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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 12, 1913

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OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C FBDERAT10N OF LABOR.
SIXTH YEX*^1^ 140.
VANCOUVER, B. C., FRffiAjT, DECEMBER, 12, 1913.
TEN PAGES
CciTfTmo") 11*50 PEBYEABj
EXPLOITING BRITISH COLUMBIA-NAMES OF LARGE HOLDERS
VIS FOR
Deputation, of United Suffrage League Interviews
Provincial Executive.
^rpHERE IS SO MUCH TQ BE SAID regarding the disposition of vast areas of public lands by die government st Victoria to syndicates and others during the
I past five years that The Federationist has arranged for a senes of articles on Isod-grsbbing at practiced, in British Colianbia. TTiey will appear from tune to
time in subsequent issues of this paper. The public in a general sense it aware of me fact that great tracU of the best land have gone into the hands of speculators, but it is essential for the people to have, a knowledge of the rich, fertile valient, fruitful table lands and abundant and prolific plateaux \vhich have been "sold,"
br, worse still, held over for bands of adventurers, to at all appreciate the. gigantic importsnce the land question is to the masses of the present day, let alone the col-
ottal concern it must prove eventually to the future generationi of this country. The Federationist hat said on mow map one occasion that the government of British
Columbia it aiding and abetting in a scheme or system to lay the foundations to buil|up a landlorditm unequalled in any-of die European countriet which can be
borne out by facts and figures. The policy of the McBride-Bowser regime hat been or* to "give the speculator a chance." and this it has done with a vengeance
And thli the great army of landless and jobless goes on increasing in numbers by the thousands. ' '
The following acreages, shown opposite the namet of tome of the land-grabbert and their agents now exploiting thit province, are merely part of the vast areas
they control, as gleaned by casual searches through the provincial assessment rollt in remote districts. Some of the largest holders cpntrol enormous additional acreages,
covertly held under the cover of namet used as mere pawns in the game of subverting the land law, with the alleged connivance of ministers of the crown governing British
Columbia: .< ,        »     ■*"*■»
No   Government  Measure
Will Be Introduced to
Give Women Votes.
BT MISS H. R. QUTTERIDGE.
"The provincial executive la not In
agreement on thla Question of the vote
for women, and for my part I am unable to subscribe to the views you offer today," aald Sir Richard McBride
to a deputation of women from the
United Suffrage Leagues of British Columbia.
The deputation numbered twelve
and two little glrla ot three and four
yeara ot age. Mra. W. McConkey, Mrs.
W. Q. Drummond and Mlas Outterldge
were the speakera, representing the
Pioneer Political Equality league, the
Equal Franchise association and the
B. C. Women'a Suffrage league. They
pointed out how rapidly the women's
movement had grown within the last
twelve months and the women today
were prepared to ahow that there is
a good strong, healthy public opinion
at the back of their demand for a government meaaure to give votes So
women,
It waa alao stated tbat British Columbia waa the only place from the
Mexican gulf to the north pole where
the women were not voters, in spite
of the fact that the women of this
province were no less Intelligent and
Just aa public aplrlted and Interested
In the affairs of the country aa the
women who are enfranchised all along
the Pacific coaat.
"I do not mean to be critical," said
Sir Richard, "but I aay that lt Is lm-
poeslble to grant your request, for a
government meaaure to give you the
ballot. A meaaure of thla kind la well
within the province of any private
member. I do not mean to aay that
the house will he dragooned hy my
views. The house will be able tb decide tor Itself on this question it it is
Introduced."
On being asked If there was not a
time when he expressed himself In
tavor of woman's suffrage, the premier
replied, "that fifteen years ago when
' a candidate for offlce he had stated
that he would support the women'a
franchise tf It could be shown on a
vote that a majority of women of
Britlah Columbia of age, and the.
wives or daughters of British subjects
were favorable to having the ballot"
Sir Richard was naked If he considered it fair to submit woman'a suffrage
to a referendum when this had never
been done at any extensions of the
franchise to men, for It waa a well
known faot that in 1832,1878 and 1881,
at each extension of the franchise, in
Oreat Britain, that a majority of the
men concerned were not ln favor, only
a clear-seeing enthusiastic minority
when lt Waa pointed out to Mr. Oladstone In 1881 tbat the agricultural
laborera were not asking for the vote,
he replied, "they may not be asking
for It but they need it and must have
It."
It would hardly be .fair ln tbe case
of the women to demand a majority
ln Vancouver before considering the
matter. Women need the vote and
ahould have It, and without any stipulation that the men had not had to
face. Sir Richard slipped around thia
ln the usual manner of politicians by
stating that he knew of "no extenalona
of the franchise to men ln British
Columbia, we have always had manhood suffrage."
Having exhausted hla own stock of
originality the premier then fell back
on the well-worn platitudes.
"The home would be neglected and
women would no doubt elt In parliament when they had tbe vote, then
form a woman'a party and mm the
affaire of the country."
A member of tbe delegation said,
"Oh! nonsense!"
It waa somewhat of a shock to find
thst ln spite of the premier's flne
phrases on public platforms about
"Imperialism," he knows ao little about
the slater colonies that form part of
the empire, where women have been
voting for twenty-live yeara. New
Zealand and othen, where there Ib not
a woman'a party, and the women are
not neglecting their homes and running the affairs ot the nation.
SSr Richard shows hlmaelf truly
conservative, one might almost infer
fossilised, to keep at the same place
In thla progressive west with all the
world advancing on this woman's
questions, as that he occupied fifteen
years ago ahowa a truly great power
of resistance to change.
The result of the Interview was on
the whole quite satisfactory- The
women of the province now know
exactly where they stand on this question so far aa the government la concerned and will frame, the policy accordingly. 	
REACHES FIVE THOU8AND MARK
Ae The Federatlonist goes to press
the Chrlattnae fund for the wlvea and
ohlldren on Vancouver laland amounts
to over 15,000. ^^
The sooner the Miners' Liberation
league disassociates itself with an
outlaw organization which contributes
audi speakers as Mr. Qaeden, who was
tol'rated at the Horse Show .building
meetinr last Monday evening, the
oeH-'r for all concerned ln the miners
welfare.
VANCOUVER
, Acres
Bonthrone, Lennard A Co...1S.33S
c|o Bowser, Raid A Wall-
bridge 18,909
B. C. Securities Co. Ltd....12,180
Croft A Athby  ..101,32s
Geo. Falrbalrn  12,710
Nell Qethlng  81,490
Orend Trunk Land Co 83,878
Grand Trunk Pacific Development Co 14,233
elo Gwlllln, Crlep A McKay. 13,300
e|o Jaa. A. Harvey and
■Partners.. 107,473
oo Stuart Henderaan..   .,63,440
North Coaat Land Ce 141,182
co Peace River Co 221,802
oo L. C. Porterfleld. 81,843
co Shaw A Shaw... 10,880
Star Realty Co.; 17,889.
c|o Taylor, Harvey, Balrd
A Orant ......11,174
Joe. 0. Tretheway ...14,193
VICTORIA
Acres
La Alexander  41,691
elo Bodwell A Lawton 33,218
Bond A Clark..... ...22,720
c|o B. C. Cattle Co 33,382
Resolution Against Crafts
Helping Bosses When
a Strike Is On
Label Committee — Trade
.   Slightly Improved—   .
Suffrage Endorsed
President Mowat presided over a
good attendance at the regular, meeting of the Allied Printing Trades
Council held on Monday evening In
Labor Temple, W. Mackle presented
credentials from the Press Feeders,
which were accepted and the delegate
took hla aeat.
After routine business the oouncll
carried the following resolution; "Resolved—That the moral sense ot the
Allied Printing Trades Council doea
not approve of ahy of Its branches doing work tbat will help the employ-
era In case any of the crafts are on
strike."
Messrs. F. R. Fleming, L. E. Dennlson, E. R. N'Page, C. C. Oray and
H. R. Allen were appointed a label
oommlttee, to whom was referred a
communication trom the Cincinnati
Allied Printing Trades Council.     A
Norwood, Ohio, firm, unfair to the
printing trades, prints calendars,
fans and other advertising novelties.
It was stated that lt had solicitors alt
over the country canvassing for work
In the lines specified.
A slight Improvement was reported
in local trade circles.
Miss H. R. Outterldge, of the Women'a Suffrage League, addressed the
council briefly on the burning* question of votes for women. It was resolved to recommend that each union
represented at the council be asked to
endorse the work of the league.
JOINT SMOKER IN
LABOR TEMPLE TO-NIGHT
Carpentera Wtll Hold Function In Aid
of Minera' Wlvea and Klddlea' Fund.
To-night the carpentera of thla city
will put on what promises to be one of
the most successful stag affairs ever
held In this city by laboring men in
aid of a worthy object. Thla will take
the form of a smoker and concert in
the Lahor Temple in aid of the miners'
wives and children's fund of the
Island strikers. Those having the
affair ln charge have spared no pains
and time ln securing talent, and the
thanks of all la extended to those who
contributed to make the occasion a
success. The clgarmakers' orchestra
will furnish the music.
Following Is a partial list ot the
contributors toward the evening's entertainment: Three boxing bouts, put
on by the Commercial Athletle Club;
William Gillespie, baritone, song; W.
Menzles, Scotch comedian, song; A.
Glenn, song; A. McPermott, Irish com-'
edtan, song; J. Key, song; Mr, Shrimp-
ton, song; J. Qoldsberry, song.
Jack Davidson, ot the Amalgamated
Carpentera, will be the chairman of
the evening.
The Bricklayers' union voted $50.00
to the Miners' Liberation League and
$25 to Tbe Federatlonlst's Christmas
tund for the wives and children ot
the Nanalmo miners.
o|o Eberte A Tayler (Mr.
Eberte la Speaker af the
Legislature).. .'.        ...30,720
c|o Qore 4 McGregor, SSJOTS
A. 8. Innee................l0,-*j0
o|o J. G. Johnston.... KLSSO
Q- 0. Leaafc 3A6S3
c|o Nell F. McKay..., 10AM
J. E. Miller (Inepecter Sf
Inland Revenue)  ..22483
c|o Pemberton A Son 10JM0
R, Parke A Sons...........14,080
Porpoise Herber Land Co.. 17,183
F. M. Rattenbury...,;..'...3&380
Robertton A Helatarman..66,177
.12,800
B. 0. INTERIOR
I. T. Avlson, Queanel...
o|e E. H. Hicks-Beach,
Hatelten,', . .      .19,662
Jno, C. Kenworthy, Llllooet 11,723
Wettarn Canadian Ranch'
Co., Llllooet     41,093
c|o F. C. MeKlnnon, Haul-
«en : 11480
Joe. 0. Tretheway, Nance.
villa...  14,133
TORONTO
Stuart Valley Land A
Investment On.     ....
62,484
Some Convicted of Rioting
-Others of Unlawful Assembly—Three Innocent.
Sentences Postponed-South
Wellington Miners' Oases
Start on Monday.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C., Deo.
11.—Contrary to general expectations,
aU but three of the 14 union minera
of Ladysmlth were tound guilty In
Justice Morrison's assise court at midnight laat night The. trial waa on
for several daya, The prisoners were
Indicted on three ooanta, tM of riotous Injury to property, unlawful assembly and riot at Ladysmlth In August last. Alexander Dunse, Jos. Mean
and John Hume were acquitted. Mike
Lyman, Mike Mall, John Hull, Robert
Wallace and Fred. Allsopp were convicted of unlawful assembly.. Mike
Metro, John Rogers, Geo. Metro, Peter
Mackenzie, John Stevenson and Isaac
Portrey were found guilty of rioting.
J. B. Bird and J. W. deB. Farris addressed the jury on behalf of the defence, and A. D, Taylor, K, C, spoke
for the prosecution.   Judge Morrison
charged the jury against the prisoners. At 5.40 the jury left the court
room. At 10.30 p, m„ the crowd waa
still waiting for the verdict The trial
lasted alx daya and the jury took alx
hours to return lta verdict.
Later—The sentencing ot the Ladysmlth mlnen were postponed this
morning. On Monday the caaea of
the miners of South'Wellington wtll
come up for hearing,
,   Electrical Troublea Settled.
Business Agent Estinghausen of
Electrical Workers No. 631, who was
a delegate to the convention of the
Northwest Council ln Seattle recently,
read his report to the local on Monday night. It appeara highly probable that the friction which has for
so long existed between the Reld-
Murphy and McNulty factions will be
eliminated and harmony occur once
more. President Oompers of the A.
F. of L., together with the leaders of
both sides, recently held a conference
In San Francisco and arranged terms
of reconciliation. A referendum will
be taken on theae terms and it favorable will end the trouble,
Suggested Dietrict Council.
Aa a result of the recent visit of
Mr. McSorley, preaident of the W. W.
and M. L. U., the lathers are contemplating calling a convention In Seattle
next March with a view of forming a
Dlatrlct Counoll tor the Northwest
In addition to Vancouver, delegates
are expected from the coast cities,
from Spokane, and. In fact, from
every city where a local Is established.
If arrangements are satisfactorily
made, organlsera for the district will
be appointed. Mr. McSorley la
expected back here in February.
Yesterday Mr. William Paton left
for San Diego, Cal. Mr. Paton has
been aeeretary of the Plumbers' union for many years, and Is taking the
trip south for his health.
Wm.
WINNIPEG
C. Leetlkew.a...
SEATTLE
c|e Bauman A Kellher 16,800
Grand Trunk Paclflo Und
Cba. , 477}|
F. M. Rattenbury (of Victoria)   1
e|e Traffard Hutlaon...... 14,726
total aerae 1,719,709
(Continued on page Ave)
Labor Premier Refused to
Call Out the Militia
for Strike Duty
Says It Is for Defence And
Not to Murder Australia's Citlsens
(From our Special Representative In
Australia)
SYDNEY, N.S.W., Nov. 15.—Recent-
ly the Employers' Association of N.
3. W„ comprising all the leading lights
In the truata, corporations, etc.
formed an association which haa as
Its object to down the Working man
when a strike takes place by ordering
the closing of all their shops and the
laying off.of their hands In the way
ot a lock-out aa a meana of defeating
the strikers by starvation, etc, and
other barbarous and savage methods.
They waste our funds In the courts
by engaging expensive counsel to get
adjournments of the cases aa tbey
come up till they want to crush our
unions by this move. Consequently
might has to be met with might, and
we must  amalgamate  to tight them
COMING CAMPAIGN
IN ROM
i
Quaitar-of-a-mllllon-dollar Labor Temple Owned exclusively by the unlona and unionists af Vanoouver, now making a profit of MM a month.
—Photo by Canadian Photo Co.
Labor Candidates for Alder-
manic Honors Addreu
Ratepayers.
Live Questions Are Bottle,
Licenses, Gat Plant and
Half-Holiday.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C., Deo.
11.—The Sapperton ratepayers held a
meeting on Tueaday night to disease!
the propoaed gaa by-law and the bottle*
license question. It wu held la the:
Methodist church, Keary atreet, Q
mcG.11 presiding. Alderman Bryaon
favored the halt-holiday by-law, and
opposed the gaa plant purchaee, and
said It waa too late to take action on
the bottle license. A. Hardman told
of what he had done to frame up the
"antl" petitions on the bottle license
question, and would like to aee the'
whole matter go before the people.
Three of the labor candidates for aldermanlc honors—Messrs. Cameron,
Hogg and Barnard—were present, Aid.
Dodd being unable to be preeent
"The burning question Is the gaa br
law," said President D. 8. Cameron of
the Tradea and Labor Council, with
a smile. He waa strongly ln favor of
re-submitting the by-law to the electorate lor lta approval; They were
told that Jamea Cunningham held the
franchise, It waa stated also that he
had nd franchise. Mr. Cameron
thought It would be better to pay the
price of $150,000 for the gee plant
than to go to law over ownership of
the franchise. He was sanguine ot the
success of the whole labor ticket, and
said: "Nest year we will distribute
things, not to benefit a privileged few
aa In past yeara." (Applause).
T. A, Barnard, one of the labor can-
dates, asserted that Sapperton ahould
have at least one representative on
the city council. He hoped that the
voten would eupport Archie Hogg,'
another laborlte,   (Applauae).
Archie Hogg got a good reception.
No delegation trooped up to htm to aak
Mm to run for nWanmrn. H» ha*
been nominated by the lahor men
at a mass meeting. He held that real-
dents ahould have the preference on
municipal' work. Light, water and
gas should be given the citlsens aa
cheaply ae possible. Sapeprton should
have better fire protection. He predicted the election of all four labor
candidates amldat applause.
It Is now quite clear that the workingmen are expecting to elect their
four candidates, Their return would
mean that the labor party will control
next year's, olty oouncll. Nomination
will take place on January 12th and
the elections will be held on the 16th
Instant.
Campaign committee will hold a
concert this (Friday) evening, when
the Women's Equality league and the
Local Council of Women will be represented. The concert Will be held
In the lodge room ot tbe Labor
Temple.
when the time comes. Some say we
may never bave the great strikes of
old when the artillery Was -wheeled
through the streets and the aoldlera
paraded with flxed bayoneta, yet one
never knowe. During the laat tram
strike In Brisbane, Queensland, the
premier of that state called on the
commonwealth government to call out
the military, but he reckoned without
his host. The socialist labor party
was In power ln the federal parliament True to their programme tbey
turned down the Insolent demand of
the state premier of Queensland for
military forces. He waa told that the
soldiers were tor the defence of Australia's ahores against a foreign foe—
not for the murder of Australia's citlsens.
CULINARY WORKERS
Hold Mass Meeting—Strongly Favor
Woman'a Suffrage
A large mass meeting of the culinary crafta of Vancouver waa held In
the Labor Temple on Friday night,
December 5th. The meeting waa
called to order with Chas. Davis In the
chair, and a good audience attended
sb business of Importance was expected. Four applications for membership were received, and two members were Initiated. After the opening of the meeting, Miss Outerldge
and Miss Brennan were admitted to
the hall. Miss Outerldge took the
floor and gave a very able address on
woman suffrage, which was enjoyed
by those who understood the movement, and was an education to those
who have not studied the question.
IA resolution carried unanimously
that the meeting was strongly In
favor of woman suffrage, and would
do all In its power to support It. A
copy of the resolution under the seal
of the union will be sent to each of
the ministers at Victoria.
Considerable business was transacted, the members considering that the
time haa come when they must enter
In the political Held and put men of
their own class Into power, as, In
their opinion, the present parliament
In Victoria, and the city council ln
Vancouver, were not conducting the
affairs to the best Interests of the
workers.
The question of a general eight-hour
day was discussed, tbe feeling being
that an eight-hour day would not
make condltlona worse than they are
to-day, but would raise the workere
to a higher plane,
.... PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY DECEMBER 13, 1913.
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
E.BURNS&CO.
AUCTIONEERS  AND
FURNITURE DEALERS
135 Cordova Street, East
Midway between Columbia and Main
GOODS   SOLD   BV   AUCTION
OR COMMISSION.
A large aeaortment of Cook
Stovea and Heatera In etock.
Weakly Baleo every Saturday
evening at 8 p.m.
Phone Sey, 1679.
Is Your Far-titan Showing
Signs of Wear and Tear ?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an eaay couoh, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot of
difference to one'a comfort
-Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture Is selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come In and aee the
new arrivals—they will bring
many houra' comfort to aome
lucky persona.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
E
IN CI
Soldiers  Are  Ordered  to
Quell Strikes and Shoot
Unionists.
Bitter Lessons Bear Fruit—
A Union Editor Buns
Amuck.
Removal Announcement
CENe&HANNA,Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. Alter December
6,1913, at 1049 Georgia Straet,
one block west of Court House.
Use of Modern Cbapeland Funeral
Parlors free to all patrons
Phone Seymour SM
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
TIT ORANVILLB STREET
Orpheum Theatre Building
lira. Genevieve Contl
Mrs. Prancea Lohrman
PATRONIZI    B    0.    FIDBRATIONI8T
»DV»RTISXRB-AND TILL THSH WHT.
dip Artatta £ta&fa
JH-otDBrspljli Artts!*
sss aoaso* snnc
VANCOUVER, B. ft
TAKE NOTICE
We publish simple, straight testimonials,
not press Merits' Interviews, from well-
known people.
From all over America they testify to
the merlta of MINABD'S LINAMBNT,
tha beat of Household Remedies.
WNARD'fl UNAHBNT CO., IalMTBD.
AN EASY METHOD POR
VANCOUVER UNION MEN
TO ASSIST THE "FED."
Patronise Federationist advertisers and tell them why.
