D. Soott: treasurer, I. Ty-
■on; bualneaa agent Joe Hampton. Phon*
Sey 1514.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vanoouver aad
Iclnlty. Branch meete 1st and Ird Frldaya at Labor Temple. Dunemulr and
Homer at, room 205. Robert C. Samp-
aon, Prea., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joaeph 0)
Lyon, Fin. Sao., 17*1 Grant at; Tom
Smith, Bee, Sec,, 111 Broadway weat
ritory   the tract  applied   for than
ataked by the applicant himself.
Bach application muat be accompanied
by a fee of It, whloh will be refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise, a royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave centa per ton.,
. Tbe person operating the mine ahall
furnlah the Agent with aworn returna
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the eoal mining rights
are not being operated, aach returns
should be furnlahod at leaat once a year,
The leaea will Include the .coal mining
rlghta only, but the leasee may be permitted to purohue whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered neoeaaary for the working ot the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of-the Department cf the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa.
W. H, CORY. .
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meete aeoond Tueaday, l:lt
p.m. President J. Marshall; corresponding aeoretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047'
financial aeeretary. K. MeKenala.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Deooratora*. Local 111—Meet every
Thursday, 7.10 p.m. Preaident Skene
Thomson; flnanolal aeeretary, J. Freckelton, 111 Seymour atreet; recording eecretary, George Powell. 1150 Fourth ave
weat.'    Bualneaa   agent'
room 888, Labor Temple.
Jamea   Train,
STEROTYPRnS' AND BLECTROTYP
era'. Union, No. II, of Vanoouver
and Vlotoria—Meets aeoond Wednesday
of eaeh month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple
President. Chaa. Bayley; recording aee.
retary, Chrie Hemewocd, 14* llth AVe
Beat :	
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
'  Bmployoca. Pioneer Dlrlalon No. Ill
—Meeta   Labor   Temple,   eecond
fourth        ""
and thl_,...    . _. _. .    .       , „.
Adam Taylor; recording eecretary.
Albert V. Lofting, till Trinity Itreet
phone Highland 1171: flnanclal aeoretary
Fred. A. Hoover. 1401 Clark Drive,
"1
    _^„.     ,...       aad
irth Wedneadaya at t p.m., anl Ural
I third Wednesdaya I P.m. Preeldent
tm    Taylor-,    recording    eecretary.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATION
■hm  iwuin awa.  usor xmnpia
secretary,    B.    Prenderfast
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER.
al Local 117-Meeta "every Wedneaday, I p. m.; Room 104, Labor Temple
Financial         -     "■
Boom 111.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal), Local No. 171-Meetlnp
held flrst Tuesday In each month, I p. m.
Preaident H. Nordlund; reoordlng secretary, -C. McDonald. Bex tot: flnanolal
seoretary. K. Paterson, P. O, Box 501.
In aurvayed territory the land muat be
aectlonar or VgaTaubdlvli-
 «
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
_ 1. B.—Unauthorised publication of thla
advertisement will not be paid for—MM*.
TYPOGRAPHICAL  UNION   NO.   Iltr-
Meeta laat Sunday eaoh month, I
p.m.   Preaident, R. P. Pettlplece;  vice-
?resident,   w.   8.   Metiger,   aeoretanr-
reuurer; B. H. Neelands. P. O. BoX M.
THEATRICAL 8TAOB EMPLOYEES.
Local No. HI—Meeta seoond Sunday
cf eaoh month at Room 1*4, Labor Tem-.
pie. Preildent H. Spears; recording aeeretary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Van-1
COWAN & BROOKHOUSB
Printers of B. C. Feilerationitt
Labor Temple, cor. Dunamuir
' and Homer. Phone Sey. 4490
E. BURNS & C
IN CORDOVA ST. E.
HARDWARE,   FURNITURE  AND
SECOND-HAND   DIALIR
Gooda aold on Commlaalon. lti
and Toola our Ipeclelty
Phone ley. ,1171.
.. Itovoe
DIXON A MURRAY
OAammtama, waa,
aad Bten nttUf.  Beutal
Jobbing
COTTON'S   WEEKLY — But
Socialist propaganda  paper In
Canada.    Price  50  centa  per
year; In clubi of four, 15 cents
for 10 weeki,
Addreu, COWANSVILLB, P.Q,
.-— that;0ah not supply thla
—el are hot strictly union offices
-believe nothing to the contrary.
str
FURNITURE
By all means come and sec our
splendid large new ttock of furniture, "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS    (
Hastings Fnrnitve Co.
Limited '
tl HASTINOS STREET WEST
A CUSTOMER
Respectfully requeata that when
you have printing dene you patron-
lie 'Union ofllcei uilnj      ' v
THE UNION LABEL
Of which these cuts are facsuhlleo.
Aa a favor to union, uk for the
label on your printed matter,
VANCOUVER   ALLIED    PRINTING  TRADES   COUNCIL
e^B^^liati^*^
rilnlon
HAOI
t»*~**tA ■M
WHDAT...
.MAKCrt tj,%m
THB BBITISH OOLg^BU FEDERATI0NI8T.
_mm
.
Black and White Suitings
-Tii Hwid*flwv> P*iapi^i Mid Plwldi
We announce the arrival of a large consignment of these popular fabrics which embrace the moit Wanted pattern* in both
checks and plaids. Particular'attention is called to the excel-
' lent qualities represented. All come 64 inches wide and wilt
sell at $1.86, S1.60, $1.76, $3.00 up to $3.00 a yard..
Stylish Umbrellas
Low Priced at $3.00 and $6.00
The umbrella at $3 is a-fine gloria covering with long handle
mounted in gilt or lilver. The taped edge is a feature deserving of special note,: as.it adds greatly tp the appearance. The
value represented in this line is especially attractive.
Silk umbrellas in the new long handle style with'knob ends;.
also with plain handle shown in navy, black, green, purple or
brown at $6.00.
Trade unlonim and their Wendi ahould remember tbat thla atore cloaca at alx
o'clock every day—Saturday included, a fact very much appreciated by our employeea and an example worthy of emulation by othen. Try and do your ahop-
ping In the forenoon. V' r
575 Granville Street
(ton Houra 1.90 to • p.m.
Saturday! Included
WE ARE
* Look for the Label.
FRANK NEWTON.
SYSTEMS
Tat ley. TH
til HAITINM BTREET W.
"Seil Thru Dollar Hat en Earth"
Richardson & f 9tt#
MEN'S HATS ONLY
Because we believe in equal treatment for all.
'*    ' X    '" ■      - :: '    '
Whether your purchase amounts to dollars, nickels or dimes
you obtain the same EQUAL care, individual attention and consideration if you deal with us.
FAMILY SHOE STORES
823 GRANVILLE STREET
and at Codar Cottage
We keep the lartut and mut
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', OIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prlcei which cannot be duplicated.
t
Everything Is to b« found h«*.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada'a Snap Speelallat
104 and 10* CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE   STORE   IS  THE  SPOT   FOR
OOOO* AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
Tbl* ii l lift thit 'will b* appreciated la aay part of tha world.
Taitefully bound In three binding*   Cloth, $1.10; Ooie Calf, fSJOi
Burnt Leather, tAIA
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
i
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32S HASTINGS STREET, WEST
We carry everything
for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest uteri of office equipment
LOOSE LEAP SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   fclNDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunamnlr Street Phoaa Exchange Sey. 3521.3527
Dressing Robes and House Coats
a^.oj%*%Tv>%.uv^M-^ir*i,n4^ ■* -•v,h™"
PRICK Of HOUIE COAT* RANOE FROM HM te Mt.M
DRIIIINQ ROBES PROM If te IM  ,
Theae make handsome Christmaa alfts for Husband, Son or Friends.
j*j> _f_____ tg_ #_$* •«»" w* ■*■" ** °- «"•*»
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
417GriavilleSt, Pkoee3M2
VANCOUVER B. C.
HATS WITH THE
- UNION LABEL
Early Struggles and Later
Triumphs Graphically and
Succinctly Told
Ouelph, Ont., Society Made
Pood Profit ^91,8^
Capital CteiiilJttle
K.iS?,,?n ^Wwattoa hid »fa real
birthplace ln the town of Rochdale,
Lancashire, In the year 1844. That
town ll today the Mecca of International cooperation. From' that little
ftorei hired at 150 per annum, contain-
Ins BO worth of,futures and trade
"tonills and S75 ln merchandise, con-
slstlni ot "low, butter, ausar and
oatmeal," aaa men that mlshty movement, to wldetpread In lti beneficent
operations, that eome years ago It
wa* described by Lord Rosebery Is
* "itoto within a atate," because ot
lta democratic organisation, ltt magnitude, its comprehensive activities,
and it* working olass eiecutive, it Is
the world's Industrial and economic
phenomenon.
While the twenty-eight cd operator!
In establishing tto society, took one
year to collect fUO capital, today
30,601 co-operators in that town have
a capital of 13,597,(185 and did a trade
of 13,310,070 the past year, and* made
a prollt ot |535;735., .
Co-operation:. has not only given
workingmen more wholesome fond,
produced. under ideal condltlona of
labor, better opportunities ot education and recreation; avoided thl: possibility of food combines, and enabled
tbem to build and furnish their own
homes, bnt it haa placed ln their
hands something they never possessed before-capital with whloh to cater
to their own needs Instead of being
centralised for the aggrandisement of
the few and the tytannloal exploitation ot the many. They depended, aB
the genuine cooperative democracy
must depend, upon their own associated self-help ton success. '.-..
Co-operators should be just In their
social and economic relationship with
one another. If a better type of humanity—morally, physically and Intellectually—Is to be evolved, a man
should be content to enjoy the equivalent only of the sooial value of the
service he gives to society and not
to accumulate and use capital for the
purpose of oppressing the actual producer, and deprive him of the greater
part of the wealth be creates.
