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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 2, 1914

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 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL UNITY      ,"*\'l3NGTH.
        . /-:.:  .*:
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
'"'-W~T.ik
POLITICAL UNITY:   vTCTOKTI
SIXTH Yfy.    *NNo. 143
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
("WSTCT) $1.50 PER YEAR
Commencing Friday, January 30,1914, Is the
Request
Of the B. 0. Miners' Liberation League—Meets
on Sunday
The B. C. Miners' Liberation league
held a busy session on Sunday afternoon ln Labor Temple. The local
ladles who so freely gave their services on "tag day" were thanked by
the league, when their collection for
the miners' kiddles on Vancouver
Island amounted to $1,013.60. The
World staff also contributed $47.45.
J. A. Fairfield is the only person
authorised to make collections for
the league and carries credentials to
that effect. A cheque for $500 was
wired to D. Todd, of the U. M. W. of
A., at Nanalmo. The balance will be
sent later. A telephone will be installed in the secretary's offices in
Labor Temple by the league. The following proclamation will be sent to
all labor bodies, political and Industrial, in Canada, and will be printed
ln the English, Hindu, Japanese,
Chinese, Polish, Italian, French, Russian and Circassian languages:
"VANCOUVER, B. C,
"December 29, 1913.
"To All the Members of Organised
Labor ln Canada:
"Fellow Workers: The B. C. Miners' Liberation league was formed for
the express purpose of freeing our
union brothers from jail, where they
have been railroaded for long terms
for trying to safeguard their lives
whilst working ln the mines. The
way these men are being treated Is
without parallel ln the history of the
Dominion. The various labor organisations forming the League have carried on a campaign of publicity so as
to make the workers acquainted with
the true situation. As a result of this
campaign there haa been mass parades, protest meetings, etc., held all
over the country. Ministers of the
gospel have voiced their disapproval
of the action of the government, and
fair-minded men in all ranks of life—
throughout the length and breadth of
the land—have voiced the same sentiment. Tens of thousands of signed
protests, petitions and demanda for
the release ot these men have been
eent to the minister of Justice. Thousands are still going ln, yet ln the
face of the expressed wishes of these
many thousands of citlsens, the gov
eminent utterly refuses to even con
elder the question, and even refuses
to investigate the matter. The league
realises that more action Is necessary
If our persecuted brothers are to be
freed and we now call upon the whole
organised labor to act. We number many thousands of men, a great
part of whom are directly afflliated
wltb the miners, paying dues to the
same organisations. We call them
. 'brothers' In our union halls. We
say 'In unionism, there is strength,'
and that an injury to one is an Injury
to all. If this Is so, then we have
got to prove It, or the labor movement
of this country Ib a farce, a fraud, and
unworthy of the attention or support
of any honest man. If the workers
of other countries can protect and
free their brother unionists, we can
do the same. The masters have called
the bluff. You have got to show him
you are real unions, lt Is up to you.
You have the power to stop this outrage, and we ask your local unions to
aend in an early reply, stating if your
body Is In favor of taking a 48-hour
holiday, aa a protest, commencing
Friday, January 30, Send replies to
the B. C. Miners' Liberation league,
room 206, Labor Temple, Vancouver,
B. C.
"H. J. McEWEN, Sec.-Treas."
Following Is a copy of a "sticker"
which also will be sent out with the
foreign proclamation:
"Mr. Worklngman: This Is to notify you that the B. C. Minera' Liberation league has called for a 48-hour
holiday, commencing Friday, January
30, 1914, as a protest against the sentences imposed upon our brothers the
striking miners of Vancouver island.
Any man working on the above date
will be a traitor to the working class.
Workers of all nations unite. It may
be your turn next. B. C. Miners' Liberation league, Labor Temple, Vancouver, B.C."
Tbe league will Issue 20,000 copies
' of a pamphlet, giving full particulars of the strike on Vanoouver Island. The letterpress was prepared
by J. Kavanagh. Additional contributions are as follows: Brewery
Workers, 115.25; Electrical Workers,
ISO; Tile-layers, 125; Steam Engineers, 310.
Tbe full league meets each Sunday
afternoon In Labor Temple. All organisations are requested to send
their delegates, as the meetings are
most important.
Sheet Metal Workera.
At last regular meeting of local
union, No. 280, Amalgamated Sheet
Metal Workers' International Alliance,
officers were elected for the ensuing
term, as follows: President, J. Fraser,
re-elected, bcclama't'on; vice-president, W. Oalbralth; flnanclal secretary,
I H. J. Wardrop, re-elected, acclama-
, .tlon; receiving and corresponding secretary, H. Spear, re-elected, acclamation; treasurer, T. Soarlett, re-elected
acclamation; warden A. Olbheart, reelected, acclamation; conductor, Ed.