When a merchant teh's you
there la no demand for the
union label, and gives that as
his reason for failure to have It,
Juat remind him that you will
withhold your patronage until
eueh time aa he considers yours
aa a demand.
A few auoh Jolts will stir him
up. Taking aomethlng else will
never produce resulta.
...>      Box  1846   Provlnr,
DOOKXEUPEH  —  SAI.AI1Y       >
A."   Hurt.    Hutl como well, recttmi,
J.,1 13<4 Province 	
STEKOORM'HEit . WAN?!!!)—Ol'Bt.N
i-itllese sriduste. t'nu.un oprmriu.
for lit, pert,' «ho con mske goo,! a,
►>• leiicr only io Hr Klna 314 Cole Dl
In I. I
"VE   HAVE   AN   OPEiilNO   KOn
jtjrel   e   - man    mud t»* '
I
isteaStoseelneooa-
1
1        Would
|   $15.00 a Week
I    Interest Yon?
£Z2 Many of our gradu- =
5 atei earn that to start 23
as at    bookkeeping     or S
a stenography,   Why not __\
ss you?   We started 460 5
as young men or women ==
__t last   year.     Get   our ss
__> pronpectui       without __
23 delay. =
I Phone Sev. 1810 3
By J, W. WILKINSON
The Saturday editions of the Dally
Province contain a page devoted to
military matters under the title of
"Soldiers of the King." Tbe Individual who edits that page writes under
the title ' f be Lancebesan." His real
name, however, Is VV. H, Youhill. Now
W. H. Y. Is a member of Vancouver
Typographical union No. 226, and
after reading an article In hts columns of last Saturday, dealing with
the question of trade unionism and
the mllltla I wonder W-H-Y he is a
member of a trade union.
His article Is too long to quote ln
full, but the purpose and main contention of It Is that an Intelligent
trade unionist can also be a loyal
militiaman, aa is evident from the
following excerpts taken from Mr.
YouhlU's article. He says: "There Is
an erroneous impression abroad,that
a man can not be a good union man
and a good soldier at one and the
same time; that this is as wide of the
mark as lt possibly can be. There Is
nothing to prevent a man belonging
to both and fulfilling his duties to
both." That Is a very plain atatement of opinion on the question, and
Is doubtless Mr. YouhlU's personal
conviction. Further on ln his article
he says: "It Is quite well understood
by all Intelligent men that military
orders take precedence, and a man
has no right to be taken Into the force
until he does thoroughly understand
this." Later on he states the case
with commendable brevity and terseness by saying tbat "While a man la
on duty lt Is his function to be a
soldier ana to obey orders."
Now I fully realize that Mr. Youhill
Is entitled to hold the opinions which
he expresses in his article, providing
that his mental equipment does not
enable him to come to different conclusions after weighing evidence
which has already convinced tbe
trade union movement In all countries
tbat a man cannot be a good union
men and a good militiamen or soldier
at one and the same time.  •
In Italy, Spain, Portugal, France,
Germany and the United States the
calling out of mllltla and regular soldiers at tlmea when trade unionists
were on strike, and before any trouble
or disturbance had taken place, has
long heen taken for a common practice, and a thing to be naturally expected.
In the United Kingdom and the
British colonies the governmental
authorities were later ln adopting lt
as a general practice, but during the
last few years we have aeen so many
practical proofs of the uses to which
the British authorities are ready to
put the mllltla and soldiers, that any
man who has the Intelligence necessary to understand and belong to a
trade union now realizes that the
armed forces of government, which Is
In the hands of the employing classes,
are part of the machinery which Is
used by them to subdue the workers
Into submission and surrender at
auch times as their efforts to Improve
their conditions threaten to reduce the
profits derived from Industry.
During the railway strike In Oreat
Britain soldiers were ordered by the
authorities to work aa strike-breakers,
and did so. Even before the recent coal
strike over there actually commenced,
large bodies ot soldiers were distributed throughout the mining districts,
and by their presence acted aa a provoking element ■ which might easily
have precipitated conflict had It not
been for the discipline and forbearance which marked the attitude of
the miners during that trouble, Whilst
the great atrlke of the transport work-
era waa taking plaoe In England the
military were also used aa strikebreakers to move frelght.and do other
work whloh wae not being done because the conditions of the transport workers had become so vile that
men with any real claim to the title
of being men could no longer tolerate
them. In Dublin at the present
moment, soldiers are being used to
break the spirit of the men and women who are lighting one of the most
desperate battles for a mere existence which haa ever been fought by
the workers of any city or country.
Only a little while ago the soldiery
were used In Johannesburg to break
the strike of the gold minera, who
were striking for better protection
from the dreaded miners' pthlsls,
which carries more than fifty per cent
of them Into their graves after five
years' work In the Rand mines. At
that time, and tn line with Mr, YouhlU's dictum tbat "While a man la on
duty It Is his function to be a soldier
and obey orders," men and women,
and children, too, were killed In the
atreeta of that city, which little more
than a decade ago was captured by
the British for the purpose of securing "equal rlghta for all white men."
In New Zealand now, young men of
18 yeara of age and thereabouts are
being sent to Jail for refusing to submit to be trained for use under similar
circumstances,
Canada Is yet young In lta Industrial
life, but Instances have already occurred which prove that here, as elsewhere, mllltla and regular aoldlera are
for the part purpose at leaat ot being used against trade unionists during time ot dispute between them and
their employers.
During the coal strike In Nova
Scotia a few years ago soldiers were
used agalnat the miners.
At the time of the Winnipeg itreet
rallwaymen's atrlke .militiamen were
used and their pay of It per day trom
the government was augmented by
another $1 from the street railway
company, thus making a wage of $2
per day, which Is a figure at which
even the professional strike-breaker
would turn up his nose,
Coming closer to home the use ot
mllltla against the coal minera who
are on atrlke on Vancouver Island Is
too fresh In the memory to need epace
here to deal with It
Now, ln face of auch evidence, and
j. A, zxanr
Ex-Organlzer of th'e Brotherhood of Carpenters, elected as an alderman on Tuesday at Edmonton, the candidate of Edmonton Trades and Labor Counoll,
much more that could be cited, how
Mr. Youhill can lay claim to possessing average intelligence, plus normal
powers of observation and thought,
and still say that a man can be a
good union man and also a soldier Is
something which, to my mind, makes
him a fit subject for the attention of
mental experts.
There is nothing to be gained by
Ignoring the part played by the military In the struggle of. the workers,
and the mission of the trade union
movement must be to show to the
working class the true facts of the
caae, because It la from the working
class that the rank and file of the
military forces are drawn. And because a young man Joins tbe mllltla,
the mere fact that be does so, Is no
proof of that, providing this question
Is explained to him, be will not see lt
as lt actually Is. Nothing Is to be
gained for our point of view by abusing bim, That kind of argument Is
no argument and only antagonizes his
mind and creates a prejudice before
he haa had a chance to learn facts.
Youth la fed on false patriotism. From
the time It is taught the kindergarten
of jingoism tn the public schools lt Is
reared to regard the work of a soldier as one of the must manly callings In life. Nearly all the romance
there ever was In the business went
out of It with Drake and Raleigh and
the swashbuckling types of the Elizabethan period. Those who were still
inclined to the calling found aome
consolation In the saying that every
soldier's kuapaack ln Napoleon'
army contained a field marshal's
baton. Nowadays the same receptacle seems to contain nothing more
glorious tban a policeman's club or
a strike-breaker's outfit It is only
by being brought Into contact with
the vtewa of the antl-mllltarlst that
youth stands any chance of learning
better. Many men do not get that
chance until they are fully grown,
and one of the most significant features of the trade union movement Is
the number of men who are strong
anti-mllltarlsts and at the aame time
ex-soldiers Whose eyes have been
opened to the truth. And the truth
le that when workmen who are aoldlera ara aant out with rifles, bayonets, ball cartridge, machine guns, etc,
to quell the etrlke of other workmen
It meana that they ara equipped to
kill If ordered to de so. For, aa Mr.
Youhill says, "While a man la on duty
lt Is his function to be a soldier and
obey orders,"
Faced ln all tta nakedness and
stripped of all equivocation and sophistry It means that a union man who
la a soldier may be ordered to shoot a
member of the very union to which he
himself belongs.
It means that he may be ordered to
shoot his own brother who may be
amongst the strikers, Aa a soldier
hts sole function Is to obey, and alt
his personality must be subordinated
to that function, until he has no more
oholce In what he shall or shall not
do than the very wood and steel
which enters Into the construction of
the gun he carries.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS
Local 288, M.P.M., will hold its annual election of officers on Sunday
nlgbt next. Following are nominated:
For president—Messrs. Hausen, Pur-
dy, Hamilton, Worby; vlce-prealdent
—Messrs. Purdy, Limerick, J, B.
Schmld, Wardrope; secretary-treasurer—Messrs. Hamilton, Huff; sergeant-
at-arms—Messrs. Wilson, Thomaa, Mc.
Donald;, business agent—Messrs. Er
rington, Huff, Wardrope; executive
board—Messrs. A. Brown, Wardrope,
Limerick; trustees—Mesars. Purdy,
Brown, Worby; examining board-
Messrs. Huttlemayer, McCostney, 3.
Brown, Limerick, Errlngton, Huff;
delegate to Trades and Labor—Mesars.
Purdy and Huff (elected by acclamation.) The business agent reported for
the year ending no Improvement in regard to unionising non-union houses,
due to the non-support of local No.
145' A. F. of M.
The last report shows that the business agent of local No. 233 protested
against the musicians working at the
Olobe theatre on the night of their
grand opening. No attention waa paid
to htm In this matter; they refuse to
stand hy their agreement. With the
support of the Musicians we could
unionize this town with very little
trouble.
The Rex theatre ia ahout to open
aa a non-union house, yef the musicians have men going in this house,
The total pack of salmon for British
Columbia for 1913 waa 1,863,901 cases,
distributed aa follows: Fraser river,
732,059; Skeena river, 164,055; Rivers
Inlet, 68.096; Naas river, 53,428; out-
lying, 336,268. As to classification of
fish the pack was as follows: Sock-
eyes, 972,178; red springs, 87,433;
white' springs, 3616; chums, 77,966;
pinks, 192,887; cohoes, 69,822.
LOCALS
NEW FEDERATION OF
FI
Fifty Thousand Unionists
Represented at the Recent Congress
Held in Australia — Policy
Will Be on Industrial
Lines
Parker Toulson, of the Brotherhood
of Carpenters, is In the General Hospital for an operation.
Business Agent J. W. Schurman, of
the Brotherhood of Carpenters, says
trade In their line Is Improving.
W. Long, of Seattle, paid the city a
flying visit on Tuesday, He says
there Is a slight Improvement ln tbe
building trades. A good season is
looked forward to.
Robert Oliver, J. C. Adams, J.
Greenwood and Robt. Thompson,
members of the Bricklayers'' and
Masons' union, who recently met with
severe acldents, are atlll in the hospital, with the exception of Mr, Greenwood.
James O'Brien, an old-time Vancouver longshoreman, arrived on
Monday from Dublin, where he had
spent a week shortly after the strike
commenced. He says the conditions
there It not relieved are liable to result in rebellion.
The Vancouver Press Assistants'
union, No. 8, will hold Its first annual
ball on New Year's night January 1)
ln Labor Temple. MeBsrs. O. Pfaff,
C. C. Butts, W. L- Spelling and A. J.
Alnsley were appointed a committee
to look after preliminaries,
William Gillespie and William Barber have been elected delegates by
the Bricklayers' union to attend the
coming convention of the B. 0. Federation to be held at New Westminster on January 26. J. J. Welsh and
Sid. Osgood were elected alternates.
Frequenters of the Lahor Temple
were pleased to aee J. McMillan, an
ex-vlce-presldent of the Tradea and
Labor Council, round again at his
old Btand during the week. Mr. McMillan haa been on the sick list for
upwards of two months with typhoid-
pnenumonla, but haa now practically
recovered.
J, D, McNIven, fair wage officer for
Western Canada for the federal government, returned to this city this
week after an official trip to the prairie provinces and the Interior of this
province. He had nothing, special to
say to The Federatlonist but corroborated reports of large numbers of
men being out ot employment
throughout the west In a few Instances sub-contractors on government
work had taken advantage of the
dullness ln the labor market to reduce wages. Of course, Mr, McNIven
Immediately enforced the fair wage
clause and the men concerned were
paid their current wagea In full to
date.
(From Our Special Representative ln
Australia),
SYDNEY, N. S. Wales, Nov. 15.—
There haa been for many years paat
a desire among the leading unionists
and organisations of Australia for
unity. With that object In view trade
union congresses have been held regularly from 1908, but no conclusions
were reached until the congress of
March of thla year, when a constitution was adopted. Thla congress Instructed Its executive to Invite unions
who were prepared to launch the new
Federation of Labor to meet at the
Trades hall, Sydney, N. S. W., on
October 20th last, and the response
was as follows: Railway Workers'
and General Laborer's union; Amalgamated Railway and Tramway Service association; Sign Painters' union; Sulphide Corporation Employeea'
union; Ulawara Collieries association
employees; Western Coal and Shale
Employees' union; Northern Collerles
Employees' association; Amalgamated
Glass Bottlemakers' union; Federated
Furnishing trade unions of Australia;
United Clerks' union of N. S. W.;
Victorian Coal Miners' association;
Tasmanian Coal Miners' association.
These twelve large and powerful organizations form the basis of the federation and each is represented on
the executive governing the federation.' Altogether over 5,000 unionists
were represented at the congress. The
work of the federation will be of a
powerful and useful nature, inasmuch
as tbe' leading feature of Its policy
will be on the "Industrial lines" as
well aB Borne attention to the craft
side of the business. Despite what
the conservative press of the commonwealth has said to the contrary,
the federation wtll pursue a policy
of settlement of disputes where possible, by arbitration, and, when that
falls, by concentrated action ln the
field as a last resource. Its foremost object will be to seek for Industrial peace, for permanency of employment to the workers, without loss
of prestige in any way. It will agitate for better conditions ln the way
ot housing, Improvements tn the factories, mines and railways, lta mission will be educative, recognizing
the necessity tbat exists for further
light on economic problems. It will
speak with one voice to the master, It
will mould a policy that will be practical and capable of early realisation;
It has no Illusions aa to the difficulties that have to be overcome ln order
that the workers may get the full result of athelr labors. The federation
will Investigate, on behalf of the
workers, general questions affecting
their welfare, and will issue trom
time to time the reports oi their work.
Judging hy the good feeling that exists at present and the earnestness of
the delegatea ot the unions, great
good may be expected of the amalgamation. The work haa been commenced, the officers and executive
have been elected, and lt only remains now for them to carry out their
duties and they will be1 supported by
every working man throughout Aua
tralla—AHERN.
The' B. C. Minora' Liberation League
Receipts
Balance on hand-
Report of Nov. 15th $ 80.85
Collections and Donations    66.95
Received by cards 239.46
Received from buttons  142.35
Received from books       6.75
1476.35
Disbursement*
Printing 1147.40
Advertising    67.05
Deposit Horse Show Bldg.    50.00
Wages  122.60
Miscellaneous expense    46.30
Postage, Express, Stationery, v
etc, Rev. Hadley, books.,..   21.50
1454.76
Balanoe on hand Nov. 80th....   20,60
(475.35
The above flnanolal statement Is approved  and found  correct  by  the
executive board of the B, C. Miners'
Liberation League.
HUGH J. McEWEN, Sec.-Treas.
Vancouver, Nov, 30.
Bean to England
H. A. Jones, a former business
agent of the local Electrical Workera*
Union, No. 213, returned to Vancouver last week, after an extended trip
to England. He says that the condition of trade In the old country Is
good, better, in fact than lt haa been
for years. At Liverpool and Birmingham the machinists and boilermakers were on atrlke for higher'
wages, their demands being granted
they returned to work. At Oxford
the drivers of the horse-cars lost their
strike. Tllllngs' Omnibus Company,
London, discriminated agalnat the
conductors for wearing union buttons.
Through the offices of the lord mayor
all the strikers were reinstated and
the union recognised, The upholsterers at Birmingham won their atrlke
after being out a ahort time. Mr,
Jonea on his return trip tarried at
Winnipeg for a few daya where he
found business dull and thousands ot
men out of work. He eays, In fact
all places west of Fort William there
are to be found plenty of Idle men.
Postal Clarke Entertain
The members of the Vancouver
branch of the Postal Clerks' association of Western Canada gathered
their friends together ln force at the
Labor Temple last Friday and treated
them to a most successful concert
and amoker. Although lt was their
flrst annual gathering, everything
went smoothly and a thoroughly enjoyable time waa Spent Mr. R. O.
Macpherson, postmaster of Vancouver, performed the duties of chairman, and Prof, J. J. F. Alnsley,
F. I. C. M„ acted as accompanist. The
association le to be congratulated on
lta excellent orchestra, composed entirely of lte own members, who gave
several selections which delighted the
audience. "Sailing down Chesapeak
Bay" and the "Isle of Dreams" were
especially well rendered. Messrs.
Oram and Barker aa character 2com-
edlans, literally brought down the
house, while Mr. A. btrong was well
received with that old favorite "Gun
gha Din." Amongst the other talent
were Messrs. MoCulloch, F. A.
Vowlea, S. Nash, O. Reld, C. Tossell,
R. W, Calderwood, T, J. Lewis, E.
Mandera and O. Parsons, wbo enter
tatned with recitation and song. The
hall waa crowded and many were the
hopes expressed that the concert wu
but the flrst of a long series, Mr, N,
Williamson, tbe conductor of tbe orchestra, haa evidently worked hard
to get hla men Into such good shape
and tbe committee have also attended atrlctly to buslneas.' In short the
whole affair was a conspicuous success and the Postal Clerks are to be
congratulated on the evening's enter
talnment
Sudden Death of Unionist
The death of Oeorge Bardoe of
Manor road, Colllngwood, occurred
suddenly on Saturday last. Deceased,
who was b member of the Bricklayers' and Masons' union, succumbed
to an attack of acute meningitis after
a few hours' Illness, He waa well
known In trade union circles In the
city, and leaves a widow to mourn
hla loss. The funeral, whloh waa
largely attended, took place on Wednesday under the auspices of the
Bricklayers' and Masons' union. Deceased waa 32 years of age.
Oeorge Miller, of the Palntera'
union, who has been suffering for
the last month frdm lumbago and
rheumatism Is about again and commenced work this week.
WANTED— Person! to frow muih-
rooms lor us and auks daily ||.ee
estri. Free booklet "How to Grow
Mushrooms In Cell.ri, Bans, Sheds,
. Boses, etc,"
INTERNATIONAL MUSHROOM
COMPANY,
10) Empire Bld|.     Sol Hiillnn St. W.
By a little effort you can
win a $100.00 Set of
Furs or $50.00 in Cash
IF YOU ARE IN OUR CONTEST
THjORK, SPEND, WIN
If you have not registered, get in at once. 5000 votes
free. Our Christmas Goodi can not be beaten as regards
selection and our Prices are Right.
We are not keeping open nights because we can't ask
our girls to work overtime.   PLEASE SUPPORT US.
You can get the moit suitable and the most useful of
Christmas Gifts here and at our other store, comer Main St.
and 18th Ave., and our prices are lower.
Toys from 5 centi and up
Books from 5 cents and up
Gamei from 5 cents and up
Dolli from 10 centi and up
Then there are for older folks—Handkerchief!, Neckwear, Ties, Umbrellas, Fun, Chinaware, Bran Goods,
Leather Goodi. A really wonderful choice at right low prices.
Alice McKinnon, 237 10th Ave. E., won last week'i prize
of $5.00 in goodi for moit votei.
BINGHAM'S
Cor. Main St. and 8th Ave.
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STALEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc, STARRETT'S
FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN LOCKS
SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR 634
7 HASTINGS ST. WEST
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant,,Managing Director.)
New Addreaa:    	
S044 OOBDOTA eTUBT WIK
Between Abbott and Carrall, alao
tt suanaos srani* ur
Corner ColumDIa Avenue,
mm Asm ovasooat vuvai
Sis.se
SUM
S1S.SO
8ST.S0
on eaaramtaaw ovamsu, ts .
United Undertakers
LIMITED
NOT MEMBERS OP THE UNDERTAKERS TRUST
225 12th Avenue, West
Telephones
Fairmont 738 and 11 S3
North Vsnoouvsr, 427 Lonsdale Ave. Phons 640
Union Prices, NOT Trust Prices.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
i onr osn nr na mabkbc
As Expreeed In Dollara
Juat prior to relinquishing the position ot superintendent ot the Union
Printers' Home, Charlee Deacon made
a complete Inventory ot the Institution, whloh la as follows: The real
estate Is valued at $108,116.87; the
buildings' are valued at 8184,743.47.