In the application of the moral principles the first co-operators devised
an economic system which was uplque
and has since been, universally accepted and Insisted on by. genuine co-
operators. They Imposed It as a condition that capital should only bave a
fair Interest for Its own use; that men
ehould be paid for their labor according to Its value. In the case ot a distributive soolety profit should be
divided In proportion to which each
Individual had contributed by hts purchase.
Ouelph (Ontario) Society, made a
net profit on capital last year of 115
per cent; the remainder went ln proportion to the purchasers. This
equitable, method ot division of the
advantages accruing from concerted
effort is adaptable alto to productive
sooletles, and It will be seen that the
fundamental principles of co-operation—the brotherhood of man and economic methods ln finance, commerce
and lndnstryr-are the only accurate
interpretation of, tire principle In so
far aa the economic relationship is
concerned,
"The war drum throbs no longer
Where the battle flags are furled,
In the parliament of man
The Federation of the world."
ENGINEERS MEET
Secretary Saunders Elected Bualnese
Agent and Organiser
NEW WESTMINSTER, March 34.—
At the regular meeting of New Westminster Jocal of the International Union of Steam and Operating Engineers
much business of Importance wa*
transacted, Included ln which waa the
election of Secretary Saunders aa
business agent and organtter. Mr.
Saunders was Instructed by the union
to begin at once to make a tour of the
jurisdiction, investigate conditions at
various points, interviewing engineers
and encourage* them to take out membenhlp In the union. The jurisdiction
of the local extends from Central
Park to the International boundary
on the north and south and to the
boundary of British Columbia and Alberta and the mouth ot the Fraaer
river on the east and west. The newly
elected organiser le one of tbe moat
energetlo members of the local union and good results are looked for
from his efforts.
The amendments to the conititutlon
of the B, C, Federation of Labor were
voted on and the union went on record ai opposed to militiamen being
members of the union, also to the
mllltla being used as polloe and scab
herders against working men on
strike,
R. A. Barnard was elected as delegate to the Trades and Labor council
ln place of Secretary Saunders, who
will be absent from the city for several montbs.
W.. J. Bartlett, Labor candidate tn
Asslnlbola, has opened committee
rooms on the south-east corner ot
Parkview street and Portage avenue
at Winnipeg. Friends and supporters
should report there at once.
'MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS.
"Tlw Kodak Hoiise"
KODAKS ind PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictune* md Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
OEOdOE PMITON
General Seoretorwtteaaiirer International
Aaaodatiea tfttaelilnlata, wbo br oar.,
ful hareWna of the nnanclal resources,
haa pulled fee macMnlita through nany
a Hard light.
Endorse Mrs. Justin Gilbert
, As School Trustee
Candidate
Vote Twelve to One Against
Militia Belonging to Labor Unions
VICTORIA, B.C, March ?«.—President Oen, Dykeman occupied the chair
at the laat meeting of the Trade* and
Labor council. A letter wa* received
from Mr*. Justin Gilbert, notifying the
council of her being a candidate for
sohool trustee, also giving some of
her views on local matters. The council, after some discussion, endorsed
her candidature. A communication waa
read from B. C. Federatlonist notifying the central labor body that Messrs.
Meredith; Douglas and Daly were no
longer representatives of that paper.
This matter was referred to the executive oommlttee to procure their credential*, and also to request the press
committee to publish a notice in the
local papers regarding the same. By
a vote of twelve to one the council
went In favor of the amendment submitted by the B. C. Federation of
Labor opposed to members of the
mllltla being affiliated with organised
labor In this province. The notice of
the barbers ot their withdrawal from
the council was referred to the organization committee. Delegate J. L.
Martin reported tor the B. C. Minera'
Liberation League that J. Robinson,
of Nanalmo, would speak in the Variety theatre on Sunday evening. The
following letter re the caae of John
McKentle, Vancouver Island striking
miner, Is self-explanatory:
"Prime Minister, province of British
Columbia, Victoria, B.C., March 16,
1914,
"A. Watchman, Esq, president B.C,
Federation of Labor, p. O. box 1538,
Victoria, B.C.:
"Dear Sir:—By direction of the
hon. the premier, I beg to acknowledge your favor of March 16th, calling attention to the case of Mr. John
McKenzle, and to state that the matter will receive immediate consideration,    i
"I have the honor to be, sir, yonr
obedient servant,
■  "LAWRENCE MACRAE,
"Private Seoretary."
Give the People What They Think
They W*nt.
Editor B. C, Federationlit:—So long
as a man separates himself In thought
from his fellows, so long wtll he dream
dreams of large fortunes and Impossible achievements, and' so long will
he remain the dupe of the old political parties. Take for Instance, the
railway policy of the McBride administration; how it appeals to the average worker. He sees himself in
steady employment. He pictures htm-
self sober, steady, Industrious and
frugal; week after week a portion of
Ug earnings goes to pay tor a lot
which he haa purchased. One lot la
halt paid for when he starts to purchase another. With ever growing
contoloutness of hit position aa a
landed gentleman, hla shoulders become more square, his chest expands,
and like the village blacksmith of
other days, he looks the whole world
In the faoe, boldly, aye even defiantly.
In conversation with his office-hungry liberal friends he Is humorously
satirical. Wltb both thumbs stuck
aldermanlc wise ln the armholea of his
vest be listens tolerantly to their ar
guments in support of their myriad'
planked platform. When they acouse
hla government of corrupt practices
how very magisterial he Is. He points
with just pride to the prosperous condition of hts province; does not be
proudly own two lots? and will not
the coming, ever coming railroads
send the price of his land soaring
heavenward 1 Fortune le very near
to htm. In fancy he is already ao
wealthy, that, compared with him
Andrew Carnegie Is a mere beggar.
He seee visions ot himself marrying
the girl of hi* heart, after having
caused, for her dear sake, a marvellously beautiful palace to be erected.
The picture grows; children oome Into
It, and he takes great delight ln teaching them to be good to the poor. He
hlmielf has developed Into a much
loved philanthropist. "FITZ.''
KEEP AWAY FROM SMITHERS
Over Three Hundred Idle Men—Only
One Building In Construction
SMITHERS, B.C., Maroh 25.—The
state of the labor market here Is at a
very low ebb, There Is only one
building In course ot erection, and
over 300 men out of employment
Prospeots uncertain for a busy season. Outsiders looking for work are
advised to give this and other northern towns a wide berth.
CANADAATAGUNCE
IN flMEF NEWS
m
Industrial Items of Interest
rtm au ow th*
Dominion
Condensed from tbe Exchanges and Special
Correspondence
Labor Cendldate
R. S. Ward li running aa a labor
candidate for membenhlp of th*
Manitoba legislature for Blmwood,
Winnipeg.
No More Than Eight Heure
Medtolne Hat Brieklayera' union haa
published a aothe to the effect that
their membera in future will work no
more than eight houra per day.
Pert Arthur Ubor Party
Tbe Independent Labor party at
Port Arthur Is right op the job. and
has arranged to hold a big organisation meeting during the present week
Oeeth of a Member >
The Winnipeg street Rallwaymen's
union lost a popular member recently
In the death of Conductor C. Wardle.
The deceased was 10 yeara ot age,
Technical Education
Dr. J. w. Robertson, eminent agriculturist and educator, haa begun a
series of addresses on' general technical and agricultural education In the
leading centres of Nova Scotia.
Winnipeg Street Railway
The Amalgamated Association of
Street and Blectric Railway employees at Winnipeg will hold a big mas*
meeting on March 38th, for the. pin-
pose of considering a new agreement
with the company, as the preient
agreement expires at the end of AprU.
Retail Clerks Organiie
Montreal clerks have taken steps to
organise a local of the Retail Clerks'
International Protective Association.
O. R, Brunet, organiser of the A. F. of
L., has the matter ln hand, and reports
tbat the new body will start out with
a large charter list
Granite Cuttcre
The local of the Granite Cutters'
Association at St Ignace, Que., reports that work baa been very slack
during the present winter. At the
present time tore is nothing doing.
Nobody is working and the boys are
holding down the stove and spinning
yarns,
Montreal Elactrlclana
The Electrloal construction men of
Montreal nave decided to raise the
Inltatlon fee with the coming of spring
to (10 for journeymen and $7.50 for
helpers. A series ot meetings will be
held during April, and all men employed at the trade will be Invited to join
while the reduced fee Is still ln force.
Women's Lsbor Leaguee
Port Arthur and Fort William have
got women's labor leagues In operation and these are petitioning the
various labor bodies ln the dominion
to take Immediate steps to form such
leagues. Mrs. E. Urry, honorary secretary, Is the originator of tbe Idea
of getting the women's labor league!
started In Canada.
Labor News Suepende
The lack of employment existing ln
tbe maritime provinces among the
railroad workers and tbe difficulty to
secure advertising, are reasons given
for the Labor News ot Moncton, N. B„
ceasing publication last week The
paper lasted seven years, and it Is to
be hoped that lt will soon be reissued.
It was a good labor paper.
Mill Work
At the laat meeting of the Fort William Trades and Labor Council, the
report of the executive committee recommending that Immediate steps be
taken to raise the finance to build a
modern headquarters for the labor
organizations ot the olty waa endorsed
by a unanimous vote. The land has
already been secured and steps will
be taken to have a suitable building
erected with the leaat possible delay.
Montreal Civic Employeea
Laborers working ln connection
wltb the city of Montreal are to be
organized Into a powerful labor union.
The matter Is being considered by local labor men, and the new union will
be affiliated with the Trades and Labor council, the Trades and Labor
congress of Canada, and the American federation of Labor. Organisation meetings will be held aa soon
as arrangements can be made.
