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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 16, 1914

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T!*E BRITISH COLUMBIA
WDtT^:^ , UNITY:  STRENGTH.
|^f J. YEAR. No. 145.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANOOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDERATION 0
VANCOUVER, B. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY 16,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
(*%&&& ) $1.50 PER YEA*
No Time for Theatricals and
Staging of Bombastic
Resolutions
U. M. W. of A. Capable of
Paying for and Conducting Its Own Affairs
Two weeks ago The Fed. referred
to the minera' strike and1 issues which
have since arisen In trade union
ranks as a result of the struggle between the coal barons and the coal
miners. That there were too many
saviours was an opinion expressed hy
The "Fed.," a statement challenged
at last meeting of the central labor
body by the secretary of the Miners'
Liberation league.
The position taken by The Fed.
was forced upon lt by a aerlea of
blundera Initiated by persons outside
the trade union movement and by
meddlesome Interference with the
duties of the officers ln charge of the
Btrike.
All the officers of the U. M. W. of
A. are asking is that, inasmuch as
they are the responsible and duly
elected officers of the men Involved
ln the strike and their union Ib paying
the freight, they shall be permitted
to conduct the strike and results involved in their own way, without let
or hindrance of Irresponsible busy-
bodies who are fond of butting into
fame, and the disbursement of funds
collected in the name of women and
children.
It Is not surprising then, that Frank
Farrington has reluctantly decided it
was necessary to call a halt. The following is a copy of a letter addressed
by him to the Miners' Liberation
league, under date of January 10th,
which should serve to awaken the
bona fide trade union membership to
the seriousness ot a delicate situation for whioh the U. M. W. of A. is
ln no manner responsible. Mr. Far-
rlngton's letter reads:
"Miners' Liberation League, Labor
Temple, Vancouver, B.C.—Gentlemen:
I think the time Is now here when
we should understand our relative
positions In connection ' with the
movement for the release of the Vancouver island miners, sentenced to
prison by Judge Howay. I am constrained to write you about this matter because I have at hand information that the activities of your league
are harmful rather than helpful to
the men ln prison, and because you
seem to be imbued with the idea
-that were it not for the Liberation
league these unfortunate men, who
have been so unjustly dealt with,
would be deserted and left to their
fate. In order that your minds may
be disabused of that opinion, if such
opinion prevails therein, let me aay to
you that the United Mine Workers of
America have entrusted the matter of
securing justice for these men to the
officers of the Trades and Labor congress of Canada, where the matter
properly belongs. In addition to this,
we have arranged to have the matter
brought to the attention of the British parliament, and we are not going
to give up our efforts on behalf of
the prisoners, and while we are
anxious to have the co-operation of
anyone who can be helpful in the
matter, let me remind you that the
United Mine Workers of America
have not delegated your league the
authority to direct the campaign for
the release of our men, nor do we
care to have our functions in that respect usurped by anyone. This is no
time for staging theatricals or the
adoption of vicious and bombastic resolutions. Inestimable Injury has
already been done the prisoners by
such tactics. If anything can be done
for these men it will be by the exercise of reason and a presentation of
the facts to prove that they have
been unjustly sentenced, and I feel
that the officers ot the Trades and
Labor congress and the United Mine
Workers of America are better qualified than anyone else to make such
prsentation, and unless the Liberation
league Is willing to respect the
wishes of those who are directly responsible to the Vancouver island
miners, I fear disastrous results will,
follow and I shall be compelled to
publicly renounce all responsibility
for your actions.
"Yours truly,
(Sgd.)   "F.  FARRINGTON."
Election ef School Trusteea
With reference to the forthcoming
elections ln South Vanoouver our
contemporary, the Chinook, has the
following to say: "Workera ln South
Vancouver. R. H. Neelands is
again standing for re-election as
achool trustee. From his record In
the past we need have no fear when
casting our ballots on the 17th. He
is the only worker representative we
have, either on the council or the
school board. Let ua try our strength
and see if we cannot put him at the
top of the poll. This might be the
means of inducing other workers who
can spare the necessary time entering
the field later on."
LABOR MEET
Washington Stats Federation Con
ventlon on January 19th
The thriving little town of Ray
mond, Wash., promises to be crowded
the week of January 19th with northwestern trade unionists ln attendance
as visitors and delegates to the cen
vention of the Washington State Fed
eratlon of Labor, which promises to
be an important one.
This Wholesale Stealing of
Land Causes Suffering
to Settlers
Some of the Large Holders
of the Vast Territories
Held for Speculation
The unemployed ot Reglna and Calgary are becoming "threatening."
That is to say, they are refusing to
silently starve to death.
Millwrights and general repair men
are working overtime in the Canadian
Pacific Lumber company's mill ln an
effort to have the works ln shape to
resume cutting by Saturday next, so
says the Port Alberni News.
i
(By SE-SOM)
26. The cloven-foot of British Columbia's worst exploitation wedged In
its malignant Influence with the advent of Wm. J. Bowser to cabinet
power, when the pernicious clause
was Inserted ln the Land Aot for 1907
empowering "agents" to stake lands
for purchasers before either government surveyors or pre-emptors
could reach the most valuable lands
in the Peace river, Grand Trunk and
Canadian Northern railway territories.
One result of that cruel and traitorous Bowserian scheme (which out-
Neroes the despicable cruelties of
Nero in slaye-suported Rome 1900
years ago) is the terrible distress and,
suffering now experienced by thouVt
sands of Britlah Columbia's worthiest^
citizens ln Vancouver and other coast
cities as well aa the interior country,
now suffering the pangs of hunger
and being deprived ot their household goods and homes, by the ruthless political machinery Bowser finds
absolutely essential to maintain the
grip of power he has usurped by befooling and deceiving British Columbia workers.
26. The first clause of this exposition of his traitorous system recorded
how 1,719,709 acres were stolen from
the inheritance belonging to you workers of thla provinoe, but without your
ever being consulted in the least as
the electors from whom he derived
the power to insert that revolutionary
one-line so-called "amendment" to the
Land act, empowering land-grabbers
to Inflict upon you and your children
the gravest Injustice recorded ln British history. And yet you are allowing your worst enemy, Bowser, to not
only wield the clubs ot law upon the
devoted heads of your most faithful
advocates and defenders, but actually
you repose in him the power to organise their persecution, call your
jurlea and appoint your judges.
'   B. C. Workera Impounded
27. The contrast between the negro miners on the South African Rand
confined within barbed-wire compounds, and B. C. workers in reality
displays much less disparity than Imagined by most people In B. C.
The dense forests, high mountains,
and lack of even trails through 99 per
cent, of B. C. naturally confine B. C.
workera within very limited range,
but the Bowserian system of despotism is craftily designed to build
around the more Insidious unseen
fence almost permanently created by
both real estate speculation around
districts where workers are industrially developing, and that worst form
of speculation Bowser encourages to
exploit the agricultural areas and natural resources of our country Into
the hands of unscrupulous foreign exploiters In advance of railways and
settlement, whilst he, under the aegis
and mask of MoBrlde, withholds and
hides the power they should in duty
to the province and empire have exercised to hold all land and resources
reserved until the people who were
anxious to permanently use and develop them were able to reach them
to safeguard the permanent welfare
of British Columbiana.
28. Instead of that we find the combined forces of Bowser and MoBrlde
rounding up the workers into more
confining limits by the real estate
schemes and booms those twin exploiters foster when public duty they
are paid to perform, demands freedom
from such wholesale forms of robbing
the workers as I will explain on. my
return a few weeks hence—though
surely workers who have bought
"lots" for homes around Vancouver
and other B. C. cities are already
keenly feeling the cruelty of that form
of robbery which most directly and
quickly deprives them of benefits they
have striven to acquire for their families. For the present It must suffice
to direct the attention of workers to
the more remote but far mora dangerous exploitation of the vast natural
reaeurcea In land, timber, coal, fisheries and valuable water-power the
Bowser confederatea are acooplng up
wholesale from you, but out of your
sight—far away ln the middle-territories of your vast and most richly endowed province.
29. Paragraphs 1 to 10 explained
In part the diabolical system of "powers of attorney" by which Bowser, the
attorney-general,  is engineering   the
(Continued on page 8.)
The Orpheum.
The New Year promises much by
way of popular priced vaudeville on
the S, & C. circuit. The coming week's
bill, taken as a sample, should lend
much credit to the Orpheum. As the
headline attraction offered Is "A Day
at the Circus," with clowns, ponies,
dogs, and a mule, who Is declared to
be the wisest in the world.
John R. Gordon is returning wtth
that big scream of his, called "What
Would You Do," a domestic sketch
where friend John gets ln bad.
The American Comedy Four, monarchs of mirth and melody, will contribute a large part of the melody on
the bill.
Two very clever young people are
Ned Nestor and Bess Delberg, who
will offer a singing and talking novelty, called "In Love."
The Four La Delia Comiques are
a quartette of acrobats who rely upon
grotesque costumes and funny bumps
for their many laughs.
Over 100,000 men and women wage
earners in Chicago are Idle, according
to a statement from President John
Fitzpatrlck of the Chicago Federation
of Labor.
RELLAJBLE JURY FOREMAN
SUITS JUDGE MORRISON
Evidently Attorney - General
Bowser has succeeded in securing the services of the judge he
needed to carry out hia plans of
prosecuting the striking union
miners of Vancouver island. And
evidently Judge Morrison has secured a jury foreman who meeta
the needs and requirements of
the oaae.
On Wednesday at New Westminster the defence counsel challenged ' a dpien of the three
groups of jury reorultB who were
drafted from the panel. At length
eleven   were   chosen   and   the
INDUSTRIAL STATE
Westminster     Presbytery
Asks That Enquiry Be
Made Into Conditions
Resolution To Be Forwarded to Victoria and
Ottawa
The Westminster presbytery has
had under'consideration at its present meeting the industrial conditions
on Vancouver island and yesterday
passed the following resolution Introduced by Rev. J. R. Robertson:
Believing that lt is within the scope
of this presbytery to take Cogniance
of any conditions that are militating
against the peace and harmony of the
community, or that -In any way
creates suffering ln any section of the
province; and whereas there Is and
has been for nearly a year and a half
such a condition existing among the
coal miners on Vancouver island, the
results of which are known throughout the dominion; and whereas the
miners have for the past tew months
been urgently pleading for a thorough
investigation of their caae, and have
stated their willingness to leave their
case in the hands of a board of three
men—one to be appointed by themselves, one by the mine owners, and
these two or the dominion government to appoint the third; and whereas the mine owners bave refused to
submit the matter ln dispute to a
board so constituted, or to any other
board calling for an investigation into the controversy; and whereas there
has followed in the wake of this prolonged dispute a period of flnanclal
stringency and acute anxiety, of military occupation and wholesale arrests
of men, many of whom were previously characterized as very worthy cltl-
ens of the locality; and whereas
throughout all the turmoil there has
not been a tribunal before which the
miners could place or plead their
cause, therefore be lt resolved that
this presbytery in view of the situation and the consequent suffering
would respectfully ask the government to waive the point that the time
has elapsed for asking for a board of
enquiry under the terms of the industrial disputes investigation act, and
urge upon the provincial and dominion governments the necessity, fairness, and humanity, of taking such
steps as may Issue in the creation of
such a'board of inquiry or investigation as is here suggested, which
shal have the power to inquire into
all causes of and reasons for the continuation of this dispute with full
power to call upon both parties to
submit their case so that an Impartial
and public investigation shall result,
and furthermore, that copies ot this
resolution be forwarded to the provincial minister of mines and the
dominion minister of labor.
OR. FRASER ON THE STRIKE
No 'ultimate Solution Short. of Col
lectlve Ownership of Mines
Rev. Dr. Fraser took occasion last
Sunday evening to reply to some of
his critics, including Judge Morrison,
because of statements he had made
from his pulpit three weeks ago. Not
only did the dootor stand by his previous remarks, but he concluded by
stating, if not ln words ln effect, that
such Industrial conflicts as that now
prevailing on Vancouver island would
last as long aB the mines were ln the
hands of soulless corporations. The
only solution was collective ownership of such resources. The speaker
also took occasion to peel the skin off
the editorial nose of The Province.
The church was packed to the doors
half an hour before services were begun, showing plainly that the people
are ever ready to hear wholesome
truths and see justice done to the
victims of corporation rule.
SUCCESSFUL LABOR CANDIDATES
Who Were Recently Vlctcra In the
Municipal Elections of Ontario
Welland, James Hughes, Geo. Scott,
aldermen. Berlin, William Gallagher,
re-elected alderman. London, Ernest
Rose, board of control; Ed. Stein, Jas.
Donnelly, aldermen. Owen Sound, J.
jT, Thompson, Thos. Wllloughby, J. T.
Ramsey, T. McRobert, alderman. Port
Aruthur, F. Urry, alderman.
The quickest way and the best way
to put an end to Industrial wars ln the
coal fields of Vancouver Island is for
the government to take over the
mines and operate them. Then let
the workers take over the government and that will be the end of the
labor wars.
twelfth   man   took  the  sacred \
r
book In his hand and stood ready
to take the oath. '
The man waa Stafford. Graham,
foreman of two Juries already'in
this assise. He la; a man of some
"commercial importance," being
a mill owner at Port Kella.
"I challenge thla man for
oause," cried Mr. Bird, leading
counsel for the defendant. This
man haa already Made atatementa
to other jurymen that all the accused ware guilty and. that ha
would aee that thsy were all pun-
"Justice" Morrison took no notice of the objection to Mr. Graham, but turned to the court registrar: "SWEAR THE JUROR!"
The Law had spoken. Graham
had proved himself worthy of the
job In, hand. A verdict lh hand
la worth two ln the bush, Why
experiment with others? Graham had proved himself equal to
the ocoasion.
"Are you trying to show your
contempt of this court!" a judge
onoe aaked a defendant
"No, your honor, I'm trying to
conceal my contempt of your
court," he replied.
1 INCOMMUNICADO
Deportation of "Mother"
Jones, Aged Angel of
the Coal Camps
MISS  H.  R. QUTTERIDQE
Delegate to Vancouver Trades and Labor
council from "the Tailors' Industrial
union—A member of the Home and
Domestic employees' union—One of the
delegates who will represent tho local
central labor body at the forthcoming
convention of the B. C. Federation of
labor.
Jury Fail To Come to a Decision Regarding
Bowater
Striking Miners' Cases Before Assizes at New
Westminster
The trials of the striking miners
still go on. On Friday the jury, after
two hours' deliberation, found Ben
Dominic guilty on all six charges,
sentence being postponed. Before the
trial commenced, J. E. Bird, counsel
for Dominic, asked for an adjournment of the case on the ground that
the entire panel of jurymen had been
In court when Justice Morrison
charged the i jury In the Angelo oase
and would certainly be Influenced by
that charge. As Angelo's counsel intends to apply for a new trial on the
ground that the charge was erroneous, and as the evidence ln the Dominic case would be almost identical,
defence counsel felt that his client
would not be getting a square deal.
Some sharp passages-at-arms took
place between the judge and Mr.
Bird, his lordship observing that perhaps a change of counsel might meet
the situation. Mr. Bird asked the
court to withdraw the remark saying
that he did not want to flght the
court as well as the prosecution. Justice Morrison got impatient at this,
and, warning defence, counsel to
stop, refused the application and ordered the case to proceed. Mr.
Lelghton, counsel with Mr. Bird for
Dominic, then took a hand ln the game
and asked If hla lordship really meant
what he said, as in that event he
would like an adjournment so that
fresh counsel could be secured. This
also the judge refused and counsel retired to confer on the matter. Eventually lt was decided that lt would be
unwise to leave the prisoner undefended and the case proceeded. The
evidence was then taken and was
similar to that in previous cases. On
Tuesday the case of Willie Bowater
was taken. On account of the youth
of the prisoner great Interest was
taken ln the proceedings. After an
absence of five hours the jury were
unable to agree and were discharged.
Mr. Bird immediately asked for a
continuance of the 110,000 ball which
was granted by Justice Murphy just
before Christmas. This was refused
by Justice Morrison, the prosecuting
counsel also stating that he could not
say when the prisoner would be
brought up for trial again. Bowater
gave evidence on his own behalf and
denied that he took any part ln the
rioting, or that he was near Mine
Manager Cunningham's house at the
time alleged. Mr. Justice Morrison,
In charging the jury, reviewed tho
evidence and stated he could not flnd
anything that pointed to the innocence of the accused, but that the evidence of Mrs, Johns and her daughter
was strong against him. At the same
time he told the jury to only allow the
oharges on which Bowater waa indicted to have weight with them. After
the jury had been discharged, after
falling to agree, the accused was
taken back to jail.
BOI ISSUES DEF!
TO STRIKERS IN
Threatens to Exterminate
Organlied Labor With
Armed Force
There  Will  Be No
More Strikes For a
Generation
Here la the threat voiced by Premier Louis Botha of South Africa on
the eve of the, big Industrial tieup:
"I will guarantee that with tha
end of the preaent crisis there
would  not be  another workers'
atrlke in South Africa for a generation."
Sounds much like the Infamous
Bowser boast:
Victoria, Aug. 16.—"When day
breaks there will be nearly a
thousand men ln the strike zone
wearing the uniform of His Majesty Thia Is my answer to
the proposition of the strikers
that tbey will preserve the peace
if they are left unmolested by the
special police."
No reasonable man will believe
that all the organised workera of
South Africa are taking such draatlc.
action without ample cause. So muoh
so that even the conservative Typographical union voted four to one to
join the strikers.
A dally press Capetown despatch
says under a January 13 date line:
"A general strike throughout South
Africa waa proclaimed to-night by the
Trades Federation and the Rand miners by a two-thirds majority voted to
join in the movement Govermental
retaliation was swift' It took the
form of the proclamation of martial
law."
Martial law has been proclaimed
and the life and death struggle,for
Industrial liberty has begun In earnest. It looks, at this distance, aa
though the ruling class had bit off
more than lt can ohew. At any rate
lt seems to show tbe lnternationality
of the labor movement and the worldwide cause of the unrest.
There* are stirring times ahead.
This is no time for the workers to be
indulging in petty jangling among
themselves, but a time when all
should be sincerely seeking the way
out of capitalist anarchy and corporation tyranny. The present situation
is not a task for wlndergarten juveniles or fishwives, but a problem that
must be faced by men.
If lt muat needs end in a worldwide social revolution, let it be revolution, but let it be explained Intelligently and ln such a manner as will
produce definite results.
Cool heads and a firm determination are needed ln the forthcoming
supreme test of strength between
those who do the world's work and
those who "own" the earth and refuse
to let others live except upon the
rulers' terms.
In Ireland, Great Britain, South
Africa, New Zealand, South America,
ln the United States, and aye, in Canada, too, the same underlying causes
are producing the same effects. It Is
simply the workers' demand to live
and refusal to starve in the midst of
plenty. On with the battle—on to
victory for a united working class!
Installation of Officers
Electrical Workers local No. 213 met
on Monday last and Installed newly-
elected officers as follows: President,
D. Fink; vice-president, M. 8. Auder;
flnanclal secretary and business agent,
W. F. Dunn; treasurer, J. E. Dubber-
ley; recording secretary, Roy Elgar;
foreman, G. B. McKay; inspectors,
Sam Cawker, C. R. Wilcox; delegates
to auxiliary, J. Whittol, H. L. Weath
erbee; delegates to Trades and Labor
council, 8. Phllpott, T. Thompson, C.
F. Jones, G. Movlset and W. F. Dunn
Militiamen   Commit   Outrages Unequalled in Civilised Countries
(Special to The Federatlonist)
DENVER, COLO., Jan. U.-Ooverv
nor Ammons' advocacy of anarchy
In Routt county and the deportation
from Trinidad of "Mother" Jonea, 82-
year-old angel of the coal camps, haa
further proved the necessity ot a full
congressional investigation Into the
Colorado Coal atrlke. Darkest Russia
with all her despotism never saw the
rights of the laboring people trampled
in the dust with such utter disregard
aa In Colorado since the strike of the
coal minera began on Sept 23rd. Governor Ammons, a recognised mental
weakling, wholly Incompetent to fill
the executive chair, haa proved a willing tool for the coal operaton. He
has enforced every law against the
miners and conscientiously allowed
the operators to mock law and order.
General Chase, intoxicated with his
overestimated idea of military authority, and drunk with the flattery of
hts bosses, the coal operaton, bas
practised tyrannies on tbe striking
miners. which are beyond the conception of a law-abiding citlsen. The
mask that the military were aent to
southern Colorado to preserve peace
has long since been proven a mockery. They were aent there to Intimidate, to, imprison, to abuse striken,
to shoot them, if necessary, to serve
the purpose of the coal operaton.