With the furniture and fixtures and
other necessary things to properly
conduct the home, the total valuation
of the property waa $366,706.77. The
Inventory previous to this one was
made In March, 1907, and $268,911.68
waa the total valuation of the home
property. The lncreaae In value ln
six and one-half yeara therefore Is
$101,866.19,      .	
Carpentera Amalgamate
The plan to amalgamate the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and the Amalgamated Society of
Carpenters and Joiners haa heen retailed by a referendum vote of the
general membership, of both organisations and the result publicly an-
ounoed, The amalgamation la to take
plaoe on January 1,1914, and on that
date approximately 9,000 memben of
the Amalgamated Society who live ln
this country will become members of
the United Brotherhood. The Amalgamated Society of carpenters and
Jolnera Is an English organisation,
maintaining headquarters ln London,
England, the American portion of the
organisation being represented by a
secretary located In New York olty.
One of the serious obstacles ln the
way of amalgamation haa been the
system ot benefits provided for by the
Amalgamated association. This matter, however, was settled satisfactorily to the membership of the Amalgamated association before the referendum vote waa eent out, The benefits
to which the members of the Amalgamated association are entitled will
be protected under the terms of the
amalgamation.—A. P. of L. Newsletter.
The friends of Eugene (Oene)
Crane are gratified at aeelng him
round again after the bad accident he
met with a couple of montha ago. Mr.
Crane, who la a member ot the
Painters' union, had hts recovery
Bomewhat retarded by an attack of
neuritis, which, together with a
broken, leg, made a naaty complication,
A, R. Hoerle, of I. T. U. No. 226, left
Vancouver yesterday for the Prlnten'
Home, Colorado Springs. All hi*
frlenda hope that the treatment
received there will restore him to
health and that lt will not be very
long before he returns fully recovered.
■:.
.*■; :.;*.?,... ,
^imitmmm-u
OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
SIXTH YEAB.    No. 140.
] THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST {
(OffKUI. PAPOt SMTSM COL-
USSSU nDStATWM OFUaSOS
VANCOUVER, B. Q, FRIDAY, DECEMBER. 12, 1913.
Christmas Gift Slippers
for every member of the family
It's quite likely that
slippers are Included in
your list of holiday gifts.
If so, come direct to this
Btore, you'll be saved
needless "worry, and we're
confident of pleasing you,
because we've just received a big assortment of
slippers for the holiday
trade and have marked
them at prices that will
please the most thrifty.
For instance:
WOMEN'S BOUDOIR
SLIPPERS
of kid, with large pom-poms,
ln blaok, red, grey and brown,
etc,  Prlcea $1.25 and.:....$1.80
WOMEN'S FELT AND
QUILTED SLIPPER8
ot satin, finished wtth pompoms; a largo variety of colors to pick from. Pair...96c.
WOMEN'S JULIET
SLIPPERS
In assorted   colors,   with or
without   Imitation   fur   trim-,
mlng.   Price per pair...$1.25
MEN'S COSY PELT
8LIPPER8
In plain or plaid effects. Price
per pair, $1.00 to.......$1.50
WOMEN'S PLAID
FELT SLIPPERS
Very   cosy  and   serviceable,
finished with  a  stlftener at
the  heels.   Per  pair,   $1.00,
$1.25 and  $1.50
CHILDREN'S
C03Y SLIPPERS
ln  good  selected stylea   at
prices ranging from, per pair,
45c. to  95c.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKTEtm, LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
for miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
LANG SALES COMPANY
626 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmen's Store"
Extra Special Thie Week, Men's Caahmere and Wool
Socke lie, 20c., 25c.
The best value money can buy
To clear, 100 palra Orey Blankets, $3,00 value, for $1.75
100 pair Orey Blankete, $2.50 value, for  1.50
THE BEST VALUE IN THE MARKET
When In want of Clothing, Furnlahlng, Boots and Shoee It will
pay you to gat next to our prlcee.   Come and get acquainted at
S2S MAIN STREET
We keep the largest and most
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices which cannot be duplicated.
Everything Is to he found here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada'a Snap Specialist
104 and 100 CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE STORE IS THE SPOT POR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORES IN VANCOUVER
4S Hastings St.      Phone Sey. SN ,      401 Giurllls St      Rhone Say, STST
712 Oranvllle St.    Phone Soy. MIS
VICTORIA STORB, Ui VIEW ST.
__ Slot Ava. and Main St.
Phone Fairmont TH,
GREENHOUSES
Vlotoria, B. O. Hammond, B. G.
Lena Distance Phono IT
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
TEN PAGES
THE B.C. MINERS'
Hold Monster Orderly Protest Mass Meeting in the
Horse Show Building
McBride and Bowser Criticized—Resolutions Passed
—The Speeches
There was a large audience at the
mass protest meeting held under the
auspices of the B. O. Miners' Liberation League, in the Horse Show build
Ing on Monday night The speakers
spoke strongly against the Imprisonment of the miners convicted ln con-
nectton with the riots on Vancouver
Island last August and to petition the
minister of justice for their release.
The following resolution was carried
amidst great enthusiasm:
Resolution Passed
"In view of the flimsy evidence
upon which many ot the striking
miners on Vancouver Island have
heen sentenced to long terms of Imprisonment, we consider lt savors of
deliberate persecution on the part of
the British Columbia provincial government—Therefore be lt hereby
"Resolved—That this, mass meeting
of citlsens of Vancouver notify the
minister of justloe that further delay
ln the release ot the Imprisoned
miners will be considered a deliberate attempt to override the expressed
wishes of the citizens ot tbe dominion
of Canada, and, once more, we ask
for a definite reply to our peaceful
protests. Wo claim that all the demands ot justice have long since been
fully met and we Insist that all these
minera should eat their Christmas
dinners with their wives and children
as free men."
Invitations had been extended to
Sir Richard McBride, Hon. W. 3.
Bowser and Messrs. Macgowan, Tta-
dall, Watson and Dr. McCuIre; also
to J. H. Hawthornthwalte, The latter
stated that he still hoped to have his
efforts to have the etrlke settled by
arbitration prove successful.
Jack Place, M.P.P., wrote stating
his Inability to be present and trusted
the meeting would be a success.
The Speeches
W. Foxcroft called the meeting to
order. He read letters of non-acceptance to address the meeting from Sir
Richard McBride and Hon. W. Bowser. Mr. Foxcroft then submitted the
evening's list of speakers, and said
that there were now 39 miners In
jail. The Miners' Liberation League
intended to stay In existence until all
the miners were released, (Applause,)
tf. W, Wilkinson was the first speaker on the list. He said that the meeting was to keep alive (he agitation
against the brutal sentences Imposed
upon the miners who have been sent
to jail. He said that now, more than
ever, was It necessary to maintain
the protest because tbe authorities
would hope that after the flrst wave
of Indignation had passed by, the agitation would die down,
He. said, "We are told that the
law Is the law and cannot be changed
or altered to suit varying circumstances, but we have just aeen the
central government of this vainglorious empire let an agitator out of
gaol In Dublin because by keeping
him there they were Injuring their
political prestige. We also aee them
refraining from Interference wtth
Carson, who la organising an armed
revolt for the avowed and definitely
stated purpose of preventing the law
from being enforced; and for just the
same reason—that it would not he
good politics In their opinion to aet
the law machinery to work against
him: "So in spite of the fact that the
minister of justice had said that he
would not be Influenced In hla decision on the mines cases by any protest meetings, yet he was ot the opinion that If only sufflclent publlo agitation could be aroused and maintained, the governing classes of
Canada would have to take notice, because the ministry of justice waa a
political ofllce just as much In thla
country as In England. (Applause.)
At this juncture, preparatory for a
flashlight of those present at the
meeting, a cotton sign waa hung up
bearing the inscription: "To the Minister of Mines and the Solid Five:
Mene, Mene, Tekel Upbarsln." (Thou
art weighed In the balance and found
wanting). Also the live vacant
front chairs on the platform
were each placarded with the
names of "A. H. B. Macgowan,
M.P.P.," "H. H, Watson, M.P.P.,"
"Hon. W. Bowser, attorney-general,"
"Sir Richard McBride," "Dr. 0. A. Mc-
Quire, M.P.P., and "Chas. Tlsdall,
M.P.P." General laughter and applause followed this unique piece of
ridicule.
The flashlight picture being duly
taken, J. Kavanagh of the B. C. Federation of Labor, spoke—pretty well
covering the situation on Vancouver
Island from personal observation. The
miners had got the Justice they received at the hands of the master
class. "This was what you asked for,
but to the oredlt of the minera on
Vancouver Island be lt said, It waa
not what they asked for, because
they had returned their representatives to the legislature," he said,
amidst applause. Judge Howay waited four days for Instructions from the
attorney-general as to what sentences
he should pass on the prisoners.
"The plea of guilty was like putting
your head ln the lion's mouth so far
as being asB-ired of justice or mercy
from a biased judge." Mr. Kavanagh
explained In detail the dynamite explosion and the calling out of the
mllltla. He convinced hla hearers
that the minera were not to blame In
the affair, and said that no man of
any principle would act as a special
policeman. The question of using
special police and troops waa   just
CHRISTIAN SIVERTZ, of Victoria, B. C.
. C. Federation of Labor, Whloh Convenes at New Westminster on
January 28th.
commenced In tbls province. The
mllltla on the Island went around
with "golden wings," bue were an.
gels as compared with the "specials."
The conditions prevailing at Nanalmo
and Ladysmlth were sufflclent to
cause anyone to become riotous (Applause.)
Geo. Pettigrew, of .the U.M.W. of
A., referred to Sir Richard's reasons
for not appearing on tbe platform.
The provincial press reported his version of the Btrike story to his (Sir
Richard's) satisfaction, but it did not
report the facts so far as the miners
were concerned. Sir Richard made
tbe statement that the trouble waa
only a question ot recognition of the
union. In this regard "he lied and
deliberately lied." With the expectation of seeing him and Bowser and
to let them know that It was the dangerous gases ln the mine that waa
the real cause ot the trouble, a flreboss was present ln the audience prepared to tell the actual facts of the
case, and that the provisions of the
Coal Mines Regulation Act were not
carried out hy the government. The
speaker dealt at length on the question of "big" and "little1' unlona on
the Island. A purely lofcal body could
not successfully cope with the mine
owners, and so the miners became
members of an International organ!,
ration, namely, the United Mine
Workers of America, Both coal Companies will ultimately recognise International unionism. The apy system was ln existence on Vancouver
Island, and was the most perfect one
ln existence on tbe continent The
men will not go back to work until
the strike was settled. The people
should own the mines and workshopa
and so work them tor the benefit of
themselves,   (Applause.)
B.   T. Kingsley,   of the   Socialist
Party of Canada, said  It was not
much   good   to   protest  so  far   aa
getting    the    dominant    claas    to
change   Its   mind   was    concerned.
Such   treatment   dealt   out   to   the
minera had  been dealt out to the
slave class of old.   A movement ot
this kind will not down. He hoped that
the working class would arise some
day and knock the "block" off every
ruler that lived.   The mllltla   and
police are the counterpart of the slave
claas.    Slavery and militancy were
born together and lived together all
down the pages of history.    He held
no  brief for Bowser and  McBride.
They hare been tried ln the balance
and found no wanting, for they represented the ruling claas.   A mistake was made by electing them. The
two classes have nothing ln common.
He compared the "working plug" to
a balking horse.  When he refused to
do hla master's bidding he was beat
up and locked up In Jail for Intimidation and various other charges. The
speaker had been mixed up In many
etrikes.   Corporation toola and thugs
were always  on hand  to  auppress
slaves In rebellion.   The ruling class
had always humbugged the workers.
People on the outside of tha working
class were becoming disgusted with
the mllltla.   "We   can't  get  along
without the miner, but we can without the other fellows," he said. There
were many who heard him that did
not know where to get the next meal.
He referred to the state of trade,
and Instanced a case where the telephone company had  complained of
a man who had heen in business 15
years jumping without paying bis bill,
and added that "things were going
on the bum," (Laughter.) The end of
the modern system of production was
a reasonable distance of ending. (Applause.)
Sam Atkinson, ot the Social-Demo-
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B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Room S17 Labor Temple
Vancouver -       B.C.
oratlo party, spoke briefly. The
miners on Vancouver Island had done
the right thing politically. The work
of the Minera' Liberation League waa
to. bring the workers together. If the
protest continues the working class
would aoon be tn power ln Britlah
Columbia.
Mrs. Hutchinson, of Nanalmo, repeated the statement the flreboss at
Extension mine had made to her the
day before the men went on atrlke, to
the effect that It waa on account of
the gas danger, He told her that If
he had done his duty he would
lose his papers. (Applause.)
A voice—Did he lose them?
A male voice ln reply—No; he
scabbed.
Parker Williams, M.P.P., received
a rousing reception. He created a
ripple of applause when he told the
audience that he must address them
standing ln front ot the five placarded chairs, as he had faced thoae
gentlemen bo long aa the legislature.
If there were more working men In
the legislature there would have been
no miners' trouble, If live had been
elected In Vancouver, there would
have been, no etrlke. "Vou cry of the
price of coal; I wish you had to
pay |40 a ton, and then you would
send your own class of representatives to Victoria," aald Mr. Williams
amidst applause, Had the Investigation aB asked for been made, the position of one party or the other would
have been untenable. They had been
willing that Miller of Orand Forks,
Place of Nanalmo and Tlsdall ot Vancouver should be appointed on that
committee. The five Vancouver members had voted against the proposition. Why are we unable to get a
ministry to perform the service he Is
paid for. For live years the conservative party bad been busy building
up a machine ln this province. Not
one statute of consequence today regarding the mines and timber was
enforced. The sum of $17,000,000 was
spent to administer the affairs of
400,000 people. Half of that sum was
spent on the spoils system. The conservative machine held a whip over
the merchant. It held a mortgage on
the life of the farmer, because he depended on the building of roads. Tou
can't get a Job on a road until the
last available conservative waa at
work. This waa not so In Ladysmlth,
however. The conservative party
bad smothered, or murdered, or
dabbed to death all opposition In
this province—except Ladysmlth and
Nanalmo, where the people were dominated by the mine owners. Coal
miners were the only ones who refused to bow the knee to conservative
rule at Cumberland and Fernle. Mackenzie and Mann	
A voice—BUI and Dan,
Mr. Williams—Tes; Dan was the
man with the nerve of an ox, They
succeeded In capitalising a scheme to
build a railroad for $100,000 a mile,
when It really only cost 150,000. The
difference In this amount that went
to Mackenzie and Mann was between
$12,000,000 and $15,000,000 lying loose.
They have made that. The McBride
administration Joined with Mann and
Mackenzie to do up the people. Their
road will dominate the Industrial
classes of thla province. Should McBride seek safety? Should he set on
Donald Mann or should he turn the
miners down? "He decided to let the
Coal Mines Regulation act go to
hell," notwithstanding we hold the
record of deaths In the mines. (Applause.) McBride was ashamed that
the senate would not agree to contribute to the navy. If there was
anything he should be ashamed of It
was his method of handling the coal
mines. It Is action that the miners
need, not sympathy. He stated the
case of his own son who had
been convicted wltb the striking
miners. After referring to the men
and their characters who were ln jail,
especially mentioning the names of
Outhrle, and Taylor, he resumed his
seat amidst applause.
R. Qosden, of the I. W. W., was
the last speaker. He said tbat by
the end of the year they would have
exhausted every reasonable and
peaceful appeal which would be made
to free the prisoners. Other tactics
would then be assumed. If McBride
or any of his gong went hunting they
would be foolish, or If they were wise
they would get some "sucker" to
taste their coffee before they drank
It If the men were not liberated
they would see to It that the cost of
property would mean a million dollars a week while the men were kept
ln jail.
The resolution waa then put and
carried with a roar ot "Ayes."
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Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
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DRESSING ROBES FROM 17 to 115
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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT.
. DECEMBER II, Ull.
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DIRECTORS: Jaa. Campbell, praaldant;
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Subscriptions 91.(0 pel-yur; In Vancouver
City. 12.00; to unlona aubscrlblng
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"Pnlty or Labor; ihe hope of tha world."
FRIDAY  .DECEMBER  12,  1913.
THE COST OF LIVING
The horrible conditions existing tn
some occupations in Free Trade England, as disclosed by the Duchesa of
Marlborough, seem to constitute an
effective answer to those who would
make conditions easier for the work'
ing class by lowering (he tariff. It
is upon the wage-worker that the
"high cost of living" most heavily
bears. But the, question is pure relative. If an upward shifting of the price
level Includes wages, the cost of living has not been accentuated, If,
however, prices rise and wages remain stationary, or if prices are
quiescent and wages decline, the
worker's living has been adversely
affected.
The Free Trader argues that free
trade means sharper competition,
consequent lower prices, and better
timeB, He usually saya little about
wages. The tariff advocate, on his
side, haa more to say about wages,
and less about prices. He Is much
concerned lest any Interference with
the tariff ahould result ln "the products of cheap foreign labor" bringing about a reduction of wagea at
home, Hla concern rarely extenda Itself ln any practical way to those
workers who may happen to be attempting to bear out his conclusions
by striving for an Increase in their
wages.
Wage-workers who have travelled
at all know that even a slight knowledge of world-wide condltlona Is sufficient to throw the whole tariff
question out of court The cost ot
living problem is soluble for labor
only ln one way, vis., by collective
bargaining for the sale ot labor-
power, organisation. Only the better
organised trades have been able to
follow the upward trend of prices
with Increases In wagee; And thla
la true everywhere, tariff or no tariff.
. Unlike the prices of ordinary commodities, any ohenge ln wages, the
price of labor-power, takes the form
of a conscious, and generally, bitter
struggle between buyer and seller.
Sometimes there Is no struggle. In
the case of the unorganised worker,
a cut ln wages or a rise In prices
brings only a private protest—he ean
merely submit and sink a peg lower
beneath the standard of living.
It la quite possible for wagea to
sink much below the eost ot the worker's maintenance according to the
prevailing ldeaa of wbat constitutes
maintenance. Five cent meals may
keep the heart beating in a prisoner,
or help a worker to cheat the under
taker, but they do not provide a
"living,"
Tbe tendency ot capitalists every-
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where Is to force wagea to the point
where a scientific analysis la necessary to determine whether the worker
la receiving enough nutritive elements to continue in existence. This
tendency can be met only by organization. If the workers ot Oreat
Britain were properly organized there
would ue no material for duchesses
to display. It the workers of Canada
do not organise and stay organised,
there will soon bo material for "exhibits" here.  And plenty of lt
JIM LARKIN
Being acquainted with the dally
news service from Oreat Britain, we
hesitate to swallow all that It tells us
about James Larkln's "Fiery Cross"
campaign. It Is conceivable, however,
that the Dublin strike leader, hot from
the acene ot the conflict, and atlll
smarting from his sixteen days ln
prison, may have been extravagant ln
some ot his remarks. Small blame to
him! But if he, as reports have It,
endeavored to cause disruption In
trade' union ranks and Institute a revolt against tbe union leaden ln En'
gland, then he should get baek to
Dublin quickly and confine himself
strictly to bualneaa before he makes
an ass of himself.
When Larkin wu thrown Into gaol,
British trade unionists rose to a man,
officials Included, and demanded hla
release. As a direct result of the
storm of protest thus created, Larkin
walked forth free after having served
sixteen days of hla seven months' sentence.
Further, the British trade unionists
are unanimous ln their support of the
Irish transport workers, a eupport
that has taken the somewhat substantial form of bver a quarter ot a
million dollara. Thla ia the kind ot
help tbat counts. It destroys tho he-
loved weapon with whloh Murphy and
his ploua assistant, the Archbishop of
Dublin, hoped to crush the workers.
Tbat weapon la starvation. When the
good Catholic archbishop refused to
allow the strikers' children to be sent
to England for proper care, the organised workera who had made the offer
replied "Very well, we shall feed tbem
where they are. We shall not allow
your solicitude tor their souls to take
the form of freeing tbem from the
little starved bodies."
With auch assistance, better times
are In store for the Dublin workers.
It Is not at all unlikely that "Larkln's campaign" Is being conducted
by the unionist press, whloh hopes
that lt haa an opportunity to attack
the, government through the labor
party. Some of Larkln'a Justly heated
remarks are no doubt seised upon and
exaggerated until they are the proper else for political exploitation.