Labor Candidates
The Lahor party of Montreal, haa
three candidates ln the field for civic
honors: Controller Alney, for re-election as controller; Zottque Lesper
ance, business agent of the Boot and
Shoe Workers' union,; aldermanlc
candidate in Longue Polnte Ward, and
David Olroux, of the Brioklayere' union, formerly preaident of the Trades
and Labor counoll, aldermanio can
dldate ln St. Denis ward.
TORONTO UNEMPLOYED
The Industrial Banner of Toronto
after an Investigation finds an almost
unbelievable state of affairs. It says
that thousands of men are unemploy
ed at the present moment ln the olty
of Toronto. There are many hundreds
who are both homeless and money
less, and glad to sleep wherever they
can get a chance. While these things-
are well known, this almost unbelievable state of affairs must be seen to
be appreciated; for-it Is only when one
comes Into contact with the destttu
tlon and want existing that any adequate Idea ot Its enormity can be conceived.
Reaevil Aaaoaatfoat
CENTER&HANNA,Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at IMS Georgia Street,
one block welt of Court Houae.
Use of Modern Chapel endFuneral
Parlore free to all patrona
__________
JAMES STARK USB
mmamarWamWmrmr mmm____mg  WaaaW aw^Ha ^mmaa'awma Wmaw mm^  Wf ^m^0 _omma
mmamamnama SWVV  *a"W. m»**amammmam} ^mm^mmw^mmma^am^f^m^mmm
;.    -ta STOM THA* I
WINDOW SHADES MADE TO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AT 33i OFF OUR REGULAR PRICES
FOR WE ARE CLOSING OUT THB WINDOW SHADE
DEPARTMENT.
W* pnrpee* mahlng wind»w thidea to rear owa measi
aad guarantee (ha work to be ant-cleat ttt wry particular.
OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH ON HARTSHORN* SHWNO ROUSES
ataS^aaoV^^^ t%LE%"M'
It'a neeeaeary to bring your measurements.  We de ae Sttlaft  W* easy
guarantee correctneas In exucuUng your ordeee. ;i
This la an exceptional offer and win prove a saving to all hisuhillsw
.^fffissraffi^
Opaque Window Shades !*■*»."• -••_¥
^Haruiwrn spring   ii^&£:;::::::::::2:
Rollers i**. it>itor...........,...**.
WEBSTER'S grooSS
WEEKLY PRIOR LIST
MILK, B. C, SO .oi. cam, each
10 centi, per dosen $1.10
TOMATOES, large cam, etch
uy,c, per 4o*en...:....fiJi
PORK AND BEANS, Urge 3-
Ib. cam, each 10c, doz...$1.10
PLUMS, G. G„ in heavy lyrup,
l-lb. cant, I for    JI
PINEAPPLE, large cam, I for
 ...  ... JI
BUTTER, fineat New Zealand,
albt.    ......IMS
FLOUR, in M lb. tacks...MS
FLOUR,   pastry, 10-lb.   tacks,
«*ch          ....... JS
ROLLED OATS, freih milled,
* I poendi for ...........   JS
FREIGHT PREPAID ON OOODS WITHIN 100 MILES
The Webster Brag.
LIMITED
PHONESi SEV. SMI, MM 127* ORANVILLE STREET
HOMEOPATH1STS
We carry * full atock of
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
*    LET US SUPPLY YOU •
MARETT & REID
' \ 117 HASTIN08 ST. W.
WHITE STAR
IHAVICElARGEST^rCANADA
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
MONTREAL QUEBEC LIVERPOOL
New 8.8. "Laurentle" (15,000 tone), new 8.8. "Megantlc."
Flrat Claaa, W2.M Second Claaa, MJ.Tt Third Claaa, **U*
OKB CLASS (D.) CABIN SERVICE
Bxpreaa 8.8. "Teutonic" (Twin Screw Steamera) 8.8, "Canada"
HI feet long (ISO.00 and up). 6H feet long (Ird claaa tl1.lt and up)
WHITE ITAR LINE
BOITON OUEENSTOWN LIVERPOOL
ONE CLA8S (II.) CABIN SERVICE
8.8. "Arable" (Splendid Twin Screw Steamera) 8.8. "Cymric"
18,000 tone, too feat long (Rate W.TS)   13,000 tons, 100 tt. long (Rate W.I0>
tll-Snd AVENUE, «EATTLE, WN.
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
^SSSSaamm_____m__mmmmmf ToolSptOlfa
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hirdwanaad
SporbaiCee*
HI Haitingt St, W.
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Halting! Street Weit
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operate! by the latett, mott tcienn'nc and ptinlen methodi
Specialiit in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA FOR 31
YEARS AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF
WHITE
SWAN
SOAP
W. 3. PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY.. ..MARCH 17, 1114
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long- "
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES 11.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rats* ts Pemaeat C0TT1NGHAM ft BEATTY
Gaettt
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
■Y SMOKINQ THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
VOU  HELP YOUR  FELLOW UNION   MEN AND   SI1IDII, VOU  OET
THE VERY HIT VALUE  FOR VOUR  MONEY
Q 0 WITH THE fi U N CH T0 THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
PSTHBRtTONHAUOH  * CO.
The OM BstaMlaked Firm ef
PATENT ATTORNEY!
Met Regan Wdg., Oranvllle Street
, Otty. Mene Seymour trt*.
Parian*
sts!
Dar*NWatCela
Fta.lir.Ml
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS aad
EMBALMERS
Vaaceaver BritUb Columbia
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
'Work with the President and
the President works with you"
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written gaaraatee
that SIT trill eur* er year meaty
bee*.
Differa from all other rente-
tteo.
Prise atM, Net Pali.
McDUFFEE BROS.
TBI   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
1*1 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. 0.
Berry Bros.
Agealilar
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Fall  line ot teeeeeorle*
Repair* promptly executed
«3S HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 195
OF CANADA
Societies Affiliated There
with—Objects of the
Union
Millions Obtain Provisions
Oheap and Pure—Education an Ideal
A great deal 1* being said and writ-
en upon tbe Queatlon of co-operation
these daya. It ihould be ot Interest
to the readers of thli lournal to
know aomethlng about the Co-operative union of Canada, an Inititutlon
founded for aome juar*, with whieh
are afflliated societies In different
localities of tha provinces. The chief
objects of the union a* tet forth In the
Canadian Cooperation, a quarterly
publication luued at Brentford, Ont.
In the lnterelta of tha Canadian cooperative movement (1) The recognition, by adulation with the unton, of
all bona fide co-operative aaioclatlon!
ln the dominion of Canada, in order
that the public may ta able to distinguish the-same from institutions
whieh are now or may hereafter be
organlted with a co-operative title:
Juitlce and Economy
may be secured by the abolition ot
false dealing, either (a)1 Direct by
representing any article produced or
sold to be other than what lt la known
to the producer or vendor; or (b) Indirect, by concealing from the purchaser any fact known to the vendor
material to be . known by the
purchaser to enable him to Judge
of the value of the article purchased. (2) Conciliating the conflicting Interests of the capltaliat; the
worker and the purchaser, through the
equitable division among them of the
fund commonly known aa profit (4)
Preventing the waate of labor now
earned by unregulated competition.
(E) Cultivating a spirit of mutual service by self-abnegation expressed la
the co-operative motto: "Each for all,
and all for eaeh," and to promote, by
the same means, moral, educative and
refining enterprises designed for the
Hlnard's Liniment Co., Limited.
I wai very ilek with Quinsy and
thought I would strangle. I used
MINARD'S LINIMENT and it cured
me at onee. I am never without lt
r.
Toure gratefully,
MRS. C. D. PRINCE.
Nauwlgewauk, Oet lilt
WM. H. JOHNSTON
President International Association of
Ifachlnlata, under whoae guidance tlie
organisation haa gained largely tn
membership, despite industrial Condi
tlona..
improvements of the people generally.
The Co-operative union ot Canada baa
the following
Soeletlee In Affiliation
In the places as named In the different provlaeee.
Ontario—Ouelph; Preston; Civil
Service Supply aaioclatlon, Ottawa;
Twin City, Berlin; Consumers, London; Brockvllle; Peterborough; Gall.
Quebec—L'Avenlr de Magog, Magog; Industrial, Valleyfield.   ■
Nova Scotia—Britlah Canadian, Sydney Mlnei; Workmen's, Dominion;
Glace Bay; Inverness; Workmen'!,
Sydney.
Alberta—Weitern Canadian Trading, Coleman; Eokvllle a oilby, Eck-
vtlle; Hlllerett; North Lethbrldge.
Manitoba—Winnipeg.
Britlah   Columbia—New   Weitmin-
iter; Merritt aad dlitrlet
Co-operation.
'Co-operation hu aucceeded In
vaatly Improving the poiltlon of mil-
Hone of the working classes by enabling them to obtain their provisions
cheap and pure, to avoid the millstone
of debt, to save money, to pass from
retail to v/tolesele trade, and from
distribution to manufacturing, building and bouse owning, store owning
and banking; above all to educate
themselves and to live with an Ideal."
E. T. Kingsley Lectures
The Empress Theatre on Sunday
night wa* crowded to overflowing
with people who listened attentively
to a lecture on the Paris Commune of
1871, delivered by the well-known and
able socialist speaker, E. T. Kingsley.
Tbe audience enjoyed the discourse
or an hour and a half, and enjoyed a
real Intellectual treat Mr. Kingsley
is a muter of hia subject, speaks convincingly, and at once commands the
earnest attention of his hearers. On
resuming his seat he waa loudly
applauded.