Lehman; business agent, J. Hamilton,
re-elected, acclamation; trustee, W.
Fisher; delegate8 to Trades and Labor
counoll, A. Crawford, G. Freeman, and
J, Robb; delegates to Building Trades
council, J. Hamilton; trustee, Labor
Temple sharea, A. Crawford; delegates to Northwest district council; H.
Spear and A. Crawford. Trade conditions are reported aa being rather
dull, but expect Improvement early in
the Ne* Year.
TO MAKE ROOM
;e
P. R. Pays Off Orews
Empresses of India
and Asia
Fine Fleet Sailing From
Here Will Be Manned
by Orientals
We are told by providers ot political pabulum that "our fair province of British Columbia is the
brightest star ln Canada's diadem."
'Also that "the world stands amazed
at the meteoric progress of our wonderful province!" At other times we
are Informed that "British Columbia
Is destined to become the motherland
of a race of hardy seamen and fishermen !" Whereat the. audience applauds vehemently and goes home
wearing a satisfied smile expressive
of false security into which lt has
been lulled. Ana right in the port of
Vancouver, called the Liverpool of
the Pacific by the publicity merchants
we had the spectacle of white men
being fired to make room for Chinese.
The c ■ P. R., generally acknowledged
to be the largest and moBt efficient
transportation company ln the world,
has Been fit to
Pay Off the White Crews
of the Kmpress of India 'and the Empress af Asia and to replace those
white men with Chinese. The compsny has the legal right to do so. It
Ib independent of governments. It
is even Bald that governments are
independent of the C. P. R. The
matter, however, Is worth studying
beoause lt brings home the evergrowing problem ot the Asiatic.
What has been done on the Empress
of India and Empress of Asia will
also be done, no doubt, on the Empress of Japan and Empress of Russia, bo that all the line fleet of the
C. P. R., sailing from Vancouver will
be manned by Chinese with the exception of the deck and englneroom
officers, the quartermasters, probably
a few petty officers and some messenger boys. In the cases of the Empress ot India and Empress of Japan,
It means that each ship will dispense
with about twenty-eight white men.
The larger and latest vessels will
Dlspenae With About Forty Whltea.
These men are thrown on to an already congested labor market and
their places taken by Chinese. The
C. P. R. claims that lt is impossible
to get steady white crews, If the
statements of company officials to the
capitalistic presB are to be believed.
Yet for over twenty years this company has built up a huge business for
Its ships with white deck crews on
its Empresses. In 1913, however,
when even apathetic and indifferent
Eastern Canada is beginning to appreciate the problem facing British
Columbia, the omnipotent C. P. R.
fires its white sailors and hires Chinese. Granted that Chinese are more
reliable—because they cannot get
shore leave on this side; granted that
they are more docile and, therefore,
more amenable to discipline; granted
that they may be just as efficient and
willing—then that is all the more reason why we ln British Columbia
should lock hands against the Asiatic
for it is another example of how
The Insidious Oriental
Is creeping on us. But why is the
Chinaman more reliable? Is It because he Ib well satisfied with his
wage which Is far ahead of what he
can earn in his own country? The
white sailor may be bold enough to
demand a wage which wtll permit him
to get something out ot life ashore
ln Vancouver where living is high.
Is the Liverpool scale of wages fair
for men who live and sail out ot
Vancouver? The Chinese may flnd
their quarters on board fairly comfortable and spacious according to
their standard, but did the white
sailors find their forecastle tending
towards comfort as regarded by white
people? The Chinese may find the
food supplied by their own cooks a
little better to what they were used
to ashore, but did the white sailors
flnd the grub sent Into their forecastle
as good as what they got ashore in
Vanoouver?
It May 8ult the C. P. R.
to make allegations against the conduct of white crews In order that
they can place Chinese on their ships
but they will not convince the thinker.
The Empresses, with their chattering
Chinese, dock at Pier B, Across the
shed are the vessels of the Union
Steamship company of New Zealand.
They carry all white crews on deck,
ln the englneroom and as waiters.
Those ships handle as big a trade sb
the C. P. R. and If they can do bo
with all-white crews lt will be hard
for the C. P. R. to excuse Its dismissal of the few whites the. Empresses
carried on deck. Perhaps the fact
that the Australian scale of wages
and, hours rules on the red-funnel
liners has something to do with the
good class ot seamen the Union
Steamship company of New Zealand
secures.
Municipal Elections In Burnaby.
The coming elections ln the municipality promise to be the hottest ln
the hiBtony of Burnaby, candidates for
councilors being In the field ln every
ward. The contest for the reeveBhtp
has brought out three aspirants, Hugh
M. Fraser, Councillor Macpherson and
the present Incumbent, Reeve McGregor. ;Aiy»ve appeared before the
electors and' the light is running merrily along.   BtacUon day Is Jan. 17th.