Anyway, real or counterfeit "Lark-
Intern" doee not appear to be succeeding and the transport strike doea, ao
there la email cause for alarm,
BLOOD AND PIRE
The Saivatlon Army la heart and
soul ln the light for the abolition of
tbe liquor traffic. Who can but admire the courage of those Army
lasses who enter foul saloons and take
up collections from men so Intoxicated that they would he generous toward anybody or anything?
One might almost wish the Army
speedy auccesa In lta great light, If,
thereby, having accomplished lta objeot, it would cease to exist But
there seems little hope, the methods
employed do not promise any early
disappearance of the great religious
body in this way.
The war upon the drink evil la
waged by the Salvation Army In a
peculiar way. It worka to reform the
individual soul and turn hla footatepa
from the broad highway to hell. In
other words, It picks up unfortunate
drunkards from the gutter, sobers
them up and sets them to labor In
the Lord's vineyard, or, to be more
exact, In the Army's Industrial Department Here the reformed one
flnda that virtue is Its only reward.
The products ot the debarment are,
however, sold on the open market In
competition with the products of labor
steeped ln fairly decent wages, and,
necessarily, wickedness.
This competition causes, o( course,
some slight lessening of the demand
for deoently-patd labor and somebody
is thrown out of employment The
chancea are this person, having nothing else to do, will Imbibe aome of
the vile acids, misnamed Intoxicating
beverages, reserved in some places
for men of small means, and, lacking
attendants or friends to place him
comfortably to bed to recover, will
fall Into the gutter and be reclaimed
by the Army to be set to work In the
department eto,
Thus the Army haa discovered the
secret of perpetual youth. There oan
be no danger of It ever eliminating
Itself, It gathers strength each day
to carry on the war. It has also discovered a magic war-chest In the
place of every dollar taken out, two
more appear.
BOWSER AND "THE INTERESTS"
It will be remembered that during
the unfoldment of tbe Bowser-
McBride "railway policy," during the
last provincial election campaign, the
eleotors were assured that the C. N.
R. (Mackensle and Mann) bonda
guarantee would never cost the public
treasury a cent, although millions of
dollara ot the country's credit were
pledged to the schemes of Sirs Bill
and Dan, Sir Richard's little launt
to the old country recently, however,
has brought to light a number of circumstances which go to show that
Mr. Bowser Is confronted with the
problem of making good the Interest
on the bonds floated by Sirs Bill sod
Dan,   Not only that, but the railway
magnates ere said to be returning to
the Capital City for more swag. Now,
let us see, Bowaer haa been Intimately associated with Sirs Bill and DaDn
In railway matters. The same Interests control the coal mines at Cumberland, Can It be that Bowser haa
his tall In a crack and Is In the
game so far that he cannot do anything to settle the Btrike on Vancouver Island? So far as bankrupting
the province, to meet obligations to
railway companies, Is concerned, The
Federatlonist submits that It will
make little difference to wage-workers. But Insofar aa lt affects, or haa
a bearing on, the coal atrlke situation,
it must needs concern tbe members
of organised labor. If the "Interests"
behind Mr. Bowser have beoome so
powerful In this province tbat the pro
vlnclal executive council Is no longer
free to step In and settle a strike ot
suoh far-reaching Importance to every
resident ot B. C„ aa that on Vancouver Island, surely It la time a little
more light waa shed on the subject.
NOT SO BADLY INFORMED
If Tom Richardson, M.P,, carried
away serious misinformation as to
the true status of affairs on Vanoouver Inland, the fault la not far to seek.
Certainly Mr. Richardson waa diligent
enough ln hla search for correct Information;, and, so far from endeavor
Ing to prejudice hla mind, the union
men and officials who entertained him
while on the coast, made every effort
to pilot him to points where Information could' be secured first-hand.
One of these points was the Nanalmo gaol, Mr, Richardson was there
refused admittance, being told In effect that nobody would be allowed In
who might possibly make publlo what
he learned there. If an enquirer, then,
le denied official Information tor the
reaaon that it will not atand publicity,
can he be blamed for accepting that
whloh comes from other sources? And
whose fault would lt be If be should
happen to be misinformed?
As a matter of fact Mr. Tom Richardson came here with hla eyes open
and gathered enough of the truth to
raise quite a stir ln the local conservative camp when he tells bis story
In England, Aa to whether he Is correct or not ln stating that the mllltla
broke up the famoua meeting at the
Nanalmo drill hall, Instead of waiting
until lt came to an end In due and regular course, this la a labored quibble,
suitable only aa solace for the harried
tory mind. The fact remains that the
militiamen were there ready and apparently willing to shoot unarmed, defenceless and ambushed men.
Whether they waited two, twenty, or
two hundred minutes le a matter of
none hut the mentally meaneat hair-
splitters' concern.
SIGNS
Ae the chill sephyr and the anow
flurry herald the approach of winter,
so doea the suppression of segregated
vice give warning of the approach of
the olvlo elections. With the regularity ot the harvest festival and the
winter soltlce, each brothel-keeper doing business In our good city of Vanoouver la annually brought before the
bar of Justice and there called upon
to deliver np a certain portion of the
year's proceeds.
That the olty'a coffers are thus replenished Is due to the reform vote,
whloh la always threatening and always unreasonable. The one redeeming feature about our looal reform
vote la Its sense of humor. It pops
out about Hallowe'en like a huge Jaok-
o'-lantern and scares the civic administration Into fits, which fits take the
form of frantic raids on the restricted
area, followed by a number ot prosecutions. The bugaboo and the spasms
usually laat until the elections are
over, then both disappear for the auo-
oeedlng ten months.
Oreat IS the reform votei May It
aome day get everything lt wants so
that lt will flnd out what tt was after,
and do otherwise.
Sometlmea even tbe slimy back-
capper Is compelled to come out Into
the open.
There Isn't a madam ln Canada who
works as hard for the money received
aa the editor of the Nanalmo Herald,
The annual bargain day, when all
the eentlmentallsm of Chrlstn.ast.de
la commercialised, Is once more approaching.
The Vernon Newa seems to hare no
difficulty In breaking post offlce regulations whloh are rigidly enforced In
Vancouver,
The officer of a trade union who te
compelled to live on 'the movement
sometimes uses his tongue oftener
than his ears—hence aqueeses his
brains dry,
One of the foremost advantages of
Vancouver's Lahor Temple, and
phone exchange la that a meeting of
twenty business agents can be summoned In less than fifteen minutes,
when occasion demands,
The pious old hypocrite who doei
the editorial work for 3. Songhees
Matson on the News-Ad. says there la
lots of work in B. C. for any man able
to work, Such criminal falsehoods,
at the time when workingmen, ln
many oases, are selling their furniture to buy food for babies, are quite
In keeping with the ethics of the owner, a fitting slde-klcker of Bowser and
McBride,
Would to Ood thst this hot and
bloody struggle waa over, and that
peace may come at laat to the world!
And yet I Invoke no seeming peace
that the weaker may ever anon be
plundered, but a peace with liberty,
equality, and honeat man'a and not
robber's order for Its condition, . . .
Let others give aid and comfort to
despots. Be It ours tostand for liberty
and Justice, nor fear to lock arms with
those who are called hot-heads and
demagogues, when the good cause re-
quires.—Chaa, A. Dans.
The Criminal's Apology
Oh, yea, I'm guilty, right enough;
It ain't no use to throw a bluff,
An' yet, I guess, Society
Kin share tbe guilt along o' me!
I ain't the kind to weep an' whine,
But say—wot chance, wot chance waa
mine?
Born ln a dirty, reeking slum
Where decent sunlight never come,
An' starved for food an' starved for
air
Through all my  years  of boyhood
there,
While evil things an* low an' mean
Was nearly all the life I seen.
Of course, I growed to be a tough,
A hoodlum and a bad young rough!
But, even then, I might uv been
Reformed to be some use to men
If every time I left the trail
They didn't slam me Into Jail
Where thieves an' all that rotten crew
Would teach me worse than all I
knew.
Ob, yes, I'm guilty; tbat Is clear,
But every guy who's llstenln' here
An' all you swells an' goodly folks
Who sniffs at men an* such-like blokes
Is guilty, too—along o' me
An' will be till the world Is free
Of stlnkln' slums an' rotten holea
That poison people's hearts an' souls
An' cheats 'em from their very birth
From any decent chance on earth,
I ain't the kind to weep an' whine,
But, say, wot chance—wot chance was
mine?
i-BERTON BRALBT.
Do nothing to others which you
would not have them do to you. Now
I cannot see how, on this principle,
one man is outhorized to say to another, Believe what I believe, and
wbat you cannot, or you ahall be put
to death. And yet this said In direct
terms tn Portugal, Spain, and at Goa.
In some other countries, Indeed, they
now content themselves with saying
only, Believe aa I do, or I shall hate
you, and will do you all the mischief
in my power. What an ImplouB mon-
ater thou art! Not to be of my religion la to be of none.' Tou ought to
be held ln abhorrence by your neighbors, your countrymen, and by all
mankind.—Voltaire.
The Federatlonist will pay two-bits
each for four copies of February 6,
1913.   Needed for files.
VANCOUVER REALTY A
BUSINESS EXCHANGE
We Sell and Exchange
Housee, Lots, Homssltee, Acreage, Fruit and Chicken Farms,
Hotele, Cafes, Rooming Houaea,
Ratall Stores, Livery Stables,
Saw Mills, Shingle Mills, Grain
Elevators,   Boats, Automobiles,
Loana and  Insurance.
401   HOLDEN   BUILDING
1S Haatinge St E.
City Auction and Commission Company
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auotlon arranged,
Satisfaction guaranteed,    prompt
Battlements. _____
AxtTxfUB *s. matottLttt
Auctioneer. Say. SOTS
FORBES 4 VAN HORNE LTD.
Importere of
TOOLS
and Pine Cutlery
114 CORDOVA ST. WEST
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FITHIRSTONHAUOH  i CO.
Tha Old tatabllahed Firm of
PATINT ATTORNEYS
ISS0 Rogera Bldg., Qranvllls Street
City. Phone Soymour 9799.
Coo. E. MeCraesoa A. M. Hsraer-
McCrossan & Harper
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Office 32-M lavettel Block
SM reader St, W.    Vaacaenr, I. C.
B.G. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED
$1.00 A MONTH
B. C FEDERATION OF LABOR—
- Meet* ln annus, convention In January. Executive ouicera. 1813-14: President, Christian Slverti; vlce-preildents,
J. Kavanagh, Jf Ferris, A. Watchmaivfl.
A, Burnee, J, W. Oray, jaa. Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; sec-treas., V. R. Midgley,
B»x 1044. Vancouver.
TRAl'EB AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrst and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H. C. Benson, preeldent: Jas. H. McVety, vice-president; J.
W. Wilkinson, general secretary, Room
210 Labor Temple; Jas. Campbell, treasurer; Miss Brisbane, statistician; V. R,
Mldgley, sergeant-at-arms: R. P. Pettlplece, J. H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE) COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover. J. H.
MoVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell, J, W. Wilkinson, R, P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manag-
Ing director. J.  H,  McVety,  Room 211.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES  COUNCIL—Meets 2nd Monday In month.
President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary, F. R
Fleming, P.O. Box 61.
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners—Room f99,
Sey, 2908. Business agent J. A. Key;
office houn, 8 to I a.m. and 4 to I p.m.
Secretary of management committee.
Jas. Bltcon, 873 Hornby street. Branches
meet every Tuesday and Wednesday In
Room 802
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 817—Meets
Monday of each week, I p.m. Executive
oommlttee meeta every Friday. I p.m.
President, Ed. Meek; recording secre-
tary, Thos, Lindsay, SOB Labor Temple; flnanclal secretary, W. Leonard, 101
: Labor Temple.	
BAKERS' AND CONFEC-
tloners" Loul No. 48—
Meets seoond ' and fourth
Saturdays, 7:80 p.m. Preu-
Ider\ A. M. MacCurrah;
corresponding secretary, W
Rogers; Business Agent, J.
Black. Room 820. Labor Temple.
BARBERS' LOCAL. NO. 180—MEETS
second and fourth Thursday*, 8:80
p.m. President, Sam. T. Hamilton: recorder. Oeo, W. Isaacs: secretary-business agent, c F. Burkhart Room 201.
Labor Temple. Hours: 11 to l; 6 to 7
p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 07I.—OF-
(Ice Room 208 Lsbor Temple. Meets
flrst Sunday of eaoh month. President,
Wm. Laurie: financial secretary. Oeo. W.
Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple.
BRIDGE AND STRUCT TTRAL IRON
WORKERS' International Union,
Oocal 97—Meets second and fourth Frl-
lay. Labor Temple. 8 p.m. President
r. A. Seetey: secretary, A. W. Oakley.
788 ffemlln Drive, phons Sey. 889,
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Meets every Tuesday, 8 p.m., Room
807, President James Haslett: corresponding secretary. W. 8. Dagnall, Box
BS; flnanclal secretary, F. R, Brown;
business agent W, 8. Dagrall. Room
315,
BOOKBINDERS' LOOAL UNION NO.
10R—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, tn Room 208 Labor Temple.
President V. J. Milne: vice-president H.
Perry: secretary. George Mowat 111
Onntevy avenue.
MOVING PICTURE? OPERATORS, Local 238, I.A.T.&E.—Meetb every seoond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President. J. H. Fletcher;
secretary-treasurer, A. O. Hanson; business agent G. R. Hamilton. Office:
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tol. Say. 1041.
MUSICIANS* MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
. Union, Local No. 141, A. F. of U-Z
Meets second Sunday of each month, 141
Hobson street President, j Bowver*
vice-president F. English? aeerstary, fi
P. Howett; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No, 88—
Meets flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brlea
Hall, 8 p.m. President, G. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal secretary, D. Scott; treasurer, L Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phono
Sey, 1614.
PATTERN     MAKERS'     LEAGUE    61
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver OAA
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st„ room 208. Robert C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph o,
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1721 Grant st; Ton
Smith, Rec. Sec.. 148 Broadway west
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, S:0f
p.m. President, J. Marshall; corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
flnanclal secretary, K. McKensle.
PAINTERS'. PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Moot over/
Thursday. 7:10 p.m. President J, ML
Phillips; flnanolal secretary, J, Froekel-
ton, 111 Seymour St; recording secretary, George Powell, 1810 Fourth Ave.
W.; business agent, W. J. Nam Room
803, Labor Templo.
aTElWTVPWilS' AND ELECTROTYP-
ers' Union, No, 88, of Vaneouvar
and Victoria—MeeU second Wednesday.
of eaoh month, 4 p,m.. Labor Templo.
President, Chas. Bayley; recording seoretary, Chris Homewood, 348 llth Ava.
Bas*.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAT
Employees. Pioneer Division No, 101
—Meets Labor Tomple, second and
fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and flrst
and third Wednesdays, I p.m. President
Adam Taylor: recording secretary,
Albert V. Lofting. 2188 Trinity Street,
phono Highland 1872: flnanolal secretary,
Fred, A. Hoover, 8401 Clerk Drive,
STEAM  ENGINEERS,  INTERNA TION-
al Looal 897—Meets every Wednesday, 8 p. m.; Room 304. Labor Templo,
Financial   secretary,    E.    Prendergut,
TAILORS.   JOURNEYMAN   TAILORS'
UNION OF AMERICA, Local No.l7|
—Meetings held flrst Tuesday In each
month, 8, u.m. Preaident, J. T. Ellsworth; recording and corresponding secretary, C. McDonald, Box 80S; flnanolal
secretary, L. Wakely, P.O. Box 803.
TILE LAYERS' AND HELPERS', LO-
cal No, 82—MeeU flrst and third
Wednesdays each month, I p.m. President, J. Kavanagh; secreUry, A. Jamie-
son. 84 Fifth Ave, East
BROTHFTWOnp OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Hrtner*
nf America. Vsncouver Lodge No. lit—
Meet* first nnd third Mondays. 9 p.m.
President F. Barclay. H9 Cordova East:
secretary, A. Fraser. 11B1 Howe Street
OIGARMAKERH' LOOAL, NO. 887—
M*>pts flrst Tuesday each month, 8
n.m, President Geo. Oerrsrd: seeretsry.
Robert J Craig. Kurts Clgsr Factory:
true surer. H. W. Johnson,
COOKS'. WAITERS* AND WAITRESSES'
TTnlon.—Meets first Friday In each
month, 8:80 p.m.. Labor Temple. W. E,
Wslker. business rfprenentetlve. Olflrs:
Rnnm 208, Lsbor Temple. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10:3ft; 1 p.m. tn 2:80 and B p.m. to 8:11
n.m. Cnmnst*>nt heln furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
COMMERCIAL imttOltAPffRRfl*.
RrtH«h Columbia Division. C. P. Bv*.
tem. TWvMnn No. 1—Mmts 11:80 a.m.
third Sundsv In month, Room 204. Local
chairman. T. O'Connor. P. O. Box 481,
Vancouver. Local secty. and treas.,
H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 481, Vancouver.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. r/>OAL NO
f18.—Meets Room 801. every Mondav
» p.m. president. Fred. Fuller: vlcs-
nresldsnt D. Fink: recnrdlnr secretary,
Roy tflrsr, Labor Temple: flnanclsl sec-
rctsrv. E, C. Knight: treasurer. George
Hesssll: business asent W, F. Dunn,
Room 807. Lahn> Temple.
KJT.FPTRTfAT, WORKER*, LOCAL NO
871 fTnslde Men)—Meets flrst end
third Mondsvs nf escb month. Rnnm 2*8.
•* n.m. President H. p. McCoy; recording secretary. Geo. Albers; business
agent F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207.'
LONOPHOBFMFJNS' TNTHmNATTOWAL
ABHACTATTON. No.  88 T 88—Meets
nvarv Frldsv evening. 148 Alevenfl*f St
President P. Peel: aeeretary. Geo, Thorn-
MACmVTSTB'. NO, 188—MEETS flEC
nnd end fourth Thursdays, 7:18 n.m
PrMtdwtt. chas. Mattlnsnn: recording
•-ap-ctfirv ,T Brookes; flnanclal secretary.
T. H. McVoty.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. Ferteratlonist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operate, by the latest, met scientific and painlu. method.
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS,9 A.M. TO 6 P.M.
Honest and Artlstlo
Dentistry
The most scientific and
up-tfrdate methods
DR. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
•   301 DOMINION TRUST BLDG,
Open (rom 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
RING UP SEYMOUR 2354 FOR APPOINTMENT
SYSTEMS
We carry everything
  for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
' LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Duaamuir Stmt
Phone Exchange Sey. 3526-3527
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
Thie la a gift that'will be appreciated in any part of the world.
Tastefully bound In three bindlnga.   Cloth, (U.50- Ooae Calf, |8.W;
Burnt Leather, |9.7J.
THB ONLY EDITION WITH SIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
328 HASTINGS STRUT, WEST
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 919—
Meeta laat Sundav eaoh month, S
p.m. President A. E. Robb; vlce-prealdent, A. H. England: aecretary-treaaurer.
R. ft Neelanda, P.O. Boa 99.
NEw'wEsfMINMER^TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meeta every s.cond
and fourth Wedneaday at 9 _p.m„ la
Labor Hall. President, D. S. Cameron!
Snanolal secretary, H. Olbb; leneral
secretary. B. D. Orant P. O. Box 994.
The publlo Is Invited to attend.
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY Or CAJC
PENTERS AND JOINERS meeta every
second and fourth Thuraday Of aeon
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St, at 9 am. Prodi
dent 3. L. Hogg, Hankoy Blk., Sapper*
ton; Secretary, A. McDonald, 991 Royal
Ave., New Westmlnater.
PLUVBERS' and STEAMrlTTERS' Local 498—Meeta every seoond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:90 p.m. President. D. Webster; eecro-
tary, A. McLaren, P.O. Bos 999, Now
Westminster, B. C
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OP CAR-
pentere, Local Union No. 1999—
Meets ovary Monday, 9 p.ro„ Labor Tom*
pie, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street President, It. C. Schmendt; secretary. A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westmlnater, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 794—MtiEf 8 IN
Labor Temple, Now Weatmlnster, cor-,
ner Seventh street and Royal avanua
[every second Sunday of each month, SI
t :S0 p. m. President E. 8. Hunt: secretary. F. w. Jameson. Visiting brothara
Invited.
TICTOBta, B. e.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets Srat and third Wedneaday, Labor Hall, 791 Johnson atreet,
at 9 p.m. President A, Watchman, seoretary, '. H. Norrls, Labor Hall, Vlotoria. B.C.
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Jolnera—Meets Ovary Tutaday,
9 p.m.. at Labor hall, 791 Johnston St
Preaident J. E. Bryan; recording seoretary, Oeo. L. Dykeman; bualneaa a»nt
.„,, at....,., .—  —  j_ parkla-
"■*»_-™«   a*   ugaaaanwta
and Snanolal aeoretary,
«on. Boa 999.