They have, committed outrages unheard of in civilized countries. Theae
militiamen, many ot them recruited
among the barrel house bums of Denver and other largo cities, committed
the fiendish outrage of making Andrew Coinar, a humble Croatian, dig
his own grave. "Jim the Greek,"
shot ln the leg and helpless, waa
chained to the bed in a Denver hospital, then forced to ride eight houn to
Trinidad and thrown into Jail where
he Is ln a critical condition. The homea
of three striking minen at Valdez
were robbed at the point of guns. Gus
Martinez was taken trom a sick bed
and arrested. He was placed in a
military tent hospital at Walsenburg
where hts condition became wone
and he was thrown into jail. There,
because he would not comply with the
requests of the militiamen to "acab"
in the -mlnee, he- waa- placed- In • a
damp cellar where he contracted
pneumonia and rheumatism and died.
To show their authority the militia
arrested Mn. L. R. Burns, a gray-
haired old woman, for singing a strike
song after six o'clock In the evening
and sentenced her to 60 days in jail.
The mllltla have arrested scores of
striking mlnen as "military" prisoners, held them "incommunicado" and
kept tbem awake five and six nights
by jabbing them in the feet with bayonets and throwing cold water on
them. They tried to drive these prisoners to insanity and false confessions. Many of them were promised
freedom If they would "scab" ln the
mines. Anarchist Ammons has been
provided with affidavits of these and
even more terrible outrages of the
militia. He promised to act if this
proof were furnished. He could not
keep this promise and please the coal
operators so he has done nothing.
BUILDING TRADES
Elect Delegatea to B. C. Federation
—Election of Officers Jan. 23rd
At the regular fortnightly meeting
of the Building Trades council, delegates were elected to attend the B.
C. Federation of Labor convention,
and instructed to act wltb the
painters' delegates to draft a bill governing scaffolding for the protection
of workmen employed at the building
trades. This bill will be presented
at the coming convention for its endorsatlon, and an attempt will be
made later to have the same a provincial law.
Electricians local union No. 621, became alfilllated with the council on
January 9th, and have sent delegates
who report trade conditions good at
present.
At the last meeting a satisfactory
financial statement for the post seven months was given by Financial
Secretary Prendergaat. A copy will
be sent to all affiliated locals.
Election of officers for the coming
term will be held Jan. 23rd. Delegates will please note the date and
be ln attendance.
U. M. W. of A. Convention
The twenty-fourth annual conven
tlon of the United Mine Workers of
America,, which will convene in Indianapolis January 20, 1914, will
doubtless be the largest representative body of union men that has
ever met In convention ln the United
States. Directly and indirectly
700,000 coal miners will be represented in this great convention.
Farmera Sympathize.With Minera
Wheatland Centre Local No. 109
United Farmers of Alberta recently
passed a resolution extending their
sympathy to the striking miners of
Vancouver island In their struggle
against "conscienceless exploiters,"
and call upon "the law-abiding and
fair-minded citizens of British Columbia to redeem their province from the
brutal and disgraceful acts performed
by the government and courts on Vancouver Island during the recent controversy."
Happily the outofworka ln Vancouver are escaping the tragedy of suffering from bitter cold weather In
addition to postponing meals. In
cltleB east of the Rocky mountains the
need of fuel cornea first, especially
among the women and children.
Bakers Elect Officers
Local No. 46, "Bakery and Confectionery WorkerB' International Union
of America elected Its officers for ensuing term at the regular meeting
held on Jan. 10th, as follows: Pre
sldent, H. G. Leeworthy; vice-president, R. H, Davles; financial secretary,
J. Black; recording and corresponding
secretary, R. J. Adams; business agent, J. Black (220 Labor Temple);
treasurer, A. Farnden; trustees,
Fletcher, A. McCurrach, T. Moss; sergeant at arms, C. G. Ferguson, doctor,
Greer.
Too Much "Hot Air"
The Labor Temple Company will be
requested to provide further ventilation for Room One—Industrial Ban
ner, Toronto.
B.ilFEDERfflON«ll
(WEI
1.26   I
Executive Committee Meet
at Boyal City Next
Friday
Attendance' at Convention
Will Be the largest
onBecord .
Preparations in now wall-nlgh.
complete, for the meeting ot th* fourth
annual convention of the British Columbia Federation of Labor, whieh
convenes at New Weatminster on
January 26th. Over 80 credentials
have bean received by Secretary-
Treasurer V. R. Midgley, and on ths
opeuing day It Is expected that over
100 delegates will be seaied. In this
connection It Is gratifying to find
that more delegates are coming tram
the** outlying parts of ths province
tban st ssy previous convention.
Christian Slverti, preaident of ths
federation, will be In attendance at a
meeting of the executive to be hold
on January 23rd, at New Westminster, when the reports ot the offlcen tor
the paat year will be considered before being sent to the prlnten. Ths
seroetary-treaaurer'a report will show
both increased membenhlp and better
flnanclal standing. Throe vice-presidents will unavoidably be abaent: J.
Cuthbertson (Greenwood), 3. Ferris
(South Vancouver), and 3. J.. Taylor
(Ladysmlth), the remainder ot ths
officers will however, be In thslr
places. Vice-president 3. W. Oray,. ot
Fernle, is how up country seourtng
affiliations from scattered unions and
will have an Interesting story to t«U
ot his experiences In some ot the out-
of-the-way places of -British Colombia. Altogether everything points to
the coming convention ss being a
"hummer" snd considering the industrial situation here at present there
will be work enough and to spare for
it to do.
\
•'A fairy Tale^ls No
"Fairy Tale" in Numerous Cases
Vancouver Is Not "Dead
Broke" but Badly Bent
at Present
The Province Tuesday night came
out in a labored effort proving that
because Paderewskl played to a packed house the night before, Vancouver
was not "dead broke." Who aald lt
was? With a population of some
200,000 to draw on, certainly there
can be found enough wealthy people,
who are lovers of good music, to till a
theatre to hear Paderewskl. Also, the
writer ventures the opinion that were
the talented Pole to pay another visit
to Vancouver tn the near future ho
would be equally well patronized.
But this does not detract from the
fact that to-day there are many, many
people in this city and the neighboring municipalities who are feeling the
pinch of hard times. One has but to
visit the city hall of a morning and
see tbe throng of men who are seeking work at $2 per day trom the municipal relief fund to prove this. Then
one can visit the various missions, the'
Salvation Army headquarters, the
Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., the read-
inp rooms of the public library and
the waiting rooms of the various unions ln the Labor Temple and elsewhere, and see the throngs of men
and women who are waiting, and in
many cases, waiting in vain, for a job
to materialize.
The writer could go on and specify
cases of destitution, but one can flnd
out for himself readily that while Vancouver Ib not "dead broke," lt la badly
bent. The Province haa not proved
Its case.
Barbara' New Offlcen
The journeymen barbers of Local
No. 120 held their regular meting
Tuesday in the Labor Temple and Installed their officers for the ensuing
year. The following memben who
were installed will look after the interests of the union for 1914: President, J. W. Green; vice-president 8.
T. Hamilton; aeoretary, C. F. Burkhart; treasurer, G. W. Isaacs; recorder, C. E. Herrltt; guide, Ell Cliff; guardian, L. W. Tebon; delegates to
Trades and Labor council, C. F. Burkhart,. Ell Cliff and II. S. Espy.
If there were ho organized labor
vote anywhere, the governing classes
would not be hard put to It to flnd
means of making action ln the Industrial field practically impossible.—
New Statesman.
There haa been a conference held
between representatives of the British
socialist party and the Independent
labor party and the Fabian society,
which was arranged by the International Socialist bureau, and an agreement was reached to Join and work
In harmony with the labor party provided that all candidates put forward
by tbe latter organization be designated as labor and socialist nominees.
Meetings will be held throughout the
United Kingdom to advocate the unification of the working class force
along these lines. PAGE TWO
NEW WESTMINSTER
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, 01,000,000.00. Beeerve Tnat, S»00,000.00
*  — **"' Snksoilbsd, SS01,000.00
Wo have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and lntereat at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westmlnater, B. C
1. J. loom. Managing Director
I, A. Sauls, ieoretary-TreMurer.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Ssoossson to Outer * Sauna, IM.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
MS COLUMBIA ITSall
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. 0.
LIBERAL CASH DISCOUNT PHONE 237
"—■HEATING STOVES
FROM
M.  J.  KNIGHT  COMPANY,  LIMITED
85 SIXTH STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
All Work Guaranteed
Hand Sewn Shoes Made to Meaaure
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
as ussn mm
McMillan a paterson
Union Shion
NBW WESTMINSTER, B. O.
Opposite Westminster Trust Blook.
0. J. Rsfnon F. P. Stevens
Pbons Sey. 7STS
Canadian Photo Co.
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHERS
ites Taken Anywhere, Anytime
Ill-Ill CROWN BUILDING.
•II Pender Strsst Wsst
A World Bsvlaw et Ssclsllns -By tf
tiMI wrlleie In Europe sn« Amerlee
will bi found In TBI NBW BBVIBW
whloh dun la aa authoritative »»r
with >U phases st •eelellem—ast Mr
•■lution, but oduostloa. pauukss
monthly, 11.00 per yosri CsnUIU sub-
•orlpllom $1.50. Bond lOo tor aeeasple
NBW    REVIEW,    ISO
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
 FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of buds, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Pkrovindal Information,
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA, B.C.
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
MARKET
-L
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
AT ANY
PRICE
Price - $3.50
Every Iron it guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
10 Years
Csifsllind
Hulinp Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 6000
II3B Granville St.
Ntsi Davie
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
UNION
LABEL
THB OSB Ot THB I.ABBI, ON YOUR PRIMTING-NO BXTR k COST TO YOO-
WIM, HBLP US DO OCR DOTY IN MCHTINC TOBBRCUIOSIS
j[HE
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 16, 1914.
REV. H. W. FRASER, D. D.
Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, who has caused a com'motion In govern-
• mental circles by his outspoken attitude In favor of the striking miners oh Vancouver Island.     Hundreds of people are turned away from his congregations
every Sunday. -.
TO PACIFIC SEAMEN.
A rumor says—tbe C. P. B.
Has fired all its white la-bar
On some boats to, and trom Chl-nar,
Now working Chink, Jap and Lascar.
Now this Is most peculiar,
For ln the East of Can-a-da,
On her Atlantic squadron are
A white man's mixture of sall-ar.
Tour seamen's unions deeply scarred,
When labor such as yours is barred,
On Empresses—as they are starred,
By such foul deed your unions marred.
Some Chairman needs a feather tarred
And stuck upon his desk with lard,
For having passed a rule so bard
Against a white man's labor card.
Now comrades, have you thought this
out,
Why such a thing should come about?
Just organize—and put to rout
This Asiatio labor tout.
The day will come when you'll   all
shout,
Our class war's won, we're free of
knout!
Then all the millionaires with gout
Will some toll do, to work lt out.
To gain all this—you'll organize,
In politics, and otherwise,
Your energies, you'll centralize,
Your theories, you'll materialize.
Society will realize
The strength of unions and their size
Tbe use you'll make of your franchise
Will make our world more civilized.
—HBMCY.
BACK TO THE POLO
Laundry Worken Get Together and
Decide It le High Time to
Reorganise
the laundry workers of the city
met in a mass meeting Friday night
in'the Labor Temple and deolded to
form a union. Miss Outterldge and
J. W. Wilkinson, secretary of the
Trades and Labor council, were the
organizers and with several others
gave sound and instructive addresses,
as a result of which a membership of
30 was enrolled. Another meeting
will be held in the Labor Temple on
Wednesday at 8 o'clock to wblch all
laundry workers are invited, when,
doubtless, many more will be added
to the ranks of organised labor, Un'
ionists can greatly assist the cause
by asking the drivers of laundry
wagons as to whether they are working for union laundries, If this Is
done—and It's an easy matter—the
hands of the new union will be greatly strengthened and lt will not be
long before all the laundries are
brought into line.
The Brotherhood of Carpenters ln
Nelson are sending 0. H. Hardy to represent them at the British Columbia
Federation of Labor on Jan. 26th.
A new catering business in Prince
Rupert will be established by Messrs.
Young and Stanley of this city. Both
hold cards In the Cooks' union.
H. P. Allen, seoretary of the Press-
feeders' union and delegate to the
Allied Printing vrades council, met
with an unfortunate accident on Tuesday by catching his hand ln a press.
While the injuries are not serious
they will incapacitate Harry for some
time.
WANTED—A few reliable trade unionists, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for The "Fed." Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple.
Berry Bros.
Agenta foi
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
Th* Bicycle wltb the Reputation
Full   line  of  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
L
DIXON & MURRAY
OAMaWttaMSt, WTO.
Ofles ud Eton yitUag.   Osiers!
Jobbing
Offlos aad Inept
low duebhu.de mni
D.r*NlihtC.IU
Phone Bar. 943
Parlon ACIumI
239S Granville Si.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
$
TO COME
SHE
General Situation Considered at Large Mass Meeting on Friday
M. W. of A. WiU Stand
by the Strikers to
The Last
At a mass meeting held last Friday
afternoon ln the Athletic Club arena
the miners on strike expressed the Intention of maintaining the present
fight to the end. As Mr. George Pettigrew stated, the time Is now approaching when one side or the other
must give way. The Pacific Coast
Coal Co. had given way at Suquash
and if the men would stand firm for
another two months, the miners would
win their fight.
Chris. Pattlnson"warned the men
against tbe insidious methods now being practiced by tbelr opponents to
detach them from their organization.
They had put up a splendid flght, and
by standing firm now they might win
a victory of which the benefits would
be felt for a long time to come. Tempting offers were being made, for Instance to the drivers to go back at
increased wages. It was to be expected that some would give way and
go back. But on the whole, the Western Fuel officials could not sleep as
well as the strikers could.
Harry Melkle was loudly cheered
as he reported that the TJ. M. W. of
A. would stand by them to the last.
He had realized as long as four years
ago that the struggle was bound to
come sooner or later. He did not
like strikes which engendered hatred
where there should be friendship, but
they were a necessary means towards
better conditions of work. It had
been lyingly asserted that he (the
speaker) had applied for a Job. The
same story was deliberately told
about others as well as himself. Men
had come ln after the strike started
and taken their pay. These were the
men who were going back. The list
of these men's names would shortly
be published. It was expected that
these men would leave them and they
bad done so. There was no such
thing as a stampede back to work.
Tbe people of B. C. would stand by
them. They must not be bluffed by
the measures taken to buckle them
up. If he thought the strike was lost,
he (the speaker) would advocate going in. But he did not so believe, He
had lived here for years, and would
continue here, "ln spite of Tommy
Stockett."
Oeorge Pettigrew explained that the
meeting had been called to consider
the geheral situation. Reports had
been deliberately spread ln the month
to split their ranks. The time had
come when one side or the other
must soon break. No doubt they had
reason for discouragement. The actual
number of men now working at No.
1 varies frdm 267 to 280. These men
are not all miners and give them no
serious ground for fear. In Ladysmlth
every man was standing firm. We
have arrived at a point when if the
men only stand firm for two months
the company Is beaten as the Pacific
Coast company Is broke at Suquash.
The conditions of work tbey would
return to, should they give ln, would
be worse than the old conditions of
subjection to the bosses. Any man
returning to work now when their
comrades were in prison was doubly
a "scab."
David Irving criticized tbe general
strike idea which found support at
the recent district convention. The
U. M, W. of A. opposed such a step
under present conditions, as lt was
bound to fail. The flght could be won
without a general strike. He proceeded to give an outline of the history of the general strike as a weapon
of labor. The "big union" Idea was
strongly held ln tbe days ot the
Knights of Labor. The difficulty came
on the flnanclal aide—no sufflclent
strike funds could be maintained.
Their union had developed out of the
Knights of Labor. No other organization was so successful .or did so
much for its members. It furnished
the largest funds ever spent on a
labor fight, and given a firmness to
the cause of labor.   No man would
PART IN CMC
World-vide Experience Is
Proving Efficacy of Such
a Policy
Training School for Larger
Sphere of Usefulness
in Labor's Mission
The Port Arthur Wage-Earner, tor
a period covering over two years, has
always assumed the stand that the
workers at every possible opportunity should labor for the election ot
candidates to positions of civic responsibility from their own ranks.
There can be no controverting the
fact that the Independent labor and
socialist parties of Oreat Britain have
put forth strenuous efforts during the
past few years to make their influence
felt on the various county boards and
municipal bodies. That they have
met with a more then fair measure of
success ts a well attested' fact of history, and at each recurring election
they continue to make substantial
headway and are, successful ln electing an ever-increasing number of direct labor representatives. While ln
Canada the workers have been far
mdre backward ln recognizing their
opportunity and the necessity of taking similar action, there are evidences
to hand that they are awakening to
the advantage of being directly represented on the various city and
town councils and the boards of education. The nomination of labor and
socialist candidates ln so many of the
industrial centres for positions of
civic trust and responsibility during
tbe last couple of years, is an encouraging omen, more especially as in
many localities the candidates so nominated have been duly elected and
have invariably made good. During
the past year more direct labor and
socialist candidates are being nominated in the various provinces of the
dominion than has ever been the case
before. It Is up to the workers who
have been so often hoodwinked and
betrayed by slick politicians ln the
past to do a little serious thinking.
If they do so they must come to the
conclusion that it is political suicide
to vote for the candidates who are
running In the interest of capitalistic corporations and exploiters. It ts
time that the workers began to vote
for candidates from their own ranks,
who understand their wants and are
acquainted with existing social problems and conditions. This will be a
good thing to remember on election
day. The workers should cease to
mark their ballots in tbe Interests of
the other fellow.
Painters, Local 138,
Some fifty members were present
at the last meeting of the local Painters' union, the principal business being the election of delegates to the
fourth annual convention of the B. C.
F. of L., to be held at New Westminster, January 26th. Members
Thomson, Grand, McMillan, Train
and McGtlllvray were nominated and
the balloting resulted in Train, McMillan and Grand being elected.
Trade continues dull and the majority
of the members are "free."
A Truth Tersely Told.
"Various unions of the American
Federation of Labor are just now engaged ln great strikes, In nearly
every case there is dire need of financial aid, but one looks In vain for any
funds coming from the I. W. W. or
any of the semi-anarchist syndicalist
crew which has panhandled the entire
labor movement for support time
after time."
The mayor was sworn ln on Monday. No doubt he will be sworn at
many times during his term of offlce.
willingly go back to the old conditions.
Frank Farrington was unable to be
present as he Is engaged elsewhere
ln executive work. Robert Foster
was also absent at New Westminster.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Grant, Managing Director.)
Two stores-
am ooapoTA siuit wail   rt mammae sniir iaet
Carpenters' White Duck Overalls,
with 12 pockets, union label $1.71
Men's Heavy Tweed Pints, union
label 13.00 to I3.S0
We ssk for your patronage In our  Suit   and   Overcoat   Depsrt-
mente, when we give value everytlme.
SHOES FOR MEN
8HOE8 POR SERVICE
SHOES FOR DRESS
UNION SHOES FOR COMFORT
FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at the servioe of every man who desires the best shoes his money can buy
W. J. ORR (Opposite City Hall) 204 MAIN ST.
S.S. "Marine Express No. 1"
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
leaves national axlaeerlag Co.'s Wharf, (eat of BldweU It., Ooal
Sartor*
UAvnro TAXootrm
Week Days 9:00 a.m.
Sundays  10:00 a.m.
ABBmro vucoom
Week Days .__.......„.._.. 6:00 p.m.
Sundays ,~—«J*—X~. l:S0p.m.
N.B.—This boat open for charter for Evening Trips.
Phones: Sey. 6332   ::   Fair. 2199   ::   Bay. 602L
EVERY  UNION  MAN   JN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR  TEMPLE  CLUB  AND   POOL ROOM
tuxnra bust i» to bow-
tat   ana   sahbow   nun
roams,   laelaant   onwowi,
OBABnuun, nu mi rt»x
and intermediate stops.
Increase the Earning Power
of Your Family
Is your son or daughter able to command a good salary? Are
they revenue producers, or revenue reducers? Are they qualified to
hold an important position? Can they do any one thing so well that
their services are in good demand?
IF NOT, WHY NOT?
Write us now for full information, or call and aee us—
Success Business College
Horner Main Street and 10th Avenue
Phone Fairmont 2075
Vancouver, B. C.