Si Hawkins sustained
!ture of the leg when
On TU*
a compound
sor baokiMl^^pie he was starting
lt. ' '       ; '*'
nginesof. tt-gasollne alr-compres-
acMtei'-w"*   *
A. M. KIihj, a member of the Typo-
graphlcsl .uriosv haa left the city for
the ii
Back row—D. Mc.Iver, vice-president Dlv. 134, New Westminster, B. C.; P. A. Hoover, financial secretary and buslneSB agent
Dlv. 101, Vancouver, B. C: Garrett Burns, business agent, Div. 26, Detroit, Mich.; T. L. McGrath, sec.-treas Dlv, 85, Pittsburg, Pa.; A. F. Duncan, rec.-sec. Dlv. 134;' New Westminster, B. C: L. Fletcher, past president Dlv, 101, Vancouver, B.C.
Middle row—W. Taber, flnanclal secretary and business agent Div 241, Chicago, III.: W. D. Mahon, international president A.
A. of S. and E. B. E. of A.: Adam Taylor, president Div. 1*1, Vanoouver, B.C.; A. V. Lofting, rec.-sec. Div. 101, Vancouver, B. C.    • '    ■
Bottom row—W. Yates, president Dlv. 134, New Westminster: H. S. Schofleld, past president, Dlv. 101, Vancouver, B. C.
Prominent Trade Unionist
Meets With Instant
Death
Passing of Bro. E. O. Knight
Oreat Loss to Labor
Movement
Edward Charles Knight, a B.C.E.R.
lineman, was instantly killed on Friday, December 26th, by coming ln contact with a live electric wire at the
corner of Twentieth avenue, Inverness
street and Klngsway. Electrocution
was caused by a current of twenty-
two hundred volts. Mr. Knight had
ascended a pole In connection with
the hanging of a light when the accident occurred. He had scraped the
insulating material off a wire and
stuck the knife he had used Into the
pole. In bringing his arm back his
hand struck the primary wire, completing the circuit and causing instant
death. As he was strapped to the
pole, he was prevented from falling to
the ground. His companions immediately climbed to the cross arm and
brought him down. Life, however,
was found to be extinct after about
forty-five minutes' work at resuscitation. At ths Inquest held on Monday
afternoon at Greene and Merkeley's
parlors a verdict of accidental death
was returned. It transpired during
the evidence that neither the company
nor union made a practise of teaching the linemen methods of resuscitation. In many cities of the east
such Instruction is insisted on by
either the union or the company. The
late Mr. Knight,'' familiarly known as
"Teddy" throughout the city, had for
years been a resident of Vancouver
and for the past eight years had been
employed by the B. C. B. R. company.
He was prominent in local union circles and had only recently attended a
convention of electrical wireworkers
in Minneapolis as the representative
of the local union. He had been for
several years a member of No. 213
Electrical Work tb' union, and had
held the various offices ln the gift of
that local. He was also ln 1909 secretary-treasurer of the Vancouver
Trades and Labor council. Two years
ago he was only defeated by a few
votes for the position of vice-president for Canada of the organization
In which he took keen Interest. He
was about 46 years of age and leaves
a widow and seven children to mourn
hts loss.
The funeral took place Tuesday
afternoon from Greene & Merkley's
parlors, Pender street, under the auspices of the Knights ot Pythias
(Mount Pleasant No. 11) ln conjunction with No. 213 Eleotrical Workers'
union. The funeral services at the
chapel were conducted by the Rev.
St. George Buttrum. The attendance
was very large, several hundreds being in the procession to Mountain
View cemetery., wb tie interment took
place in the Knights of Pythias plot.
The beautiful ritual of the latter society was used at the graveside.
The pall-bearers were: C. Smith,
A. Mcintosh, R. H. Malcolm, H.
Hogan, W. Thomas and R. 4a. McKee.
Bricklayers.
At Tuesday night's meeting of the
Bricklayers' and Masons' union there
were two members initiated and two
applications presented for membership.
The state of trade Is dull, only
about half of the members being
employed.
President J. Haslett will leave on
Tuesday for Houston, Texas, where
he will be a delegate at the annual
convention.
E. M. Endlcotts, of Barbers' Local
No. 120, Is on a visit to Portland.
Ernest Whltworth, compositor on
Seattle Times, spent Christmas and
New Yeara with frionds In Vancouver.
1
BRUTALITY TO
President Moyer Assaulted
and Shot in Back by
Seething Mob
Desperate Efforts of Mine
Owners to Win in
Struggle
The following te'ayam from C. H.