 UMOSaS.
KIMBERLET MINERS' UNION. NO. 199
Western Federation of Miner* -
Meata Sunday evenlnia, In Union Halt
President W. Fleming; aecretary-treaaurer. M. P. Vllleneuva, Klmberley 8.0,
LADTSMTTH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 9999. U. M. W. of A.—Meets
Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m.   President Sam Outhrle:  secretary, Dunaaa
McKenale. Ladysm'th. B. C.	
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.Of A.
—Meata every Monday at 7:90 p.m. la
the Athlotlo Club. Chapel Stiwt Arthur
Jordan, Boa 410, Nanlamo, B, 0.	
'l'M""m,»Nr> LOCAL UNION, No.
9999. U. M. W. of A.—Meeta every
Sunday 7 p.m., In U. M. W, of A. hall
President .Tos. Nsvlnr: serrolsry, Jamea
Smith, Box 94, Cumberland, B. C.
..........  ..»,«.   ■*,  ^.aaaaawrawia,  P.  M,
TRAIL   MILL   AND   RMELTRRMEN'S
Union, No. 199, W. F. of M.—Meata
every Monday at 7:90 p.m.   President, .
F. W. P.rrln: swrelarv. Frank Camp-
hell. Box 99. Trail, B. C.
LOCAL     VANCOUVER     OF     SOCIAL
DEMOCRATIC  PARTY  - Publlo
meetings In Dominion Theatre, Oranvllle
Street, Sunday eevnlnao.    Seoretary, J,
Artems.  Rrtom »04.  Lsha>r TrniDle
wrnorta or ooai sasrao raaa-
KATIOn.
Coal mining righto of th. Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Provinoe
of British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of ll an acre. Not more than
9,949 acres will ha leaaed to one applicant.
Application for lease muat ba made by
the applicant ln person to tho Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which tho
rlghta applied for are situated.
in aurveVed territory the land must ba
daaorlbed by sections, or legal aubdlvla-
lona of notions, and In unaurv.y«d territory tha tract applied for shall -he
atakod by tha applicant himself.
Eaoh application muat bo accompanied
by a fee of II. whloh will ba refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwlae. A royalty ahall ba
paid on the merchantable output of tha
mine at the rata of Svo centa par ton.
The peraon operating tha mine shall
furnish th. Agent with sworn returna
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay tha royalty thereon. If the coat mining rlghta
are not being operated, auch returna
ahould be furnished at leaat onoe a year,
The leaat will Include the coal mining
rights only, but tha leasee may ba permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for the working of tha mint at tht
rata of 110 an acre.
For full Information application
should be made to tha Secretary of tht
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Landa.
W H CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
■N.   B.—Unauthorised   publication   of
this advertisement will not h» nald for.
Union
MADE
Beer
lie
AND
Porter
Of America  *•***}-?'
tatmm stwoi mmksisistssib isos \
■■•'••'•'•wws-SSi^^ IWDATv,..,.|||^|<^f*^.j^||
™5^«i^mi^^l
•Hhimm-eei' (ea will tajwfk^sjk
Slain**) and lend'fPaeniits *-ei*nsl*
■j.'eatei ♦gBtrelled'-■Wm ataSlt,.path
'" lend, Spekae* S« Frenolsee, Chll*.
so, Ntw Yorkj alao London, Berlin,
Parle and other Bure^an otntrta ef.
Usenet,
- Tht Io«|oln» Hat inoladtt only a
■, tmau portion of- l-a.vtat. ereae- asek
«Hoteira aw toMlnj tor hujker
Wless. hy wfelek to wrnif from nv
Mtpns ttttttre "-vreevtaf* from thtlr
t Is •inUoant to note the eebter-
,__ip«. which Some of the etove retort to Mrttt&it siieniiSf ttSirkoW-
'; Inrii-**.' "J. G.' jehhston ef Vlttofla
M a^ttt half ^olHiha tax hotleea tent
to tht Smsrett hoUl and tht otter
I to tht Union <*»h, o^raaeoienOy
the aaiesaor nor pereone as-
.- jaa.-Hi.', searehlm tts'.'SssssS-^
;:roUs,':e^;/:hs':^-.'« i'«.
ba owns lit oomMssi sress, et
wileh »4» *^ii|s a^sd totte
'r.*aaWmi^aW^^t^*>:-~- —*■
<elsb," jssMsa thsy know him,  or
- gjee the oomStaed chow* when re-
Similarly, ■***. M. Battenbury, tba
areklteet far the tdvenment kslM-
, It* aV yletorla, has otWM**MMs.
tax notices eent to Vlotoria, whets he
c?|stsW''*'As a ■_i»^:imM''mi;aA<i
Usee are Seat to him onre of Traitor*
Hatlaon ot Beattle, the worhera of
the provinoe now paying hla esmmls-
alos on the-aam'Jgovtrnmtnt baHd-
m(L hart ttt rt*fttto athwhy his
tax notlota ere bsfet tent to ttat tor
aad what haa heeomS
" i'''h*wFst«td,i»
y tlons ttt
l^^pistU reaei(5f
"—. wnloh the eleotort
&*_&&
i oontrtrafsseh
rfsMi-re-
_       Mkaammm
-tyttvhical m^WW*.,**' «v&-
■OVStUSehtT'"•'• ;'J   ■:..'.■:-':,■-".'.':*..
-Hsw^'Uirfto *>«*dto tht Nstsss s»
At the time ansnttmtata were heist made to (ortatall tettlere ahtof
tu tt T. P. route, Ave jreara ago, the
writer' *ae naked to Join the party
thto htlnf secretly arraa|td to tub-
rati: tt* ■ blrtbrliU'.Cot sstttes, and
was: astounded oh learning tha kra-
saa, wholetale mannar In whloh that
plllait of pubU*- landa waa bthtf
esrrled out, to the permanent Injury
e< preeent wertw^ tstute eettlert
ssd nnvlnehil wslfarea
A contributor to The Ftderadoolat
e*Ms: "The party's etskera,' who ta-
vtUd me, were living at the Emprtat
..„. hotel, Victoria, after their previous
ataahn't exploitation. Mr being new
to British Columbia lsd me to toiler
that their expedlUon waa a rartsS,
bat iwstnt lsvsstlcstlon oonvtooed sie
thoae aehemee were only ohs of Be
many troupe atanlted by Snsanlesi
latent upon plusdering provlnolal r>
soueeee.  My thon pooUion "   -
*,. Ltd Theee Sotttwt
to think that I was 'on ths InsMt
traoky and ss Istsut aa they upon
gntplsg wealth by publlo plunder.
Meyi,were, mistaken, however, ae I
it honest fovarnmtnt «*»
i the mott tatrfttlo oen-
^empire. Coneeqnently
they INtWf explained thtlr eyatem
to me, vrtfll the eaturance that I
oould by Jolnlnt ttelr ayndloate make
toorta ot thouaanda el dollars; so
with febptd reluetonoe their pK*
fered opportunity waa allowed to pese
Ss family bualneaa neeeesltated. my
departure for England, whllt I resolved to And out later the burden
Sua exploltera bring upon workers In
British Columbia and Canada, Inflst-
mt prioee at land to ettOtrt tod ttut
Inlktlnt upon the community the
Inoreaataf coat at Uvlaf now erlppl-
Int proeperlty. Tht tohamt wu
baaed upon their being liven aeoret
I information (rem gorammant totroee
I Saactralnt ttt meet fertile loeaUtlee.
"- :tot»tA*w«et:.ttey .-vats, allowed to «*
ens' year ahead of the awreyss*»
? ployed by the provlnolal teventment,
and so cUke the beat land In onooees-
- Ivt-Stwtt-ktiore the go>ernmeol sir
.•vsyajjf-;tryly«I;':'iiert teatoa.   Thue,
I
while the tirvtyort were In district
'"   lehtmi ""' *     "
elongelds tt* rtrsriT WtttXnHt-ioJ
U'tts7
mott n
hemers were phduiu oiuHa
 Wt landt to dUtriot %•
toys where railways and rosth wsra
Ukelltet to be made.  Nest year the
I
Surveying tht 'Oltanlngf
In district 'B' (noting the prime artaa
staked and Icestlng the hillsides snd
manhy treat left unatsked, tl*
Kjhtmara would ht 'tuktag' tht beet
lands ta atotriet 'C* and to forth, tset
1st quite Immune trom lnttrttrtnot
by goveenment officials at tutt tx-
ploltatlon In advance of govtrnmtnt
suriisjrsv.:.    i ■■■■■
The dcheme
"tls pertleulsr expedition wss' being eutledd for the Petes Hirer district beyond the loir divide aesaisttog
ths headwattrt ef the frsssr from ths
Fssee river shd lis trlbutaritt along
which ths Orsad Trunk Psetfl* railway WIS proltcUd.   A attrn-wbetl
i——La-.' aldSS.'    Kit.,      hnllt      (gf      JS
stosntsr ..
party north
She the   "
being  built
' the    portage
party several hundrtd moss
navlgal"
I-, us thoee navigable rivers, snd
akmgstse which the best agrici
i    lsa*>H|»e*l(ic9itod,aad(ioiild"be
SuVrivere. and Wtat,
mtoral
_—_      i rapid-
I ly 'etaked' by tht party tahlng with
I ttsm s ilst e< naott.to write on tht
oorntr peett, *'«»'■'• e«slled 'power
ot sitowsy' for. escb, sS a bltod to
' hoodwink tha alecton and hide that
. baaett' form. of provlnolal jobbery
tram the worthy stttlen. By. that
mess system setUort are Impovep.
lahed continually ao that very tew
Indeed. sr* *bi* * to ntslutstn ttelr
famlltet even when working the land
to the utmoat of their. powers dining
many years, beeauss theae teoundrels
i iiap* ft*' lUtlong Savings from"; the
tettlfjrl-by lessctlng «tortl«tt*to'
prices: for land tbey thui stesl (cen
the people. - To shshls workmen snd
oltlatat gtneralty to undtrttaad how
This Ntftrloet tytttm '....':-■-.
worked, we muat Iraiddy reallie
. thst tlote 'powtrt 'otvMtimty't.'ars'
uted br theee wholesale ergantatag
devutsttts of BtMth ColtmUa for
the! asm* deapkiM* -ysrpss* ot too,
bery Sat -holdup' men ute haadker-
cblefe u masks to hide then- Identity
whllt ptasdsring ttelr hdsiooo vk>
ttots." Wt tttyhave neither the eoe>
age needed by ttt hlghkwaymaa ner
tbp hardihood neeaaaary for tta
itool-plgeont they nee as ttsktrS to
subvert tt* igw ttstr friends to ss*
WmSht one of SENSIBLE GIVING. Wiwii
your friendi this ywr let your gifts r*efl*xt
tatte and thoughtfubiett rath-sr than mere generosity
HIS STORE IS FULL OF THE SORT OF THINGS MEN LIKE TO GET AND GIVE-WE HAVE
TAKEN SPECIAL CARE THIS YEAR TO MAKE CHRISTMAS GIVING EASY FOR YOU (AND
YOUR PURSE) AT THIS BIG MEN'S STORE.   IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEE THIS GRAND DISPLAY BEFORE MAKING YOUR CHRISTMAS SELECTIONS.
T
For1rol,»Bilt"      For "Daf
These are bound to please "Bill:" A box
of Linen Handkerchiefs with Bill's initials on'em; $1.00 a box.
Knitted Silk Ties in bright tvnd, elteery
colors, 76e., $1.00 andHM      '"
Christmas Seta of Ties aodj|
pretty Christmas Boxes, Wo, $
Shirts, with stiff and soft -sufe, $1.00 to
$8,60.
Fancy Sets ol Studs and' Cntf Links,
Scarf Pins, eto.
Sweaters and Sweater Coats, $2.60, $3.60,
$6.00, $6.60 and$7.60.
Suitcases and Traveninjf Bags.
He would really appreciate most any of
the following:
i. Silk Crayt11 in beautiM^|i conserya-
': tive patterns, 80c., 76c., $1.00^ $1.60, $2.00
;to$8J0. :' " .' t       f
Qr.-'15611 us iiis^liat size" and we'll please
him. Hats from $2.60, $8.00 and $4.00.
Smoking Jackets from $4.60 to $20.00
(with solid comfort for "DatJ" thrown
in),    yt
Dressing Gowns and Bath Robes in soft,
beautiful patterns, $3.60 to $20.00.   *" - ;;
Or present him with an order on us for a'
new^brt Schaffner .& Marx; Suit or
Overcoat"';
Foar Any
Men Friends
tflfoiir
let us suggest:
__$""h*VMi'**   Ww>>
^-iH^aaLilssasii'.ussiMaut.-
Nifty Silk Ties, Knitted Four-in-Hands,
«feit76o,, $M, $1.60.
Hosiery, 26c.j 86c., 60c., 76c., $1.00.
Combination _Sets in Christmas Boxes,
Ties and Hose to match, Sets of Arm-
. bands, Carters and Suspenders, in colors *
to mtch, 78c; and $1.00.
;SUl%ed Gloves, $1.60, $2.00, $2.60.
|(^ii.26($a^|t2.6a$wp,;
Leader Collar Cases, $1.26.
And a large variety of other inexpensive
gifts that Mr. Man is bound to appreciate.
*W^-*#?liiK:#^"i;
During this Festival Season you will Want to appear your best, Why not present
"Yourself" with one of our Hart Schaffner & Alarx Suits or Overcoats. The cost is
not large, but your own satisfaction will be great
Suits, $15.00 to $45.00
Overcoats, $15.00 to ^.00
"THE HOME OF BART SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES"
^,-^fsgwrUalon l-St
or. camtsaa.'—mZ
NaTweaiSSw-
A*fcor Counoll: *
-^sjffiTfe
baraufTTB. n -. r~: ~t—  ■ 4.^.
Street  *  Biec.   n». ISSCiSi*- u-w
Ulv. 194, Wew^etuBJJll. at'it
Bo"__"n "■"«» nTim. vc: •"
V*«oa»«r —_W.:TaSSSh7?r.
S9.ee
Amslna^l«j^ WwK^Mtul - IlnSm ^
fot—atVbAur_—^l—kiiri~ --.
' Ml 191, Sttwart________ net
Uuslolana' Mutual ProtwHv.Cn-     .   -
' ion. Hasina     .,  .   ' 9.99
££_*$£_%*• Vawuver  .    Eg
'lesaga ffloS? Uoioo-No, IU. Vaa
.' vaooouvw —— ,,.,„..■, A-
Silver  RtaoSan   aunt,  Maaelum
Minera' OojuStUt per S. SSoX
wf'Jc'Wioa, -fWami...,,,.-!—■'
John 9V. Bnm, Toconto
tataWa-VSainttatU.*
Vaaoouvar ,,.,.„ , ■,,,„„„-
W. a Trotl^vSooa».7lZZT.
C, O. Johaaoa, carml, ft n. ***
O. A. kUlpatrlck. Vaaoou.SZZ^
CollKl.l'b/BSith^Sui'iSSS;
gwUia Trade, and UaoToounaU
naattrtrf Union No. 99_ilZ_!
MwlU,"M,,^_!!!!L*!?KS5'
P. TaraSuiar iiwrltt
Steam Eotineere' "
„ 997, Vaaoouvar , ^_
Oualav Franoq, Mnnir-i
T.  c.   Clinton and W.  Hatter
  Haiti
ga-gBJg^
MsrStVe
Mlnira,
uver Journermen
-lacpu1
_rjafon "Kyr.Tid
Ftdaratwa of
iiS^&4>rsfvS :*#
t-w&h
.__ Jt. mR
._.. ofSloam
itSlnttn No. tlL. „_ _.
Barimderf lot Uano Ho.
Om. H«tUi«rtoii,"'Va«oov«_—
Int AUIaaoa of Tkaalrteel Sta«a .
■opiorm Victoria _L  t>
A. C. Cummins, Pwnaoa, B. ft™   1
Claarmafcera' OnloaVo. ltt, Now
Weatmlaster —
Tradee aad Labor
Street Railway
isns&ar&
Prince Buoerl  ..,,.
Tile Larerf * Helper.- Ualoa Ke!
99, Vanoouver ^_y.^-,,.I'.,:_,%
Tile Uvera- Looal No. It, VltCrla ■
1st Lonraboramea't Aata, fl», ,
toria '..?  'ifj*
Unl#te4 Aaaj.„of. •Mumbena' ittjC'
Helpers of O,
Bulldtnt Trada.
M. MeBaath, Vw
M. MeBMth, VanMtWK-^^a^.
ft a. P., Vanoouw>___
WIIHl     "
w. »v
Van.;
Mis. H. R Outmrldn \
iournermen  SIoomoIu
Vlotoria »,-i
Total
MINAROV LINIMINT CUM*
^-■V ,' *!,:-|>ll>HTHB|IIA
teanMS^^^
&;^i*^S9*nPra
JvA:: ^i._hkMlkL *V
PACE SIX
THB BSITJSP COLUMBIA FFJ)E^*HONlST.
' tKSOi.t.i .) ■ - .BBCBtfflOR JI, l|l»i
NEW WESTMINSTER
TOU CAN'T SEAT OUR PRICES, SO DON'T
WASTE TIME TRYING—GIVE
US A CALL
Our Holiday Goods are in and we can save you money all
die time.   You lose if you go elsewhere.
DENNY &ROSS
THE BIG FURNITURE STORE
6th and Carnarvon Street
N*w Westminster, B.G
Westminster Trust, Limited
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.   .
Estates manaied for out-of-town and olty ellenta. Payment! col-
leeted and forwarded or Inverted. We set aa agenta only for the
purehaae and aale of real eatate.
ntpottts aecepted aad lntereat at 4* allowed on dally balance.
•AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES POR RENT
Head OBes:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Weetmlneter, I. C.
■■Bv.
.   a. a. Sfos, traaaimrattetu
I. A. ■tnitt, Smstai9 Wwiaaior,
Get the Habit  ' -•!•
*.   W« Giv* You
vare Deal
Have Tea Ever Tried Us?   He?   WsU, th* sotmryog do tke
s**wtr yssi wiO stv* Mb**
Crockery, China, Olasswsre, Toys and Dolls, Stationery,
Graphophonss and Records, Fancy Ooods.
wm
UU COLUMBIA 8TBSBT
NBW WESTMINSTER
amam—mmomm _\ \9§Q
J. P. GAlAW
High Claw Ladies' and Gsntlemra't Tailor
, a. a
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
I ts Ceatee a aaaaa, tM.
FUNERAL. DIRECTORS
hssil-; -^_____ * *
  NBW WS-STaUNST-SB, B. ft
LOOAL CASHDISCOUNT PHONE 237
^^HEATING STDVES
FROM
M. J. KNIGHT  COMPANY, LIMITED
SSSf-RH STMR |gW-w9lllatavtl9Si I C.
I Work Guaranteed
Hand Sown Shote Hade to Meaaure
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
McMillan a patkrson
nbw —aaraiwwttm, & <
0. J. Romon     . -   >;>, Stevens
Phone Sey. MIS
Casadku''Photo Co.
PtwtN Ttk
911-419 -
aHolSSSSliana
A Werlt tervMwat I
beet wtltete  la    SS!**-J!f
will So SoaaS la THB N*jr       _
•blek deals   le ea utaerltatm   war I
atae-a.*-?   &S8STfSUS
meatair. SI» per roori Caaatlaa att-
B* C Electric Irons
"tHE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
-MARKET
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
ATANY
PRICE
By SAU ATKINSON.
Laat Sunday evening E. E. Lemke
of Lockport, N.Y., (ave an lntereat
Ing talk upon "AS Indictment of the
Capltaliat Preaa." He paid a very One
compliment to The Federatlonist, and
hoped that tt would not be very long
before the paper waa publlihed dally.
On Sunday neat, December 14th,
Qeorge E. Winkler of Victoria, will
apeak In the Dominion theatre, Oranvllle atreet Thla will be the laatlee-
tun In that theatre. The executive
committee have made arrangements
to move to the Colonial theatre, at
the comer of Oranvllle atreet and
Dunsmuir. On Sunday, December Slot;
Sinn .Atkinson will apeak on "Modem
Vlewa on Education." It la believed
that a great crowd will welcome him
back to the city.
On Wednetday, December nth, the
Social Democratic party will hoM a
convention In the large hall of the
Labor .Temple for the purpoie . of
nominating candidate! for the municipal elections. Any member of a
tradee or Induatrlal union will be admitted upon preaentatlon ot a union
card If they disclaim any connection
with any other political party.