PRINTING
THE FEDERATIONIST has completed arrangements which
make it possible for ui to accept the printing orders from unions, unionists and others, at a profit of 10 per cent., which will help THE
FEDERATIONIST and cost the customer no more than if sent to
the printer direct
This LABEL is our GUARANTEE
And in addition we will give you Union-made Paper, and your
orders will receive careful and prompt attention. Mail orders a
specialty. Here Is an opportunity for the unions of British Columbia
to help THE FEDERATIONIST, help themselves, and at the same
time get the best class of work possible at the hands of competent
union printers.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7495—Or send your Orders or Request for
Quotations to
The B.C FEDERATIONIST
ROOM 217 LABOR TEMPLE VANCOUVER. B.C.
MINARD'S LINIMENT POR 8ALE
EVERYWHERE.
STRIKE
NOW ON IN THE MINING CAMPS OF CUMBERLAND,
NANAIMO, SOUTH WELLINGTON AND LADYSMITH
ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALL WORKERS KEEP AWAY.   THE COAL B.ARONS ARE
BEING AIDED IN AN ATTEMPT TO BREAK THE STRIKE
AND DEFEAT TRADE UNIONISM.
By Bowser's Special Police and Soldiers
THOUSANDS OP MEN ARE OUT OP WORK IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA, AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A MAN TO
GET WORK UNLESS HE GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN
SO KEEP AWAY FROM VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICIAL PAH* VANCOUVER
TRADES AMD LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OPFHALPAM* HVTBW 001,
SIXTH YEAR. No. 145.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 16,1914.
EIGHT PAGES
{"dS^ST ) IL60 PER YBA»>
OUR
January Sale
isnowon
AND  YOU  OAN SAVE  MONEY BY
TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE
'    PRESENT PRICES
Past experience haB taught you that our
sales are GENUINE.
You know •when we advertise a special you
are going to get, it. We do not say special
unless our price jb lower than you can get
the same goods for elsewhere.
DURING THIS SALE
All our prices are special, except on wines
and spirits, groceries and contract lines.
We Are Selling Many lines
Below Cost Prices
The goods we are selling are our regular
stocks—quality lines—every one of them.
Our sale prices cannot be matched anywhere.
SPECIAL SALE WINDOWS
EVERYDAY
Goods taken from the windows if you want
them.
J
Hudson's Bay Stores
OORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture .every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
for miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C.
LANG SALES COMPANY
626 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmen's Store"
Extra Special Thli Week, Men'a Cashmere and Wool   \
Books 15°., 20c, 25c.
The beat value money can buy
To elaar, 100 pairs Qrey Blankets, 1300 value, for $1.79
100 pair Orey Blankets, 12.50 value, for  IM
THE BEST VALUE IN THE MARKET
When In want of Clothing, Furnishing, Boots and Shoes It will
pay you to get next to our prices. Coma and get acquainted af
525 MAIN BTREET
Phone asymour IM
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
WT ORANVUaLB STREET
Orpheum Theatre Building
lln. Osnevlsvs Contl
Mrs, Fitness Lohrman
City Auction and Com-
mission Company
Cash nald for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction amused.
Satisfaction guaranteed,    prompt
settlements.
Auctioneer.
UBOR MOVEMENT
IN THE INTERIOR
0FB1
The Unobtrusive Way in
Which It Progressed In
A.P.ofL.
Results of Electing a Member to the Municipal
Council
G. H. Hardy, of Nelson, B. C, arrived lh the city this week. Mr. Hardy
is ex-business agent of the Trades
and Labor counoll of that city and a
member of the carpenters' union,
which body he will represent at the
New Westminster convention of the
B. 0. Federation of Labor. Regarding the labor movement tn the Interior
of tbe province he Informed The Federationist that "to oonslder the question it- is necessary to refer briefly to
the progress made during the past
three years in its two phases—Industrially and politically. The year 1911
proved a critical one for labor at
Nelson, B. C. (which, after all reflects
the position of the interior), Inasmuch as the I. W. W. was firmly established and controlled civic employees, teamsters and unskilled laborers
in the building trades, Considerable
propaganda had been done by that organisation, with the result that the
internationals were somewhat undermined and rent asunder hy factions,
much to the
Delight of Employers.
The locals suffering most from this
Btate of affairs were the Brotherhood
of Carpenters and the Electrical
Workera, fifty per dent, of the members carrying I. W. W. cards. A motion made by the I. W. W. members
of the Carpenters' union to admit the
organiser of that (I. W. W.) body, being carried, brought on a crisis, and a
war was commenced ln which the
cautious radical element became uncertain of its position. The year 1912
brought the call from the Calgary
convention to the trades congress.
With a view of obtaining a clear, con'
crete condition of the labor movement,
I was delegated i to attend that gathering by the Brotherhood of Carpenters
(there being no central labor body at
that time). Considering lt a duty to
endeavor to meet all phases of the
question, I approached every source
of information available, including
U. M. W. pf A., W. F. of M., I. T. U.,
E. W., both western and eastern delegates, not forgetting the now president ot the congress, T. C. Watters,
who, ln a quiet way, aet forth
The Industrial Policy of the A, F. of L.
the organization of central labor
bodies and the machinery thereof. The
unobtrusive way ln whloh the labor
movement progressed ln the A. F. of
L. appealed bo much to me, that I
promised to seek assistance of the local unions to form a trades council
In Nelson, B.C., which I did. A debate was arranged between J. Johnson (I. W. W.) and myself (A F. of
L.) with a view ot placing the relative values of each organisation before a mass meeting ot workers. Like
most controversies, nothing accrued of
any benefit at the time, but my honest
opinion Ib that this was the birth of
a general reorganization ln all the
trades. Several meetings were arranged with a view of creating a
trades and labor counoll. Three
unions were represented at the first
meeting, namely: Brotherhood ot Carpenters, t. T. U„ and Barbers' union.
A charter was eventually sent for by
a body ot eleven out of thirteen.
Internationale Affiliated,
The I. W. W. asked to be allowed to
Uy. tm
'   f
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FETHERSTONHAUOH  i  CO.
The Old established Firm ef
PATENT ATTORNEYS
1020 Rogers Bldg., Oranvllle Street
Olty. Phone Seymour snt.
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
42! GRANVILLE ST.
■end delegatea, but ttat Informed that
though the unskilled trade would be
an asset .to the labor movement, yet
the charier, unfortunately, excluded
their membenhlp. Placing the matter In a nutshell, with the approval of
the membera of the 1. W. W., a federal union charter was procured and
those on the outside organised a Syndicalist league. From that point can be
traced the development ot the political and Industrial movement at Nelson, i
Industrial Movement
The Hew federal anion, having affiliated with the i central council,
worked to consolidate the labor unions of that city, continually holding
that the central labor body ahould
bave supreme authority Instead of
trade autonomy. Last spring the executive committee ot the Trades and
Labor oouncll decided to circularise
the locals afflliated, asking tor information regarding any trade movement
likely to be undertaken with a view
of consolidated action (general
atrlke). On April 1st, machinists, la-,
borers, olvlo employees and the whole
of the building trades quit work, having failed to negotiate a new scale for
the various tradea. (1) It la here
quite necessary to Indicate the existing position: The employers were
unorganized when the strike occurred,
but the consolidated action of tbe
workers produced a like action ot
every man engaged., ln business (no
matter what his political opinions
might have been). (2) That all the
skilled tradeB had a closed shop and
with very few exceptions unskilled
labor was in a similar condition, The
strike lasted one week. The police
had Informed us that law and order
must be kept At the end of that
time several men were approached to
unload a car of oement on demurrage,
who eventually broke away from the
strikers. From that incident
It Waa Inevitable
In the minda of the executive that a
landslide had started which would
crush the unions for a time were It
not for the valuable assistance of a
well-known member of the W. F. M.
and Brotherhood of Carmen, who
skillfully negotiated arbitration that
preserved the form. Under the direction of the business agent of the
Trades and Labor council, J. Nottman,
in one year produced as strong a
position as was ln existence before
the strike. The moral, if any, would
seem to be that ln industrial action,
the members of an organisation cannot for any great length of time be
held together, based only on enthusiastic agitation among themselveB,
but by keen oppression emanating
from the outside of the ranks of organized labor. The only other way for
labor's success Ib by development of
the entire membership through steady
growth.
Political Movement,
The trades council tn 1912 showed
considerable strength, and the "limited expenditure" party in the city
council, being weak, wished to obtain,
the labor vote and placed I. A. Austin,
a prominent member' of the trades
council, on Its ticket. The result was
that the tloket went down to defeat,
but Austin headed the polls. The
result, accruing from one member in
the city council as a rule cannot amount to much, But a short detailed
account of the work done by Alder
man Austin, not to mention what he
endeavored to do, and failed, shows
the advisability of the workers carrying on an active campaign to elect
additional members of the wage-earning class '
In Municipal Politics:
(1) Bight-hour das' for civic employees; (2) success tn persuading council to pass favorably on resolution for
only union men to be employed; (3)
opposition to gas plant by-law to purchase at |75,000 (by-law defeated),
afterwards purchased on by-law for
$50,000; (4) only opposition to pur
chase of street railway on which the
city holds a first mortgage, and which
undertaking was insolvent (the shares
were principally held by real estate
dealers); (5) a slow and laborious unravelling of the fact that 120,000 was
owing to the city for water and light
rates, not one of the delinquent ratepayers being in the wage-earning
class, some of the accounts extending
back eight or nine years. So proficient were the services of Alderman
Austin to the citizens of Nelson and
tbe - workers In particular that the
tradeB council have decided to place
another candidate . in the field to
strengthen his hands for cleaner government for the citizens Instead of
considering only buslnes matters."
J. O. Bleaken, Oalgary, and
"Jumbo" Stevenson, Toronto in the Race
Lynch's Successor   Drops
Out and Two Big Sixers
OototfieMat
Following Is the official list of nominees for I. T. U. offices as they will
appear ln the January Journal,- No
more namea can be added:
President—Hawkes, Charles B.,
New Tork; Soott, Marsden S., New
York.        ,   "
Vice-president—Barrett, Walter W.,
Chicago; Casey, Henry V„ Blnghampton; Hltchlns, Edwin L., Cincinnati;;
Shrewsbury, 6. M., Nashville,
Secretary-treasurer -r- Brownfleld,
Charles W., Blnghampton; Carson,
William J., Imperial Valley; Hays, J.
W., Minneapolis; Perry, C. W„ New
Orleans,.
Delegates tor A. F. of L.—Bonnlng-
ton, F. Q., San Francisco; Campbell,
Robert, Dallas; Fear, Charles W., Jop-
lin, Mo.; Hayes, Max S„ Cleveland;
McCullough, T. W., Omaha; McDevltt,
Edward P., Steubenvllle, Ohio; Morrison, Frank, Chicago; Peats, H, C,
Lincoln, Neb.; Portenar, A. J„ New
Tork; Rodriguez, Armand E., New
York; Bprunk, Otto C, Detroit; Stevenson, Hugh, Toronto; Vandervelt,
Henry L., Paterson, N. J.fWIse, Joseph A., Indianapolis.
Home Trustees—Bleaken, John C,
Calgary, Alta.; Grimes, William W„
New York; Lacher, Martin, Denver;
McCaffrey, Thomas, Colorado Springs;
MoKee, Walter H., New York; McLaughlin, W. J., Buffalo; Merritt,
George B„ Cheyenne, Wyo.j Nichols,
George P., Baltimore; O'Leary, William E., Boston; Taylor, Bert, Toledo;
Walden, J. W., Clarksburg, W. Va.;
Whittemore, Charles H, Albany; Wilson, Anna C, Washington, D.C;
Wood, C. L. Fort Worth.
Home Agent—Canty, John, Chicago;
Faries, Walter, Philadelphia; Johnson, Joe M„ Washington, D.C.
erts, F. C, Washington, D.C.
TECHNICAL EDUCATION
dUMSi. Oouu     _
a.tj>      Bn»  1245   Pi'ovlncp"
BOOKKBKPBH — SALARY     »
•tart     Hun  conic  Melt  ncumu
am 1JM4 Provinw
STEXUQRAI'HEit WANTED—DUH1N
I'ollejro (fiduatt. Vnuiuii o-irjoriu.
for iho nnnj' tthu can make i-oorl At
I'V letter onl)' to Mr  King*   314 Colt Dl
In I, t
■•"yE   HAVB   AN   OPENINO   FOI,
*g era I   o    •• -man     muit h"   '
f Every day you iee advertisements  like  the
sss above.
§ DONT ANSWER
| Unless You Are
1       Trained
S Merely "havlni a try
= at lt'r won't do. Tou
= must be certain of
= making good. Oradu-
== etea of this school's ths largest In Canada
ss wsst of Toronto—are
= filling Important post- =
= tlons because prop- ss
ss srly trained. |§
g= Write for Prospeetue       j=
K Phone Sey. 1810     =
Premier Borden Interviewed by T. and
L, Congreaa Delegation
An Ottawa, Ont, dispatch says that
one of the most important questions
to which the attention of the government aad parliament will be drawn
this coming session, will be that of
the desirability of embarking upon a
policy of technical education with" the
purpose of placing Canada upon a
level, educationally, with the most
progressive of the industrial nations
of Europe. The report of the. commission on technical education
will shortly be ready. The other
day Premier Borden gave the
delegates representing the Trades and
Labor congress, who waited upon him,
the impression that the recommendations of the commission would be considered without delay. It would not
be surprising, therefore, if the coming session should witness an advanced educational movement calculated
to ensure a marked Improvement in
the efficiency of the Canadians ln the
future.
RARE OPERATION
Performed on an Electrical Worker
at General Hospital
Some four months ago Dlllwyn
Heald, of New Westminster, member
of the Electrical Workers' union, was
severely burned at the Vancouver
substation by a charge of 30,000 volts,
and has been in the general hospital.
Thursday week Dr. J. W. Auld performed an unusual operation In skin-
grafting, which has resulted satisfactorily. This treatment Ib not uncom-
bon tor burns, but it Is a new thing
for electrical cases. It Is praiseworthy to add that two members each
gave about eight square Inches for
the first operation, which will be repeated every week, until about seventy-five or eighty square Inches have
been grafted upon the patient's chest
and abdomen. Tbere are plenty of
volunteers to give aid as the doctor
requires.
Aided by Montreal unionists, the
organized workers ot Three Rivers,
Que., have just formed a Trades and
Labor council. At a mass meeting of
over 600 unionists the new movement
was launched.
Toronto ratepayers recently passed
a by-law to extend the municipal franchise to married women. Also they
expressed themselves ln favor of the
city going into the dead meat business.
Beginning June 1st of this year
Montreal union carpenters will work
eight Instead of nine hours a day, for
45 cents an hour, Instead of Vty, cents
as at prsent. An agreement to this
effect has Just been signed with the
contractors.
A 8UGGE8TION.
Do you know anyone whom you
think would become a subscriber to
The Federatlonist, if he saw It?
If so, mall his name to this ofllce
and The .Federatlonist will be sent to
him for one month free of charge and
accompanied by a letter Inviting him
to become a subscriber. *
Send ln the name of that friend of
yours NOW.
MINARD'S LINIMENT RELIEVE8
NEURALGIA.
1
sVaKOumBusinMj
1   Institute
*=VjlK0U»tl
The Nova Scotia "Lumber King"
says:
"I consider MINARD'S LINIMENT
the BEST liniment in use.
I got my foot badly Jammed lately.
I bathed It well with MINARD'S LINIMENT and lt was as well as ever
next day,
Yours very truly,
t. o. Mcmullen:
E. BURNS & CO.
135 CORDOVA ST. E.
HARDWARE,   FURNITURE  AND
SECOND-HAND  DEALER
Ooods sold on Commission, stoves
snd Tools our Specialty
Phone Sey. 157S. 	
Ii Your Furniture Showing
Signs of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot of
difference to one's comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture is selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come In and aee the
new arrivals—they will bring
msny hours' comfort to some
lucky persons.
Halting! Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTING8 STREET WEST
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNApLtd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,
one block weat ol Court House.
Ute oi Modern ChapelmdFuneral
Parlors free to all patrons
SPENCER'S
JANUARY
SALE
STANFIELP'S UNDERWEAR
AT REDUCED PRICE
BLUE LABEL; reg. $1.75 for......... .$1.20
FULL    WEIGHT   NATURAL, reg.
$1.50, for    .05
WHITE SILK AND WOOL, regular
$2.00,for... .................... 1.45
FULL WEIGHT   NATURAL COM,
BINATIONS, reg. $3.50, for....... 1.90
WHITE SILK .AND WOOL OOMBDT- "
ATIONS, reg. $4.00, for. ..'... 2.90
EXTRA HEAVY NATURAL, regular
$1.75,for...... ...  1.25
EXTRA HEAVY NATURAL COMBINATIONS, reg. $3.50, for....... 2.60
EXTRA HEAVY PUKE WHITE, reg.
$3.00,for 1.95
EXTRA   HEAVY   PURE \ WHITE
COMBINATIONS, reg. $6.00, for.. 3.90
David Spencer limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Heintzman&Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLD ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street West
Stanfield's Underwear
Blue Label, Suit $3.00    Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight Ot eralls of all kirds
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Contort St., Weit
L.13-OJSH10N
co:.presses vnat
KEtiABMUOrrECTAXf
TOW
I ctumoN iupports man.
4-cuaiiw ruu houm iuas
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
Dressing Robes and House Coats
We ,are showing a beautiful line of Houie Coate In Wool, Silk and Velvet:
aleo Drtising Robes In Wool,   All eliei from 14 to 41.
PRICES OP HOUSE COATS RANGE  PROM 15.00 to ttt.M
DRESSING ROBES PROM 17 to I2S
Theie make handsome Chrlitmu flfti for Huiband, Son or mends.
Call and Inspect our stock.   By paying a deposit we will lay one tilde tor
you for a reasonable length of time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd,
T.I. Ssy. 70S SM-SIS HASTINOS STREET W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools and all
lands of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Stmt W ! ■.«" '""■
-BBaVjaa
PAGE FOUR
fct:
Pi'
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 1855
Capital and Reserve,
$8,700,000
85 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Business
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches.   Interest Allowed at Highest Current Rate.
East End Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A. W. Jarvit, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 186»
Paid-up Capital
Ressrve 	
Total Assets ■ ■
■ I 11,600,00
■ 12,800,000
■ • 180^)00,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On. Dollar will open
th.'account, and your
businsss will be welcome be It large or
small
FOURTEEN BRANCHE8 IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
18SS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve 111,178,871
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In ths BANK OF TORONTO
ar. proving to be a great, convenience to many ol our
Mends. With these accounts
either of two persons et ths
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest m. paid
on all balances twice a year.
In event of death of either
party the survivor may withdraw the money.
Main Offlce-
488 HASTINGS ST. WEST
(Near Rleharda)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinga and Carrall sts.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONET   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITT    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
837 HA8TINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
8.100
iiioo
I1S.0O
4M RICHARDS STREET
Phonae Ssy. 1'M-Uit
Loans Without
INTEREST
BT THB .CONTRACT PLAN
per month   •   11,000 Loan
}1,W
♦Ml
slot
par month     -    18,000 Loan
per month   •   M.ooo Loan
For   tbe   purpose   of   Bulldlns
Homes,  Paying off Mortfaaes  or
Improving Real Estate.
' Repayments $12.50 per month on
eaoh 11,000, without Interest
MAIL THIS At) FOR FULL
INFORMATION
AN EASY METHOD FOR
VANCOUVER UNION MEN
TO ASSIST THE "FED."
Patronise Federationlit advertisers and tell them why.
When a merchant tel'i'a you
there la no demand for the
union label, and gives that aa
his reason for failure to have tt,
Just remind him thst you will
withhold your patronage until
auch Urns as he considers yours
aa a demand.
A few such jolts will stir him
up. Taking something eise will
never produce results.
IB. C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlihed oj-r-MT Ttidttj nornlaf *? *■*•
B. O. Pefleratloalit, Wd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece •
-   - 'Manager
DIRECTOR^: Jan. Campbell, prerildtnt;
Christian Slvertz, vice-president; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety. secretary*
treasurer, and R. P. Pettlplece.
Office: Boom 917, Labor Templt.
TeL Bxohaatre Waj, 7498.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrader
Subscription. $1.50 per year; in Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unlona lubecrlbmt;
ln a body, 11.00.
"Pnlty of Labor; tlie hope of the world."
FRIDAY JANUARY 16, 1914.
ABSURDITY OF HARD TIMES
Is society tb go on forever worrying over tbe alleviation of distress
arising from unemployment, Instead
of making unemployment impossible?
It Is a great pity that there Is no
other civilization that could see us
feeding crumbs to Btarving men, bragging at the same time of our achieve*
ments, and laugh us Into  common-
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY......... JANUARY 16, 1914.
tion is: Will education and evolutionary progress bring about a peaceful
readjustment so that peace may really prevail, or shall Labor be absolutely forced to wreak an awful vengeance upon the perpetrators of Its
manifold wrongs? The answer lies
with our masters, they must learn
that human patience has a limit.