Organiser Busy
The Babies' Modified MUk depot
Winnipeg, hu been taken over by the
city, and will hereafter be run as a
municipal enterprise. The labor organisations were very active In the
agitation for municipal ownership of
the milk supply/ Tbls move may ultl-,
mately lead to the handling of the entire milk supply of the city.
mmm
ME
Resolves to Form a Permanent Organisation For
Political Action
Another Meeting WUl Be
Held Monday Evening,
W: April 6th
On Monday evening the local Labor
Representation League held a lengthy
aesslon ta Labor Temple, Ia absence
of Chairman Benson, J. Wilton presided, and Secretary Harrison was ln
his place, The report trom the varloua unloni regarding permanent or
ganlsatlon were received and read. Aa
there were organization! enough with
sufflclent voting strength that signified a readiness to affiliate and go
ahead with the work, lt wu decided
to call another meeting for Monday
night, April 6th, In Labor Temple. At
thla session a fixed committee will
be duly organised: (1) composed ot
representatives of national, International or local trad** unloni, of any
other working class party or association, who may be deemed worthy of
affiliation. (2) The electoral committee will be constituted, composed of
two' member* from each union for
each 100 member* or less, and on*
for eaoh additional 100 members or
major fraction thereof, dp to Ave
members. (8) Tlie executive committee will comprise not more than seven
member* chosen from the electoral
committee..
A SUGGESTION.
Do you know anyone whom you
think would become a subscriber to
The Federationlit, If he eaw tt?
If so, mall his name to this office
and The Federatlonist will he seat to
him for one month free of oharge and
accompanied by a letter Inviting htm
to become a subscriber.
Send ln the name of-that friend of
yours NOW.
neseSey.221 Day ar Night
Nam, Thomson &
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
'___ti__        Voaceaw, a) C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DMECTORI AND
BMSALMSM
VencouYer—omoe   and   Chapel,
ten Oranvllls St, Phona Stay. Slist
North Vanoouver —Offloe
chapel, UI Seeond Bf ~ "
IM
HOTEL  CANADA
CO. MULLER, Peep.
Phone connection in every room. He* End Com
Water in every Room.      w      European Plan
Transient Ratea, $1.00 per day up.   Special Weekly Ratea
Merchant's Lunch, 11 JO to 2.30 pa, 35c
Dinner • la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bui
518 Richards St Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
Firit-claii Grill in Connection
F.  h.   WALLINOPORD,  Manager
:: ..HOTEL ::
CONNAUGHT
HAV A DEPTFORD, Proas.
PHONE SBTMOUK Hit-Till.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
m leT "**|  G-wdS-ffriceTkr-ruhoBt  I .urt&h'iJ*
t. tetat—% ttt. I i I     i      tew
0.
SMS HASTINOS STREET WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Richly rureleh.d Throughout Hot aad Cold Water la army Roots
naaet Oaf. aaa tMtt Bee* ta the fMtto Otasl ia Oiaataaita
HOTEL ASTOR
ft J. MASSR, -Proprietor W. O. HARSH. Manager..
mates, SU* tag eg Sgooeal Weekly -Bates.
PENDER HOTEL ^33f^
su-ranassiaasi want Rauatu*p« BeTaieBa.
THE HEW ENGLAND HOTEL   NEW AND umo**te
'"** '*-**-"    *c-"'"»"»"»/ "VI IM; ajtrta M09T REASONABLE
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CLIFTON ROOMS    _**-»"?"?*■]!!*■
PATRONIZE LABOR TEMPLE POOLROOM
CAN A DA
MILLIONS OF ACRES
OF LAND AVAILABLE
Farm Hands Become Farmers Who Can Look Forward
to a Competency for Later Years
h . .' ^ .
There is an urgent and ever-increasing demand in Canada for farm kelp and domestics, who are assured of steady employment.
The industrious farm hand, who lias no capital and savechis earnings, can soon become the owner of 160 acres of fertile soil.
Improved farms can be obtained on easy terms in almost every Province, and the farmer with small or large capital has unlimited opportunity for hie energy and enterprise and every assurance of success. Upon application, illustrated pamphlets will be mailed free of charge,, giv-.
ing specific data showing the approximate sum required and how to commence settlement, and the excellent educational facilities available in
every Province of the Dominion.
No effort is made to induce the emigration of mechanics or skilled labor. It is advisable for auch classes to make inquiry from reliable
sources as to the demand for such labor, and to have a sufficient sum of money for maintenance until employment is obtained. The Immigration Department DOES NOT undertake to find employment for mechanics or skilled laborers.
8YHOPU8 OF LAND LAWS     /      . r.' .
Six months' ntddsnos upon snd cultivation of ths lsnd in t-aes of thm yean. A homMtsadar-^
at leut 80 sort** willy owned snd oecupisd by him or hli fatJier, mother, ton, daughter, brothir or liiter. ..
In oertsln dirtricti a homesteader in good tUndlng may preempt s qnarUr iiction alongiide hli homert^wi   Prios $8.00 psr am.   Dutiss-Muit
raids lis monthi in eaoh of six years from date of homntesd sntry (Including ths time nfqulrsd.to ssrn homsstsad patent) and cultivate fifty acre* axtra.
- '•' ..'.,■ • . -•<..'...."'•'....' '*-• \> V
'■.'■   **" .''.''' *    '  ■' '      X   ' .  V
FURTHER INFORMATION SUPPLIED FREE OF CHARGE ON APPUCATKM-J TO
.1 ' , , , jW*  • ' V   ,   ' '     , '  :,',     '       ''
W. D. SCOTT Supemtemient of Immigration OTTAWA
r-
!! FBIDAT  MARCH 27, 1914
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
D1AV uarums
FEDERATIONIST WESTMINSTER ADVERTISERS
Westminster Trust, Limited
We h*v* MONEY TO LOAN on improved property.
Batatea managed for out-ot-town and eltr cllenta. Pajmenta collected and forwarded or Inverted. We let aa agents only tor tke
purchase and sale Of real estate.
Depoeite acoepted and lntereat at 4% allowed on daily Balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlee:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Weetmlneter, B. C.
jr. a.
t.t
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Saeeeeamts te Oeater a attaaa, tM.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
NEW WMTaUNSTBlt, * ft
llSMOl
SOLO SPECIAL CIGARS='
MADE
JOBSEEKERS EVERYWHERE SHOULD
REMEMBER THAT THE STRIKE ON VANCOUVER ISLAND IS NOT SETTLED
PAT NO ATTENTION TO PHONEY DAILY
PRESS REPORTS SENT OUT BY THE COAL
COMPANIES. WATT UNTIL OFFICIAL NOTICE HAS.BEEN GIVEN THROUGH THE
LABOR PRESS.
Help the Goal Miners to win the right to organiie by
remaining away from Vancouver Island.
NEW WESTMWSTER UNIONS
aoiTio av h. at en. aoa\ ttt. nsw wiiTMiNtTtR
Treated Oouncll in Cavalier Manner When Asked
To Be Present
TradeB and Labor Council
Men Were on the Job
From the Start
The Quality of Oar Service, the Qualify of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reaaon our bualneaa Is lneraulng Is due to the (aot that our bualneaa polloy la correot. We adopted tne polloy of Informing the publlo
through the medium ot the preaa aa to what our ohargaa would be (or a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage (or Family, Care o( Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal service (or
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We are living up to our advertisement to the letter. Thla baa eatabllih-
ed conidence with the public ln ua, and (or that reaaon alone we ara successful, and we Intend to continue aa we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone' Fairmont 119
Commcdloue Chapel Free to All Patron.
Formerly Center * Hanna'a Branch
P. H, Qrote, Manager
THE UNITED MINE WORKERS
OF AMERICA
have secured a working union agreement with the
"JINGLE POT" mine management on Vancouver
Island, and have some 300 members employed.
Demand "Jingle Pot" Coal
and help the men on strike to win the right to
organize.
council:  We
the ellminatl
elans* from
especially
plant cost-  ,
vain* of the
oonelderI
tal* are of no.;
76 ner eent
(Mental*'**!
forever.  Take
example.  Above i
> oral
•UaiS;
,-sCl
'ugly opposed to
the   antl-Aaiatlc
irty leases, snd
* where the total
it $10,000, and the
is $30,000.    We
that employ Orlen-
'  a community, as
wages paid to the
the community
ibla straet a* an
e Merchants' hotel
to
NBW WESTMINSTER, March It—
For some reaaon, at preient unknown
to a large number of citlsens of this
elty, ln which la Included organlied
labor In general and the city council
In particular, James Brookes, president of the Westminster Woodworking company, failed to put In an appearance at the special meeting of
the city council called for the purpose
of hearing hi* application for a lease
of city property at the foot of Twelfth
street, on which he desired to' erect
hi* plant, lately destroyed by Are, on
Lulu Island. Mr. Brookes, ln hla application, stated he would ereot a 110,000
plant on the alte whloh Is valued at
130,000, but could not do so If the
council Insisted on the clause In the
lease which prohibited the employment of Asiatics on civic owned property, aa he had ln his employ several
Hindus employed as laborers, and
could not get along without them. At
the regular meeting of the council
on Monday night the matter was referred to a special meeting to be held
Friday at 5 p. m. and Mr. Brookes and
the municipal committee of the
Trades and Labor councU were In
vlted to be present and give then-
reason for and against the queatlon.
The Trades and Labor delegatea
were there with bells on, but Mr.
Brookes failed to appear, sending a
very short and curt note to the effect
that lt waa Inconvenient for him to be
present The aldermen present who
had put themselves out to hear the
matter fully discussed, were outspoken
at the cavalier manner ln which Mr.
Brakes had treated them, and after
the clerk had read the applicant's
note, Aid. Jardlne moved, with Aid.
Qoulet seconding, that the eurtness of
the communication was enough for
the council to drop negotiations and
the motion carried unanimously.
In view of the fact that the Trade*
and Labor committee were present
and prepared to atate their Bide of
the case, they were Invited to address
th* council on the general question. In
case matters of this nature should
arise ln the future.