Moyer, of the Western. Federation of
Miners, speaks for Itself:
"IRON MOUNTAIN, Mich.,
"Dec. 26, 1913.
"Ernest   Mills,   606   Railroad   Bldg.,
Denver, Colo.:
"Chas. H. Tanner and myself were
brutally assaulted in my room in the
Scott hotel, Hancock,' Michigan, tonight. I was shot ln the back and
dragged more than one and one-halt
miles through the tsreets of Hancock
by a mob of Waddell-Mahon thugs
and Cltlens' Alliance, put aboard a
Milwaukee train and threatened with
death if I dared to return. But you
can say for me that the cause I represent Is well worth the suffering I
have undergone; the cause of the
striking miners Is just and they will
win. (Signed) "CHAS. H. MOYER."
Later news states that the wounded
man bore up under his terrible experiences and is now progressing
favorably.
"TAG DAY."
Sum of $1,013,60 Ralaed For Minora'
Children.
"Tag Day," authorized by the city
council, in aid of the wives and children of the strlklngminers on Vancouver Island, was a great success.
The Bum of <1,013.60 was donated by
the citlsens. The unique showing during Saturday mode by the Mlnere'
Liberation league was favorably commented on. Drawn through the
streets on wagons were signs: (1)
Depicting an explosion ln a mine, Inscribed with the words: "Never a
Mine Blown Skyward, but We Are
Buried Alive (Or You; for 25 Years
an Average of 27 Men Have Beon
Killed Each Year In Mines on Vancouver Island." (2) Depicting scales
of juBtice; on one Bcale was a cartoon of a miner; on the other, "stocks,
bills and dividends," the wording being "BrltlBh Justice." Also a wagon
containing about 20 children carried
cotton signs on both sides, which
read: "We Want Our Daddies Out
of Jail."
Harry Cowan, ex-president B. C.
Lacrosse association and of the well
known firm of Cowan & Brookhouse,
left yesterday for an extended trip
combining business and pleasure to
the old country. He is accompanied
by Con Jones, Viincouver's popular
and well knowai citizen.
MONTHLY TOLL OF
INDUSTRIAL WORLD
EVER INCREASING.
Industrial accidents occurring
to 510 workpeople in Canada
during the month of November,
1913, were recorded by the department of labor. Of these
162 were fatal and 368 resulted
ln serious Injuries. In October
there were 111 latal and 400
non-fatal accidents recorded, a
total of 5U; and in November,
1912, there wero 128 fatal and
626 non-fatal accidents recorded, a total of 653. The number
of fatal accidents recorded In
November was one leas than
In Ootober and twenty-four
"November, 1912.
more thin .
The nuSiser
dents
was   _—.
ber andJ67
. ber, 1»J«
non-fatal accl-
ln   November
ib than ln Octo-
than In Novem-
LOCAL TYPOS MEET
Delegates to Coming Convention of B. C. Federation of Labor
I. T. U. Commission Gives
Notice of Issue of Lessons for Apprentices
President Alf. England. presided
over a large attendance af the regular
monthly meeting of the Typographical union held In Labor Temple on
Sunday. Secretary Neelands was also
in his place. A communication was
received from T. W. McCullough, of
Omaha, Neb., one of the delegates to
the Seattle convention of the A, F. of
L., representing the I. T. U. ln which
he expressed his appreciation o<: the
courtesies extended to the delegates
by the local union on the occasion of
their recent visit to Vancouver. Credentials were given four delegates to
attend the coming convention of the
B. C. Federation of Labor at New
Westminster, commencing January 26,
1914, namely: H. C. Benson, W. R.
Trotter, R. P. Pettipiece and George
Bartley.
The International Typographical
commission has given notice of the
Issue of nine lessons in connection
with the I. T. U. course of instruction
In printing on the following subjects:
(1-3) punctuation, (4) use ot capital
letters, (6) proofreaders' marks and
their meanings, (6) type faces and
their use, (7) question of spacing,
(8) the use of decoration ln typography and (9) the question of display. These lessons are especially
valuable to apprentices.
H. C. Benson gave a lengthy report
regarding the formation of the labor
representation league in the city.
Proceedings then terminated.
NEW LOCAL FORMED.
Steam and Operating Englneara Hold
Regular Meeting,
Vancouver Local No. 397, International union of Steam and Operating
Engineers, held their regular meeting
on December 24. There were fourteen applications for membership
which were dealt with ln the usual
manner. The chief business of the
evening was the reading of Business
Agent Prendergrast's report, who stated that on December 20 he visited
Powell River for the purpose of organizing the engineers ln the paper
mills. In this he was successful and
he felt sure the new baby would
prosper. He also reported that the
dispute, which had Involved 4 engineers and 40. Ironworkers with the
Dominion Bridge company at Lytton,
had been settled. The troubel between the engineers and ironworkers
and the contractors on the Hotel
Vancouver work was still unsettled.