Hard times have hit the world
again, and just when, according to
the crude standard of the savage,
times should be good., Poor old savage. He believed that the time to
eat was when he had something to
eat. Civilized man has advanced beyond that stage. He believes that is
the time to fast. Crops were good
last year. There are lots to eat, drink
and wear in the world, yet the "times
are hard."
Money is tight. That is the whole
trouble, Money Is tight beoause it
cannot be profitably employed. That
is to say, the accumulated wealth
that has resulted from previous labor
can not be used by society because its
owners can not add further accumulation to that already existing.
Labor, having passed all its surplus
products over to the divinely appointed custodians of social wealth, cannot
have access to those products until
the said custodians can see the way
clear to make further profit and increase the store. It Is a beautiful
arrangement. One that the unemployed are doubtless carfully pondering ln their ample spare time. Many
of them are wondering what has become of that which they have made
and why they are compelled to beg
for work in order to maintain life a
Uttle longer.
It would be well if more who are
not unemployed would ponder this
problem also. Hard times ln the
midst of plenty are a disgrace to everybody's Intelligence. The disgrace
is deepened by the. puerile efforts of
the old political parties to blame
these world-wide conditions on each
other. It is when such important
questions as these arise that the orthodox political parties show themselves to be utterly incapable of considering the needs of the workers.
The solution is plain and quite simple. Private property ln the social
means of wealth production must be
abolished. Wealth must be produced
for the use of all the people. The
surplus that accumulates must be
held ln charge for the public, but
there must be a public surplus only
after individual satisfaction Is complete. No wealth must be used to extort Interest or profit from anyone.
To accomplish this great and necessary change in all Its ramifications
appears difficult. But lt Is not half
so difficult as to preserve order, peace
and happiness in a community dominated by Rent, Interest and Profit,
the three cardinal virtues of capitalism. Only that political party which
is pledged to move toward this mighty
objective is deserving the united support of labor.
PAPER LAW
Down in Mexico the railways have
suffered considerably from the various revolutions; A favorite method
of revoluting Ib to blot out the roadbeds of railways and scramble the
rolling stock. However, the companies
present claims for damages to the existing government, which were approved. So everything is all right—
except that damages have not been
paid. The unreasonable railway
companies are complaining at this,
they say they are grateful for approval but they need (he money.
How like British Columbia! Disaster after disaster in the coal mining
Industry proclaimed the necessity for
special legislation. The government
was very sympathetic, approved the
claims of the miners and passed a
Coal Mines Regulation act Then It
promptly proceeded to Ignore its own
action. So far as the application of
the act is concerned, its only value
has been to provide work for printers.
The miners, ungrateful wretohes, are
not content that their governors have
so far troubled themselves to pass a
coal mines act, they would like to see
the law enforced.
That this is perfectly unreasonable
is being brought home vigorously by
the attorney-general's department',
which haB been engaged for some
months now punishing men who held
such a view. But there is yet hope.
Just as ln Mexico, a government may
arise which will pay damages, so in
British Columbia there may yet be a
government which will enforce its
own laws.
nlty, and it is worth while to note
that these supremely dignified callings are the meanest paid it is possible to mention. Verily, dignity
comes high!"
There are 12,000 women organized
in trade unions in Denmark and they
work in close harmony with the men's
organizations. The Danish women
enjoy universal suffrage and seven
have been elected to the city council
in Copenhagen, three of them being
socialists,
The greater you are, the greater
the penalty of your progress. Tbe
farther you go, the wider your range,
the more you increase the points of
contact with which you must recken,
and, therefore, you multiply your
battles against misconception and.
slander and envy and malice.—Herbert Kaufman.
The Masses, published in New York,
at 91 Greenwich avenue, advises Tbe
Federationist that the publishers will
be glad to send their paper free to
all working men and women on the
American continent who have been
sent to jail for participating in the
labor troubles. Names and addresses should be forwarded direct to the
above address.
The Federatlonist acknowledges
with thanks the receipt of an Invitation from E. P. Marsh, of the Everett
Labor Journal, to attend a meeting of
editors of labor newspapers to be held
at Taeoma on Saturday, January 24th,
for the purpose of forming a permanent organization, the object of which
will be to devise methods to Improve
and enlarge tbe papers now being
published in the interests of wage-
earners and producers.
FREE 8PEECH
Free speech Is a privilege that
should be jealously guarded. When
abused, lt becomes a public nuisance
and, reacting, hampers the freedom
of legitimate speech. By legitimate
speech is not necessarily meant that
which is approved by the legal authorities, which would not be free
speech at all, but any speech which
deals seriously with public problems
ln a manner having some element of
dignity.
Those, then, who deal with social
questions, and ln consequence have
most to gain by free speech, should
be the most careful to so govern their
expressions that they cannot be accused of license. If they will be
governed by caution, and confine
mselves to the presentation of
facts and thoughtful argument, even
though the argument be ln favor of
revolution, the authorities could not
attack them without attacking the
very principles of free speech, admittedly a dangerous proceeding.
Thoughtless declamation, and improvident language, on the other hand,
do not educate or Improve anyone,
they can do nothing but offend, and
suppressing'them can in no way be
construed as an attack upon free-
speech. Those wbo handle working-
class problems in public should at all
times be careful to place upon the
authorities the onus of any movement against the liberty of speech.
ENLIGHTENED DAY8
The pleasant pastime, indulged in
by many Americans, of congratulating
themselves that the dark ages have
long since gone and the days of enlightenment come to stay, has been
subjected to rude Interruptions lately.
The blood-stained tyranny of coal
barons In West Virginia, tor instance,
if transferred like Mark Twain's "Connecticut Yankee," back a few hundred
years, would make tho barons of King
John's time shudder with horror. The
polite aristocracy that "graces" modern civilisation hardly bats an eye.
History Is challenged to,produce a
more hideous blot upon the record of
human activities than the Citizens'
Alliance tbat holds high carnival of
assassination ln the Michigan Btrike
zone. It shoots its victims ln the
back, too, Yet the "best citizens" of
a profit-crazed system are not
shocked, not half as much as they are
when a millionaire's daughter marries
a waiter.
If these are enlightened days, why
Ib there no storm of protest from all
portions of society when a little grey-
haired woman is seized by armed men
and forcibly deported from a sovereign state? What has Mother Jones
done to be thus treated as an undeslr-
I able alien? Nothing but speak her
mind. No other crime has :<een fastened upon her. And ln a free country, why Is lt a crime to speak her
mind? Does she speak falsely? If
so, there are surely enough conscientious persons ln that great state to refute her falsehoods. No; she speaks
the truth, and those who fear the
truth always seek to suppress it by
physical violence.
Perhaps tbe times appear to have
Improved because ages of class rule
have so calloused the race as to make
the same old brutalities, or worse
ones, seem softer.   The great ques-
MOVER
As a rule tbe best men ln the service of Labor do not seek the shabby
glory of the public platform, nor the
cheap notoriety tbat would make
their names constantly appear ln the
columns ot the press.
If the name of Chaa. H. Moyer becomes famous, lt is because fame bas
been thrust upon the man by the actions ot his enemies; Moyer's one
ambition appears to be to carry to
successful conclusions tbe various affairs in which his unton becomes Involved. Always at the firing line,
and always attending strictly to business, he is rarely ln the publlo eye,
and when he does get there lt Ib always as the victim of some foul conspiracy on the part of forces opposed
to and endeavoring to crush the Western Federation ot Miners.
It is intended to heap no panegyrics upon Moyer for his work (for
which he, doubtless, would not be
grateful). There are other men
working quietly and efficiently In the
cause of Labor. But Moyer sets an
example to all. Here's wishing him a
speedy return to health, and more
power to confound his assailants.
BUSINESS AGENT  DIRECTORY
A.k for Lsbor T.mpla 'Phon. Exchange,
Seymour 7459 (unless otherwise stated).
Amalgamated Society Carpenters—Room
209; Wm. Currte.
Bartenders—Room 208: Geo. W. Curnock.
B. C. Federatlonist—Room 217; R. P.
Pettlplece,
B. C. Federation of Labor—Room 208;
Victor R. Midgley.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L. Yule, Room 208.
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room 804
. and 805; w. Leonard
Bricklayers—Room 216; Wm. 8. Dagnall,
Bakers—Room 220.
Barbers—Room 208; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey, 1776.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Room 220; John Sully.
Cooks, Waiters, Waitresses—Room 208;
W. E. Walker; Tel. Seymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207: W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room 807;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers (Steam)—Room 216; Ed,
Prendergaat
Labor Temple Co.—Room 311; J. R.
McVety.
Longshoremen's    Association  — Office,
- 146 Alexander street; Oeorge Thomas;
Tel. Seymour 6869.
Moving Picture Operators—O. R. Hamilton. Room 100, Loo Bldg. Tel. Sey.
8045.
Musicians—H. J. Brasdeld, 640 Robson
street; Seymour 7615.
Plasterers—Joe Hampton; Tel. Seymour 1614.
Plumbers—Room 218; Melvln Engolf;
Tel. Seymour 8611.
Street Railway Employees—Fred. A.
Hoover.
Trades and Labor Council—Room 210;
J. W. Wilkinson.
Typographical—Rooms  212,    218,    214
,   R. H. Neelands,
Western Federation of Miners—Room
217.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED     n     11.00 A MONTH	
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention in January. Executive oaaacers, 1918-14: Preeldent, Christian Siverts; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, G,
A. Burnes, J. W. Oray, Jas. Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; sec-treas., V. R. Mldgley,
Box 1044, Vanoouver.
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrst and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H. C. Benson, president; Jas., H. McVety, vice-president; J.
W. Wilkinson, general seoretary, Room
210 Labor Temple; Jas. Campbell, treasurer; Miss Brisbane, statistician; V. R.
Mldgley, sergeant-at-arms; R. P. Pettlplece, J, H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
LABOR TEMPIaB COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover. J. H,
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John MeMlllan, Murdock McKenzle, F. Blumberr, H. H. Free, Manag-
ing director. J. H. MoVety, Room 211.
ALLIED PRINTING  TRADES   COUNCIL—Meats 2nd Monday ln month.
President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary, F. R.
Fleming. P.O. Box 66.
AMALOAMATED 80CIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners—Room 80S.
Sev. 2908. Business agent J. A. Key;
office hours, 8 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Secretary of management committee,
Jas. Bltcon, 878 Hornby street Branches
meet every Tuesday and Wednesday In
Room 302.
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Loesl No. 617—Meets
Monday of each week, 8 p.m. Executive
committee meeta every Friday, 6 p.m.
President Ed. Meek; recording secretary, Thos, Lindsay, 806 Labor Temple; flnanclal seoretary, W. Leonard, 106
Labor Temple.
Did you ever notice that the crabbed old cranks, male and female, who
oppose woman suffrage and croak,
'woman's place is the home,' never
make the slightest effort to take the
5,000,000 women and 2,000,000 children or more trom the mills and factories and place them in the home?
They never even protest against the
present unjust wage slavery to which
women and children are condemned
order to build up fortunes for plutocrats. Tbey are as insincere as they
are stupid and ignorant"
Some day, perhaps, it will dawn on
aspiring politicians that the practice
of labelling themselves labor representatives is a losing game, unless
they can show authoritative endorsatlon of their claims. When the labor
men desire a labor representative in
an election lt is pretty sate to conclude that they will not leave the electors in any doubt as to whom they
have' selected. Assumption of the office of standard bearer by politicians
is generally resented by those whose
support lt is desired to attract—Phil.
Obermeyer, Hamilton Herald.'
The big bulk of the reports being
received by the wage commission of
Minnesota, which has been appointed
to investigate the conditions of working women and recommend a minimum wage rate, show that the pay of
those tollers ranges from (1 to $6 per
week. It is predicted that the commission will advise, that a minimum
wage rate of $8,50 be enforced for
women workers', and already the labor
exploiters are lamenting ln the usual
disconsolate manner that they will be
ruined, that the industries will be
driven out and the state bankrupted
and that the country generally is going to the devil.
One of the most hopeful signs ln
all the agitation about the unemployed
at the present time is the spirit of the
unemployed themselves. Instead of
begging and cringing for food and
shelter, they are demanding, that their
wants, or at least needs, be supplied.
Instead of thankfully accepting the
dole of charity granted and slinking
out of the offended sight of the master
who has no present use for them they
are demanding that they be given
more and more and that what is given
them be better prepared. Instead of
gratefully accepting every proffered
opportunity to slave for a mere pittance they are asking whether the
work is designed to deprive some
other worker of his rightful due and
refusing to act as strikebreakers. The
next logical step will be for them
to assert their "inalienable right to
work" and demand a division of the
work which will provide employment
for all with returns for their labor ln
proportion to their contribution to the
social well being. That means a
radical reduction in the working day,
—Seattle Union Record.
Agalnat. "Phossy Jaw"
Hon. T. W. Crothers, minister of
labor, will introduce a bill at the forthcoming session of parliament to prohibit the manufacture of matches
with white phosphorus, White phosphorus Is responsible for what is
known as "phossy Jaw" amongst the
employees of the match factories
which use such substance ln manufacturing the matches, A measure to prohibit its use was Introduced into the
Canadian parliament ln 1910 by the
then minister ot labor, but the legislation was not pushed forward and lt
never went into effect. Mr. Crothers
proposes to have the bill go Into law
this session.
"The 'thing' that's mayor of Nanalmo."—Rev, Dr. Fraser.
The only sure way to raise men
physically, mentally and morally is
to Improve the conditions under
which they live.—Frank Turner, in
"Justice."
The London police are forming a
trade union. There are over 20,000
men on the police force ln the metropolis. The trade unionists are watching the move with considerable interest and are wondering what its effects
will be.    .
Just because a baker's dozen constituting the "Miners' Liberation
League" have made asses of themselves and tried to make monkeys ot
the United Mine Workers' unions, It
Ib no good reason why they should
try to turn the trade union movement
of Canada into a menagerie.
Typographical Union No, 350, of
Jopiln, Mo., has moved for a referendum on the proposition of having the
I. T. U. levy an assessment of 10 cents
a week on all members for the benefit
of the Michigan copper strikers as
long aB that contest lasts. The idea
is meeting with considerable favor.
"Retail clerks, bookkeepers, store
and office help generally are still obsessed with this anti-trades union dig-
Allied  Printing Trades  Council—F. R.
.Fleming. P. O. Box 66.
Amalgamated    Carpenters—Jaa.   Bltcom
Room 209, Labor Temple.
Bakers—W.   Rogers,   Room 220, Labor
Temple,
Barbers—C. F, Burkhart Room 208, Labor Temple,
Bartenders—Geo.    W.    Curnoch,   Room
208, Labor Temple,
B.  C. Federation of Labor—Room 206:
V. R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm    Porter,    View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat 615  Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1151 Howe St
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
215, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood   of   Carpenters—A   Paine,
Roome 304-305. Labor Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—John Bully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooks,   Waiters,   Waitresses — W.   E.
Walker, Room 203, Labor Temple.
Elevator Constructors-
Electrical   Workers    (outside)—W.   F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical   Workers   (inside)—Room 207;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E,  Prendergaat  Room   216,
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment  Workers—Miss   McRae,   Labor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles   Roberts,   Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's Union (I. B. E. W.)—
Horseshoers — A.  c  MacArthur,  City
Heights, RC.
Lettercarrlers—Robt. Wight Dlstriot 31.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco.   Firemen   and   Engineers—James
Patrick, 1188 Homer street.
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway. 1688
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo.   Thomas, 146  Alexander Street
Machinists—J. H. MoVety,    Room   211,
Labor Temple.
Metal   Trades   Council—Fred.   Barclav,
Labor Temple.
Marine Engineers-
Miners, w. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple,
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Room 5, 640
Robson Street
Mnrbieworkers—J. Bullock, 822   Pender
Street West
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West
Moving Picture Operators—A. O. Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building. *
Photo   Engravers—A.   Kraft,   Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire, Block.
Painters—W. J. Nagle, Room 308, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John   James   Cornish,   1809
Eleventh Ave. East
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith. 948 Broad'
way west
Quarry Workers—James Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvllle,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,   420 Nelson
Street
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Stage Employees—C.  Martin, oare Orpheum theatre.
Structural  Iron Workers—W.  L.  Yule,
Room 208, Labor Temple.
Stonecutters—Jamea Rayburn, P. O, Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
6, Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting. 2836 Trinity Street.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, oare Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 432.
Trades snd Labor Council—J. W. Wilkinson, Room 210, Labor Temple,
Typographical—H.  Neelanda,  Box 66.
Tailors—C. MoDonald.
Theatrical    Stage    Employeea—Gordon
Martin. 657 Prior street
Tllelayers and Helpers—
TWoMerers—A. Dnthle. 1068 Homer St.
Western   Federation   of   Miners—R.  P.
Pettlplece.
WANTED—A few reliable trade union,
lsts, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for The "Fed." Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple.
BAKRRS' AND CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No. 46—Meets second and fourth Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President,
A, M. McCurracb: corresponding secretary, W,
Rogers; business agent, J.
Black, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
HI
'•"■fpinsiFr-cO) i
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 120—MEETS
second and fourth Thuridays, 8:80
p.m. President, Sam, T. Hamilton: recorder, Oeo. W. Isaacs: secretary-business axent C. F. Burkhart Boom 208.
Labor Temple,   Hours;   11 to 1; B to 7
o.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 678.—OF-
flce Room 208 Labor Temple. Meets
first Sunday of each month. President,
Wm, Laurie; flnanolal secretary. Oeo. W.
Curnock. Room 208. Labor Temple,
BRIPOE AND STRUCiTTRAL WON
WORKERS' International .tTnlon,
fjtwal 97—Meets second and fourth Frl-
lay. Labor Temple. 8 p.m. President
r. A. Seeley: secretary, A. W. Oakley,
788 Semlln Drive, phone Sey. 881.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'. NO. 1
-—Meets every Tuesday. 8 p.m., Room
807, President James Haslett: corres-
nondtntr seoretary, W. S. Desman. Box
ISS: flnanclal secretary, F. R. Brown:
business agent W. S. Dagr.sll, Room
218.
BOOmuvnERF' LOCAL UNION NO.
10B—Meets third Tueaday In every
month, In Room 205, Labor Temple.
President, F. J. Milne; vice-president, II.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat, 616
Dunlevy avenue. 	
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodere No. 191—
Meets flrst and third Mondays, 8 n. m.
President, F. Barclay, Sfi3 Cordova East;
secretary, A. Fraser, 11E1 Howe Btreet.
CIGARMAKER9' LOCAL No, 857—Meets
flrst Tuesday each month,. 8 p.m.
President, Walter HosMns; vice-president, F. J. Brandt; seoretary, Robert J.
Craljr, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.—
Meets second Sunday of each month, 140
Robson street Pruldent J. Bowyar:
vice-president, F. English; secretary, C.
P. Howett; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89—
Meets flrat and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President Q. Dean; corresponding secretary, F, Sumpter; finao-.
dal secretary, D, Scott; treasurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phona
Sey. 1514.
PATTERN MAKERS* LBAGUHJ Q_f
NORTH AMERICA.—Vaneouvar and
vicinity. Branch meeta 1st and Srd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st, room 205. Robert C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ava.; Joseph &.
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1721 Grant at; Tom
Smith, Rec. Sec, 948 Broadway west
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branoh—Meats second Tuesday, 8:01
P.m. President J. Marshall; corresponding seoretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 104T;
flnanolal secretary, K. McKensle.	
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
,__ Decorators', Looal 188—Meet every
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. Preaident Skene
Thomson; flnanolal seoretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour street; recording seoretary, George Powell, 1550 Fourth ava.
weat.
STKROTVPERB' AND BLECTROTYP-
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver
and Victoria—Meets seoond Wedneaday
of each month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple.
President Chaa. Qayley; recording aeeretary, Chris Homewood, 248 18th Ava.
Eaat
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meeta Labor Temple, aacond and
fourth Wednesdaya at 2 p.m., and flrat
and third Wedneadaya, 8 p.m. Praaldant
Adam Taylor; recording aeoretary.
Albert V. Lofting, 2688 Trinity Street
Phona Highland 1572; flnanolal aeoretary,
Vred. A. Hooyer, 2406 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS. INTERNATION-
al Local 897—Meets every Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204, Labor Temple.
Flnanolal secretary, E, prendergaat
Room 216.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonat), Local No. 178—Meetinga
held flrst Tuesday In eaoh month, 8 p. m,
President, H. Nordlund; recording aeoretary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanolal
aeceretary, L. Wakely, P. O. Box 608.