"The Quootlon ef the Hour"
It would teem that onr power to
think bad been luapaaded gad we had
lost even the Impulse to protect our
loved onet which ia ever preient even
ln the animals. The wretched struggle
the workere endure year after year
la a damnable outrage. The only difference between the action of Mr.
Robert Ooeden snd that of the other
speakers ln the hone ahow building
on Monday laat it that he dared to
aay what other* only think. The Sun
misrepresent* him, but that la only to
be expected.
The minera on Vancouver Iiland
are .not the only people who have
came to complain In thla matchless:
province. Sir Richard, the P. T. Bar-
nnm of Brltlsb Columbia, may make
a very good showman, but the facta
demonstrate that In iplte of hit empty
worda, Britlah /Columbia doea .not
want mtn at thla atage of the game
unless: they sre ot the jelly-flah order.
A ten-mile tramp through the woods
from. Stave telle to Mission Junction
th* othtr day, with many a talk with
ths homeoteadera, convlncei mt that
suffering and poverty as the reeult ot
mlarepetoentatlon la rampant T^ere
la abaolutely no encouragement far
a man to take a forty-acre tract In
townehip'18. s
We have tbouaanda of men in the
province needing work.. By. the opening up of roads so that theae small
farmera might properly .clear their,
land the province would materially,
add to lta wealth. Here la a aectlon
without a mill. A road haa been cut
for many miles: but ths treea are allowed to He .there. An army of men
eould bt employed for montha, ■ sec-
tlona could be hometteaded, a railway eould be .run from Mission tb
Stat* falla, market* eould be more
eaally reached, canning factorial
could be almost permanently employed. At the preient, time tremsn-
doua Quantities of fruits sre allowed
to rpt by the wsyalde whUe people In
the City are lufferlng from high
prlcea and actual want due to thon
prkjSs. One farmer carted half hla
berrlee to Mission Junction, but when
he.took the.other halt he found the
cannerycloeed. Themis-management
of the affairs of the provinoe la appalling. It explain! why thouiandi of
people sre In want In the mldat of
plenty,
Five hundred yeara ago the people
had none of tbe advantage! we enjoy
to-day, yet the farmera here are not
able to live. We. are living In an
age in which we ean produce a thou-,
aand fold more than our ancestors,
yst thsy never Buffered as we. are doing. We produce it, yet we can have
no ahare In the lncreue.
At 9 reeult of the Invention of
nmeblnety, .the farmer wae; able to
raise eleven timet more barley In
1898 then he did In lilt. Does he live
eleven times better?
In 1896 three tlmea mon cotton waa
ralaed in the southern States than In
1841. Ia the cotton grower tl
times richer?
We are -raising ten. times* ■' mon
upon the farms of thla continent than
■we wen alxty yean ago aa Individual farmers, but oondlttona hsvs not
Improved.
The sucoeesful farmer to-day ta. a
man like Joe Letter,1 who gamblea In
wheat, corners It, and holds up two
or time nation! until Dread rtota
threaten revolution. Yet If he
put en a farm he would probably Ssk
to see the buttercups from which the
butter waa produced.
Then Is abaolutely no difference,
then between the condition of the far-
mer and that of the miner. If any,
the miner has the beat of lt He hss
a union, while the farmera an etrug-
gllng along alone.
The reason la not far to seek. While
MoBrlde and Bowser csn dicker with
railroad! nothing will be dons to alleviate thla suffering.   Tht working
,       »  J.  0.  MoNIVBN
rederal Pair-Wage Ottteer with
quarters In Vancouver, B. 0.
farmer and the miner have only their
labor power to Sell, they mutt sell
their labor power to-day, but. the employer need not buy It until tomorrow. The MoBrlde policy la to let
the laborer wait The laborera and
miners .-and 'the fanner, are .being
lashed by neeesiity. They feel ttt*
pangs of empty stomachs. Empty
stomachs are causing a revolt Violence can only be avoided by gaining
control of the machinery or production. To gain that control the worken will need: to control the govern-
Price
Evarjr Iron ia gnarantoed by die B. C. Electric for
IOYaars
££*%  B.C. ELECTRIC "»*£&*
PHONE, SEYMOUR 8000
Getting oa b tbe Worid
dspsnds moedy in specialised
ability
AREY00 A SPEOAUST?
If not tak* np our ipeoal eome
ot bwinern wbuction
m—\————m\—   BiisMUsM   \-itaal
nom DBWH MNN
The  Central  Hotel
H. Vrttman, Manager
European nan        Telephone ttt
„ Bates SSo. per day and up	
Cuisine unexcelled.    A la   	
meals at all houra. pop. a CVK.
Railway Depot eolumMaSt.
,     NEW WISTMINSTSR, S.C.
WHY PAY SUCH HIGH PRICES FOR YOUR CLOTHES? We can turn out
SUITS TO MEASURE from $13.00 to $25.00, value $20.00 to $50.00.
MADE BY UNION TAILORS
We use only English, Scotch and Irish Cloth, buying direct from Mills, and we
positively guarantee FIT and WORKMANSHIP tnd STYLE. Phone Fraier
292, or call orwrite and I will be pleased tp see you here or at your own house and
show you the largest range of samples in Vancouver then you can see what value
lean give.'
DAVID ROSE
I   '     '     'ilrf.ni   ■
Cor, 47th Ave, and Fraser St.      SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
The miners have already demonstrated that they undentand the situation. They have placed the.only opposition the present government have
In the bouae,: Two Social Democrats,
repreient them. They-are suffering
unjustly. It'll the working people
elsewhere who have been lax The
minera are Suffering for the other,
fellow. One 'good thing will be accomplished by their troubles It the
working clear ln British Columbia oan
be aroused to action, ,
The pearl IS the only Jewel having
an animal organism. A. foreign aub-
atance, a piece of land, la injected Into the shell and irritates the flesh
of the oyater. The oyster haa not
the power to 'elect .thli Substance. It
begins to cover the sand with a lacquer of mother of pearl. Thli Is followed by another and another, until
the Jewel Is produced. The pearl It
tht tntwir of tht Injured ont to the
injury done.,' If, aa a reeult of the
persecution of the worken on Vancouver Inland the other worken are
arouaed and Belie the reins ot government the minen will be Satis-
led. The government which will
open the doors of the co-operative
commonwealth, will atone for all their
Injuries.
A  LETTER  FROM  PA
Hobble's Clearing, B.C., Oeo. 8,
Dear Martha: I take my pen In
hand to let you know that everybody
at home ta well since you left, bar
the man with the white off foreleg,
whloh la took with the colic She
will be around. In a few daya again,
1 think. Leastways ahe'd ought to,
the way I been working with her.
Your brother lot, he stepped on a
aplke the other day that went right,
through hli boot aad. Into hla foot
But he needed a new pair anyway.
'.* We are glad to aee that you are getting on well |n the olty, Martha. Tour
Ma waa glad to get the cook-book you
Sent up. We all been atudyfng at lt
pretty hard. I have got aa far aa
page 14 where lt speaks of pot-au-
fue to serve, In petitei marmitea. I
don't know aa thla la exactly clear to
me, although It wouldn't do to let on
to the neighbors. There are aome
thlnga your Pa can be beat at, Martha, ao far aa heed work goei, but
when It comes to Sgurin' the beat
way to take out a atump, he don't
take no back water from any man In
thla aettlement
Tour Ma allowed aome of the things
In that book wae for making up Into
vlttlea. Of coune, you and I show
that ain't ao. The man that wrote it
waa meaning to train the mind like.
Anyway, Ma has her good polnti, even
If the don't undentand thlnga as eaay
aa some bf us, to I told her to go
ahead. She calclated the'd tackle the
ohloken bechamel in ramequina. We
don't- raise tbl- bechamel breed but
the gueaied the Plymouth rock Would
do at well. 1 don't know ss sny of
the Iambi would paaa for ramequlm
thli time ot yesr, but there'! a year-
lln' ram I waa going to kill anyway.
While we was talking about It your
brother Bill came ln the kitchen.
When he heard whst Ma wai Jlggln'
up, he aald we wouldn't likely lose
anything beeauss If none of the other
animals could eat It there wsan't
muoh a hog would refuse, and pork la
up Juat .now. Ha got red-headed at f
him and give him a good droning
down. Sht wld tht didn't think lt
was polite of him to spesk that way,
When you was so Und to think' ot ths
horn* folks. That's whst I think, too.
But you muan't mind BUI Hs ssys
thlnga off-hand without thinking. BUI
la a good worker, too,
Well, Martha, Uke good care of
younelf and writ* soon. Ws look for
you to eome home Christmas. Ths
big gobbler la getting that fat snd
■assy, I reckon l'U hsve to chop off
his bead along about that time, .
- With love from all. —PA.
It Is apprehended that arbitrary
power would itesl In upon ui, were We
not careful to prevent Its program, snd
Wen there not sn easy method bf conveying the alarm from one end of the'
kingdom to another.' 'The spirit of thS'
people must frequently be roused, ln
order to.curb the ambition of th*
court, sad, the dread of rousing this
ipirlt must be employed to prevent
thst ambition. Nothing la to effectual
to thla purpoie aa the liberty of ths
press, by which'sll the learning, wit
and the gen'tu of ths nation amy be
employed on thrslds of freedom, and
everyone be animated to lta defense,
Ae long, therefore, st the republican
part of our government csn maintain
Itself agalnit the monarchical, lt will
naturally be careful to keep the press
opsn, ss of Importance U> its own pr*
lervation.—Hume.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES OAR-
SET IN COW*
Workers of the World
ARE OFFICIALLY ADVISED BY THE OFFICERS OF DISTRICT 28, U. M. W; OF A., WITH HEADQUARTERS AT'
NANAIMO, THAI? THE
STRIKE ON VANCOUVER
ISLAND K STILL IN FULL
FORCE AND EFFECT
AND IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO SCAB, KEEP AWAY
FROM CUMBERLAND, IADYSMITH^SOINTULA, SOUTH
WELLINGTON AND NANAIMO. WHEN THE STRIKE IS
OVER, OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION WILL BE SENT OUT
THROUGH THE LABOR PRESS. THIS NOTIFICATION
IS MADE NECESSARY BY FALSE REPORTS, SPREAD IN
THE OLD COUNTRY PRESS^ THAT THE STRIKE HAS
BEEN SETTLED IN FAVOR OF THE MEN, THUS
CAUSING MANY VICTIMS TO COME-TO VANCOUVER
ISLAND UNDER GROSS MISREPRESENTATION. UNION
MEN AND THEIR EMENDS WILL JKEEP AWAY FROM
VANCOUVER ISLAND UNTIL THE STRIKE IS SETTLED.
%
OFF AD Our PIANOS
uid PLAYER-PIANOS
on Easy Monthly Payments
25%
OFF ALL PIANOS ana
PLAYER-PIANOS FOR
CASH
OFF AUMUSIC GOODS
. EXCEPT TALKING
0 MACHINES
We are loaded down, with a huge stock of Music Ooods
ordered many months sgo for the Holiday Trade., To meet the
Special conditions of the exlitlng money stringency,! we hsve
concluded to offer all ot our patrona for the Christmaa Holidays the pick of thlt magnificent atock at tht huge discount of
twenty-live per eent Our goodi an all new and were purchaeed
ln the lowest markets of tbe world, to that our Meade can depend upon getting the beat value ln any and all kinds ot Mutlo
Goodi ever offered ln the city. Our friends ln ths country will
be dealt with In the aame liberal manner, and all mall orden
entrusted to us wUl be filled promptly.
HERE IS A PARTIAL LIST
ACCORDEONS
AUTOHARPS
HOHNER MOUTH ORGANS
HUMANITONES
TIN WHISTLE*
FLUTE*
CLARINETS v
CORNET*
TROMBONE*
DRUM*
■AND INSTRUMENT*
INSTRUMENT CAW*
OCARINAS
BAGPIPES
VIOLINS
GUITARS
BANJOS*
MANDOLINS
UKHtLELES
MUSIC CARRIERS
MUSIC BOXES
MUSIC NOVELTIES
STRINQS POR ALL INSTRUMENTS
TOY PIANO*
CONCERTINAS
KAZORS
EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
'xm i^uction
10 HASTINGS ST, EAST
mSmmSfSm
w«i ii.    m»ii»miM»mn«aa>ft■»- ,w
FRIDAY. DECEMBER U, Ills.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIOl
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS
Thit ii one mske of underwear in which you can secure good
quality and a perfect lit The maker* studied these two
requisites and have produced garments that clearly show
much thought along these lines. Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally associate themselves with underwear that fits the figure.
If you want real underwear comfort this winter we would
recommend that you try Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino separate garment! at
$1.00 and $1.25 a.garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
$3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to 14 yean, and all sizes
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garments in
light or medium weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
575 Granville Street
LIMITED
Vancouver, B. C.
It will pay yon to see our showing for Fall,   Prices that cannot
be beaten or repeated in tbe City.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 • Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADVT. AND WE WILL
■ LEARN to be an expert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hats; make and curl
plumes, etc. A six-week cotirse in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for a few dollars a week, when you can leam
a profession with short houn and e/uy work that
paya a high aalaiy? We guarantee poiiu'oni to our
graduate!.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For particulars ate Madame Milli, 112 Halting! St. W.
or Phone Seymour 7450L. Houn daily from I to 5 p.m.
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
BOY'S
Would you like to receive a remembrance every month.    Fill ln
blank below, mall to me and I will aend you one.
SAM M. SCOTT
Boye' Clothing Spaclallat 721 Oranvllle 8treet Vancouvtr, B. C.
MAILING LIST
Name	
Street Addreu	
P. O. Box      City ,,	
Age      Birthday	
"Best 7nree Dollar Hat on Earth" .
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
_rw_       ttbR5I
__MJ_W_WmMM
Phone* Sey. 2327-2328
Phone Seymour 1390
Hardware and
Sporting Goodi
111 Hastings St., W.
Always Open
The T. EDWARDS Co.
SUCCESSORS TO
ARMSTRONG & EDWARDS
- Jfantral lirwiora, ■EmMmprn
612 MAIN STREET VANCOUVER, B. C
A.M.McN^n
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
We specialize In
Moving Furniture (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons lor all description ol work
Estimates cheerfully given
i
Telephone*; Seymour 620, 5820 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 2514-R
a
ggo^^^Vym
Baited by MISS H. B. OOTTBWDOB, Boom 919, Labor Temple.
WHITE SLAVERY
The present money stringency and
Increase ol vice with Its profitable
white slave trafflc Is probably due to
the wrong men being placed ln
power by Ignorant male voters, who
have to depend on a leader to dictate to them who they shall vote tor.
Cunning has been mistaken for Intelligence very often. The white
alave traffic Is a business enterprise
and has a strong political pull everywhere, and to quote Mr. Rockefeller's
Bureau of Social Hygiene report, "All
the strange, vile creatures concerned
in this trafflc have their centres
where they gather together for their
business and social relations. Suoh
places Include restaurants, poolrooms, delicatessen stores, candy
shops, cigar stores, palmists and
clairvoyant parlors, livery stables and
opium dens, where they sell shares,
secure women and pay money for
favors received.
"The white slave trafflc Is not only
a reality, but a reality almost wholly
dependent on houses of prostitution.
The man who proves himself capable
of achieving the political pull Is
called 'the king.' This man came from
Russia, by way of South Africa. The
resorts owned by this type of man
are operated by a special type of
women, who are their wives or mistresses. They attend to all the details of the houses, When an arrest
has to be made these women are the
ones to go to jail,
They have had years of experience
In operating houses in many cities of
North and South America, as well as
In foreign lands, especially ln South
Africa. To procure women for the
houses of these people procurers are
necessary. There Is a group of men
who devote themselves simply to this
work. As soon aa houses are set up
an opportunity for trade la created.
The proprietors give specific orders to
the procurers for young girls, for Innocent girls, for blondes, for brunettes, tor slender women, for stout
women, and the procurer mis the
order, resorting to every possible device ln the effort to do so; to deceit,
to misrepresentation, doping and
whatnot. The pimp or cadet, as he Is
commonly called, has not yet developed Into a professional procurer
or keeper of a house ot prostitution.
The majority, and the large majority,
of young girls, who become prostitutes are not Immoral but unmoral.
Under the pimp's Influence the girl
finally breaks away from a secret Immoral life and becomes a "regular."
Those who solicit for trade and peddle advertisements for houses and
watch for danger are called "runners," "lookouts," "lighthouses" and
"watch boys."
In this well organised commerce Is
an army of fifteen thousand women,
who are exploited ln a thoroughly
business-like way. There are men employed to seduoe defenceless women,
who have kept this up all their lives.
They travel all over Uie world; their
trail of seduction and corruption may
be traced through Argentine, Braill,
Cuba, Canada, Alaska, and large cities
elsewhere, Their centres are ln New
York cltv, and they go back over the
old trail f*om time to time. If a
composite photograph could be made
of typical owners ot vice resorts lt
would be shown a large well-fed man
ot about forty yeara of age, and five
feet eight Inches In height His
clothes are the latest cut, loud tn design,   and   carefully   pressed,   with
MEETINGS
A regular weekly meeting la held In
the Labor Temple, Dunsmuir street,
every Wednesday at S p.m. under the
auspices ot the B. C. Women's Suffrage League. Tbe question of votei
for women la discussed from all
points of view, front that of the man
who thinks only women with proper
ty should vote, to the man wbo, because he hai not used hit vote as
wisely as perhapa he might have done
says the vote Is no good.
Come and give ua your point of
view and we will tell you ours.
The regular weekly meetings of the
Mount Pleasant branch every Monday
evening at 8 p.m. In the Lee Hall,
Main street, continue to be a great
success and members join at every
meeting. If you live ln that part of
the olty take your wife next lojonday.
ORGANIZED LABOR AND
VOTES FOR WOMEN
We are pleased to announce that
organised labor Is steadily going on
record ln favor of woman'a suffrage.
Up to the present sixteen unions have
been visited by a deputation from the
B. C. Woman's Suffrage League, and
all sixteen unions have passed this
resolution: "It la resolved that lt la In
the best Interests of the people that
the parliamentary franchise be extended to women at the next session
on the same terms as It haa been or
may be granted to men."
With the trade unlona on the side
of women comes greater hope for the
working woman. The working man
can realize how necessary Is the enfranchisement of the working woman
If satisfactory Industrial legislation is
to be obtained for both. The woihan'a
movement and the labor movement
are the expression! of a great revolutionary wave that is passing over the
whole world, recognition of the workers of both sexes will come more
quickly with the wpmen enfranchlaed
than without.
Mr. Stanley, a Brltlih M.P., speaking sb the representative of the
miners, at a meeting recently In England, stated that the vast and overwhelming majority of the Minera'
Federation had decided to Join with
the women's cause and to use all
their efforts to bring about lta success aa aoon aa possible. "I have
wondered what the arguments are
against It," he said. "I have never
heard them; I have heard all sorts
of excuses."
Many phases of. legislation are
awaiting development In which women could give help and enlightenment.
For all our boasted advancement
and education, there are millions of
men,* women and little children who
never have the ghost of a chance to
live a olean and pure and healthy life.
Women could bring to the solving of
the social problem a purer and a
surer Instinct, the Instinct tb preserve
and protect human life. I apeak for
myself. I speak for this mighty federation of nearly three-quarters of a
million men; I wtll work with the
women, and we will hall the day
when woman comet Into her own."
"The woman and tbe worker
stand side by side."
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
"CAe Vheeln Semllfel
Sullbtn * ComUlne Vsudwllle
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Miana
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, S.1S
Season's Prioei—   ,
Matinee 15o, Evenings 16c, 25o.
FOR EXPERT
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller' and Optician
143 Haitingi Street Welt
rhona Seymour afSS
DIXON e\ MURRAY
CAvrnrcau, ara
Offloe and Store Titttnf.   Oases
Sobtttof
099ea aaS Skopi
toes ponsitwua anaar
THE BELGRAYIA
FLORISTS
1015 ROBSON STREET
Phons, Sty. 15475
FLORAL DESIGNS, WED
DING ORDERS AND
HOME DECORATIONS
OUR SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
flashy necktie and diamond ring. He
Is fat and chubby fingered."
This enormous trade Is backed by
big capital. The working man'a
daughter Is the chief victim of It
While tne working man Is being
ground down by capital his daughter
ts being lured away to supply this
trafflc and his son to the army to
protect the capitalist The Suffragist, the worklngman's truest friend
and sympathiser, Is so misrepresented
that he Is taught to despise her, and
he Is left to the tender mercies ot
the rich specimens ot his own sex,
who treat him like a useful, blind
simpleton and machine, who works
over hours supplying them with
everything In return for a bare living.