Vice-president W. M. Flndlay, international organizer, is here, and will
hold an open meeting on Sunday,
January 4, at 2.30 ln the Labor
Temple.
Vancouver Labor Temple Company.
The third annual general meeting
of the Vancouver Labor Temple company, limited, will be held on Monday
evening, January 5, 1914, at 8 o'clock
In the evening, at the registered office
of tbe company, corner of Homer and
Dunsmuir streets. The company will
doubtless show a satisfactory report
comparing well with the successful
ones of previous yeara.
Nelson Unionists Nominate.
NELSON, Dec. 30.—At last meeting
of Nelson Trades and Labor council,
Alderman I. A. Austin was nominated
for re-election as alderman, and in
addition John Notman, present secretary of the central labor body, was selected as an aldermanlc candidate ln
the civlo elections. Alderman Austin
has sat aa an alderman for the past
two years and during the present year.
UNOGRABBERSNOWMINISe OF UBOR
BUIY
E       INDIFFERENT
How This Fraudulent System of Wholesale Plunder Is Worked
Report on 118 Sections, or
75,620 Acres in Peace
River Valley
(BY BESOM.)
1L The following specimen list ot
grabbers—dummy and fake names
used for the illicit manufacture ot
Bowserlsm powers-of-attorney, to covertly filch away at one fell swoop
75,520 acres of the richest agricultural lands In BrltlBh Columbia—Is
published to bring desoislvely before
the minds of settlers and working
citizens, the base and disastrous methods by which our heritage Is being
bartered away for the sorriest "mess
of pottage" profligates can gulp down
How the System la Worked.
12. The Issue of December 12th recorded how one such syndicate of
schemers was organized. We.now
proceed to unfold the subsequent
stages of the working of these powerful plundering syndicates who first
get a list of names signed by any
Tom, Dick or Harry, and secondly
provide the grub-stake, outfit and
other Inducements to the "staker,"
(euphemistically described as agent)
and his party, who for such unconscionable work will likely be designated as "bleeders" striking tbelr
plundering knives at the heart of
British Columbia's outflowing prosperity, they are causing to ebb away.
13. Report on 118 sections of land
ln the Peace river valley, containing
75,520 acres. These 76,520 acres of
land lie around Nation lake, and are
but samples ot the eleven similarly
plundered areas totalling 449,093
acres offered in one letter. The original report described each section
as Is done for the flrst name, James
Morrison, listed as No. 1, but aa every
seotlon held through each name la
fully staked for 640 acres, there
would be waste of time lh repeating
640 acres 118 times needlessly. Similar sections are applied to the words
"soil," "sandy loam," "subsoil," "clay"
and "surface," copied below for more
effective comparison by columns
headed by these words. Any departure therefrom Is noted thereunder,
opposite each respective section, with
the description of the surface, timber,
etc., written right across the lines following the name of each party ln
whose name tbat particular section
was staked. The needless words,
"this section is" are not repeated as
this would waste space and time. The
word "dark" under the "sandy loam"
column means "dark sandy loam."
14. The Important tact that will
fructify ln the minds ot all right
thinking people, who will earnestly
strive for the welfare of British Columbia, Canada, and the British empire, Is that those 118 names were
used by a grasping or grafting syndicate to aubvert British law and to
deprive, if not defraud, British citizens
of their birthright to take up land,
at government prices, by preemption,
direct from the crown, those 76,620
acres of the best agricultural land for
development by themselves and their
families. They are being forced by
this nefarious system to pay ao muoh
more than government prices to enrich the Bchemers who arranged and
did the staking, recording and manipulations now barring the entry of
3,000 families upon 160 acres each
they are entitled to acquire on the
eleven areas to be detailed later,
15. James Morrison, 640 acrea
(copied ln full as sample for sections
following No. 1)—Soil—8andy loam;
sub-soil—clay; surface—this section
Is fronting on Nation lake and rlaea
gently. Tha aectlon la moatly all covered with good spruce fir for milling
and the aoil ia good,
(1) Jp.r.-sa Morrison — 640, sandy
loam, i:':.,; fronting on Nation lake
and rises gently; mostly all covered
with good spruce fit for milling and
soil is good.
(2) Sarah Ann Smith—adjoins and
Is same as No. 1.
(3) Thomas Henderson—one mile
from ..atlona lake; land Is almost
level and covered with spruce lit for
milling purposes,
(4) Hugh Hendereon—almost one
mile from Nation lake; Bame condition as No, 3.