TILE LAYERS* AND HELPERS', LO-
__ cal No, 62—MeeU flrat and third
Wednesdays each month, 6 p.m. Preaident, J. Kavanagh; secretary, A. Jamle-
gon, 54 Fifth Ave. Eaat	
TYPOGRAPHICAL  UNION   NO.   226—
Meets laat Sunday eaoh month,  I
S.m, President A. E. Robb; vlce-preal-
ent, A. H. England; secretary-treasurer,
R. H. Neelanda, P.O. Box 66.
nw wiinmrsTn m- o.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meeta every aecond
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p.m., tn
Labor Hall, President D. S. Cameron:
flnanclal secretary, H. Glbb; general
secretary. B. D. Grant P. O. Box 884.
The public la Invited to attend.
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR.
PENTERS AND JOINERS meats every
second and fourth Thursday of each
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St., at 8 p.m. Preaident, J. L. Hogg, Hankey Blk,, Sapperton; Secretary, A. McDonald, 881 Royal
Ave.. New Westmlnater.
COOKS. WATTERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meeta flrst Friday In each
month, 8:30 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, buslnes representative. Office:
Room 80S, Lahor Temple. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10.30; 1 p.m. to 2.30 and R p.m. to 6.00
p.m. Competent help furnished on abort
notice.   Phone Sey. 3414,
COMMERCIAL TELEGRAPHERS
Britlah Columbia Division, C. P. System, Division No. 1—Meets 11:20 a.m.
third Sunday In month, Room 204. Local
chairman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 492,
Vancouver. Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 432, Vancouver.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEETS IN
Labor Temple. New Weatminster, corner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of each month, at
1:30 p. m. President, E. S. Hunt; secretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothera
Invited,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
218—Meets Room 801 every Monday
8 p.m. Preaident, Fred Fuller; vlce-
prealdent, D. Fink; recording secrtary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; financial secretary, E. C. Knight; treasurer, George
Hessell; buslneas agent, W. F. Dunn.
Room 207, Labor Temple.	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
621 (Inside Men)—Meets first and
third Mondays of each month. Room 205,
8 p.m. President H. P. McCoy; recording secretary, Geo. Albers; business
agent, F, L. Estinghausen, Room 207,
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
Monday of each week, 8 p. m. Executive
committee meets every Friday, 8 p.m.
Preaident, Ed. Meok, recording secretary,
J. Schurman, 306 Labor Temple; financial seoretary, J. G. Porter, 305 Labor
Temple.
LONGSHOREMENS' INTBRNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No. 38 x 52—Meeta
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander
street. President, P. Peel; secretary,
Oeo. Thomas.
MACHINISTS, NO. 182-MEETS SEC-
ond and fourth Thursdays, 7.15 p.m.
President, Chaa. Mattlnson; recording
secretary, J. Brookes; flnanolal secretary,
J. H. MoVety.	
MOVTNO. PIHTTTRE OPERATORS, Local 288, I.A.T.H.E.—Meets every mw-
ond Sunday of each month'. Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President, J. H. Fletcher
necretary-treaaurer. A- O. Hansen; business airent. G. R. Hamilton. Offloe
Room 10(1. Loo Bldr.    Tel. Hey. 9046,
m__
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. F-ji.erat.on.st
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 449J*
Geo. E. McCrotMn A. M. Harper
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Office. 32-3S IniMrial Block
539 Feeder St., W.     Viacoanr, B. C.
A by-law In (avor of Sunday street-
oars bas been carried by tbe electors
ot London, Ont The rote stood: For,
4,484; against, 2,207. It was fought
strenuously ln the pulpits.
B. 0. FEDERATION
OF LABOB PREAMBLE
'The British Columbia Federation of Labor is organized for the
purpose of voicing the needs and
aspirations ot labor, legislatively
and otherwise; and to provide a
place for worth]* members of its
afflliated unions to participate ln
the discussion of those practloal
problems, upon the solution of
which depends their welfare bs
workers, individually and collectively.
- "With the Introduction of the
modern machinery of production
and the harnessing of the forces
of nature, lt Is only fitting that
the wealth producers should participate ln the benefits derived.
"We,   therefore,   pledge   ourselves to unceasingly demand a.
universal work-day of eight hours
or less; so long as labor-power is
sold as a commodity,
"We believe there is more efficacy ln electing working-class
representatives to write the law
than by supplicatory methods;
and our efforts will be more ln
thst direction In future.
"We are firmly convinced that
the future belongs to the only
useful people In human society—
the working class."
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E, Pauline Johnson
This is s gift that will bs spprecisted In any part of the world.
Tastefully bound In three bindings. Cloth, IU0; Oose Calf, 18.10;
Burnt Leather, pun, ..
THB ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
325 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
SYSTEMS
We carry everything
for the office
The mott succettful business men are the *
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAP SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunsmuir Straet
Phone Exchange Sey. 3526-3527
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Piste and Cold Inlay Work.
HOURS 9 A M. TO 6 P. M.
PLUMBERS' and 8TBAMWTTERB' LO-
cal 4t6—Meets every seoond and
fourth Friday of month in Labor Hall,
7:10 p.m. President, D. Webster; secretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box III, New
Weatmlnetar, B. G.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD Of CAIU
penters, Local Union No. Ills-.
Hesfs svsry Monday, I p.m., Labor Temp's, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, It. C. Schmendt; secretary, A. Walker, Labor Temple, Now
Westmlnater, B. C.
YicTOBia, a. o.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meete flrst and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 731 Johnston street,
at 8 p. m. President, A. Watchman; seoretary, W. A. Parkinson, Box 302, Victoria, B. C.
_____aioma.
MMBERLEY MINERS' ONION, No. 100,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
Sunday evenings In Union Hall. Presl-
dent, W. Fleming; sccretarv-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Ktmherloy, B. C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 2388, U. M. W. of A.—MeclB Wednesday, Union Hall. 7 p.m. President,
Sam authrle; secretary, Duncan McKenzle, Ladyemlth, B. C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. of
, .£"!*£?,s evcr>' Monday at 7.30 p. m.
In the Athletic Club. Chapel stroet. Arthur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND    LOCAL    UNION, ' No7
2299, U. M. W. of A—Meets   every
K1"SJ' 1 Hm- i? V- M- w- ot A. halt.
President, Jos. Naylor; eecretary, James
Smith, Box 84. Cumberland, B. C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.-Meots
every Monday at 7.30 p.m. President,
F-„Wi PeJIlnJ. secretary, Frank Campbell, Box 28, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. 81,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
every Saturday In tho Miners' Union
nail. Address all communications to the
Secretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL-
i„.PP'OCRATIC PARTY-^Publio meetings In Dominion Theatre, Oranvllle St.,
Sunday'evenings. Seoretary, J. Adamo
Room 304, Labor Temple. "»-«".
morns or com mama amort-
LATIOVS,
■-•u*1 aPl"1"! rt«hlt ">' «■» Dominloa.
ffi A*l,.UobSi Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
TS9S*i,tntJl * P?'"on of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased (or
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of II sn acre. Not mora than
2,160 acres will bs leased to one appll-
Appllcatlon for lsass must bs mads by
tbe applicant In person to tbe Agent or
8.it.x*""lt..0t ihe 4'strie* In which the ,
rights applied for are situated.     .
in surveyed territory the land must bs
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and tn unsurvsysd territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Bach application must be accompanied
*I * .'*!." «.>blch will bs refunded IS
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty ahall be
paid on ths merchantable output of the
mine at the rats of Ave csnts psr ton.
. •ffi,tPii'8».°P,f»,l!l[. "» "nlns shall
furnish the Asent with sworn rsturne
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay tbe royalty thereon. If ths coal mining rights
are not being operated, sucb rsturne
should be furnished at least ones a year.
. TJl< ltt'" ?".' Woluds the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for.the working of ths mine at tbe
rate of fio an acre.
For full Information application
should be made to the Secretary of tbe
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands.
-;     .   .„ W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
„.."'   B.—Vnauthjrlsed   publication   of
tbls advertisement will not b. paid for.
Of America rJQxr
Ma-WIIHT ITMH HMSSmsTIftin Ifff
___
..   ■    ' TW
r'-W^tMm
FRIDAY......... JANUARY 16, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
1
Is
to
'»
.4
■ %
■flft'
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS
This is one make of underwear in which you can secure good
quality and a perfect fit The makers studied these two
requisites and have produced garments that, clearly show
much thought along these .lines, Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally associate themselves with underwear that fill the figure.
If you want real underwear comfort this winter we would
recommend thst you try Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino separate garments at
$1.00 and $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
. $3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to 14 yean, and all sizei
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garments in
light or medium weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
It will pay you to see our ihowing for winter wear. Prices that
cannot be beaten or reputed in the dty.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
'    NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 ■ Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADVT. AND WE WILL
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
LEARN to be an expert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hats; make and curl
plumes, etc. A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for a few dollars a week, when you can learn
a profession with short hours and easy work that
pays a high salary) We guarantee position! to our
graduates.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For particulars see Madame Mills, 112 Hastings St W.
or Phone Seymour 7450L  Hours daily from I to 5 p.m.
VICTORIA STORE, 111 VIEW ST.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THREE STORES IN VANCOUVER
IS Hastings St.      Phons Ssy. MS 401 Cnntilk St.      Phons Ssy. J7J7
782 Oranvllls St.    Phone Ssy. Mil
GREENHOUSES
Slat Ave. and Main St Vlotoria, B. c. Hammond, B. c.
Long Distance Phone IT
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phons 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Phone* Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware and
Sporting Goodi
111 Hastings St., W.
_t\MtPtU
Y**\^___v*
s  THE  MUSICIANS  UNION s
wish to announce that Mr.
Franklin and members of his
orchestra are not members of the
Musicians' Union. When engaging music for your next dance or
social, make sure that your
Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
For full Information Phone Musicians Union
Seymour 7815.     840 Robson Street
A.M.McN.ill
J. N. Fr«tm»n
O. J. Bandlct
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
We specialize in
Moving Furniture (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons tor all description of work
Estimates cheerfully given
Telephones: Seymour 620, 5520 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 2514-R
PAINE LABOR 1EHE IL
g*S5^"W*jftAfi SUFFBAGE'
PAGEFW1
Edited by HISS H. R. GUTTERIDQE, Room 119. Labor Temple.
WOMAN'S WORK.
One of the pleasant conventions
sbout women's work, still maintained
hy those who are unwilling to face
the harsh reality, Is the fiction that
sll the rough and disagreeable tasks
are discharged by men. The "stronger" sex chivalrously spare women
the heavy bodily labor which.they ore
Physically unfitted to sustain, and
tor a parallel reason women are excused from work Involving prolonged or arduous mental toll. In
a hazy, indefinite fashion, no donbt
most people honestly believe the
work of the world is divided on this
admirable principle. And they would
be considerably startled, perhaps
shocked, lt they could be made to
appreciate the grim fact, against
whloh women are increasingly inclined to revolt, that an immensely
disproportionate share of the un-
pleasant drudgery of dally life, a
great deal of the dangerous work,
and most of the monotonous and
semi-automatic work Is done by
women. If the world's work were
divided on the principle of giving to
men the heavier tasks and to women
the lighter and more pleasant duties,
the male clerk should at once change
places with the housemaid and the
ticket-collector with ths laundress.
The physical labor of holding a pen
or collecting tickets is Infinitely less
than the physical labor of carrying
coals upstairs, scrubbing floors, or
wringing ont dirty garments.
It would be very difficult to-day to
define what is woman's work, even
agriculture and coal mining ln some
countries are not the exclusive monopoly of men. If you have seen farmers' Wives ln any country at work,
lt Is seen thst the lightest snd most
pleasant tasks are not reserved for
women. In the mines of Oreat
Britain alone, mare than live thousand women and girls are employed.
Domestic service accounts for one-
tenth of the ocoupled women to-day,
and statistics show that there is a
greater percentage of insanity among domestic servants than any other
class of workers, probably due, to the
long hours worked' and the endless
monotony of drudgery. Factory employment accounts for nearly half of
the women in the labor market, the
rest following commercial and professional occupations.
It is a significant fact ln connection
with the employment of women that
they are always expected to fulfill
the traditional duties ot the sex no
matter what industrial occupation
they may follow.
Often ln manufacturing centres a
man and his wife will both, work ln
a factory, the woman ln addition does
all the house-work, washing, cooking,
etc., while both tbe man and the
woman take lt for granted that the
man should be free to amuse himself
or rest, One of the worst features
ot the economic inferiority of women
is the fact that the children of these
mothers are not well cared for, because the double stress of work ln
the home and ln the factory ts so
great as to render them unfit to bear
and care for their children efficiently. It Is altogether too much for
women to perform the threefold duty
of bearing children, of caring for the
home, and working to. earn a living
tor themselves and their families.
But thlB is what to a very great extent is required today of a very large
number of women. They are drlvtn
to work by sheer necessity, because
the wages earned by husbands and
fathers are too Bmall to keep the
household going. The country Is beginning to reap the harvest of women's economic inferiority In a sickly,
degenerate race born of the mothers
who try to fulfill the triple doty of
worker, wife and mother, and the
children of a nation are its greatest
The charge of malingering was
brought against the women of Oreat
Britain who applied for benefits under the Insurance act. A commission
appointed to enquire as to why so
many women were sick and for such
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
DANDRUFF.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE 8HOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, 9.19
i's Prices-
Matinee 15c, Evenings 15c, 26c.
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
Vht "Chtalrt Sttatltlfill
Sullbu A Conaldlas V«ud«UI.
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c.
THE FAMOUS G0URLAY
Pianos can be purchased from us
at |25 down and ton dollars per
month. This Is the house that
protects the purchaser, In cue of
loss of employment the payments
are postponed. Not one dissatisfied purchaser on our books, and
most of our business Is done by
recommendation.
AJELLO PIANO CO.
MT  ORANVILLE  ST. •
long periods found that they were
the women Who had been doing the
work ot three people as stated, above,
but previous to the Insurance act had
borne their sickness Without assistance.
Sir Richard McBride Is afraid the
homes would be neglected if women
had the vote, and Father O'Boyle1
cries shame on the women who have '
Invaded Industry, because lt removes
some of their feminine charms. It
Is time women awakened to say for
themselves "What Is woman's work
and place, and why?" —H. O.
. MEETINGS
There is a meeting of tbe B. O.
Woman's Suffrage league every Wednesday evening ln the Labor Temple
at 8 p.m., room 206. Enquirers Invited to attend these meetings.
A regular weekly meeting Is held
ln room 206 on Tuesday afternoon at
2.46 p.m, A very cordial Invitation
is extended to women to attend these
meetings.
THE 8UFFRAGE DANCE
The dance and oard party arranged
by the B. C. Woman'' Suffrage league
will take place in the large hall of the
Labor Temple on January 28th, at
8.30 p.m, Tickets 60 cents. Tickets
can be obtained from headquarters,
room 206, Labor Temple, or at the
door on the evening ot the dance.
MOUNT PLEASANT
there is a regular meeting ot the
Mount Pleasant branch held in the
Lee hall, Main street, near Broadway,
every Monday evening at 8 p.m.
PLEASE NOTE
While letters both for and against
suffrage are very welcome, no letter
will be published unless signed   by
the writer. —H. 0.
- "CHILD LABOR" DAY
The 8ubject of Child Labor To   Be
Discussed on January 26th
Five thousand clergymen throughout the continent, members and correspondents of the "sooial service
commissions" of the various churches,
have just received trom the National
Child. Labor committee a reminder
that the last Sunday in January is
Child Labor day. The committee is
also asking several hundred college
presidents, school superintendents,
principals and teachers to bring the
subject of child labor before their
students and pupils on Monday, January 26th.
1 Same Old Arguments
"Woman's place is the cave," the
cave man said, and he drove his wife
back with a clip on the head. We've
improved our homes since then a bit;
But man's arguments haven't changed
a whit—Louisville Courier-Journal.
A MINIMUM WAGE
The editorial in the last issue of
The Federationist on the question of
a provincial minimum wage law was
exceedingly interesting from the point
of view ot organized male labor. There
is, however, the women's point of
view on this same question. The
writer of the article, commenting on
the application of the act through a
commission, generously allows that
"tbat lines on which this bill Is drafted would seem worthy of being followed, because the application of the
act could be widened to include male
workerB and artisans providing lt won
approval by its effect upon the wage
conditions of the women and minors."
Exactly! Try lt on the dog and if
the dog survives then we will come
along and graciously accept a share.
After years of slow starvation wages
for the most monotonous work ln the
labor market, In the sweated industries that are peculiarly women's own
because men bave generously left the
badly paid work to women and called
It women's work, when, for his own
protection, man finds it-necessary that
women should have a living wage,
then she is still only an adjunct to
man's needs and to serve his Interests, the minimum wage shall only
apply to women until such time as lt
is seen to be successful enough for
him to come within its scope.
The way the so-called stronger sex
protects the weaker Is truly wonderful. The history of women in industry—where they are forced to be—If
allowed to live at all—Is the story of
struggle against, not only the capitalist class who have exploited them
mercilessly, but also against the men
of their own class who said because
they were women they muBt not expect to be looked upon as co-workers
or receive the same pay when doing
the same kihd and quantity of work.
Tbe charge is made that woman's
meekness in the labor market is because they lack the ability to unite
to protect their interests. Wherever
anxious for the women to be organ-
men and women work in tbe same industry you will find the men most
ized bo long ae tbey only do Inferior
parts of the work and do not receive
as much pay, knowing tbe women
could do the better-paid work If given
the chance, they think it wiser to see
that the women are within their ranks
and tied down to certain work, that
tbe employer may not use the women
in place of the men.
If the men think there is a possibility of an employer paying a woman
for work done, and not because she
Ib a woman, then these natural protectors do as the bookbinders of Glasgow did, go on strike for the elimination of female labor from the trade,
and, to quote their own words, "We
want to keep the craft to ourselves."
How truly grateful women should be
to man for the protection he gives her
if her interests and his conflict.
First she shall not join the union
as in early days, then she must, because his interests fire at stake, then,
finding that does not keep him top
dog, she must leave the trade entirely alone—It belongs by divine right
to him, Oh, Chivalry, thy name is
man!
Now the working of a minimum
wage law is to be tried on women
first. It is Bald that the saying
"ladies first" originated ln the middle
ages when an enemy might be waiting round the corner to spring out
and club one he disagreed with, so
the ladles were Bent first to protect
their male relatives. Our customs
bave changed somewhat, but ladles
first still holds good if it Is a question of experimental Industrial legislation. —H. O.
Bridge and structural Ironworkers
report all their members working,
WOMAN'S  INDEPENDENCE.
It is interesting to study the rise
and fall ot nations, past and present,
to enquire into the position of then-
women, their standard of education
at different periods, and their stages
of national strength and deterioration.
Apparently at a certain height gained,
of civlliaztion, all leading nations
have hitherto stopped Bhort of the
mark and failing to attain the qualifications necessary to hold the position permanently, or keep pace with
evolution, are forced to give way to
the next competition to take its place
and prove worthy of leadership. The
aspects of life of the negative and
positive sexes have not been equally
studied, represented or considered,
and from this arises the failure of any
nation to hold the position of leader
ship permanently. Tha leading nation which will come to stay, must
be broad and. scientific enough to
understand the value of an equally
balanced development, and that tho
subservience of either sex to the
other means mental and spiritual deterioration of the human being, both
male and female. Both the negative
and positive side of 'humanity, man
and woman, must have absolutely free
and equal chances of expression tor
the full development of the race, It
yet remains to be seen whloh will be
the leading nation In the near future
and it will depend very greatly on the
position of its women. Are they to
be held as the machines wherewith
to mould bodies for the next generation, or ore. they to be free human
beings? Man InheritB his mental and
moral qualities from his mother as
well as his father. If the mother's
intellectual faculties are cramped and
starved through lack of freedom .to
express herself, then will the ohlldren
Inherit dwarfed faculties, and lt follows that a nation with auch mothers
can never he fully developed, or mentally balanced enough to retain any
permanent footing as a leading nation.