President D. S. Cameron stated that
the Tradea and Labor counoll waa absolutely opposed to Asiatic labor anu
thought that any corporation leasing
land trom the city should be able to
compete with other firms If only white
labor were employed. Tbe union men
were quite ln sympathy with the leasing of such property and have the Interests of the city at heart just as
much aa any other citlsens but the
Idea of Oriental labor was repugnant
He further thought that Mr. Brookes'
stand was entirely out of place at this
particular time, when bo many white
men were out .of work, and lt was
well known that many were working
and willing to work for very, low
wages. Mr. Cameron said he was
afraid that a concession of thl* nature
at this time would leave a loop-hole
for great abuse of the privilege In
time to oome.
Secretary W. E. Maiden said: "Tour
worship, and other gentlemen of the
the reoord of theirhlte man Is graven
in stone and stall—in the building*
and businesses that are his achievement*. Below ths hotel is the Oriental, ln squalor and filth, and other condition!, unspeakable and vile. In con-
clualon, I would state that we consider that any contemplated Industry
that Is dependent for lta existence
upon the employment of Oriental
labor, had better be allowed to expire
In the ohrysallia rather than to flower
forth aa a breeder of thla curse of our
ooaat"
Alderman Dodd In upholding the
latereiti of the union men went Into
ititlitlct whieh'showed that Mr.
Brookes would be practically given a
bonus at the lease price offered by
the city. That lt would be Impossible
for Mr. Brookes to secure the use of
* place of ground of the same value
trom a private Individual for less thsn
12,400 * year, and then have to pay
the taxes and assessments besides,
while the olty 'which had based the
rental for the property on 5 per cent
of lte aaiessed value, was only asking
11,600 a year, which was practically
a bonus of 1900, given aa an Induce,
ment for the employment of white
labor exclusively; and further that
even tbat low rental had been cut ln
half for the flrat five years as a helping hand to the Industry.
A motion waa carried that In all
other circumstances where Industries
seek dty property, the Trades and
Labor counoll would be notified and
given a chance to speak on the mat-
ALFRED H. BARDOW
Died Laet Friday at New Weetmlneter—Leavee Widow and Daughter
NBW WESTMINSTER, March 24.—
Tbe members of the local Musicians'
union No. 664, lull the sorrowful duty
to perform on Sunday last ot participating ln tbe last rites over the remains ot their! departed brother,
Alfred H. Barlow, who passed away
on Friday morning at his home, 321
Alberta street, after an Illness of over
four months.
Mr. Barlow was always an active
worker ln the ranks pf organlted
labor and one of the prime movers
ln the organisation of the local union
of musicians, and hts loss will be
keenly felt by his brother members.
He was also a member of the New
Westminster aerie of the Fraternal
Order of Eagles, who assisted In the
funeral ceremonies and turned out In
numbers In respect for the deceased.
The funeral cortege was headed by a
band of over forty pieces, under the
leadership of J. W. Rushton, composed of the loesl union, assisted by
a number of members of the Vancouver Musicians' union, who came over
In large numbers.
The deeeaaed was a native of England and for several yeara past was
employed as an attendant at the Insane Asylum ln this city. He leaves
to mourn his loss a wife and baby
daughter, who will remain ln this
city for the present
His protracted Illness has left his
family ln somewhat straitened circumstances, and his brother members
are arranging a concert for their
benefit, which will take place In the
near future.  .
Rev. F. Plaakett, of St. Mary'B
Episcopal church, read the services
at the grave. The pall-bearers were:
Messrs, Hoult, Siplth, F. Kerr, H.
Schofleld, Montelth and H. Mackness.
Those who sent wreaths were: Mrs.
Barlow, harp; Musicians' union, harp;
Mrs. Dlgby, Insane Asylum staff and
Colony Farm Essondale employees,
wreath; Mrs. J. McRea, Baby Barlow
and Miss Fllmore, spray.
II
UUi TEMPLE
SHARES
Local Labor Parliament Discusses Again Anti-Chinese
Question
Labor Papers In Library-
Work Still Scarce—Bylaws Adopted
NEW WESTMINSTER, March 26.-
The regular meeting of the Tradee
and Labor oouncll wae held thla evening wtth hardly a quarter ot the
membenhlp preient. The hualn
transacted wa* mottly of a routine
character and Preildent D. S. Cameron waa In tha chair. Maura. Bra-
nan and Moran, Bartenders' -local,
were teated as delegates, vice Scbofleld and Wood, reilgned; Chris. Cameron, Street Railway employeea, vice
Jaa Humphrey, resigned.
Labor Tenyle Shares
Delegate Kenyon reported that he
had arrived late at, the Labor Temple
oompany meeting, after the transaction of the business for whieh the
meeting had heen called. President
Cameron stated that the company bad
adopted unanimously the amendment
to the by-law* permitting the oompuy to aell ahare* to penon* aot
memben of onions after June 1,1114,
At the pruent time oat of 1,600
shan* Issued, 7,000 had heen aold,
leaving 1,600 to be disposed ot. A*
It wu necessary for the company to
raise more money u soon aa possible,
the amendment to the by-laws was
Some More Reasons
Why Yon Should Use
The malt we use in brewing
CASCADE is the PALE BAB-
LET MALT from Alberta and
Saskatchewan—known to be the
best in the world for brewing
purposes,
We're extremely careful to get
ONLY THE FIBST QUALITY,
and we buy $175,000 worth of it
every year.
"And then CASCADE IS
MADE IN B. C."-and every
doien bottles you buy helps to
make British Columbia grow.
CASCADE BEEB sells at $1
for a doien PINTS—$2 for a
dosen QUARTS,
Ask ANY LIQUOB DEALEB
FOB
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
FEDERATIONIST VICTORIA ADVERTISIKg
THE POPULAR PBICED, EUBOPEAN PLAN
hotel Rrrz
VICTORIA, B.C
FORT ST., At DOUOUS
BATES 78c, $1.00, $1.26, $1 JO, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOY, MOB. FBEE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
aammma^gsaa JSLSSff-mwu
aaamam. aaa. ?JffixtH WHBt> ^ag. na. , aat u.
STREET RAILWAV EMPLOYEES.
Notice to Withdraw from B. C. Federation—*/. Cameron Vice-President
Preaident.
NEW WESTMINSTER, March 26.—
Quite an improvement In the attendance was noted at the last meeting of
the Westminster division of tbe Street
Railway Employees' union. It Is hoped
that the good work will keep up, as
the business now before the union Is
ot such a nature aa to warrant the
presence of every member. A large
amount of routine business was transacted, In the discussion of which all
took an active Interest. A notice of
motion was given to withdraw from
affiliation with tbe B. C. Federation ot
Labor. Christopher Cameron was appointed as delegate to tbe Tradei and
Labor council in place of Jas. Humphries, withdrawn. The vacancy In the
vice-president's chair, caused by the
resignation of D. Mclvor, was filled
by the election of Bro. Cameron. The
meeting adjourned at 10:15.
THE B. C. MINERS' STRIKE
B. C. Fediratlonlet Supported It With
Seed Judgment
The miners of Vancouver Iilind
have shown a splendid spirit of solidarity during the course of then-
great strike which haa now extended
over the year. Signs are now beginning to Increase of an approaching
termination of the struggle, and well
Indeed have they become entitled to
the victory. During the long term of
the itruggle The British Columbia
Federatlonist has supported the minera and their cause with both enthue-
la»m and good judgment, and this, no
doubt, haa been a factor ln retaining
and increasing the publlo good-will,
which some other Influence* would
long ago hav* alienated. Now that
the whole of the prosecutions have
been disposed of It la hoped that the
great bulk of the Imprisoned miners
will be released. In the large number of case* their ofteneea were purely technical, and ln other casee there
la little room for doubt that the set-
tlngs for unlawful deede were worked up to the keeping ot the peaee rather than forcing a clash.—Winnipeg
Voice,        ^^
James Smith, who had the misfortune of losing a leg last year, was
again compelled to go to the hospital
thla week for another operation. "Jim"
ia, a popular member of the Bartenders'
union.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA.
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
Victoria, ac.
Brookee Turned Down
The municipal committee reported
having attended three meetings of the
city council, oae of which waa a special meeting held to consider Mr. Jas.
Brookes' application to have the antl-
Aslatle clause stricken from a leaae
on elty property. Mr. Brookes failed
to put ln an appearance, and the elty
council had dropped the mater.
Delegate Knudsen ot tbe organisation committee, reported that be had
visited the Letter Carrier! and that
they would not recede from their Intention to withdraw from the council.
Delegate Olbb reported that aa the
Progressive association waa now
meeting at 10 o'clock In the morning,
he wu unable to attend their meetings. So far as he knew nothing of
Importance to the council had been
brought before the association.
Labor Papera
Delegate Olbb reported (bat while
several lahor papers ware being received at the library, no flies had been
provided. The secretary waa Instructed to write to the library oommlttee of the elty council and ask
them to provide the necessary flies.
Delegate Tyler uked u to the report of the auditing committee. Delegate Tate* atated that the books of
the secretary-treasurer had been examined and found correct, and the
matter of reporting the fact had been
lift to the chairman ot the committee.
The report wu accepted.
Work Still Scarce
The various unions reported work
as being scarce and many of their
members out of employment The
shingle weavers threw the only bright
light on the prevailing gloom with
the statement that they were getting
along well, with none Idle.
By-lawe Adopted
The amended constitution and bylaws were read tbe third time and finally adopted, with the exception of the
building trades sections, whloh were
referred to a meeting of the building
trades union delegates to be held
Tuesday, March 81.
There being two vacancies on the
munloipal committee, Delegatea Kenyon and Mackle were appointed by
the chair for the remainder of the
term.
Chinese Must Go
In tbe matter of the employment ot
Asiatics by the Royal Columbian hospital, Delegate Olbb reported that he
had received Information that the object In view had already been accomplished by the local council of women,
and recommended that the aeeretary
be Instructed to write the counoll and
congratulate them on their success ln
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
COLDS, ETC.