(5) Samuel Henderson and (6) Albert WatklnB—two miles north ot Nation lake.
(7) Joseph Williams and (8) Barbara Harvey—dark; good spruce;
land is level and soil good, covered
with spruce, with some open spaces
covered with wild hay; fronts on Nation lake, and rises gently to the
north,
(9) George Watklns, and (10) Alexander F. MoGrlmmon (11) Mrs. Annie
Simpson and (12) William Joseph
Earl—two miles from Nation lake,
about aame as No, 8.
(13) Mabel McQrlmmon — fronting
on Nation lake; some open patches
of wild hay; soil and timber same as
No. 12. ,    •
(14) Frank Thomas Bayley—dark;
covered with spruce and wild grass;
fronts on Nation lake; land rises
gently to the north.
(16) William George Robblns—two
miles from Nation lake; same as No.
14.
(16) Tryphena Thompson and (17)
Eva May Thompson—Two miles from
Nation lake; same as 14.
(19) James Goldstraw—Land good
and level; same as No. 18.
(20) George H. Hattwood — Two
mtleB north ot Nation lake; same as
No. 14. ifc* m.
(21) John Andrews and (22) Theodore Woolley—Dark;    covered   with
(Continued on page 8.)
F. Farrington, Concerning Labor Conditions on the Island
Hon. Mr. Crothers Makes
No Attempt to Justify
Price's Report
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Under
date of December 15th, I addressed a
letter to Hon. T. W. Crothers, minister of labor for Canada, In whieh I
pointed out the gross injustice done
the striking miners on Vancouver
Islsnd by reason of a report treating
with the Vancouver Island strike, and
submitted to the department of labor
by Royal Commissioner Samuel Price
My letter, published in The Feder*
tlonlst, wae self-explanatory, an<
proved conclusively that Commie
sloner Price was either utterly 'neap
able of making an Intelligent report
on the Vancouver Island'situation, or
that he was controlled absolutely by
the mine owners. In reply to my letter the minister of labor wrote me aa
follows: •
"OTTAWA, Dee. 17, 1S13.
"Frank Farrington, Esq., tote United Mine Workere of America, Scranton, Pa.:
"Dear Sir!   I beg leave to acknowledge receipt of your letter
of tha 15th Inatant re labour con- '
dltlons on  Vancouver Island. It
would be Impossible to dlscuee .
thla matter within the four cor.
nere of  a   letter  of reasonable
length. Faithfully,
(Signed) "T. W. CROTHERS."
A careful reading of the minister's
letter will reveal that he ia absolutely
Indifferent concerning the matter; no
desire to correct the wrong done the
Island miners by the commissioner's
report Is expr eased br the minister;
no attempt la made to justify It, and
not even an apology Is offered In de
fence of the commissioner. There
fore, I ask that you publish this let
ter so that as many of the workers la'
Canada as aro reached by The Federatlonist may be warned not to place
too much faith In the department of
labor as now administered. Yours
truly,
F. FARRINOTON.
Sprlnfleld, HI., Dec. IS, 1918.
BRENNAN AND MONRO!.
Who Have Been Seven Yeara In B.C.
' May Be- Deported;
The Press committee, Vancouver
local No. 322, I. W. W., asks tne
Federatlonist to print the following:
"About two months ago Mike Bren-
nan and Jas. Munroe were sentenced
at Revelstoke to serve three and four
months ln jail for vagrancy. The
court proceedings were held In
camera. Brennan and Munroe have
been residents ln British Columbia
for about seven years, and had left
Kamloops for Revelstoke on a business trip, namely, to rent a hall. They
paid for their room and board In advance and also had money ln their
pockets, The prisoners, who are now
Incarcerated at Kamloops, request
The Federatlonist to say that upon
their release an attempt will be made
to deport them—Brennan to Ireland
and Munroe to the United States. The
authorities some time ago were requested to Investigate the whole matter, but up to the present nothing haa
been done. The men are prepared
with any number ot witnesses to testify to their good characters."
TO CORRESPONDENTS.
The Federatlonist has again to request their correspondents to make
their letters as short as possible. Owing to the mass of correspondence received lt has been fonnd Impossible
to publish more than a tithe of lt. The
aim of The Federationist is to give
its readers every opportunity of expressing their opinions, but unless
those opinions are pithy, short and
concise that aim cannot be realised.
Will correspondents, therefore, kindly
observe the above rules, thereby
helping The Federatlonist to present
to Its readers as many shades of
opinions and different Ideas as possible? In many journals lt has been
found necessary to limit the length
of contributions, but The Federatlonist trusts lt will not be compelled to
resort to such a meaaure.