True woman is broader and more unselfish than man in her sympathetic
love for humanity as a whole. She Is
willing to push on to the highest good
and will sacrifice herself to do so. Man
tries to rule without her, his object,
at the best being self-glorification,
and In so doing man falls to uphold
the standard necessary to keep pace
with the evolution of civilization and
retain the position of leader, lt requires more than he Ib able to give
alone. The foundation of man's development has not been strengthened
as woman's has, by the many sacrifices of motherhood, and the indispensable attention to the many details
of dally life. The dense materialism
enclosing man, Mb self-centered blind
egoism has been a barrier to the
highest development of any nation
beyond a certain point, in the past,
but to-day the warning cry of the
woman Is heard demanding equal
chances, freedom and a voice in the
governing of their people, for the sake
of humanity. 'In spite of the many
obstacles placed ln her way, woman,
the mother of the race and early originator ot inventions snd Industries,
has evolved along higher human lines
that man has not reached yet, but
must some time, for the male and
female of a perfect race should be
equal partners, and build up together
a civilization that will give to tbat
particular people the right to be called
a leading nation. Tbe human and
humane instincts of the woman when
she Is free to express and enforce
tbem will lead to a cessation of war
and all Its attendant evils, graft and
fraud. The man who opposes the
right of woman to be free is he who
does not deslro the welfare of the
whole, only his own immediate benefit, he is more knave than fool, more
criminal than blind, and in many
cases be prefers war ln which he can
distinguish himself more easily, or
make more money on the side, to a
peaceful economic condition of the
whole people, where he would have
to compete wltb a free womanhood
and a standard of morality that would
give no place to graft, cunning and
brutality.
AMY CAMPBELL JOHNSTON.
PATRONIZE    B     0.     FEDERATIONIST
ADVERTISERS—AND TELL THEM  WUT
THE BELGRAVIA
FLORISTS
1015 HOBSON STEEET
Phone, Sey, 6475
FLORAL DESIGNS, WED
DING ORDERS AND
HOME DECORATIONS
OUR SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
Mr. Edison and His
Diamond Disc
has set a new standard In the reproduction of sound. Tou oan not
ooncelve how great this advance
has been until you hear lti The
writer has tried a dozen times to
put Into words a description of
what this new Instrument Is like,
but falls every time he tries It. If
he could convey for five minutes
tha exclamations and expression
of wonder that came from visitor! at our store during the past
few weeks we wouldn't have supply enough to last the week out.
A comparison of- the tou of the
Edison with other makes of machines reveals the faot Instantly
that something has been missing
and we are hearing It now for
the flrst tlmo. Tou owe lt to yourself to hear the new Diamond Edison before deciding on any make
of instrument.
-BttOMa#Mast!HeaMlDEC
558 Grsnville St
JAMES STARK UH
suirnrcM mntiM   -   .   asm Beats, ■«» ♦» siso rm.
aetmtta Aasorr Mm auuusi      attnttr erne am. u asm rm.
THB STOBB THAT SERVES TOU WTLL
January Clearance and White Sale
We are making substantial price reductions all
through our store. The prices that maintained in
our Great Re-organization Sale made us famous.
Our values are to-day identical and prices in many
cases lower. We are closing out Bugs entirely.
WE OFFER
$30.00 Brussels Bugs, 9x12, For .$18.80
$40.00 Axminster Bugs, 9x12, For  25.00
Tou will save money, get value and good service at
"THE STOBE THAT SERVES TOU WELL*'
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Beit Flour, 49-Ib.
sacb $1.45
Rolled Oats, fresh milled
8 lbs      .25
Butter, Finest .Creamery,
3lbs. ...[.:. ... 1.00
Com Starch. Johnson's,
3 packets      .25
Lard,  Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each      .35
Hsmi, by the whole ham .
perlb.  .23
Bscon, machine sliced,
perlb... ........ .25
Ens.   absolutely   loesl
new laid, per doz... ,55
Apples, Wiaessps, 5 lbs. .25
Castile Soap. 35c bars. .20
Ham-mo   Hand Cleanser, per tin  05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
The Webster Bros*
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 8301, 8302
1271 ORANVILLE STREET
COLD  WEATHER  IS  COMING
GET ONE OF OUR HOT WATER BOTTLES
Ws CaanalM Tina to UN Twe Ywn
2-Qt., res*. $2.00, Special $1.50      3-Qt., Rtf. $2.25, Special $1.75
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU    ■
MARETT&REID
157 Hastings St West    I nBllfifiKTC        Independent Drugstore
Phone Seymour I5S3     ! ■>«"«■»» 7th snd Mais   Fair*568
The Burning Question
Is yonr Cook Stove or Usage
one tbat gives satisfaction, of
Is It the kind that wastes ths
fuel, burns the cakes aot pies
on tbe top and leaves them
raw on the bottom.
IF SO, now Is the time to make
the change, and whsn yoa
make the change, there Is no
better range you eould gst
tban
"The Stay Satisfactory Range"
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
W.CSTEARMAN
Hardware Merchant
MS GRANVILLE STREET
vWORKERSUNiON/
UNIOIWrAMP
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless it bears a
plain and readable impression or thla stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mus.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   O. L. Blaine, Sec-Treas.
LET IT RAIN!
LET IT HAIL!
Let it Snow if it will,
Boyal Crown is Supreme!
And is easily still
The best Soap in the West
for the Laundry, and
ROYAL CROWN
WASHING
POWDER
CLEANSES-FUBIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents ' ■ ■■
PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 16, 1914.
HOTEL STRATFORD
VANCOUVER'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
' FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTEL
IM Bedrooms. 60 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Each Room ...„., .... auriuiie
Equipped with Telephone, Hot and C?^E" «=» „.«T
Cold Water, Steam Heat, etc.   Our AND KEEFER 8TREET
Beds are the Best In any Hotel In Vancouver, B. C.
America.
RATES
(Weekly) 8lngle, 13.00, S4.0O, $5.00
"        Double, $4.50, $6.00, $7.50
Transient Rstes, $1.00 per day.   No
More.  No Less.
Hotel Stratford Co., Ltd.,
Props.
John B. Teevens, Man. Director
THE POPULaiR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
BATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOB. FBEE AUTO BUS
BERGMAN'S MODE KITCHEN
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity visit me for a First-Class Msal at
Moderate Prices.    White Help Entirely
Ths best products obtained that the market affords. Ftrst-clsss
accommodation. Only modern system ot cooking on the Paciflo Coast,
second to none when compared with other American Cities on tha
Coast. Nicely furnished rooms In connection, just perfected in the
most modern style aid now ready for occupancy, at 50c. per night
and up.
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3,25c
Short Orders Day and Night
GO WITH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout Hot and Cold Water ln Bvery Room
Haeat Oafs and (Mil Boon en tin radao Ooaat la OoaasaMn
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager.   ,
aalest Si,oo and np—Ipselal Weekly sums.
wtrmona* rz*m       mmss i
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL JHfiMESKL
MaaSsemsly mnlshed
6S6 Seymour 81.
Ontrally IVoeated
CLARENCE HOTEL
CM PENDER aad SEYMOUR STREETS
SBABOI.D & McBlOSOY
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
- x HOTEL -
C0NNAUGHT
TTHITIT ItF^fff *""  Vrops.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7SS7-T0SS.
■nnpeen TUn, Sl.00 Me Say Vp.
Up-to-Date    First-Class    Dining
Room and Cafe ln Connection
120  ROOMS;   SO   ROOMS  WITH
P.RIVATB BATHS
Steam Heated—Phono In Brerr
Room—Elevator   Ssrvioes;    Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS
NEW AND UP-TODATE
Lounging and Smoking Room.   tr. , if    ,    I
Spscl.1   aamjo   permanent   KlDgSlOIl   tlOtel
Rates:   33.S0 per week and up.   7S7 licksidi St.
Psese Sey. I2SS0
CLIFTON ROOMS   \_tt_WffJ* _Z
RAINIER HOTEL
European—Rates il per day.
^m^_^______^___^__^__   lst-class Cafe ln connection.
Rooms rented by Day or Week.  Special rates to permanent guests.
First-class Liquors and  Cigars.    Every comfort and  convenience.
JOHN SINDAR, Prop. Corner Cordova and Carrall Streets.
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
Enlarged snd  Remodelled 100 ROOMS 100 BATHS
Comfort    without    Bstravaganoe        ':■■....
American Plan   ■   SS.00 Up European Plsn   •   11.00 Up
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor.
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
hack.
Differs from all other remedies.
Prlos i___ Post Paid,
McDUFFEE BROS.
THE   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova St W.
Vsncouver, B. C.
noae Sty. 7(53 Dty or Night
Nnnn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
520 Hctsrdi St.       Vtaeoaver, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL.  DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offloe and Chapel,
1031 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 1481.
North Vanoouver —OSlct and
chape]. 111 Second Bt. B. Phone
IM.
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
AT REGULAR PRICES
5408-
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
 PHONES SEYMOUR 5409
Leaders on Leaders
Editor B. C. Federationist: "Prom
envy, hatred, malice and all uncharlt-
ableness, good Lord deliver us." So
runs one of the petitions in an ancient
litany and so should run the rule of
life to be learned and practiced by
every union man and woman. A common enemy demands a common purpose of defence and offence—a united
front—and surely labor bas a common enemy, for never before have the
powers of capital banded themselves
together as strongly as to-day. But
what is found to be the position in
our ranks? Recently in this city was
seen at a big public meeting an enormous plaoard with the old warning to
the doomed king of Babylon pointed
afresh at the powers that he: "Mene,
mene, tekel upharsin" (thou art
weighed In -the balance and found
wanting). So far, so good. But tbls
captious spirit should not be carried
into our own organizations. Differences of opinion there may be and
should be, but they must not be carried to the point of hampering the
work that Is set before us. Honest
and intelligent criticism is valuable,
and is welcomed by all right thinking
people, carping and ignorant criticism
is harmful and productive of mischief
—the one builds up, tbe other pulls
down and fritters away much-needed
energy. The greatest danger to the
cause of labor to-day is not bo muoh
from capital ae lt Ib from labor's own
ranks. Any union official who has-
been at the helm ln strikes and lookouts knows full well that the greatest
trouble be bas to contend with is the
"weak-knee-edness" of his brother
members, and this, ae a rule, is exemplified by petulant and often malicious criticism by alleged leaders
and followers. One theme constantly
discussed is the payment of leaders
in the movement. "They've got a nice,
soft Job," "They're doing themselves
well," are phrases often heard round
the offices of unions and workshops.
Have the speakers ever stopped to
consider that they themselveB elected these overpaid (?) officials? Did
they not elect the best? Does lt not
require competent, capable men to
handle the affairs entrusted to them,
to be at tbe head ot big institutions
and often to be responsible for big
sums of money? Then, in the name
of common sense, give them every
chance, every support and assistance,
and let those who are leaders In small
things remember that when they, are
leaders in big things they will ask for
that same support and not expeet a
hindrance. Take, for instance, the
publication of a newspaper. Of cpurse
lt is an understood fact that nearly
everybody imagines himself capable of
successfully running a paper, but tbe
trained journalist knows different It
ts just aB necessary to Serve an apprenticeship to journalism as it is to
any other trade or profession. One
section 'of readers wants drastic or.
direot action, another wants to go
slowly, but surely, and each party
wishes his/ views to have the cachet
of the paper. What is to T>e done?
There Is only one answer, and that
Ib for both sections to forget differences and .think only of their points
of agreement and thus confound tbelr
opponents. Another harmful result
of these animadversions is the contusion and chaos Into which tbe rank
and Hie are thrown. "Box is tbe
friend, not Cox," they are told and
they know not whom or what to believe. And yet if this criticism were
constructive they would know what
to do—the path would be so plain
that the wayfarer could not err therein.  At this time of danger from with-
ont—and Armageddon is in sight—let
uncharitableness be forgotten, unite In
and for the best, and there can be no
fear about the result. But let there be
dissensions ana back-biting, obstructions and malice, then the clock of
progress will be put back and it will
only be ln the dim and distant future
that the worker will receive the full
product of his toll.
■_ TRADE UNIONIST.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 16, 1814.
FRANK BURNETT, SENIOR
8cores McBride Government Treatment of Miners.
Prank Burnett, senior, resident of
.this city, who is now at Los Angeles,
Cal., sent five oollars as a donation to
(tho "kiddles' fund."   He writes:
'It is very gratifying that there Is
at least one righteous and just man
outside the labor ranke ln Vancouver
like the Rev. Dr. Fraser, who has the
courage to publicly place the blame
for the Nanalmo troubles where it belongs, namely, upon the shoulders of
that iniquitous tyrannical oligarchy,
masquerading as a democratic government, which, unfortunately for British
Columbia, controls its political destinies—in other words the McBride-
Bowser administration. They ("Dick"
McBride and'"billy" Bowser) are the
men that should be in jail, not the
striking miners. There is only one
thing to be Bald in their favor: ln this
mining dispute' they could scarcely
have acted otherwise than the way
they have done; they were absolutely
powerless; they 'were never at "any
stage of the game" free agents, for
the. simple reason that they have
been owned body and soul by tbe mine
owners, especially tbe Canadian
Northern crowd—there can. be no
doubt about that. Who has furnished
the funds to keep them ln power?
Who supplies the sinews of war? Echo
answers, "Mackenzie and Mann." But
tbe working men of the cities are not
blameless. Without their votes McBride would have been relegated to
the obscurity from which only a chapter of accidents enabled him to
emerge. The lord knows he has no
ability—only a smooth tongue. Of
course there is no doubt about Bowser's cleverness, but with his disposition he should not be allowed to live
ln a free country. His proper place
is ln the Czar of Russia's dominions.
It appears to me the only salvation
for our province politically is by the
formation of a new party, independent,
of the conservatives or liberals. The
organizations of these two latter are
both too much under the control of
corporations for the mass of the people even to receive their dues or justice from which either ot them Ib ln
control of the government for the
time being.
COOKS' UNION
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
BURNS, ETC.
Mono Seymour S7S7
% Ariotta Btubia
■pUntogmpIjlr ArBats
sss BOBiosr inssr
VANCOUVER, B. C.     '
FOR EXPERT
Watch and Jewelery
REPAIRING
GO TO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller snd Optician
143 Hastings Street West
Sptetaltltai
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread .
Weddlna and Birthday Cakes,
We Use T/nioa moor.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Rot Drinks and Lunches
All Goods Fresh Dally.
«sL Bey. 7104.
WHENORDERINGASUIT
See that this Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
It stands for all thst Union
Labor Stands for.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
T* HE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Union
Elect Officers for 1914—Will Not
Take a Holiday tor 48 Hours
Last Friday evening the Cooks'
local union, No. 515, held its regular
meeting, President H. Zumstein ln
tbe chair, and there was present a
good attendance. The following officers were eleoted for the ensuing
term: President, Herbert Forshee;
vice-president, Al. Wright; recording-
secretary, Thos. O. Crombie; treasurer, Dave Bell; inspector, Andy Brett;
inside guard, Wm. Wagner, delegates
to T. and la. council, W. E. Walker,
H. Zumstein, Thos.. O. Crombie; delegates to local joint executive board,
Dave Bell; H. Forshee, H. Zumstein;
executive board, John Kaupps, Frank
Johnston, Andy Brett, John Quick,
Wm. Wagner; retiring president, H.
Zumstein; press agent, Al. Wright;
financial secretary and business
agent, W. E. Walker (acclamation).
The retiring president H, Zumstein,
conducted the Installation of the newly-elected officers. Correspondence
from the B. C. Miners' Liberation
league regarding the proposed 48-
hour holiday, on January 30th, was
dealt with. The consensus of opinion
was,that it would be unwise to approve of the proposition at tbe present time, and while the members
were entirely ln sy.npathy with the
Imprisoned miners,' yet they could
hot see their way clear to accept the
proposition, owing' to the fact that
they conslcer tbat were enough unorganized out-of-works in the city who
would readily fill their positions were
they to quit work. W. E. Walker was
elected delegate to the New Westminster convention of the B. C. Fed-
ertaion ot Labor. He reported that
conditions at the Royal City were
very favorable for a good lire organization of culinary workers. It
may be stated that when the business
agent visited New Westminster a few
days age, he was accompanied by V.
R. Midgley, the secretary of the B.
C. Federation of Labor, who, with tbe
assistance of Organizer R. A. Stoney,
were able to arrange affairs so that
those desiring to join the union could
affiliate with the Vancouver locals until such times as their numbers were
sufficient to warrabt them taking out
a charter for themselves.
LETTERS TO
THEJFED
EDMONTON'S UNEMPLOYED.
Commissioners Warn Outtlders Want-
, Ing Work to Stay Away
A despatch states that about 150
men have been put to work by the
city of Edmonton, Alta., clearing
brush, and active steps are being taken to find sufficient employment for
the men who are parading the streets
unemployed. The commissioners have
issued a warning to people from other
cities seeking work to stay away as
they can not be employed. Only citizens pf Edmonton will be given work,
those with families being given preference.
Officers Elected.
At tbe last regular meeting of the
Hodcarrlers', Building Laborers' and
Civic Employees' union the following
officers were elected for the ensuing;
term: President, John C. Hammitt;
vice-presidents, Geo. Kilpatrick; O. W.
Oibbs, A. Gallagher; recording secretary, Chas. Bunce; financial secretary,
Geo. Harrison; treasurer, John McBeth; business agent, Jobn Sully (acclamation); warden, Geo. Henderson;
conductor, D. Cuthtl; trustees, J. McDonald, Chas. O'Brien, G. W. Glbbs;
delegates to T. and L. council, Wm.
Blackie, J. McBeth, J. Sully, Geo. Harrison, Geo. Nichol, A. Gallagher; delegates to Building Trades council, A.
R. Nordstrom and J. Sully.
H. H. Stevens, M. P., very properly
asserts that the federal subsidy to the
Second Narrows bridge will be given
only on condition that the proposed
structure shall he owned and controlled exclusively by the different
municipalities concerned. North Vancouver is beginning to feel tbe burden
of the iron maw of land grabbers and
transportation companies. Then no
direct benefit would accrue to the people through a privately owned bridge.
It would only increase the menace of
corporation-owned publlo utilities,
From South Wellington.
Editor B. C. Federationist: How
much longer are respectable citizens
going to be insulted by the so-called
representatives ot law and order, l.e.
the brave soldiers. Apparently Col.
Hall seems to think that his men are
incapable of any wrong-doing, as he
threatens martial law when their ill-
mannered actions are criticized. We
have lately had another case of their
bull-dozing tactics at South Wellington. Mrs. Tllley, the wife of one of
the striking miners; went to Nanalmo
on December 31st and lost the 3
o'clock train, consequently she had
to walk back, taking the most direot
road, which led her past the Pacific
Coast Coal company's mine. She
travelled this way because she was
in a hurry to get home to her children
and the main road would have meant
an extra two miles, the shortest distance being five miles. When she
arrived opposite the mine at South
Wellington she was walking on tbe
E. and N. (C. P. R.) track, when she
was met by an official of the coal company who told her that the coal company had permission to stop people
from walking on the track, a practice which, by the way, was allowed
till about two months after the strike
was called. This official told her to
get off the traok on to the government sidewalk, which sidewalk, the
coal company, through their emissaries, the special police, prevent citizens of South Wellington from using.
Finally she resumed her journey
along the track, and when about 300
yards from the mine two soldiers
from the mine overtook her and told
her she had to go back. They were
under the influence of liquor, and did
not give her a chance to either
acquiese or refuse, but took hold
of her and pushed and jostled
her back to the mine. When, they
got to the mine, they questioned her,
refused to believe she had walked
from Nanaimo, told her to go back
from whence she came, and threatened to put her ln tbe guard-room for
an hour and a half for being cheeky
to a oempany of officials, finally being
unable to get her to the guard-room,
they directed her up a muddy bank
and told ber to get off the property.
Shortly after a special policeman
caught up to her and escorted her off
the ground. In a conversation, condemned the soldiers for the way
they had treated her and asked her If
she could recognize them again,
which she certainly can do. Now,
this matter has been reported to Col.
Hall, but I have not much faith ln
the brand of justice that we shall receive from that despot. Our only
hope lies in the solidarity of the
working class. Here we are, a community of respectable citizens, at one
end of the small district and a buncb
of riff-raff from the four corners of
the earth composed of gun-men,
gamblers, and "blind pig" runners at
the other end, and they are surrounded by an armed force and special
police. The armed force is there
ostensibly for the purpose of protecting them from us, but the real reason
for the armed force Is to try to get
us to make a break and give them a
chance to shoot a few of us and beat
us Into submlBison, but they will get
left on that proposition, for when the
workers' do really awake, they will
rise ln their might at the ballot box,
and then the soldier, special policeman and scab, wilt be used as scavengers, wblch work their calling is
training them for. They are always
used for cleaning up a mess; as soon
as their master, the capitalist, makes
a mess of things in general, tbey are
the flrst on the scene, to make an
attempt to clean lt up by shooting a
few workers and clubbing women and
children.   Tours ln the flght,
WALTER HEAD.
For Press  Committee Local  872.
South Wellington, B. C, Jan. 6,1914.