The worklngman Is a very easy
tool to the politician who knows the
ropes and how tb use him. He has no
time to study his own interests, nor
have his women-folk, who are closely
tied day and night to the four walls of
the home. The suffragist, so Jeered
at, and who gives up her life to the
oause, has been carefully represented
tn him as an unsexed female who
hates men. Will the worklngman
never see that men ln power only
study the Interest of tbe rich and not
tbe poor. Will he never see that his
truest friend and partner Is the much
abused suffragist, who best understands the conditions of the workera
of the world and the poor who are
being forced Into criminals by the
laws and conditions surrounding him?
The minimum wage and shorter
hours would put an end to many evils.
The workers of the world, both men
and women, want more leisure to map
out their own lives. The average
capitalist Is not as a rule the highest
principled, but he controls. Still the
worklngman and the suffragist have
It In their power to down htm If they
would only put their heads together
and stand by each other. Women
patronize certain stores or goods from
certain manufacturers and certain
churches, etc. Men supply the labor,
members of police force, the soldiers
and sailors. Let them co-operate and
set to work and teach co-operation between women and the laborer. Does
the worklngman approve of graft,
doei he like supplying the dishonest,
Inhuman capitalist with underpaid
labor, sons to supply armies and
navies to flght their battles, and
daughters to supply the white slave
trafflc, ln return for broken up
homes, increase of mad asylums, jails,
reformatories, mis-managed hospitals,
poisoned and adulterated foods,
shoddy clothing and doped drinks.
If the male worker! of the world
prefer this state of affairs, with Its
great economic waste, then as far as
hli Interests, are concerned, and he
ts willing to sffuer, let him continue
to play Into the hands of grafters and
robbers, whose wretched tool he Is.
He is told that women are all alike,
and sucn saints that they want to
bring about the millenlum, that his
honest pot of beer would be denied
him, and that the poor victim pros,
tltutes would vote lt the franchise
were granted women, and that would
never do, although the white slave
trafftcers and seducers may vote all
they like; that mothers would want
leu than twenty-four houra of work
a day. If this Is the worklngman's
idea of Juitlce how can he hlmielf aak
for Juitlce from those of his own sex
In power over him? How can he ex.
pect different treatment for hlmielf
than that which he dolei out to thoie
In his power?
AMY CAMPBELL JOHNSTON.
IZ
The st(
human ra
of moral
fruition li
means—ei
Evoldtlc
and If thl
the normi
ally broui
part of tl
manlty, bt
obstructed
is  Indeiti
surely as
revolution,
a new mo!
concourse!
all over tl
nloated by
men.  It I!
in equi
and Is ml
human eqi
The realla
truth tbat
as touchim
nlal of thi
men wltho
consent by
cullnlty, Ji
liberty, eqti
of the rlgb
co-operatloi
ly awakenk
divine calm
the fullest
their persoi
fllment of '<=
of   race,   _
whole of hi-
right la wu
ual mother.*
tree to expa.
tbat the chri
tor and hare
-tn
LABOR 11
Labor or(l
coming out*
along the I-.:
Ing In Buttta
'Women totr.
the ballot 1:
They aay til
In the homa.1
the fact tha
5,000,000 na.;
their own >e
■hould have*,
lot In thells
the great nal
the home, tl
will vote rip;
takes. Then,
but we can's*
the women
-is
If 11 coun
•lightest aim
atltutlon fra
when I had lc
possibly ends
of any ecclele
I would nocture to It; ate
thst the gene
ao admtniabo
erty of coni.t
will be pen
be more zear-
lish effectuas
rore of ipla-
ipectoui of a
Of sll tb*-
exttted amoy
are cauaed Ll
ments In nt
moat Invetei,
ought moit _
hopeithat ty
policy, whk%
age, would B
Chrlstlani Cf
far that we.
their religion,
a pitch aa If
loclety.      t
GovernmeL
eloquence—11.
a dangeroul
ter; never fig
left to Irresi,
The govern
of America It
ded upon L.
Qeorge WasL
$2!
ING]
QAVt
In orde
vlous Chrl
this libera
The fInj
ers of nei
gular stoc
prices will
divided Ini
Tha lit
The 2nd
Tht 3rd
Purcbasi
ets, the di
retain lint
nos are si
will be so
drawing,
then meet
to draw tl
HieOUe
5S8
THEFAI
Pianos can
at |26 down
month. Thl
protects the
loss of empl
are postpoD
fled purchas
most of oui
recommenda
AJELL( FRIDAY DECEMBER 23, 1913,
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every
■Water in every Room.
Hot-and Cold
European Plan
Transient Ratea, $1 .OO per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 1130 to 2.30 p.tn., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
SIS Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey* 1571
______  Addition to   Vancouver*** Up-to-Date Hotel*
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat.  -        Cafe ia Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Ratea to Pei
Guests
eat COTTINGHAH * BEATTY
Proprietort
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
GAUER * DUMAKESQ, Mprieters
FULLY  MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
Tbe Leading Hotel.  :: Auto Parties catered to.     /
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Corner Fourth Street and River Road        Ebon* Sutton, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921   Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES  $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.    L.    WALLINGFOBD,   Manager
PENDER HOTEL
__ New. Modern. Flrat-Claaa
Steam Heated. Electric LlaKtaS
Telephone atrmom 18*1.
Ratea Si.90 per Day and Up.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Rises    S3   par   week
Vp.
D.  F.  Vmmmamara, Pro.
83-38   HA8TING8 STREET WEST
Ttleplaas, Hat saS
-,™,      — . 1   lelsHsas,  Bsl sal
Good Service Throughout   | CaU Waisr ia t«s
VANCOUVER, B. C.
■"> __ I1\|T|7D    UHTFI     Ca,e opeD ,rora s" oClock
M^.-r^m-M.l.~\RM_ta~a.      MTmKJ M. MLti-    a.m. till Midnight,   The Beat
Meiie   ln   the   City,  at Popular Prices;   White Cooki only employed.
Rooms Rented by the Day or Week.    Flret-elaea Liquors and Clgan.
JOHN   8NIDAR,  Prop. Corner Cordova and Carrall Sta.
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's Pioneers Cigars
ASK   FOR  THBJM,  SEE THAT VOU GET THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS FLIM-FLAM TOU WITH CHEAP TRASHY SUBSTITUTES
. Soy. 76S3
Day or Nigkt
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
1 EMBALMERS
St. Vaacaaver, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL. DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMER8     '-
Vanoouver—Offloe and Chapel,
10S4 Oranvllle St. Phone Bey. 9199.
North Vanoouver — Offlce and
chapel, IIS Seoond St B. Phone
189. FBIDAT. DECEMBER 26, 1913.
theb:
HOW CAN YOU
JFE SO EASILY?
Pendray s Naptha
Soap
IS MANUFACTURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE KNOWLEDGE GAINED FROM
1st  Thirty-»even yean experience in soap-making.
2nd. The services of our research chemist
3rd. The watchful eye of our factory superintendent
In addition to thi*'you are helping to
BUILD UP LOCAL INDUSTRY
which means that instead of sending your money out of the
country it stays here and returns to you. Pendray'a Naptha
Soap gives you a handsome profit and a satisfied customer.
W. J. PENDRAY & SONS, LTD.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, *j.C.
Bnlaraed and Remodelled Mt ROOMS—191 BATH*
Comfort    without    Extravagance
American Plan   • JHJSO. Up    ,_.,„  ^European Han  •  SIM Up
STIPHIN JONES, Proprietor.
ONLY THIS CITY Hi
mm
Trades and Labor Council
Committee Reports on
Transportation
Prevailing in Many Chief
Cities on North American Continent
At the laat regular meeting ol the
Vanoouver Tradei and Labor, oouncll
held on December 18th In Labor
Temple, a report waa submitted by a
committee composed of Messrs. L. B.
Dennlson, R, p. Pettlplece and C. F.
Burkhart, appointed to-Investigate the
matter ot atreet railway tares and.
electric lighting ln various cltlea oh
the continent.    It la a .follows:
VANCOUVER, B.C., Dee. 18, 1913.
To the Officers and Members Vancouver Trades and Labor Council:
Ladles and Gentlemen: Your com-
mittee, .to look Into the excessive
fares ln force on the B. C. Electric
Railway, have gone thoroughly Into
the matter. We flnd that many public meetings have been held by ratepayers' associations, olty anil municipal councils, and board of trade. The
olty council, we believed, were In
favor ot seeing existing trafflc by-laws
enforced, If nothing more, but up to
date no. prosecutions have been
announced. >
Tour committee have filed everything that has appeared In the city
newspapers abont the matter, which
information is at the disposal of the
couhcll.
On Ootober 23, 1913, your oommlttee wrote some thirty-six letters to
labor officials in the larger cities of
this continent. We have received answers from Galveston, Texas; Toronto, Ont.; Montreal; Que.; Edmonton,
Alta.; Chicago, 111.; Winnipeg, Man.;
Portland, Ore.; St. Paul, Minn.; Boston, Mass.; New Orleans; La.; Salt
Lake City, Utah; London, Ont, New
York, N. Y.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Sacramento, Cal.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Denver,
Colo. From these the following data
has been compiled:
1. "How many tickets for 25
cents are sold ln your city?" •'"..,
Out of. seventeen replies the answer
Is 4.8 cents against Vancouvisr'a 6
cents straight. , '  '
2. "How many workmen's. tickets
for 25 cents, and length of time morning and evening.'that they can he
used!"
', Five cities sell workmen's tickets,
the average price being 3.5 cents each.
The shortest time they can be used
dally Is 3.30 hours; the longest, 4.30
hours. Vancouver sella white (workmen's tickets) ln conjunction with
green (unlimited) flue each for 40
cents.    The use of the white tickets
-h-_
COLUMBIA ^ElJRRATIiKrST
iiiT,.^       ,?,'■:"'nil, vy,
hours i
ia restricted to two houri dally-rlje-
fore 8 Km.   ''"■'       '■/
*m "Price   ot   achool   children's
ttekettt"; 7
The price ranges front iy3 centa to
5 centa, with the average about 3.4
centa each. Vancouver sells tickets
of this description fo 2.5 centa each.
4. "What la the '. ingest ride tor
one fare In miles?" P actically eleven
miles. In thai' elty oi e can ride from
Cedar Cottage to the end of Fourth
avenue—eay alx. miles.
5. "What la the area ln square
miles which can be reached on one
fare?" ■ , v
This question waa answered poorly.,
Some did not knoar; others ignored It
Salt Lake City, Utah, gave 100; St.
Paul, Minn., gave 36; Vancouver W/a.
6. "Is any additional charge made
for transfers?"
Mew York city Is the only olty
which charges for transfers.
7. "Does the street railway company ln your olty also sell light and
power?" .     '
Eight cltlea do—some outright,
others through subsidiary companies.
8. "It so, what are Uie rates per
kilowatt, hours for power? For light?"
In some cases the answers did not
differentiate between light and power.
Ga|veston. Texas, gives 16 cents per
kilowatt hour; Portland, Ore,, 0 cents;
Salt Lake City, Utah, 10 centa tor
lights down to ly, cents for power.
The local, rate Is from 4 cents to 11
centa.
9. "Have the fares,: .power or light
charges been Increased during the
past 12 months?  If so, how much?"
The answer la NO ln every case.
10. "Are the street railway, light
and power companies private concerns
or municipally owned?"     -   .
Sixteen are private companies.
Edmonton, Alta., is the only olty reporting a municipally owned i street
railway and light and power plants.
In Galveston, Texas, ihe olty owns Its
lighting plant i Toronto has the government controlled hydro-electric
plant. Ini Chicago, while privately
owned, file olty gets 55% net receipts.
In answer to the general Inquiry for
information that would be helpful to
the oommlttee, some valuable information is gained.
First it will be noted that ln no
portion of the continent have tares
or rates been Increased except Vancouver. Toronto says: "Since the establishment of the hydroelectric the
rate has been cut In half. Hydro:
electric .means government control.
Hydro charges for power (17.00 per
year. Electric company has to meet
this rate."
Winnipeg, Man., says: "The rates
have not been Increased for fares during the past several years. Light
charges also remained unchanged. It
Ib understood there has been a raise
for power during the past year but a
proper statement of same could not
be given as practically each oohsumer
Is given a separate contract, according to the amount of power uaed.
RateB tor power for heating and cooking were raised by both the city plant
and the atreet railway company In
June last, from 1 cent to 3 centa per
kilowatt hour, with a minimum charge
of 75 cents per month for each
ampere (I believe this ia the word).
For a stove taking 5 amperes the
minimum charge is $3.75 per month.
"We have two companies here, the
Winnipeg Street Railway company
and the city plant The latter, of
coune, la owned by the city and since
the latter company has supplied light
and power tor the city the rates have
been reduced for. lighting from 10
cents per Kilowatt, hour to 3 cents.
" PHIL.' SCOTT
Active Homebrew Member of "The Saturday Sunset" Chapel
There haa also been a like reduction
In power rates. The .city plant has
been running for Just two yeara and
is now making money.
"Since the city has started the supplying of light and power there has
been a regular, war wtth the private
concern, and the latter company bas
resorted' to all manner of expediencies to keep * the citlsens from using
their own power. These efforts have
been successful In some cases, but the
large majority of the people are
standing behind their company."
Salt Lake Cicy, uith, saya: "There
la but one company operating In Salt
Lake at the present time and they
have.a.practical monopoly on the
light, power and street cars for the
next .50 yeara." Yet one gets six
tickets for 25 centa; workmen's tickets 50 for 11.25; school children 50
for 9)1.60; and the "one fare rule of
the company Is operative over an
area of approximately 100 square
miles."       .-.,..
London, Ont, says: "The London
Electric, a .branch of the Canada General, supplied light and power at their
own price until the advent of the
hydro (the municipal plant) some two
years ago. • The L. B. domestic lighting was 9 cents per kilowatt, hydro 5
cents with 6% discount; making It ln
reality ty, centa per kilowatt. The
L. E. met the cut. On February 16th
next, the street railway will take 1,000
horse-power at 136.00 per horse-power
from the city, who purchase power
from the Hydro ..vommtsalon of the
Ontario government, the power being
generated at'Niagara Falls, 120 miles
distant Hydro power Bella for about
(26.00 or 128.00 per horse-power. The
olty's surplus was «*5,000 for the current year, hence the Ontario government: commission haa authorised a
reduction of 18% ln power prices and
16% In lighting to take effect at once.
The city of Calgary owns lt street
car system and operates It successfully. In 1911 lt had a net surplus of
(33,315.28. The people of Calgary believe that two obstacles to a city's
progress are'. the taxing of Improvements and private ownership of public utilities. They have abolished
both.
VANCOUVER
JPTTi
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN FLAK
C. J. Love joy, Mgr.
istst 71s, %\M, 11.2$, $1 M,t-U
FREE AUTO BUS
Fort Street at Douglas - VICTORIA, B. C
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers   •
FREE
TERMS-Residence on the1
land for at least three yean;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres. < '
For further information apply to
Deiraty Minister of Ui4Vid(W,aC
Secretary, Korean of Provincia] lof-ormatieB, Vktora
The carpentera of Olace Bay, N. S„
have organised a union with 19 charter members. Bert Hills Is president
and T. Appleton Is secretary.
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
.MARKET
THE BEST
IRON     ,
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
ATAIvY
PRICE
Price - $3.50
Every Iron i* guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
I      10 Yean
i i     ,' '    '       .
SU  B.C. ELECTRIC -"Baa*
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED BY THE CANADIAN GOVEIttiMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic Servants
these are the only classes advised by the dominion government to
come to canada. all others are advised to have sufficient funds to look
after themselves in case of failure to obtain employment.
farming in canada offers to skilled workers of every craft, an
opportunity to get away from the grind and worry of industrial pursuits
And also to escape in a large measure the ever increasing cost of living
in cities.
in the vast wheat fields of the west a free farm of 160 acres is
offered to every man, while in the eastern provinces improved farms may
be acquired at prices within the reach of the man who has a little capi-
tal and prefers farming in one of the older settled provinces.
if you would like to know more about this, write for illustrated
literature to
Superintendent of Immigration
mm rassxi miliar
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FBDEEA.TI0NI8T.
FBIDAT DBCBMBBB 16, 1913.
NEXT MEETING OP T. AND L. C. JAN. 8, 1914,
Delegates to the central labor body will remember that at laat
meeting it was decided to postpone the next regular meeting oi
the council one week, trom Jan. 1st to Thuraday Jan. 8th. Nomination of officers tor the ensuing term will be one of thefprdera ot
business, and every delegate  In Vancouver should be present
TRADES AND UBOR
ADVERTISEMENT
msR
Br SAM ATKINSON.
The subject of the lecture to be
delivered by Sam Atkinson ln the
Colonial theatre, Oranvllle and Dunsmuir streets, on Sunday next, December 28th, will be "The Growth of
"freedom." There will be an organ
recital commencing at 7.45, and Mr.
F. L. Jeffry will render the solos.
The Thursday meetings In the
Labor Temple have heen postponed
on account of the holidays. Commencing January 8th, Prof. Morton,
of Warrington, will deliver a lecture
on "A National Minimum Wage." The
discussion following the lecture promises to be lively. The ladles of the
(social Democratic party are arranging to hold another musical and
danoe. Further particulars will be
announced next week.
OUR EDUCATIONAL »V8TEM,
(By Sam Atkinson)'
A atatement waa recently made to
the effect that the publlo schools In
Britlah Columbia were the. most ad-
vanoed In the world. There Is much
to criticize ln our modern methods,
More than thirty years ago in Great
Britain, tree klnaergartens were established. Here kindergartens are
conducted privately and for proflt
The flrat attempt to educate the child
ahould be through the senses. That
whloh we emell, see, hear, taate and
touch makes the greatest Impression
upon us In our most impressionable
yeara. , The orthodox Jews are the
•nost Sanitary people In the world.
They never allow their ohlldren to see
death' until they are about fourteen
years of age. The consequence Is
that the feat ot It does not play havoc
with the childish mind, Children are
Hot naturally bad. That which we
consider bad In them Is the result of
their environment They are willful.
Willful Individualism, however, haa
given to ua moat ot the blessings
we now enjoy. In our nubile school
system the teachers are not allowed
luuiMuuul expression, and because the
ruiing uisss determines what the cull-
men snail study, the opportunity to
ue»eioj» the oniid along the line of
natural Inclination la not allowable.
with Ine rapid advance of Industry,
we Shd that it will be Impossible to
have i individual expression until the
'Wvperauve commonwealth'' is e»
tauiuutsu. We ought, however, to
teas auvantage of every opportunity,
to tram the child's mind in suoh a
Wanner tnat tne men and women of
tu-uuwrow will be prepared to lace
tne prooiems of an Industrial republic
Buuaiiau la aooiety-ism. The children oi w-day will control the social
uie oi to-morrow. Present educational
lueuiudB wiu have to be discarded.
iue uunga they are taught now they
win u*«e to 'un-learn' li they are to
be uaeiui. Xneir senses, their in-
aunuts, tnelr perception, their mem-
or; w« neglected under the present
a/sum. 'iney are taught a great
u<»i tney cannot learn and will not
kyiiieviaie until they have reached
luauuiiy. Their brums are crowded
to auuu a degree tnat the principle
puijiuse ot an education la frustrated.
mi a result of misplaced authority,
our oimuren are not trained to tnlna
lur tueuueivea. 'thia is clearly the
lauit ot tne Bystem. Their parents
were neglected in the same-way, ap
tnat tne teaener haa no support in
Ue nuiue.
it u perfectly natural for tbe child
to aaa questions. The ohildlsh "why"
is ounsuuiuy being used. The parent
dues nut neip the ohlld to reaaon out
an answer to its own question, but,
answers the queatlon. The consequence la tnat we nave a nation computed of people who are, to quote
uiriyie, "mostly tools.''
auppoae, tor example, that you are
silting upon a benon In the park,
iour child aaka the question, "Why
do you eit here/" If you answer you
have atarteu the child to depend upon
your thought for an explanation of
your actions. The result will be that
tne child will become a mere automation—parrot-lute. Repeating your
answer without graaplu; the real reason. The proper way to do la to
answer your child'a "Why" with another "Why." laet the child answer
tne question. Presently the child
will reaaon the matter out In thla
way, that you either chose that particular aeat becauee lt la shady, or
you prefer to alt In the sunshine, aa
the caae may be.