The "Fed." takes the present opportunity of expressing Its regrets for
certain unintentional mis-statements
which appeared as a heading ln its
Issue of Oct 3rd last, "Tools of the
Coal Barons Fail To Create Dissension Among Bowser's VIctlmB." The
members of the Defence Committee,
and certain of the counsel employed
in defence of the imprisoned miners
allege that therein they were thus
described, and The Fed, hopes the
publication of the above may close
an unfortunate understanding, as it
believes the members of the committee to be men of honest intentions
and good reputation.
"Ftd.'s" Kiddles' Fund
Previously  acknowledged    18,879.06
From Powder Works Employees,
Nanalmo        7,50
Canmore Local, No. 1387, TJ. M.
W. of A., Canmore Alia      72.00
Jas. Somerville, Moose Jaw, Sask.        6.00
Local 674 V. M. W. of A., Leth-
brldo, Alta,, per A. 3. Carter,
Fernle      88.00
C. Holden, 1087 Richards street,
Vancouver       1,00
Total ,...l«,»7S.6l
Of the above amount 18,000 haa already
been turned over to and distributed by
Robert Foster, president of District II.
U. M. W. of A., on Vanoouver Island,
among tbe ohlldren of the strikers. The
fund will be finally closed on Jan. 6 and.
ihe balance paid over to the district
officers. PAGE TWO
THE BEITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 2, 1914.1
NEW WESTMINSTER
YOU CAN'T BEAT OUR PRICES, SO DON'T
WASTE TIME TRYING-GIVE
US A CALL
Our Holiday Goods are in and we can save you money all
the time.   You lose if you go elsewhere.
DENNY & ROSS
THE BIG FURNITURE STORE
6th and Carnarvon Street New Westminster, B. C.
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, si.ooo.ooo.oo. Basem runt, «soo,occoo
■nbeorlMd, (S01.000.00
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only for the
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Deposits accepted and interest at 4% allowed on daily balance.
8AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Straet, New Westminster, B. C.
3. 3. Jones. Managing Slreotor
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Baaldawa B-10S0
J. P. GALVIN
High Class Ladies' and Gentlemen's Tailor
nw wasramxaB, a. o.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
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FUNERAL DIRECTORS
mOBB 083
SOS COLPniA WBBBT NEW WEBTMINSTEB, B. C.
LIBERAL CASH DISCOUNT =' PHONE 231
■"-HEATING STOVES
FROM..
M.  J.  KNIGHT  COMPANY,  LIMITED
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NEW WESTMINSTER. B.C.
AU Work Guaranteed
Hand Sewn shoea Made to Meaaure
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
McMillan a patbrson
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IT NBW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
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COMMERCIAL
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Photos Taken Anywhere, Anytime
ill-ill CROWN BUILDING
lit Pender atreet West
A World Beilnr el aeelaUias-Br ths
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whloh deals la aa authoritative war
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For further information apply to
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Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
AT REGULAR PRICES
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
5408 PHONES SEYMOUR	
-5409
FE
I
ITERS TO
Is the Militia a Guardian of the Home?
Editor II. C. Federatlonist: When
the story was told me recently, how
Geo. Pettigrew waB kept in jail during the summer, and his wife was ill
from conllnement, not expected to live
nnd the life of the child dlspalred of,
hut denied the r)ght fo-go to the bedside of his sick wife and child by the
authorities at Nanalmo, it reminded
me of the following story of military
brutaliam that was practiced In Cripple Creek, Colo., during the strike of
the miners in 1902: Big 13111 Havis
was the president of the local union
of the W. P. of M., and when the
militia, under Gen. Sherman Bell arrived and declared martial law, the famous "bull pen" was established. One
of the first victims to enter the "pen"
was Big Bill Davis;  torn from his
manity, and serve up less of that military. Ironclad "rough stuff," get..more
progressive Ideas in their heads, and
keep closer in touch-wlth the working
man, they might find something dif.
ferent to think of. Parker Williams
says that McBride and the clique take
us to be simple-minded. We will give
him- (McBride) a chance to flnd that
out when he goes on his next election
trip. He will have some hard questions to answer, that is, if he Isn't
afraid to visit Nanaimo and Cumberland. I know one thing, it will take
him some time to doctor up that part
of his speech about a white B. C. If
he would only make a visit to Cum-'
berland now, and take a walk Into the
company's reserve,,where we used to
live before the strike, I warrant that
he would not he five minutes there
before he begins to think he is ln the
cannibal Islands, instead of .Vancouver island. As for James Smith, the
other man who was discriminated
against, the charge against him by the
bosses, I can aay this 'much, during
the time John Matthews was superintendent,  and   Dave   Nell's   pit   boss,
home where a sick wife lay on ber „   , , ,
conch of confinement;  penned up fl(lSm,,th wa? B,wa?" ,w01,kl"? In narr?w
_. . . ...        . . "      a. . \nnnl,        nnri      ttln      All      lrnaaiir      thu      .»»n„       fnp
that filthy hole with the other miners,
like so many cattle, subjected to
every Indignity that a brutal military
instinct could plot and think ol, to
break the spirit of the men that wero
fighting for living conditions and an
enforcement of the laws of the state,
tne mllltla perpetrated one of the
foulest acts ot fiendish cruelity and
murder I ever heard of. One nlgbt
when the doctor was ln attendance
on Mrs. Davis, assisted by several if
the neighbors' wives, a 'rap at the
door brought tbe doctor to it, and,
opening the door, he was confronted
by a lieutenant and eight soldiers.