Because Chicago employment agencies shipped strike-breakers to work
In Cleveland hotels on strike, the
Allied Restaurant Trades have called
upon Mayor Harrison to revoke the
licenses of concerns thus Involved,
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room. European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.   Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rstes to Permanent
Guests
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
<JAUER A DUMARESQ, Pnprieten ,
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Leading Hotel. :: Auto Parties catered to.
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Comer Fourth Street and River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C.
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
P.  L.  WALLINGFORD,   Manager
PENDER HOTEL HBKSSF-
sis nwnaa snra was*
lepaone
e~M
per Day and Up.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Keen S3 per week
Up.
D. F. Peaasbers, Pre.
33-35 HA8TINGS STREET WEST
.     .,      ,     _ | Telepkest,  Het w
Good Service Throughout    I   CeU Wsler ia each
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
ASK FOR THEM, SSO THAT YOU OUT THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS FLIM-FLAM TOU WITH CHEAP TRASHY SUBSTITUTES
Vfieer
People paid out in 1913
slightly over $125,600 in
wages to their employees,
besides considerably over
$145,000 for supplies
bought entirely in Vancouver.
Over 110,000 pounds of B.
C. Hops were used in 1913
in the CASCADE plant,
at a cost of .over $30,000.
Only union workmen are
employed.
CASCADE sells at 3 for
a half and 6 for a half.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
___*___
,'T,"-H'*T-     ...iAWWIE.
^m_m^_mm
~\)?*¥.&_&::--\__£^-.f,:. FRIDAY JANUARY 16, 1914.
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
The Sensible Housewife
alwaya Insists upon
NABOB COFFEE
When, the housewife, who prides
herself upon her table, rings up
the grocer ln the morning, she does
not merely ask for "coffee."
For she understands that a multitude of questionable substances is
sold under that name.
She invariably asks for "Nabob
Coffee," and insists on getting it.
This is not only because she
knows that Nabob Coffee is cheaper
in the long run tban ths many so-
called "coffees" that are sold—
But because she takes a genuine
pleasure ln serving only the best
to her family and her guests. And
she knows that that is Nabob.
She loves to hear the Joyful exclamation at breakfast or dinner:
"Such good coffee I That must be
Nabob!"
The Wise Grocer
always carries
NABOB COFFEE
The grocer who knows his business always carries Nabob Coffee,
and is always pleased to send it to
you rather than any other—
Beoause he knows that when you
ask for Nabob Coffee you want
nothing else but Nabob—
And, being a wise grocer, he
wants to please you and keep your
good will.
He might have other coffees that
bring Mm more proflt, but he knows
tbat the housewife who has once
used Nabob will have no other.
He knows that to substitute
"merely coffee" for "Nabob Coffee"
would suggest to your mind that he
might be selling you other things
inferior to what you asked for without you knowing it.
So the grocer who values your
patronage smilingly replies: "Certainly, madam, I will send you
NABOB."
PATRONIZE   THE "FED." ADVERTISERS
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
OF
Honolulu Like Vancouver
Faces Serious Unemployed Situation
Proposed 48-hour Holiday
as Protest For Miners
Tabled
The Trades and Labor council met
last evening, when there was a large
attendance of delegates. Vice-president McVety presided.
Credentials.
Bricklayers—L. Padgett, W. Favell,
Molders—W. O'Nell, H. Partridge, E.
Simpson, L. S. Hildabrandt, D. Brown.
Builders and Civic Employees—J. McBeth, J. Sully, Geo. Harris. Tailors—
H. Nardland, F. Dock, A. Beamish, C.
McDonald, Miss Outterldge.    Bakers
A. McCurrock, M. Maokie. Lathers
—V. R. Mldgley, AI. Roberge. Bartenders—H. Davis, J. Milne, F. Lavlgne, F. Mulhern, O. W. Curnock.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, E. Oibh.
Bookbinders—A. S. Razey, Oeo. Mowat. Street Rallwaymen—F. A. Hoover.
Bridge and Structural Workers—C. A.
Trail, W. L. Yule, Allan Sim. Walters
—Michael Brown, E. H. Howard.
Sheetmetal Workers—J. Robb, A. 3.
Crawford. Cooks—E. Crombie. The
delegates were obligated and took
their seats. >
JI. P. Wood, secretary Honolulu, H.
I. Chamber of Commerce, wrote enclosing resolution passed by the board
ot trustees, re the burden of caring
for the unemployed which has become quite a serious problem on the
islands.    Read and flled.
Business Agent Wilkinson reported
at length regarding the unemployed
situation ln Vancouver. One of the
best friends of labor In the civic
bodies was Chairman Owens of the
Board of Park commisisoners. He
would endeavor to get as much money
appropriated by (he city as possible
for Immediate work, and his board
would pay 13 a day to laborers instead
of the (2 relief wages. There would
be a six-inch water main laid around
Stanley park and the English bay
bathing beach Improved as soon as
money was available for the purpose.
Chairman Clubb of the school board
said quite a lot of work was contemplated by the trustees Inasmuch as
$400,000 would be applied for for improvements this year. The government authorities were serious about
the alarming number of out-of-works,
as the order-ln-council passed prohibiting the arrival of Immigrants looking for employment to this province
during the period between November
9th and March 31st He hoped tbat
the time would be extended. The
laundry workers had re-organized
with 30 members.
The delegates of a number of the
unions reported that a large number
of tbe members were idle.
Tbe suggestion of the B. C. Miners'
Liberation league that organised labor
take a 48-hour holiday as a protest
against the imprisonment of the striking miners, was laid on the table on
motion ot Delegate Pettipiece, by a
vote of 47 for and 35 against.
Delegate Foxoroft reported at length
on the work of the B. C. Miners' Liberation league. He had been to Vancouver island in the interests of the
league and tound that the ladles' auxiliaries as well as the miners themselves were sanguine of winning the
strike,
Officers Elected.
President—W. Foxcroft (elected),
49 votes; 3. H. McVety, 41. Vice-president—J, H. McVety (elected), 48; V.
R. Mldgley, 38. Ueneral secretary and
ilness agent—J. W. Wilkinson
(elected), 65; H. 3. McEwen, 24. Secretary-treasurer—Jas. Campbell (elected) 62; H. J. McEwen, 38. Statistician — Miss Brisbane (elected), 44; Miss Outterldge, 40. Serjeant-at-arms—John Sully (elected),
61; R, P. Pettipiece, 31. Trustees—
Curnock, 38; H. J. McEwen, 30;
W. R. Trotter, 34 (three elected); R.
P. Pettipiece, 27. Alternate delegate
to B. C. Federation of Labor—W. Foxcroft (elected), 37; Burroughs, 31.
.7. Wilkinson was elected on committee re The Federationist.
Adjourned at midnight to flrst
Thursday ln February.
THE DECLINING BIRTH RATE
Lord Rosebery, ln a speech at Glasgow, said the recent announcement
tnat there was a shortage of 600,000
babies struck cold to his heart. He
said lt was one of the worst symptoms of modern civilization. Personally, I think lt Is one of the best
symptoms. It means that women are
not so helpless and crushed as they
were and that they are able once
more to express themselves ln race
preservation. It means thst. sooner
or later, the state will have to guar
antee equal opportunity and equal
care of every child. The following
letter ln Votes For Women deals with
this problem trom the working woman's point of view: Dear Editors-
It the subject were nqt so piteous and
so pathetic, the national inquiry Into
the declining birth rate would be
most humorous. It has started at
tbe Mahslon House with a committee
composed of leading doctors, ministers, biologists, sociologists and social
workers. A few dukes, duchesses,
and a bachelor bishop with some thousands a year will arrive In due
course. Well, thank Ood, that It Ib
declining! Thank Ood that at last
parents are refusing to be responsible
for ohlldren that they cannot properly feed and clothe. There is no need
to have a national enquiry Into the
subject; this Ib "What every woman
knows," and knowledge is power. It
Is heart-breaking enough for . us to
have one, two or even three half-
starved little ones always before our
eyes without being blamed for not
making it a dosen. Every night
through the coming winter there will
be thousands of dear little frozen toes,
drawn up to poor, little empty stomachs, ln blanketless beds. At stated
times there will also be a committee
which will arrive In motor-cars, sitting warmly-clad In a comfortable
room, seriously enquiring the reason
why there are not more of these unfortunate victims. O, God, the irony,
tbe stupidity, the brutality of It all!
Where are we to put them when they
do arrive?   At a time when we want
more room for 11 e chllftsu we have
to do with less. To feed them we
take a lodger. And whsn we take a
lodger we. are asking for trouble and
generally get lt If we take lodgers,
ror washing, or go out to work, our
homes and families suffer, snd "the
soft answer that turns away' wrath"
aoes not come readily under these
conditions, and the publlo house
round tbe corner frequently reaps the
benefit Is It to be wondered at?
There Is no one more devoted to
their children than the poor. Light ot
our lives they really are, for it's very
little other light that penetrates into
our dark homes, and the declining
birth rate Is a practical and sensible
proof of our love. Never shall I forget the sad, reproachful look In the
eyes of a little boy who said, on being
shown his new sister: Oh, mother,
why didn't you have my boots mended
instead of buying that.—A. J. D.
Such a letter about the declining
birth rate does not strike cold to our
hearts, it makes our blood boll—hut
we are not lords, or legislators, or
even voters—only Just the mothers.
IDA DOUGLAS-FEARN.
ROSSLAND NOTE8.
A big dance will be given at the
miners' union hall on January 28th ln
aid of the relatives of the victims ol
the Calumet disaster.
Hiram Stewart, an old timer In the
camp, has been elected to represent
Local 38 Western Federation of Miners at the British Columbia Federation of Labor convention at New
Westminster next week.
Secretary Herbert Vareve has gone
to Denver, Col., having been appointed
by President Meyer to audit the books
of the Western Federation of Miners
at headquarters. The audit starts
January 12th. During his absence
Dickie Hutchlns, recording secretary,
will take over the duties ot flnanclal
seoretary.
Owing to the recent decision of a
British Columbia Judga tbat a man
Injured while working on Sunday was
not entitled to compensation under
the Workman's Compensation aot, the
secretary of Rossland Miners' union
was instructed to write to the employing companies ln the Rossland
camp asking the management whether
they would pay compensation to their
employees who might be Injured while
working Sundays. The Canadian
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
company replied that they would pay
compensation to men injured Sundays
the same as any other day.
Vancouver nege-workers csn materially assist The Federationitt'by caBing sr
writing for a few cards which htve juit beea printed, reading:
I ceme here because I read your
advertisement hi onr paper,
THE B.C FEDERATIONIST
Owned uid published bf orgtaited
labor, io our own qiMrter-of-i-mlllioa
dollar Labor Temples every Friday
moraine, and I always five or *
lo  good*  beariog tot   union
When out •hopping go to Vederationtit advtrtiaeft, cod before leaving leave •
card where it can be found by tbe clerki and probably -reach the principab. It la
an easy way to help The Pedtrationiat get remits—hence more advertising ■ and •
bigger and better paper to champion the cause of Labor.
Remember, too, when, yon are in need bf printing of any Und tnat Tbe Federa*
tionist accepts orders.   Union paper—union printers.
MR. WORKINGMAN
For the past. 25 years an average of 27 men have been
killed each year in the mines on Vancouver Island
chiefly through gas explosions.
For rebelling against these conditions, 89
Miners are suffering imprisonment in New
Westminster.
WE ABE DETERMINED THAT THEY SHALL
BE FREED
WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO?
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
New Westminster Elections.
New Westminster held Its civic
elections yesterday, resulting ln the
re-election of Mayor Oray by 254 majority. Messrs. Annandale, Bryson,
Dodd, Ooulet, Jardlne, Kelllngton and
Smith were elected aldermen, Dodd,
labor's representative being third on
the list The other labor candidates
tailed to be placed.
Dead Quiet
The little chap was playing "store,"
Along with other boys;
And as they romped around the Boor
They made a lot of noise.
"Keep that store quiet," mother said.
The little chap was wise.
"All right," quoth he, "we'll Just pretend
That we don't advertise."
Interest the
Non-Union Man
Every loyal member of a labor organization
should try to induce fellow workers who are not now
members to join. The dangers which seem to
threaten one union threaten all, and are not confined
to the organized, nor to the unorganized. The mem-
bers of the union may look to the union for protection and feel somewhat safer than those who are not
members. Still, if those who are not members have
their wages reduced, competition may bring wage
troubles upon those who are members. For this reason THB FEDERATIONIST believes it is to the
interest of every member that he shall induce the
largest possible number of non-union workers to
become members of the union.
STEADY EMPLOYMENT
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic -Servants
THESE ARE THE ONLY CLASSES ADVISED BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
COME TO CANADA. ALL OTHERS ARE ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
AFTER THEMSELVES IN CASE OF FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
FARMING IN CANADA OFFERS TO SKILLED WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET AWAY FROM THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
AND ALSO TO ESCAPE IN A LARGE MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
IN CITIES.
IN THE VAST WHEAT ^FIELDS OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
OFFERED TO EVERY MAN, WHILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
BE ACQUIRED AT PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPITAL AND PREFERS FARMING IN ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES. "~
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS, WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED
LITERATURE TO
W.D.SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST,
PRIDAT ...JANUARY 1«, IM.
Workers of South Vancouver
RE-ELECT YOUR OWN CANDIDATE
R. H. NEELANDS
FOR SCHOOL TRUSTEE
PHONE SEY. 3175.
Hotel Alcazar
(opposite Labor Temple)
Two hundred modern rooms, hot and cold water and
telephones in every room.   Up-to-date dining room
a la carte.
Best 35c. lunch in the city.
HOW LAND GRABBERS
PROPAGATE SO RAPIDLY
(Continued trom page 1.)
mighty force of. land-grabbers, now
depriving you and your children from
that direct access to the land tor
homes, and the natural resources
which are absolutely vital to the freedom, prosperity and happiness of
yourselves and your families. In explaining how land, etc, was and Is
"staked" In the names of dummies, I
told how one of the earliest of the
"agents" of these confederate robbers
of the public domain, whilst living at
the Empress hotel, Victoria, on the
fat of the land, and "faring sumptuously every day" during the winter
months, invited me to Join that marauding gang of publlo plunderers,
when with full knowledge then acquired I could certainly have quickly
become one of the quick-rich profligate millionaires B. C. Is propagating
far more rapidly than anywhere else
on earth, as future articles will explain.
30. Just now tt is best to concisely
disclose the earliest results of Bow
ser's abominable scheme begun by
that base insertion to the Land act
of 1907 empowering such "agents" to
stake land for speculators who In
reality are the worst plunderers of
B. C.—except Bowser and his nearest
confederates. It has taken about six
years of hazardous efforts to unearth
the grave extent of injury perpetrated by this gang whose earliest tool
for undermining the prosperity of B.
G. workers was evidenced in D. D.
McPhall, who acted not only as the
"tempter" at the Empress hotel, Victoria, in January, 1908, but spread the
flrst great B. C. land net for enriching
that land-grabbing gang during the
summers of 1908'and 1909, when, after
hurriedly visiting the likeliest agricultural areas north of Quesnel wtth
his confederate, who staked 28,000
acreB downwards as below,] he finally
"staked" and recorded on the 7th October, 1909, tbe pick of all the lot as
44,80** acres around Fort Fraser which
is richer, and far more valuable than
the much-advertised Fort Oeorge area,
as the minister of agriculture was surprised on finding out during his recent tour through central British Columbia.
Rapid   Results of Bowser's "One-
Line" Inserted B. C. Land Act
31. How rapidly those looters of
our province's natural resources multiplied may be seen In part trom this
condensed table of land-grabs, exceeding 0,000 seres each, seised by
Bowser-created "agents" for "speculators," then given every chance to'
cripple British Columbia':
(The first column Ib the year, the
aecond the number of "agents" employed, the third the average acres
per grab, the fourth acres combination grabbed, and the fifth column is the percentage over the preceding year).
1908 '  10     14,504      145.040
1909 25     15,187     379,680    262%
1910 109 11,797 1,284,720 338%
Total for flrst 3 years—1,809,800 acres.
That evidences the dissipation of our
land resources at an ever increasing
rate.
32. To list the ever-expanding
swarm of "agents" since working for
the Bowser-fed gang would weary
readers by Its length and obscure the
enormity of the crimes they are perpetrating with greater, greedier force
as each year passes, but .In order that
citlsens of British Columbia may recognise the dangers resulting from the
operations of these exploiters the list
of the leaders who during these initial
three years staked more than 20,000
acres each follows in alphabetical order:
Acreage staked before
Agent employed Dec. 31, 1910
F. B. Allard 49,000
' O. Ba Allan 26,000
Jno. Wm. Allan 22,400
Geo. E. Bowes 68,800
Eugene Croteau 34,000
S. P. Dunlevy .22,000
Hana P. Oellstadt 90,400
Mat Haller 35,000
W. R. Harrison....' 67,300
W. H. Harrison 36,200
A. E. Johnston 25,000
Fred, C. Johnston 25,700
F. C. Jones 22.500
Chas. E. Mahon 28,000
W. Hay Melkle   59,380
' Robt. Irlaodonald  32,000
Robt. McDonald  61,000
W. McKlrdy   40,800
D. D. McPhall 68,000
Jno, D. Nelson 25,800
Jas. H. Pettry 92.800
Arthur Robertson  60,000
Jas. Shepherd  64,400
Jas. W. Smith 32,000
Allan Stewart  22,240
B. L. Tlngley .42,400
C. H. Walker 21,000
H. L. Walters 31,900
Frank Watson  74,800
Jas. F. Wood 48,000
How Land Sharks Propagate So Rapidly In British Columbia
33. .When the workers realize that
the land-sharks like those are being
propagated far more rapidly in B, C.
than the worst exploiters in IT. S. A.
ever dreamed of, tbe question naturally arises, how do those "agents"
live. The answer Is "on the fat of the
land," and as those sample 32 agents
not only received their "grub-stake
and expenses" whilst staking, but
also generally 25 cents per acre, they
averaged 42,761, they could proflt about 110,700 in a year, or about double
the pay you give to the premier of
British Columbia for allowing these
despollers to plunder our inheritance.
Is there any wonder why there is
such a rush of men anxious to become
members of Bowser's gang, wblch has
increased so amazingly that later figures will stagger the electors.
34. But beyond the awful suffering
this wholesale land-thieving causes to
worthy settlers who are striving to
flnd pre-emptions, the most abominable feature of this outrageously
wicked exploitation, is the purposely
debasing effect of Bowser's machinations ln undermining the true spirit of
manliness and citizenship in electors
wbo are allured in the thousands who
have been persuaded to allow these
'agents" to stake land in their names
to grasp "easy money," whilst the despotic originator of this debauching
system of political trickery chuckles,
knowing he has thereby tied those
voters to uphold their wholesale
spoliation by their hope of participating in the plunder. That is how thousands of the worst kind of speculators
are being propagated yearly in B. C.
as tax rolls prove.
How Land Stakers Become Real Es-
tate Sharks
35. Whilst those agents can make
610,000 or more per year, the exploiters they serve make their 6100,000 or
even filch ln millions of dollars. Their
ever increasing surpluses are for the
most part invested In "real estate,
etc.," on whioh workers live, or around their neighborhoods, forcing up
the price of rents, mortgages and the
cost of homesltes, stores, etc., to those
extortionate figures which are directly robbing the workers.
Further facts and figures of greater
Interest will follow la future Issues of
The Federatlonist.
A Word to the Unionists of
British Columbia
With the beginning of the New Year The Federationist aims to increase its usefulness to the
organized labor movement of British Columbia.
During the latter part of 1913 The Federationist
was enlarged to a minimum of eight pages, and it
is now proposed to increase it to twelve pages as
soon as possible.
Your organization. can co-operate in making
The Federationist a thoroughly provincial paper
in three ways:
(1) By inserting a card in the union directory
at the nominal price of $1.00 per month;
(2) By subscribing in a body for the entire
membership from the local treasury, the paper to
be mailed to each individual address at the rate
of $1.00 per year each;
(3) By sending your orders for job printing
to this office, upon which The Federationist will
receive 10 per cent, at no increased cost to the
patron.   Union printers; union-made paper.
LEAGUE OF B.C.
Date of Meeting Changed—
Important Resolutions
Passed.
Michel Favors 48-hour Holi
day—Delegates Visit
Island.