To the Oitiiens of New
Westminster and
District:
Co-operation is making splendid progress and by your patronage you can help forward the
cause which stands (or Equality.
OUR PRICES
Salmon, per tin, 1 lb 10c
Herrings, in Tomato Sauce
3 for   Sic.
B. C. Milk, per tin 10c.
Peas, per tin   IOC.
Corn, per tin   10c.
Eggo Baking Powder Sic.
Eggo Bak. Powder, V/, lbs. SOc.
Tea, 3 lbs. for 11.00
This movement is a safeguard
against   trusts   and   combines.
NEW WESTMINSTER
CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
K. of P. Block
Eighth St. Phone MS
Branch—
1007 Sixth Ave. Phone UI
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Depoty Minister of Lands, Vktom, &C
Secretary, Bnreai of (Yovitxal bfomafa, Victim
having the Chinese removed.   A motion to that effect wu carried.
duetts Correepondent
On motion of Delegate Tyler th*
secretary wu Instructed to write the
department of labor and endeavor to
secure the appointment of Secretary
Maiden u correspondent ot tbe Labor
Oatette. Bill* to tb* amount of $5.50
were ordered paid. Receipts were
15.50.
A subscriber wants to know wbat
percentage of the employeea ln and
about the city hall are Canadians.
SANDS
Funeral Furnishing Co.
LIMITID
niNERAL DIRECTORS
LAOV ATTENDANT
TELEPHONE MM
Ull QUADRA STREET
Near Pandora Avenue
VICTORIA, S.C.
Named Shoei are freqaeatiT nude is Nos-
Unjoa Fsctoriei-Do Not Bar Aay Sine
no matter what tt* name, unleu lt beats a
plain and readable lmpreetlon or thla stamp.
All iboes without th* Union Stamp ar*
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT * SHOE WORKERS' UNION
Ml Summer Stnet, Beeton, Hu*.
J. F. Tobln, Pr**.   C. L. Blaine, See.-Treu.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Oustavus Myers, historian and
socialist, bu added another Immensely valuable volume to hla
work* In
The History of
Canadian Wealth
JUST COMPLETED
There never bu been * single
work ot any kind In Canada siring the real economic history of
Canada; not even a bourgeois
history. Therefore lt will he fa-
valuable to socialists and eta-
dents.
Mr. Myers writes: "The history of the Canadian land grabs Is one
of the most gigantic ever seen. I spent nearly two yeare going over
official document* In the archives, that tell an appalling story of tha
way capltalltm hu run Canada.
"The book will detail bow the great land, mines and other domain*
were gobbled up by the flnanclal powers. Some portions will be devoted especially to the Roman Catholic Church In Canada.
What This Great Work Contains
347 PAGES
Blue Cloth Biaaug
Stamped is Geld
The Quiet of Trade and New Seureti of Wealth.
The Eecletlaitlcal and feudal Lerde
The Hudson's Bey Company
Ware on the Fur Traders and Companies
The Landed and Mercantile Oligarchy
The Landed Proprietors Revolt Agalnat Feudalism
Sovereignty of the Hudsen'e Bey Compsny
Patting of the Hudton't Bey Company's Sovereignty
Inception of the Railroad Power
Pint Period of Railway Promoter*
Contest for the Pacific Railway
Era of Railway Magnates
Progreu ef the Railway Lorde
Extension of Railway Possessions
s. C.
Fedaratlenlat,
Ream H7,
Later Temple
Vaneouvar, B.C.
Enclosed flnd tl.H
for which please
raallMyera'HIatoi.
of Canadian Wealtl
Addreaa
Appropriation of Coal, Timber end
Other Landa PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH ^OEUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
STOCK OF WOOD'S PHARMACY IS BEING SOLD OUT,
AND BELOW COST. FOLLOWING GOODS ON SALE ALL
DAY SATURDAY.  COME EARLY!
26c Packer's Tar Soap, Out to 16o
10c Oallard & Bowser'a Butter Scotch 6c
10c Ivory Soap, Per Cake, 6c
TOILET ARTICLES
50c Hydrogen Peroxide ....Mo
25c Sanltol Mouth Wall) lte
SSo Ingram'! Cold Cream ....lie
60c Toilette Cold Cream.... JOs
25c Ingram's Camphor Ice. ISo
76c Face Powder, cut to. SOo
SSo Arthur's Talcum Powder..-10o
25c Mulford's Talcum Powder..l5o
26c Sanltol Talcum powder. ISo
86c Corylopsla Talcum Powder.lBe
91.00 Perfumes, cut to per bot...S0o
60c Bau de Cologne ......M©
11.00 Plnaud's Eau de QuinIne..SBe
91 00 Herplc.de, now only .78o
50c lb. Talcum Powder 90e
26c Tooth Paste lOo
26c Tooth Brushes ...,..,.-13e
SHAVING SUPPLIES
97.60 Auto Strop Raxor Set....H»5
51.00 Ever Ready Safety Rator 70o
9100 Gem Safety Raxor. TOO
25c Shaving Sticks    15c
■, Uo Styptic Pencils -.So
lOo Soap. Williams' and Colgate's   » ..Se
92.00 Rubber Set Brushes .95c
■ $1.00 Raxor Strops .-. .flSo
92.00 Raxor Strops  Sl.30
' 93 50 Koken's Raxor 6trops....tl-*6
COMBS, BRUSHES, ETC.  j .
' 28c Pocket Combs In caae..™..lO»
60c Combs, assorted, each .......lie
91.26 French Dressing Corat>s..Mo
10c Noll Brushes, your choice.—6e
60c Noll Brushes, cut to, each..!5t
91.26 Ebony Nail Brushes now..«o
60c Ebony Nail Brushes now....S5o
91.00 Hair Brushes cut to„„.„..jea
92.00 Hair Bristles now JSo
94.00 Hair Brushes, cholee J1.M
92.60 Whalebone Hair Brushes'
cut to _............, .91.34
92.00 Military Brushes, pair Ho
 U. i
CANDY.
Our candy factory Ib tne most
modem and sanitary in Vancouver. It la devoted exclusively to
the manufacture of high-grade
Chocolates and Boa Bons. If
you would secure the best, while
paying reasonable prices, buy
candles at this store.
10c Toffee, ln bags Jo
26c Toffee, In bags lOo
5c Spearmint Gum, 3 for.... lOo
65c Italian Cream Bar, lb «o
76c Nougat, per pound 50e
PATENT PREPARATIONS
60c Fruit-a-tlves JSo
60c Gin Pills ..380
50c Cascarets SSe
91 00 Emulsion God Liver Oll.JOe
60c Make-Man Tablets .SOe
50c Citrate of Magnesia SOo
26c Cascara Tablets, 3 graln....lBo
25c O. B. S. & C. Tablets .15c
26c Liquid Corn Cure 15c
16c Medicated Corn Plasters .Be
26c Belladona Plasters ISo
50c White Pine Cough Syrup....SBo
,40c Cascara Aromatic, 3 oxs.....SBe
91.26 Wilson's Invalid Port......78e
60c French Vichy Water 30o
50c Absorbent Cotton, 1 lb, SSe
91.25 Beef, Iron and Wine ..SSo
91.00 Iron, Quinine and Iron......6So
76c Pure Cod Liver Oil.... .SOo
50c Pep's Cold Cure..„ 40o
RUBBER GOODS
92.60 Hot Water Begs SI SS
93.60 Hot Water Bags SB.1B
93.60 Douche Syringes.. SB.15
91.50  Fountain  Syringes 95c
91.26 Ladles' Sanitary Syringes SOo
91.00 Ladles' Sanitary Syringes 45c
Wood's Pharmacy
CORNER SEYMOUR STREET *
601 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
J
■EAUTIFYINQ ASSOCIATION.
■laet Officer*-^). J. Banfield, Presl.
dent—Henerary Preeldent,
Mayer Baxter.
On Wednesday afternoon a meeting
of the Vancourer Planning and Beautifying Association was held ln the
Board of Trade rooms. J. J. Banfield
was la the chair, among those Ming
preeent were H. A. Stone, J. Rogers,
Stanley Tytler, R. P. Pettlplece. Fol-
lowing were the oncers selected: Honorary president. Mayor Baxter; president, J. J. Banfield; .first vlce-presl-
dent, H. H. Stevens, M.P.; second vice-
presidents, Hon. W. J. Bowser, H. Wat-
ton, UX—,, A. H. B.. Macgowan, M.L.
, A., Dr. McQuIre, M.L.A., C. Tlsdall, M.
L.A. The executive committee comprise: For tbe architects, W. M. Dodd;
engineers, O. R. O. Conway; city council, Aid. G. H. Cottrell; board of trade,
J. Rogers; Beautifying Association, H.
A. Stone; Industrial Association, C. W.
Enrlght; trades tnd labor, R. P. Pettlplece; school hoard, Mrs. McNaugh-
ton; tine arts, Stanley Tytler; park
board, W. R. Owen; women's organization, selected later. The next meeting
will he held Monday* afternoon at 4
o'clock.