Thia may seem to you a question of
minor Importance, but If you will
consider that the working class are
only just beginning to think and reaaon for themselves, and It you will
remember bow much that Is useless
has to be discarded, you will readily
see that our present methods are
wrong, and we ought to train the
child to reaaon for Itself ln order that
the child will be aaved a battle with
the un-reaaonable ln after life,
If the children ln our schools are
merely trained to paaa examinations,
then that which they "cram" will soon
pass into oblivion. If they are taught
to think and reason, then their pow
ers of perception, will be so tuneo
that they will the more readily rec
ognise that they must take their share
of society's burden.
Examine one subject, namely, hla
tory. There Is not a country In tht
world where the truth la taught A
false patriotism teaches every child
to be a liar. The names of so-calleo
great characters are taught to the,
children, while a course ln "lndustrlaa
history" would show them that his
tory has been made by the chatte.
slaves, the serfs, the working olasa
of every epoch. Trained to reason,
the child would be prepared to stud,,
political economy when the turn
came, without being hampered, a.
the children of a larger growth art
\yho vote for a party becauee thel.
lathers did.
There Is no attempt in our school*
to teach the child how to protect lt
self for society, either with regan.
to vocational matters, or the study o.
sex hygiene. Pope said: "The chle.
atudy of mankind, la man." Ou.
ohlldren may be said to be over-edu
cated In some things. That la be
oause we let them pick up garbagi
from the gutters, when the grant,
secret eould be explained to them ai
a very early age ln the schoolroon,
or the home.
No schools should be allowed to
exist where religious Instruction Is
given. Impressions are made with
regard to punishment here and here
after that are worse than criminal.
Religion h) purely personal and private. The childish mind should not
oe compelled to swallow any. particular dogma. Men have suffered untold agonies In trying to dispense
with beliefs that are beyond reaaon.
Fortunately for; the majority of us,
"the tears of pity have put out the
flames oi hell." History proves that
we have had a lop-sided humanity,
uet ua have aa a heritage to our ohlldren an educational System whloh
will allow them to be trained to think
and reason for themselveB.
The Executive Board Be-
porte re Miners' Liberation League
Delegates to B. 0. Federation of Labor—Beports
of Unions
BRAKEMAN KILLED.
John Simpson Met With a Fatal Accident on Lulu Islsnd.
Last Friday morning John Slupson,
a B. C. Blectric brakeman, waa killed
pn Lulu Island, within the city limits
of New Westminster. He was at
work shunting cars on the spur track
of the Westminster shingle mill. It
waa foggy, and the track waaSlippery.
In some way Mr. Simpson slipped and
the shunter ran over his body, break-
tog both arms and crushing the chest
He lived a few minutes, but died before the arrival of the unbulance. Deceased was about 85 yeara of age, and
unmarried.
Ian editor who started about twenty
years ago with only fifty-live centa la
now worth IIOO.OOO. His accumulation of wealth la owing to his frugality, good habits, strict attention to
business, and the fact that ah uncle
died and left him |9S,89t.—Bdltor and
Publisher.
Last Saturday the labor unlona of
Germany decided to withdraw deposits amounting to $5,000,000 from a
leading bank In Berlin which recently discharged one of lta employees
ueoause he had been engaged ln agitating tor the formation ot a bank
clerks' union.
Court records of Los Angeles county have been Anally cleared of the
laet vestige of the McNamara dynamiting caae, the indictment against
Clarence Darrow, who waa counsel (or
the dynamiter, charging him with
jury bribery. Darrow'a bondsmen
have been dismissed.
A. B. Scott of Winnipeg, sixth vice-
president of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of
America, haa been a sojourner to New
Brunswick recently In the Interests
ot hla organlation. He reports having found live locals of hla craft at
Halifax, Sydney and fit John and la
endeavoring to give Moncton local a
boost It Is altogether probable that
the L C. R. palntera who have been
afflliated with the carmen's organisation, will form a asperate local as
they now number upwards of fifty
men, which Is deemed quite sufficient
to carry on a successful branch. .
According to figures supplied by the
Interior department of the United
States, the ten-year average (1801-
1811) of men killed ln American collieries was 2879; that of Oreat Britain
1810; that of Germany 1017, and that
ot France 309. It la ahown that the
United States employs 807,438 men to
840,434 In the mines of Great Britain,
482,132 In Germany and 178,749 ln
France. The deaths per thousand employed were therefore ln America,
8,47, In Oreat Britain 1.36, In Germany 2.U and In France 1.89. The
department haa alao arranged the
mortality figures according to eoal
mined and on the aame ten-year aver
age In the respective countries per
million tons mined the computation la
for America 5.85, Great Britain 4.40,
Germany 7.66, and France 7.79. In
Japan it reachea the tearful total of
82.71 deatha per million tone ot eoal
mined,
Retrenchment Sale
WRAY & McKEE «re closing out their GRANVILLE
STREET STORE in order to give to customers and
friends the personal attention they find is due them and allow
them to devote their time and energy in building up their
already well-established business on Hastings Street.
For the balance of the month every article in their two
stores wiD be marked at CLOSING OUT PRICES. All
our new winter and CHRISTMAS GOODS muit go in
order to combine our stocks in January,
You can make great savings in selecting your Christmas presents in our store.
Wray&McKee
LIMITED
HI HABTINQt *TREET WEST
*t| ORANVILLE »TRBET
LABOR TEMPLE, Dec. 18,.1913.
The Tradee and Labor Council convened thla evening at 8 p.m. with
President Benson In the chair. The
minutes ot the previous meeting were
approved as read, Credential wae received and delegate seated, namely,
Wm. Barker, bricklayer.
Executive Beard Report.
The executive board met this evening at 7.30 with the following members present: Benson, MeVety, Burroughs, Pettlplece, Campbell, Wilkinson, Mldgley, McEwen and Miss
Brisbane.
Communications.
From F. F. Westbrook, president of
University of BrltlBh Columbia, re
secretary meeting board of governors,
Reoelved, flled and concurred ln.
From A. F. of L., asking for detailed
Information of unlona. Reoelved, Sled
and concurred ln.
From B. C. Federation of Labor:
Call for convention to commence lh
New Westminster January 26th, 1914.
Received; that two delegates be sent,
concurred In.
From B. C. Miners' Liberation
league containing copies of resolutions passed at meeting In Horse
Show building Dec. 8th; also request
that a night lettergram be sent to
minister of justice on Dec. 23rd, demanding release of miners who are In'
jail. Received. That communication
be received and request compiled
with, concurred in.
From 'District Council of Painters
of Seattle and vicinity re firms placed
by them on the unfair list. Received,
read to delegates and flled; concurred
ln. L ■
Recommendation—That exeoutlve of
Trades and Labor congress of Canada
be urged to go forward with our plan
of protesting agalnat miners' sen*
tences, as submitted to them by this
council, and tbat this recommendation
be sent by lettergram.  Conourred in.
From Chas. Boardman, notifying
council ot hla Intention, to run for
offlee of alderman In ward 4. Reoelved, read to delegates and filed.
Amendment tbat lt be laid over to
new business;  concurred In.
The following accounts were recommended for payment and concurred
In: Jaa, Campbell for December, 815;
J. W. Wilkinson, wages, 160.
The report of the.business agent
waa given, and on motion, received,
de recommended that a committee
consisting ot Delegates Miss Coote,
Miss Outterldge and the business
agent be appointed to take up the
queatlon of attempting to organise the
laundry workers. The recommendation was adopted.
. The report of the committee appointed In re fares charged by the
B. C. E. Ry. waa read and received.
The committee ■ waa complimented
upon lta exceedingly able report
Motion—That a letter be sent to the
city council, pointing out that no notice had been aent to the Trades council re the last meeting of the B. C. B.
Ry. committee.   Carried.
Delegate Foxcroft reported for the
B. C, Miners' Liberation league. The
report waa, on motion, received,
Motion—That we donate $60 to B.
C. Minera' Liberation league,
Amendment—That  we  donate 150
providing that similar organisations
other than unlona donate like anms;
and that If auch organisations do not
donate, we withdraw from the league.
Amendment lost; motion carried.
Delegate Walker reported for the
Labor Representation committee. Report wbb received, aa progress.
Delegate McVety reported aa delegate to the A. F. of L. Report was
received.
Reports of Unions.
Cook, Letter-carriers—They had de-
elded that each member should contribute to the B. C. Minora' Liberation
league aa he aaw fit
McEwen, Amalgamated Carpentera
—Trade bad; carpentera' smoker had
realised »70 for miners' children.
Burroughs, Street Rallwaymen—
Conditions very slack; half of the mechanical staff had been laid off; they
hoped to adjust matten by all working halt time,
Lyall, Plumbers—They had formed
a new local at the C. P. R. ahops. .
McVety, Machinists—They had decided to join Liberation league, providing Mr. Godson waa eliminated
from future meetings held by the
league; they had 37 new members last
meeting,
Moving Picture Operaton — The
new Rex theatre wu going to use
non-union operaton.
Trotter, Typos.—R. P. Pettlplece
had been elected president of the
Typographical union; they were opposed to language used by Godson at
recent meeting held In Hone Show
building.
Burkhart, Barben—Trade bad.
Walker, Cooke—They bad  put a
card ln the Dufferin hotel.
Election of Officers,
The following were' nominated as
delegatea to the B. C. Federation of
Labor: Wllklnaon, Mouwen, Foxcroft
and Miss Outterldge, Nominations
were on motion dosed; Delegates
Brooks and Trotter were appointed
tellers. Result of election—Wilkinson, 82; McEwen, 15; Foxcroft, 8;
Outterldge, 28; one spoiled ballot.
Wilkinson and Outterldge elected.
'     New Business.
The letter of Chas. Boardman was
taken up and on motion flled.
Motion by Delegate Trotter—That
the ease of the estate ot Steven Pieces
against J, W, Stewart to recover
damages under the Workmens' Compensation aot be referrTdfto the business sgsnt of this council to gather
what particulars he can; and that the
legal advlsen of this counoll be requested to state what effect the de-
clalon of Judge Orant In this esse will
have In the esae of other worken In
the province who are at preeent com
pelted to work, whether oasually or
regularly on Sundaya.     Motion carried.
Motion—That a representative of
the proposed Civic Centre scheme be
asked to attend bur next meeting and
explain the proposal.   Carried.
Motion—That) the matter of the
Rex theatre be left ln the handa of
the business agent to act ln conjunction with the moving picture operators, the stage employees, and the
musicians.   Carried.
Good and Welfare.
Delegate Plcklp called the attention
ot the couhcll to the.reckless driving
of automobiles ln the city, and the
tact, that no one seemed to be punished,'tor accidents which occur.
Motion—That the next meeting be
held on the second Thuraday In January.   Carried.
Delegate Sinclair criticised the B.
C. Federatlonist for Inserting government advertising of farm lands. Delegate Pettlplece replied.
The president apopinted Delegate
Cook to attend the B. C. Miners' Liberation league. Fifty-three delegates
were present.
Council adjourned.
COA6T IMMIGRATION.
The Propoeed Opening of Panama
Canal Brings Queatlon to Pore,
Legislation on Immigration haa
been striking, particularly on the Pa-
olflc coaat, where the approaching
opening of the Panama Canal has
again brought this question to the
fore. While California, Oregon and
Washington united ln asking Congress
to exclude all Aalatlo laborers, California established a , commission
whose powers embrace the whole Held
of educational, legal and Industrial
protection of Incoming aliens. The
Canadian federal government has promised further legislation to regulate
Oriental Immigration.
LETTERS TO
I. AND L
L
Representatives on Board of
Management of Day
-    Nursery
Delegates Elected to New
Westminster B. 0. Federation of Labor
A Reply to Mr. Youhill.
Bdltor B. C. Federatlonist: In the
Issue of December 19th, I note a letter by Mr. Youhill, defending his
previous stand, that a union man can
be a good union man and a good soldier at the same time. I wish to
take exception to that statement, because I know It can't be done. I
put ln three years ln the U. S. army
and am at the present time a good
union man. The oath of allegiance
tb tbe flag of his country and to his
government, states that he swears to
Obey all commands of his superior
officers. I would like to have Mr.
Youhill tell us how he would avoid
going to some strike zone and be told
by his offlcen to make a raid on the
union hall and confiscate all the
property of said union and destroy
all ihe furniture ln the building, then
be marched across the street to a
co-operative atore' (run by the union)
and told to carry all the flour lh the
place.out Into the street cut open
the Sacks and go la and get all the cans
of coal oil, bring them out ln the
street and pour contents over the flour,
bring all the clothing and wearing
apparel ln the store out and burn
them In the street aa was done by
the mllltla ln Cripple Creek during
the atrlke there In 1902? Would he
still be a good soldier and obey and
still.be true to the obligations of the
union he belongs to? I realise he la
trying to Justify his position' by In-
ferlng that If the union men would
keep the peace and not break the law
there would be no need of the mllltla
being used against them. I request
that he eend 10 cents to the Department of publlo documents at Washington and secure a oopy of the report nf the commission that InvsSil-
gated the strike troubles at Cripple
Creek, also at Ooldfleld ln 1907, and
see for himself how muoh disorder
the union men were responsible for.
It would convince him that the mllltla
is not used to maintain order In this
twentieth century, but Is used alu.ost
exclusively to Intimidate labor. Add
hla quoting that bid "chestnut" about
the Invasion of this country by the
Oriental coolie hordes Is too childish
for a grown man to use. I hereby
challenge him to debate the queatlon:
"Can a Union Man Be a Good Union
Man and Be a Good Soldier at the
Same Time?" before his union or,
preferably, before the Trades and
Labor counoll meeting ln the near
future; and I will guarantee to fur-
nlsh him all the proof he requires
that It Is Impossible. Lack of apace
does not permit me to answer bis
article aa It should be answered.
Yours for labor,
' ■    E. B. LEMKE.
Vancouver, B. C, Deo, 24, 1913.
VICTORIA, B.C., Dee. 17.—The regular meeting of the Trades and Labor
Council was held laat evening. Vice-
president Siverts occupied the chair,
credentials were received for J. M.
Smith of the Electrical workers, The
Horseshoers Local union applied for
affiliation to the central body, Delegates A. C. Holmes and R. S. Williams
acting for same. Minutes of previous
meeting read and approved.
A communication from the Day
Nursery asking the council to appoint
two delegates to act on the management board was accepted and Delegates J. A. Martin and C. Siverts were
appointed to act on same.
Upon communication from the Canadian Peace Association, asking for the
cuunoii to have representation on the
C. P. A. board, after quite a discussion lt was thought advisable, If we
wanted to flnd out more about this
aiir. Scullln and his tactics, to send
some person trom our own ranks,
delegates Watchman and Martin were
appointeu to act on same. We think
lt would do aome good It all central
uodies were to send delegat.es to their
meetings, as we would be on the
ground floor and be able to show up
this so-called peace advocate.
A communication from Department
of Labor, asking for a Hat of labor
organisations In our locality, was referred to the Seoretary to answer as
requested.
Convention call of the B. C. Federation of Labor waa received and the
council decided to send two delegates.
After a spirited contest T. H. Norrls
and C. Siverts were Anally elected, to
attend same and J. L. Martin and J,
Day were elected to act as alternate
delegates.
The hospital commission reported
that they were still trying to get the
fair-wage clause Inserted ln the Jubilee hospital contract.
Vlotoria unionists are not as Slow
as some people think, as In the specifications ot the Hudson's Bay company's new building we have the union labor clause Inserted, which states
that union labor only shall be used In
the construction ot the building.
J. L. Martin, delegates to the central labor body, Is a candidate for
aldermanlc honon In the coming
municipal election.
The committee on the Kiddles'
Christmaa, Box Fund reported that
they had aent Ave hundred and Ave
dollars to Mr. FoBter, president of the
District 28, U. M. W. of A., and that
he had turned lt over to the B. C.
Federationist.
fa All ©ur spatrmtfi atift Mrtentoi
WB SRND THB
ftatltalp*
FOR A
<8lai> mt& pnroptnnoi
j8>ro ptr
i
HENRY BIRKS & SONS, LTD.
. JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS,
Geo. E. TROREY, Men. Dir. Vancouver, B.C
CranUb aad Csorah Stmts
CIVIC EJECTIONS
At Edmonton Gratifying to Members
ef Labor Counoll
EDMONTON, ALTA., Deo. 20.—At
a well attended meeting of the central
labor body here, In Mechanics' hall
last evening, a notable feature was
tbe feeling of jubilation which marked
t>« membership as the result of the
recent civic elections, not only
because of the • election of brother
J. A. Kinney, a member of the Brother
hood of Carpenters' union, to the aldermanlc board, but also because of
the defeat of the number of candidates who have, ln ihe paat acted
Inimical to the Interests of organlied
labor. 1
The counoll passed a resolution asking the provincial government and the
city council authorities to proceed
with all publlo work possible during
the winter months so as to mitigate
aa tar as possible the period of non-
employment whloh usually prevails at
this season of the year,
A communication was read from
Hon. J, C. Doherty, minister of Justice,
ln anawer to, a recent letter from the
council stating that all steps possible
would be taken to secure the liberation of the Vancouver Island mlnen.
A. W. Murphy-, of Reglna, Electrical Worken' union, No, 672, nays:
'Brothers Pegg, Ord and myself together with two members of the exeoutlve board of the local tradea and
labor council recently visited the attorney-general ot thla province, Hon.
A. Purgeon, K. C, relative to aecurlng
legislation at thla session If possible,
for 'an act' governing all hasardous
electrical constitution and equipment
We were given a very courteous and
sympathetic audience. He thought
nothing could be done at thla session,
hut-might try to use lt under the government's signature. He waa eur-
prised to learn the electrical workers
were not Included In the compensation aot and promised to Include them
Immediately. WS left rather pleaaed
with our efforts. Brother-Pegg contrasted thla Interview with other provlnolal officials elsewhere."
An Increase of 6 per cent, to all
workmen now earning under 82 a day
as employees of the Dominion Coal
company at Halifax, N. S„ will be
granted Jan, 1st, In accordance with
an agreement that has been reached
between the company and the employees. About 10,000 men are Involved. The present wage scale expires at the end of the year and negotiations for a more satisfactory contract for. the coming three yeara were
begun In September.
The Holland government has Just
published a plan, submitted by the
clerical cabinet, tor an old age pension, which Involves, no contributions on the part of the workers.
Seoretary Neelands of the Typographical union spent the week end
at Vlotoria.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
COLDS, ETC.
NOTICE
WILSON & RICHMO
who handle all daises of Union Goods for Men, have acquii
buiineu formerly carried on by BURTON BROS., 37 HASTI1
STREET W., along with At, handling of all the noted brendlW
clothing, including the famous L System Clothes carried by that firm.
We are offering at our Cordova Street store special reductioni on all
stock prior to our moving. STANFIELD UNDERWEAR, STETSON HATS, CURRIE'S RAINCOATS. SWEATER COATS,
OIL CLOTHING LINEMEN'S GLOVES, ETS.. at prices
never equalled,   Come and bring the family..   .
MENTION THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST' AND WE WILL
GIVE VOU A BEAUTIFUL CALENDAR
Wilson & Richmond
3S CORDOVA ST. W.
37 HASTINGS ST. W.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, Managlna Director.)
Two Stores—
so-s4 ooxwota s»n* wan   n
Carpenters' White Duck Overalls,
with IS poeketi, union labsl 81.71
Man's Heavy Tweed Panta, union
'seal ■ MOO to 11.(0
Wa aak for your patronage In our- Suit  and   Ovareoat  Depart.
meets, when wa glvs value everyflme,
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
AT REGULAR PRICES
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
5408-
-PHONES SEYMOUR-
-5409
GET   ACQUAINTED  WITH   HIM
WHOt
THE  WESTERN  COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magaslne,
breathing the spirit of our Great
Weat   Emanuel Julius and Cheater lt. Wright Editors.   (1.00 a
Eear; single copies, 10 centa.   101
tew High St., Los Angeles, Cal.
DuANIsMCdk       PsrianACaaMl
PfcsasBar.SSS        aSSSGnavSiSt.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS aad
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Britlah Columbia
NOW ON IN THE MINING CAMPS OP CUMBERLAND,
NANAIMO, SOUTH WELLINGTON AND LADYSMITH
ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALL* WORKERS KEEP AWAY.   THE COAL BARONS ARE
BEING AIDED IN AN ATTEMPT TO BREAK THE STRIKE
AND DEFEAT TEiADE UNIONISM.
By Bowser's Special Police and Soldiers
THOUSANDS OP MEN ARE OUT OP WORK IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA, AND THERE 18 NO-CHANCE FOR A MAN TO
GET WORK UNLESS HE GOES TO WORK .ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN
SO KEEP AWAY FROM VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ll.
I      i

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