There being but fourteen delegates
at the regular weekly meeting on
Sunday afternoon, the B. C Miners'
Liberation league decided to hold Its
future sessions on Friday evening in
Labor Temple. President Robt. Gosden presided and Secretary H. J. McEwen was in his usual place. A number of Important items of business
were disposed of, the principal one being the passing of the following resolution: "In view of the fact that
Frank Farrington and Robert Foster,
of the U. M. W. of A., have given
statements to the press that they
have good reasons to believe that the
minister of justice would free the Imprisoned miners providing that the
Miners' Liberation league repudiates
statements made by Robt. Gosden; of
the I, W. W., at the mass meeting In
the Horse Show building on December 8, 1913, the league again takes
this opportunity to officially repudiate, not only the statements of Robt.
Gosden, but of all Its speakers at that
meeting, who spoke on behalf of the
organizations they represented, with
the exception of Chairman W. Foxcroft, the official representative of the
league."
It was decided to publish a four-
page, six-column paper as the official
organ of the league. The press committee comprises: W. Foxcroft, C. V.
Cook, H. J. McEwen, Robt. Gosden
and J, Kavanagh.
Edmonton, Alta., Miners' Liberation league wrote asking that a
speaker from B. C. he sent to that
city, where he will address a mass
meeting within the next few days. It
was decided to send J. Kavanagh.
H. Elmer, secretary Michel local
union, No. 2334, wrote that the members of that union voted In favor of
the proposition to take a 48-hour holiday by a big majority. They realized
that all the petitions and demands of
the workers will be Ignored by the
government unless backed up by "a
good dose of direct action." Solidarity must be the watch word of the
workers.
C. V. Cook reported on behalf of the
delegation who waited on the Trades
and Labor council re the proposed 48-
hour holiday In protest of the miners
being imprisoned. He regretted that
the spokesman, Sam Atkinson, omitted to state that the league considered
that no agreements would be broken
were the men to lay oft work as suggested.
The following Is a copy of the cablegram sent to His Majesty King Oeorge
V. and also to Hon. Reginald McKenna, home secretary: "Minister of
Justice Ignores demands of thousands
of citizens for liberation ot Vancouver
island imprisoned miners. In Interests of British Justice intervene.—H.
J. McEwen, secretary-treasurer B. C.
Miners' Liberation league, Vancouver,
B. C."
Following donations received and
acknowledged: Trades and Labor
council, 150; Longshoremen, 850.
*W. Foxcroft, who was sent to Vancouver Island by the Miners' Liberation league, reports on conditions oh
Vancouver island as follows:
Having been delegated by the B.
C. Miners' Liberation league to go to
Vancouver island to make arrangements for a special train to take the
strikers to Victoria on the 16th Inst,
when a tag day processiqn will be
held, cannot help expressing myself
as to the conditions on the island and
the noble fight the men and women
are putting up. In Ladysmlth I got
ln touch with tbe ladies auxiliary,
whieh is composed of miners' wives
and daughters. They look after the
sick and Bee that none are in want,
besides making all arrangements for
dances, concerts, etc. Their cry Is:
"Free our men from jail and we will
carry on the fight—no matter how
long it may last." In Nanalmo the
ranks remain unbroken in spite of all
the militia and the special police. The
coal barons cannot dig coal with bayonets, clubs and guns. They must have
miners. It is impossible to get experienced men, although they have
scoured tbe four corners of the earth.
In Extension fewer scabs are working
today than before the trouble. I attended the meeting of the miners and
the enthusiasm and lighting spirit
amonst the men Ib worth seeing. After
the meeting songs were called for
and the building rang with music and
song, finally culminating with that
good old song, "We'll Keep the Red
Flag Flying." Victory Ib ln sight. I
feel assured the U. M. W. of A. will
be firmly established on the Island.
The ladles auxiliary there reflects the
same firmness, the same unquenchable fire to carry on the flght. I engaged a Bpecial train to take them to
Victoria for the 15th, to leave Nanalmo and pick up more of them at
South Wellington and Ladysmlth. Altogether 126 adults and 50 children
will be sent to the Capital City by the
league. After reporting to the executive board of the B. C. Miners' Liberation league on Tuesday afternoon
tt was decided to send Secretary McEwen to Victoria to make arrangements for their reception. The Nanaimo municipal elections are on
Thursday the 15th and the miners
are running candidates.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
"Tag day" on Saturday, December
20th, 1913, on behalf of wives and
kiddles of imprisoned miners,
Receipts
Collections $1,014.
Received from World ofllce..     47.45
$1,062.26
Disbursements
Fares, hotel and   restaurant
expenses $ 278.55
Printing  35.00
Signs and wagon displays... 26.20
Miscellaneous expenses  .... 22.05
$ 361.80
Balance ,     700.45
$1,062.25
Five hundred dollars cabled over
on December 24th to D. Todd, 635
Kennedy  street, Nanaimo,  and-bal-
Fares on B. C, E. Railway.
Editor Federatlonist: The following letter appeared in recent Issues
of the News-Advertiser and World of
this  city: •
"Sir: In today's Isshe of your paper
I notice an interview with Mr. R. H.
Sperling, general manager of the'B.
C. E. R. In this interview he endeavors to controvert the findings of the
committee of the Trades and Labor
Council of this city. Of this committee I had the honor to be chairman. Now, sir, in order to finally
settle this vexed question, I hare the
following suggestion to make to the
B. C. E. R,: I,et a commission be appointed, one member each from the
following organizations: City Council,
Board of Trade, Progress Club and
Chamber of Commerce and the
TradeB and Labor Council; let the
mayor appoint one citizen at large,
who Is not a member of either of the
above organizations, to act as chairman, the commission to be formed
within one month from date. Let the
commission then meet and organize.
Then give either side to this controversy—the B. C, E. R. and the
Trades and Labor council, who represent a considerable number of the
patrons of the company—sixty days
to gather and prepare its evidence.
Then let the commission sit, hear
evidence and make a finding upon
the evidence submitted, The result
to be given to the public through the
press." „
I think the Trades and Labor council should endorse this proposed evolution of the question, and approach
the other organizations named with
a view to interesting them ln the
movement.     Yours fraternally
L. E. DENNISON.
(Note.—The above letter has received considerable comment in the
correspondence columns ot the newspapers of this city. No doubt if the
suggestion is agreed to by the different bodies interested, that the Trades
and Labor council will be pleased to
do its share, seeing that lt has already
dealt with the matter of cheaper
fares.—Ed.)
Women Thank "Fed."
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: The
members of Ladies' Auxiliary of
South Wellington Local No. 872, desires to thank all those who so handsomely donated towards the Kiddies'
Christmas Fund; also the B. C. Federationist, it being the means of
brightening so many homes on Christmas morn.
MRS. W. H. EVANS,
Secretary Ladies' Auxiliary.
South Wellington, B.C., Jan. 11.
Vote ot Thanks.
Editor Federatlonist: We, the Ladles' Auxiliary of U. M. W. of A., Local
No. 2299, of Cumberland, B. C, take
the opportunity of extending a hearty
vote of thanks to you and all those
who helped to make Christmas fund
successful towards children's treat,
which was very much appreciated by
all. Thanking you again and wishing
you all a happy New Year, I remain,
Yours truly, ' •
MRS. DELINA FRANCESCHINI,
Recording Secretary.
Cumberland, B.C., Jan. 12.
PRE83MEN AND ASSISTANTS
No. 69 Will Send Delegate to International Convention
The local pressmen's union at Its
regular meeting on Tuesday night appointed a committee, comprising Thos.
Hlnes, AI. Mauerhan and Chas. Orey,
to devise ways and means to send a
delegate to the next international convention to be held in June at Hale
Springs, Tenn. The newly-elected officers were installed. Chas. Hawkins,
who is at Rogersvllle, Tenn., wrote
that he is Improving in health, and
spoke highly of the pressmen's institution there. Trade Ib very dull in
this city.
MACHINISTS' UNION
Elect Delegates to B. C. Federation of
Lsbor—Improved Conditions '
The Machinists' union held its regular meeting on the 8th Inst, when
Messrs. J. H. McVety and J. C. Davis
were elected delegates to the New
Westminster convention of the B. C.
Federation of Labor. The B. C.
Miners' Liberation league wrote asking that a 48-hour holiday be de.
dared on January 30th as a protest
against the imprisonment of striking
miners of Vancourer island. After
due discussion no action was taken
and the letter was filed. In accordance with a recent International referendum vote, the per capita tax has
been raised from 55 cents to 60 cents.
It may be added that the International unton has been very active in
organization affairs. It Is expected
that ere long that all "specialists"
and helpers ln the trade will the organized.
SIGNED UP.
Tailora   Elect   Officers   for   Ensuing
Term—Changs of Name of Union.
Looal No. 178 Jorneymen Tailors'
union, held tbelr regular meeting In
the Labor Temple on January 6th.
The principal business was the election of officers for the ensuing year,
resulting as follows: President, H.
Nordlund; vice-president, Miss H.
Outterldge; flnanclal secretary, K.
Paterson; recording secretary, C. McDonald; sergeant-at-arms, O. Gren;
executive board, F. Dolk, A. Beamish,
Miss Alexander and Miss Benson;
delegates to Trades and Labor council, H. Nordlund, F. Dolk, A. Beamish,
C. McDonald and Miss Outterldge.
M. Langtry, Hastings street west,
has signed up and his employees are
now on an eight-hour day basis.
F. Williams gave an instructive ad-
dreBS on the Labor Temple company's
affairs, which was considered most
satisfactory. The organization has
changed Its name and Is now "Industrial" and "International."   -
Medicine Hat T. and L, C.
At last session of the Medicine Hat
Trades and Labor council the following officers were elected for 1914:
President," F. Haley; vioe-president, J.
Thomson; recording secretary, B. W.
Bellamy; flnanolal secretary, p. Cur-
rie; treasurer, R. Collier; warden,
Jas. Henderson; statistician, N. Turner.
ance on January 3rd.   The secretary
holds receipts for full amount.
Executive Member J. W. Oray, a
delegate from the A. M. W. of A.,
Fernle, is out on an organizing trip In
the interests of the B. C. Federation
of Labor, which convenes for its
fourth annual convention at New
WestminBter a week from Monday.
Workers Turn Out in Pull
Force on Election
Night
Thousands Line Streets —
Pleased at Success of the
Lahor Candidate
Ontario labor exchanges just to
hand speak in glowing and flattering
terms of the election of James Simpson, the Toronto labor candidate, as
controller. The Industrial Banner has
this to say: "How such a splendid
campaign could be worked up in the
short space of a month was a mystery
to the old time politicians who
thought they knew all the tricks of
the game and more especially during
the last week of the contest lt was
generally considered by about everybody but tbe "Dally Telegram" that
the Simpson campaigners were sure
to land their man. That big committee of the Typos and the Bricklayers, backed by the hundreds of
workers from the various local unions
covered every section of the city. The
ward captains, every- one of them
proved to be the right man in the
right place, and every day the struggle
lasted witnessed new workers crowding into line.
Unbounded Enthusiasm
manifested from start to finish was
contagious, everybody was on the job
anxious' to do his share to help th'e
good cause, and for once at least organized labor was putting forth its
united energy to make success doubly
assured. All through the day the various committees worked like veritable
beavers, and no honest effort was left
untried to bind victory to the labor
banner. Upon the arrival of Ave
o'clock the various workers who were
not acting as scrutineers at the counting of the ballots hurried to the Labor
Temple, all four telephones were ln
use. The leaders and managers of the
campaign commlttee*took possession
of the office, another aggregation
crowded the business agents' headquarters, .while still others congregated In the big assembly hall.
The Returns
from many of the polling subdivisions
were received at the labor headquarters before they had reached the
newspaper offices. Immediately the
vote was counted the scrutineeers
used the utmost dispatch to carry the
tidings to the Labor Temple, which lt
is hardly necessary to state was soon
the scene of unbounded enthusiasm.
As the returns came pouring In It
was seen the' Simpson was leading
almost everywhere and as the totals
began to go up in wholesale measure
bo to speak, lt was evident lt was
simply a question of majority. Then
the enthusiasm broke loose. The committee had called the working class
candidate over the phone, and be set
out from his home, and his arrival was
greeted with cheers. It was ln fact
hardly possible for him to make his
passage up the stairway. The big assembly
Hall Was Filled
to overflowing, everybody was clamoring for the putting on of a big demonstration, and while preparations
were being made to give effect to
their wishes, the controller-elect and
other prominent laborltes addressed
them. Finally everything was ready
and the crowd began to line the roadway. All kinds of horns and devices
for making ear-splitting noises were
quickly in evidence, the broom brigade led the way and cheering hundreds followed in their wake. It was a
sight to Bee thst labor day parade
held on the first night of the new
year, the best labor day demonstration that organized'labor In Toronto
had ever pulled off. From the Labor
Temple up Shuter Street to Yonge,
then south to King, gathering volume
and sound as lt proceeded on Its way,
the first stop was made at the Star
ofllce and the crowd called upon Jim-
mle for a speech, his picture was
flashed on the bulletin and was greeted with a storm of cheers. The controller-elect, as soon as quiet was restored, spoke from one ot the windows
of the newspaper ofllce.
The Life of a Scab.
"Once a pretty maid climbed an old
man's knees
And asked for   a   story—do,   papa,
please,
Why are you lonely, why are are you
sad,
Why do your former friends call you
a Bcab?
I had friends, pet, long years ago,
And how I lost them you soon shall
know.
I'll tell It all, pet, tell all my shame—
I was a scab, pet, I was to blame.
Live men were striking, standing side
hy side,
Striking for justice, striking for right,
I then was with them, with them
heart and soul,
But when the test came, I left them
ln the cold.
I thought best, pet, to turn a scab;   '
Best to return, pet, to the job I had.
That's why I'm lonely, that's why I'm
sad.
That's why my former friends call me
a scab.
./
Many years have passed, pet, since I
won that name,
And ln song and story, they have told
my shame;
I have tried to tell them, tried to explain,
But they will not listen, pleading is ln
vain.
Everywhere I wander, everywhere I
roam,
The story of shame is sure to flnd my
home,
I'd give my life, pet, I'd give my all,
If I'd not turned traitor or scabbed at
all."
It takes a lot of McBride's "prosperity" to make a meal tor the poor
devil seeking the consent of an employer to earn his own wages.
A cablegram from South Africa In
a London paper says: "Employers aro
brutally flogging captured strikers ln
Africa." They are behind the times
there. In British Columbia they hire
"specials" to do the dirty work.
RADICAL VIEWS ON PUBLIC
QUESTIONS
By W. 3. CURRY, D.D.S.,
S01 Dominion Building
Painless Dentistry
An examination of the subject'
proves that considerably less than 10
per cent, of the population have teeth
In really good condition. The cause
of this is three-fold—carelessness,
largely due to Ignorance, poverty and
fear ot pain. If we pass over the
flrst two causes and confine our attention to the third, namely the dread
of being hurt, we flnd that this keeps
the majority of people of the middle
and upper classes from the dentist.
The average practitioner has little or
no idea of the discomfort he inflicts
on his subjects. Often his attitude
towards his victims is one of Impatience and Irritation, rather than of
sympathy and care. He often feels
that he Is the one who is being Injured, due no doubt to the loss of
time, and consequently of money, and
so we flnd that once more "the root of
all evil" stands between the dentist
and a correct relation to the public.
I would like to see dentists, doctors
and judges have a dose of their own
medicine once ln a while, especially
the Judges of BrltlBh Columbia. There
are In this city several firms of expert
painless dentists who collectively
spend over $1000 a month In advertising their "painlessness." A moment's consideration should show anyone that were their claims correct,
they would not have to spend their
money ln this way, in fact special
police would be necessary to keep
back the mob anxious to have their
services. The news of painless dentistry would be spread from one to
another bo rapidly. There are various
methods used to relieve the discomfort attending dental operations.
These can be divided into general and
local anaesthetics. The gas-oxygen
method Is used successfully ln many
cases. For extraction the patient is
rendered unconscious; ln preparing
teeth for filling or crowning the
patient is kept ln a semi-conscious
state. An Important objection to this,
however, ts the expense; another Ib
the after-effects from prolonged inhalation of the nitrous oxide. Local
anaesthesia through the application of
cocaine or novacalne Ib now becoming more popular and will no doubt before long replace the general anaesthesia almost entirely.
My Method
After 25 years of experience, and
after trying every suggested method I
now practise where necessary, putting
the tooth to Bleep Instead ot the
patient. This system is, however, not
popular among dentists, not because It
is not effective, but because lt is
difficult to use, and the average dentist teelB that he haB not the time
necessary to make it a success. The
Instrument used 1b not even Stocked
by our dental depots. Those who apply this method, however, and who
persevere will not care to use any
other. The application costs nothing,
is practically painless, and ln three or
four minutes the most sensitive tooth
goes to sleep so thoroughly that lt can
be drilled or have Its nerve removed
without discomfort to the patient.
This relieves the nervous strain from
the operator aa well as the patient,
and means rapidity of work and
thoroughness. In 10 or 15 minutes
the tooth wakes up without being any
worse for Its hap, only a minute portion of the drug gets into the tooth
and there is no danger or after-effects
attending this method. I have been
using this system over 10 years and
am using it more frequently and more
successfully all the time. There Ib no
doubt but that the fear of the dentist's chair is becoming lessened every
year. In dentistry the best is none
too good, ln fact, not good enough,
and the most effective means of relieving pain is something which the
practitioner owes to himself and the
public, After all, dentistry Is not a
cure for defective teeth, lt is merely,
a palliative, it Is a means of relief,'
while humanity is passing through
Its transition period called civilization
—that period which' lies between primitive society ln which our race had
sound teeth, and true civilization, the
co-operative commonwealth where
thorough knowledge and a correct adaptation- to environment, we will
possess sound teeth and good general
health once more.
NEL80N  TRADES COUNCIL
To Place Candidates In Field at Municipal Elections
George H. Fraser was elected president of the TradeB and Labor council
for tbe ensuing term at a recent meeting ot that body. Other officers elected were: Vice-president, George
Chapman; secretary, John Notman;
treasurer, Aid, I. A. Austin. That an
effort should be made by the council
to place further candidates ln the
Held at the forthcoming municipal
elections was decided on, particularly
to contest the vacancies on the board
of school trustees. A campaign committee consisting of J. Whlttemore,
J. Cose, E. Blondln, George Beaumont, O. H. Hardy, George H. Fraser,
M. Mulrooney, F. Pezerall and George
Chapman, was appointed to look into
the advisability of running further
candidates and to conduot a campaign
on behalf of the candidates of the
council. A committee, composed of J.
Elliott, J. Cose, John Notman and W.
S. Johnson, was appointed to look Into the feasibility of a concert in the
near future for the benefit of the
striking and imprisoned miners of
Vancouver island.
Shoe Workers Gain
A Toronto, Ont., dispatch says that
a steady advance- in Canada is reported by the Boot and Shoe Workers'
union. The latest gain Is the Adams
Shoe company, of that city, manufacturers of children's shoes, which will
hereafter bear the union stamp. The
Murray Shoe company, of London,
Ont., and the Weyland Shoe company,
of Montreal, are also recent accessions to the theory that workers have
the right to bargain collectively. The
union officials announce that outside
of a rapidly declining national movement ln Quebec, there is no dualism
among Canadian boo,t and shoe workers.
The   Central   Hotel
H. Freeman, Manager
European Plan Telephone 706
Rates SOo, per day ana upwards.
Cuisine unexcelled. A la carte
meals at all hours. Opp. B. C. B.
Railway Depot Columbia St.
NBW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
OET  ACQUAINTED   WITH   HIM
WHO?
THE WESTERN COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magazine,
breathing the spirit of our Oreat
West." Emanuel Julius and Cheater M. Wright, Editors. 11.00 a
year; single copies, 10 cents, 20S
Hew High St, Los Angeles, Cal.
ADVERTISEMENT
By SAM ATKINSON.
The Nanalmo local of the Social
Democratic party is having a buss
week ln preparation for the forth
coming municipal elections. There Ib
a full ticket in the field.
We extend our heartiest congratulations to the comrades lh Toronto
upon their recent success in returning James Simpson as controller.
Last Sunday evening Dr, Fraser
gave a straight-from-the-shoulder talk
to a crowded audlenoe In the Colonial
theatre upon the question of the unemployed. He did not mince words
and phrasea. We appreciate the lift
the doctor gave us.
On Thursday evening, January 22nd,
Vancouver Local No. 12 of the Social-
Democratic party will hold the regular weekly meeting In Room 204 of
the Labor Temple.
Sunday, Jan. 18th
MASS
MEETING
Colonial
Theatre
Cor.of Dunsmuir and
Granville
Streets
SPEAKER
Sam Atkinson
"A SOLUTION OF THE
UNEMPLOYED
Organ Recital at 7:45
MR.F.LJEFFRY
i,
ami-
i-.,        -    -■     -' ; ._

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