.: COMING CONVENTION
It. John, N. B., Unionists Busy—Souvenir T. end L. Congress
The trades unionists of St John,
N. B„ in already actively preparing
for the thirtieth annual convention of
the Trade* tnd Labor congreaa of
Canada, whieh . wUl meet there on
September 13-28 of thl* year. A reception committee, with 3. T, Mon-
ttgu* as president, and James L. Su-
greue te eeerettrytreasurer, has been
organised, tnd they are preparing an
official souvenir number to be Issued
und*r the tusplces of St John'Trades
Ind Libor council, to which a number
of weitern unionists and officials have
beea asked to contribute. Mr. Su-
greue advises The Federatlonist that
no (tone will be left unturned to
auk* th* coming convention of the
congress * huge success, end 1* even
now Inviting the co-operation of un-
lonlit* throughout Canada. Inasmuch
■* Vancouver 1* out for the 1916 convention of the congreu, lt Is fitting
that British Columbia unionists should
be ** strongly represented as possible
at St Joha, N. B„ In September next
ELECTION DAY
Destine* Purpoie of Leap Year Hu
Been Discovered
A year Ii made up of 366 days. But
in the working out ot the scheme of
every fourth year, says the Ottawa
Citlsen. The year is called Leap
Tear and the day baa been tagged on
to the end of February—for lack of
room In any of the other months pre-
eumably. Some genius has suggested
that providence, foreseeing all things,
clearly, Intended tbe extra day to be
need, tor special purpose, so why not
make It general election day. all over
the world. It would be a general
holiday and would not be counted In
among the common or garden daya
of the calendar. There would be
no audden springing of general election* upon unwary people, and It
would be futile for the opposition to
plot deep plans to throw the government into confusion. Clearly the destined purpose of Leap Year day haa
been discovered. Could anyone suggest a more appropriate use of th*
spare day every fourth year?
JUNEAU IS MENACEO
Overeupply of Ltbor—Immigration
Should Be Halted
'JUNEAU, | Alaska, March 18.—
"Something ihould be done to get the
news outside tbat Juneau has all the
labor it can possibly use," said But
L. Thane, mtnager Altika Ctetlnetu
mining company, to-day. "ft Is unfair
to the community and unfair to the
men who eome here expecting work
to allow the real condltlona to remain
unexplained. We are now employing
upward of 700 men, and even after
the season open* fully, thli force will
not be Increased more than 250. Many
ot our old men are on vacations, and
they will, of course, be given preference. The labor problem Is more serious than appears on the surface. In
my opinion, Juneau haa more labor
than can be used now. Many men
coming here to get work are enduring
hardships, and It the Immigration continues, condltlona will get worse."
Varloua estimates give the number
of men who are seeking Jobs and willing to work as between 800 and 1,000.
Every boat is bringing more.
western Mail clerks
Will Receive s Substantial Incraaee
In Saltrlte
Weetern railway mall clerks are to
receive an lncreue la their salaries,
says a Winnipeg dispatch. Thos. J.
Kneebone, eecretary of the Manitoba
Railway Mall Clerks' association,
received a • wire' from the postmaster-general, Hon. L. P. Pelletler,
stating "An order-ln-councll wu
passed Saturday giving the Western
railway mill clerki the same living
allowance u la given to other postal
employeee in the West" Thl* gives
Western mall .clerk* a itralght living
allowance of $15 a month ln addition
to their salaries.
At the Orpheum theatre another Interesting feature of the bill Is "The
Typewriter and the Type," a skit In
which Chas. Nevlns and Ada Gordon
have won fame aa entertainer*. The
scene is laid In the Hotel Savoy, Dent
ver, Colo., and Its humor Ib very real.
Our Special for the Week-end
SEMI-PORCELAIN DINNER^ARE
97-PIECE SETS, $17.50
R. G. Buchanan & Co.
VANCOUVER'S SELECT CHINA STORE    .
Telephone Seymour 2021
BUCHANAN BUILDING 1121 ROBSON ST.
1
GO JO POUS
President Watters Puts the
Views of Labor Before
,.,   the Commons,
Asks That no Deposit Be
Required From the
Candidate?    ,
The special committee appointed to
enquire Into the aot regarding election of membera of the, house of commons met on March 18th at Ottawa,
the chairman, -Hon. C. J. Doherty,
minister of justice, presiding. The
Federationist last week briefly referred to thla meeting from telegraphic reports. This week a verbatim
report bu been received, and is of
considerable Interest, showing, u it
does, the way ln which. J, C. Waiters,
president of the Tradea and Labor
congress of Canada, is attending, to
business and giving expression to the
opinion of members, of organised labor
throughout the dominion. When called
u a witness he said he represented
at leut 150,000 voters and that he did
not Intend indulging In captions and
criticisms either of the government
or the Electoral act, but proposed to
give a concrete statement of any suggestions regarding the amendment of
We law u it now stands. He went
on to say that organised labor had
for yeara petitioned the: government
to make election day a .holiday. Em.
ployera often refuted to give tbelr employees an opportunity of voting when
their political views did not agree
with his. A free and unrestricted
opinion ot the whole electorate wu
desired and fori that reason election
days should be general holidays. The
Issues resulting from a general election applied to all time and were of
vastly greater Importance than keep
lag the'wheels ot Industry* In operation those particular days.
Compulsory Voting.':
It had been suggested that voting
should be made compulsory but before that ts done It would have tb be
compulsory on the part of the employer to give his men time to cast
their votes. It "has been suggested
thtt failure to vote should be punished by disfranchisement for a term of
years. Unless lt Is compulsory for
employers to give their workmen
time to cut their votes, this would
he a very convenient method by
which the employer could disfranchise his men, and would certainty
be a menace to unfettered opinion.
Mr. Watters said he did not wish to
aee voters disfranchised beoause they
had not cast their votes, hut he wished to compel them to attend at the
polling booths as a safeguard against
Impersonation. One could take a
horse to the water but could not make
It drink and when a voter went to the
polls he could simply spoil his ballot lt he did not wish to vote for
either candidate. Hla name would
then he scored off. and that would
lessen the possibilities of Impersonation and would undoubtedly help forward the purity of eleotlon. Although
a whole day would be much the best
plan yet even two hours would.meet
the necessities ot the cue, In the latter event however, the men would have
to be paid for lost time.
Workmen Would Net Mind Sacrifice
la reply to questions from the chairman Mr. Watters said that working
men would almost be ready to sacrifice a day's pay so as to have ample
opportunity to cut their vote. On
the oth-jr hand, they insist,that It
only a limited time be granted them—
tor example, It they are restricted to
two hours— that they should he paid
for that'period. The contention they
make Is: "Why should we lose,the
two hours t We are compelled to go
and vote and we should be paid for
the time occupied In doing so, and
the companies can better afford to
meet that outlay thin we can afford
to lose It" The chairman suggested
that while aome (workmen might be
willing to lose the day and lose their
wagea, other men who were married
and had large families, might he better satisfied to remain at work)'rather
than forego their day's pay of three
or four dollars and he presumed It
waa to meet that contingency' tbat
Mr. Watters' suggested; a couple of
hours.. Mr. Witters agreed with the
euggeatfon and said -If work* ware
closed down it 3 o'clock on polling
daya lt would meet with general approval.
Mr. Carvell said that what would
happen If auch a regulation; were
made, giving men the legal right to
knock oft at three o'clock In the afternoon, would be that the employer
would at once make hla arrangement
to allow the men to go and vote at
different tlmea In the day ao that the
operation of the work would not he
stopped, and thought they would work
lt out without any difficulty whatever.
Mr. Watters agreed with thl* and
pointed out that In several countries
men were guaranteed two hours for
the purpose and they were paid for
their: time. Labor organisation* have
considered the question and the general opinion Is that thsy would be satisfied lt they were assured a couple
of hours during the day ltt whieh to
eaat their vote, - ,
,""*': . Election Deposit ,
President Watters.then took up the
question of the election deposit He
said It waa felt to be a restriction on
working people that a deposit should
be required. They claimed and have
claimed time and, time again that men
of the.best calibre, the best type of
men, are sometimes prevented from
running because eaoh candidate Is required to put up that $200 deposit, and
to run the chance ot losing it It wu
a restriction that should not be In operation. In Ontario there was no
deposit required for provincial elections-ind In British Columbia it. had
beta reduced. Canada wu practically the only country ln the world
where deposits were necesary. The
principal objection—that bands pf
men might knock out an election by
putting up a large number of candidate*—wu certainly valid, but that
men were never .bribed to do right
When men .were bribed lt was Jor the
purpose of attaining some ltnpropsr
end. Experience had shown that a
deposit waa unnecessary. Perhapa the
signatures of 50 or 100 bona fide elector* to a candidature would meet the
caae.   He did not think a large nam-1
South African Deportwe
Editor B. C. Federations: Pleau
find resolution appended bearing upon
the deportation of. the South African
ltbor leader*, we, Local No. 30, Social
Democratic Party of South Wellington, hereby make an appeal to all organizations ot workingmen to forward
similar resolutions to the British Colonial seoretary and by so doing, show
the. powers that be that such Russianized actions hav* the condemnation
of the worker* throughout the empire. Fellow workers, comrades aad
brothers, we have felt the Iron heel of
capital on Vancouver Island) we have
eeen the Iron flat used In Dublin, South
Africa, New Zealand, Australia and
elsewhere, and, In a short time, tt
may be your turn to feel it so join
ue ln protesting* against the tyranny
of the muter class and their hirelings. Yours for the revolution,
LOCAL No. 80 S. D. P.,
,. .South Wellington.
South Wellington, B.C., March 23,
1014-      .   ,
.    .[Resolution]
"Whereas—It Is a well-known fact
that the ostensible reason for the
South African war was that' Britishers
were disfranchised, while it ie equally
well known that,the real reaaon wu
to give the British capltaliat new
fields ln which to exploit lahor; and
"WhereM—The worker, who la alwaya foroed to fight hla masters' battles brought about the conqueat of tbe
South African, republics; and
"Whereaa—Nine of the workera'
representatives hive been deported
from South Africa for exercising their
constitutional rights; and	
"Whereu—The Interests of the
workers, the world over tre Identical
be lt therefore
"Resolved—That we, tho members
of South Wellington Social. Democratic party, protest against the despotic
and highhanded, treatment handed
out to members of our class by the
hirelings of the capitalist clus ln
South- Africa; and we demand that
they be Immediately, taken baok- to
South Africa; be It further..-...
"Resolved—That this resolution be
forwarded to the labor press of Canada and Great Britain for publication,
with a request for Indorsation from
the working class organisations."
WESTERN   FEDERATION   MINERS
K-    a'
FRIDAY.
MARCH IT, 11
' .1  "■	
Question of Monthly Working Card Sent to Trades
;V'j'U      Council' <mjj .i.;
Delinquent Members Pined, Expelled
and Declared Unfair
Following are delinquent members
of miners' unions as officially listed
on March 15, 1914:
Casey, Daniel—Fined 525 and declared unfair by Rossland M. U. No.
38, Rossland, B. C, for leaving the
camp without a paid-up card. Supposed to have gone to Bisbee, Arizona..   •■ '
CaBey, John—Fined $25 and declared unfair by Rossland M. U. No. 38,
for leaving the. camp without a paid-
up card. Supposed to have gone to
Bisbee, Arliona.
Cooper, C—Declared unfair by Ymlr
M, U. No. 85,- Ymlr, B. C, for having
worked In, Queen mine, Sheep Creek,
BC.       ^  '	
. Crossley, John (alao known ta John
Smith)—Declared unfair by Ymlr M.
U. No. 85, Ymlr, B. C, for having
worked ln Queen mine, Sheep Creek,
B.C.
Ducette, Anthony—Declared unfair
by Ymlr M. U. No. 85, Ymlr,.B.C., for
having worked in Queen mine, Sheep
Creek, B.C. .
Dixon, James—Fined (25 and declared unfair by Rossland M. U. No.
38, Rossland, B.C., for refusing to
pay up.
Langdon, Ed.—Fined ] (26 and declared unfair by Rossland M. U. No.
38, Rossland, B.C., for refusing to
pay up.
MoLaren, Ed.—Declared unfair by
Ymlr M. U.'No. 85, Ymlr, B.C., for
having worked ln Queen mine, Sheep
Creek, B.C.
Miller, Mike—Declared unfair by
Ymlr M. U. Na 85, Ymlr, B.C., for
having worked in Queen mine, Sheep
Creek, B. C.
Porteous, H.—Declared unfair by
Ymlr M. U. No. 85, Ymlr, B.C., for
having worked In Queen mine, Sheep
Creek, B.C.
Simpson, J. B.—Declared unfair by
Ymlr M. U. No. 86, Ymlr, B.C., for
having worked in Queen mine, Sheep,
Creek, B.C.
Funeral . .
Kenneth McDonald, a member ot
the Britannia Lodge No. 728, who was1
killed on the B.C.B.R. on Monday,
was' burled Friday at New Westminster from the .undertaking parlora of
Murchle & Son, the Rev. Dr. Fraaer
officiating. Brother M. M. Wright acted as worshipful muter. The pall
bearera were Robert HoMinus, A. W.
Coulter, Richard Dunbar, Joseph Elliott D. A. Acorn and Dan Campbell.
Many wreaths decked the coffin.
The Plasterers' Laborers have decided to raise the initiation fee from |5 to
$10 during tho working season.  .
The claim of J. English against the
Kettle Valley Railroad for damageB
under the Workmen'* Compensation
aot wu referred to Judge fichults,
who was' appointed, arbitrator by Justice Murphy. ,'
Weekly Meetings Will Be
Held Every Monday
Morning   :
The business agents of the different
unions held an interesting and important, meeting yesterday In the
office- of the aeoretary of the Tradee
counoll. - Preeldent'' Walker, of the
Tradea and Labor council, occupied
the chair, and there were present
Business Agent* McEwen (carpenter*), Hamilton (sheet metal. Worker*), Train (painters), Sully (laborers)
Prendergut (engineers), Neelands,
(typos). An Informal discussion took
place aa. to the work ot subsidiary or
ganlzatlona auch as metal trade*
oouncll; building trades council, etc.,
which, It being the concensus of opinion expressed, could be handled by
the Tradea and Labor council. This
body could' luue a monthly working
card, which would be of great benefit
tor organisation purposes.....
It was moved by John Sully, seconded by. E. Prendergut that Business Agent Walker, of the culinary
crafts, be authorised to lntroduoe the
queatlon of issuing a monthly working
card system .before the Trades and
Labor council for lta action thereon.
Carried  	
Moved by VS. Prendergaat seconded
by H. JI McEwen that the business
agents, meet each Monday at 9 o'clock
a, m., room 210, Labor Temple. Car-
rled.
A WORD TO THE UNION MAN
The Union Label should stand for quality ot material, fit and make-up
of gament, as well as the sanitary-conditions of a factory,
wage* paid, etc. .
A copy of thia guarantee goei with every garment
"   manflJaotured oj us. ,,;,,.,,.
MOTHER   JONES   WILL  RETURN
DENVER; Col., Mar. 24.—The Colorado, mllltla has admitted that holding military prisoners Incommunicado
I* Illegal by the release and deportation of Mother Jones on the ave ot
a petition for a writ of habeas oorpus
being heard In the state supreme
court. She hu been held Incommunicado for nine weeks without »
charge being laid against her. Mother
Jones, however, will return to Trial-
dad and give the mllltla another opportunity to take away her constitutional rights. The coal operators
admitted the success of the .etrlke
when they announced that they would
sue Individual membera and offloers
of the United Mine Worker* for
$4,000,000. The Colorado: National
Guard who were aent to the atrlke
sone by the corporation-owned governor under the, guise of "preserving
the peace,'! but in reality to break the
etrlke, have left nothing undone to
accomplish thla: purpose. In their
efforts to perpetuate a reign of terror
ta thla dlatrlct children have not been
overlooked. They have been kleked
tnd thrashed by these thuge, some-
times having bones broken, ln short
the militiamen bave been juat bell-
hounds.
WM; J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD.
Manufacturer* of   *
MAO'S MOOAL ATO WOK BRAND 8HIETS, PANTS AND
OVERALLS, ALSO THB VASTER SHTJIT
1178 Homer St., Vanoouver, B. 0. Telephone Seymour 831
This garment ia guaranteed ae to workmanship, quality of material,
fullneaa of slse, buttons' eecurely fastened, buttoAhofee well made.
Anyone wearing one 'Of"our garments nnd finding it defective will do
na a favor by either returning li to Me dealer or mailing It to us to be
exchanged for another.
*•'•' All our itarnwiite bear the lab.l of the.-
UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OP AMERICA.
You are invited to visit our factory.
f]j0H&VY$$! lloMAillft^SONfrMJ)*''-'-''
Per Jaa. A. McMatter, )
Managing Director.;
r«ior ''dr^'; mark
BraTd's
Best
Coffee
ju Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Select your Cigar* from Boxes bearing this Label
1'i'iiiii'    ___________^B—m—vam——me____-
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Per Month, Without Interut
Open meadow land situate ln the fertile Bella Coola Dlstriot, on
river and lake and close to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hoc ranching. Call or
write tor full particulars before all tract* are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
10* aeldaa BnUllac
ie Baattace Itreet aaat
TAaOODTSB, a. 0.
Without  obligation,  please mall me
particulars of your ten-acre farina.
her of men would put themselvee up.
There were few men,- If tny at ill,
Who were to callous to public opinion, ts to mtke themselves a laughing ttock or even, worse, "beoause
thete bona tides would be questioned.
There were few, it any, men who
would willingly be parties to allowing
their names to be used limply to
bring about the defeat of-another opponent In constituencies where
there was an overwhelming aentiment
favorable to one party, elections often
went by default because.the minority
did not care to losa the deposit That
wa* wrong from tn educational point
of view as, If there were a contest,
the people would get t clearer conception of the questions tt. Issue.
Mr. Witters also stated that labor
wa* In favor ot suffrage tnd also thtt
train crews should have an opportunity of voting. He tbo agreed with in
amendment to the.Bleotlone »ot making it easy to Institute proceeding*
against violations of that act. He disagreed with a;literary test for franchise. The chairman on adjourning
the meeting, thanked Mr. Witter* and
expressed the committee's , appreciation of his evidence.
————   i ii    ' =
DOLL'S HOSPITAL
Broken heads, limbs, or,any
other part of youi/floll can bo
repaired   lh   the  DOLL   HOSPITAL it
MILLAR * COE    IM Haatlaia St. W.
A
Single
DOLLAR
Admits You and 292 Others
Tile famous Hoosier Cabinet saves you mile* of steps. It is insect-proof and mouse-proof.
Every part can be scoured—every part can be sunned—every corner can be reached. Tou
don't WALK for things—you limply REACH for them.
Over 200 members have enrolled their names already and paid their enrollment fee of
$1.00. This club fee of $1.00 entitles members to a Hoosier Cabinet in regular order of enrollment. Payments of $1.00 are made each week until the full amonnt of the special club
price ii paid. •'■ ■''
The "Hoosier'1 Store haa permission to form a
Hoosier Cabinet Club of 500 members, each of
Whom gets these SPECIAL FACTORY MADE
TERMS AND PRICES, Enroll your name and
become one of the five hundred club membera.
$1.00 secure* the delivery of a Hoosier Cabinet
immediately when you Join the club. The Hoosier
Company supervises thl* sale. . The demand for
Hoosier Cibtnete on thl* remarkable offer haa
'been so great thit our entire tllotment will be
gone long before *e expect it. Only those who
come early and enroll their names quickly wllliget
the advantage of thi* sweeping opportunity.
You and Your Kitchen
Book Free
A limited shipment of the famous "You tnd
Your Kitchen Book" has been eent to us. Each
lady who visits the store before thl* supply of
books Is gone will receive one of theie famous
hooks without charge, regardless ot whether she
Joins the club or not ' »
, Special Termi for Out-of-Town B«iddentlt .   yYateh Thie Dial From Day to Day
The "Hoosier" Store  __\\
1087 GRANVILLE ST.     HOUSEHOLD SPECIALTIES °*1fi$.
Baals. Branoh
1714 Ron St,
Regina, Saik.
Y

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