The doctor asked what was wanted,
and was told that they bad come to
search the house; and for him to get
out of the way so they could get at
the job. The doctor barred the way,
and told them that it would be Impossible for them to come in and explaining the condition of Mrs. Davis,
the reply was: "To hell with her and
you to!" When he tried to prevent
their entering, they hit him over the
head with a gun, and entered tbe
room where Mrs. Davis lay; seizing
her by the hair, they dragged her
onto tbe floor and stamping upon her
with their feet, remarking: "We will
deliver the brat.'1 The result was that
both mother and child died from this
treatment. All this was carried out
under the name and flag that is supposed to stand for "liberty and justice." This murder was committed
by "brave defenders of the nation and
the home" that my friend, Mr. Youhill, upholds bo much. The story of
the above brutal happening was told
me by Mrs. Mctianus, one of the women attendent on Mrs. Davis on the
night of her death. Then there are
those who preach the doctrine of
peaceful love among the people, to
the down-trodden workers. Tbe question-Will, no doubt, be asked: "Why
did not Mr. Davis get redress from
the courts, and have theBe guilty
wretches punished?" To which question I will reply: "Why don't the
miners get justice on Vancouver
Island?" E. E. LEMKKE.
Vancouver, Dec. 30, 1913.
work, and we all know the men for
this kind of work are all first-class,
competent men.
ANDREW AITKEN.
Cumberland, B. C, Dec. 31, 1913.
RADICAL  VIEWS ON  PUBLIC
QUESTIONS
Caaea of Dlacrlmlnatlon.
Editor B. C. Federationist: In reading correspondents' letters on the
trouble amongst the miners, I notice
some taking up the discrimination
cases. I have also heen asked the
question by outsiders, and when told
about the discriminating of two of
our gas committeemen, they seemed
to think lt was nothing of importance
—even calling the men down, and
saying, "Why don't they get out of the
place and save all this trouble?" But
I can give good reasons for the initiated, and also for the men standing at
their back so firm, which I am glad to
see; and al,so, more glad at it happening when they had the United
Mine Workers of America at their
back—a calculation they never thought
of. I will give you a true statement of
what might have happened a number of
years ago in Naanlmo when the Vancouver Coal company owned the
mines, but was really prevented by
having a gas committee. It was this
way: the fire bosses neglected their
duty for one week, the cause being
some water lying to the dip before entering on to the raise of some old
workings. The company kept a main
here pumping the water out, but they
had taken the old main away to do
Borne other jobs; the water raised,
and the Are bosBes pretended that
they could not get across. But It so
happened that the gas committee
came along on its regular visit—Kalph
Smith' waa one of them—and they
built a platform, and got across. Upon
examination of tbe two old inclines,
they were found full of gas and pretty
nearly down to the lower level where
the boys were driving with naked
lights. It only needed the touch of
this to blow out the "lives of 200 white
miners. It had happened, J am sorry
to say, right in this shaft a number of
years before. I also know aB a fact,
that there were new fire bosBes appointed In the old hands' places who
vte to be discharged. However, on
tho, management finding that the new
men were not qualified, it gave the old
hands another chance. Now, If
Messrs. McBride, BowBer and Shoebotham think for a moment thnt we
are doing wrong in Btnndlng at the
back of our gas committee men for
doing their honeBt duty, we fall to see
it—seeing that we have these same
kind of accidents happen with us periodically. If some of these people in
power would exercise a little more hu-
Ladyamlth Caaea.
Editor B. C. Federationist: With
regard to keeping men ln jail, after a
jury trial, without receiving their sentence, ln the name of humanity, why
did not Judge Morrison pronounce
them at the time the verdict was returned 'by the jury? It is now over
two weeks since the trial took place
at New Westminster; and the court
will not sit again for another week
It would seem to me or anyone else
who cared to study the problem, that
it had been cut and dried to torture
the unfortunate men and their loved
oneB. Regarding some of the evidence
for the prosecution, told at Nanaimo
and New Westminster, to make one
side look better and the other as black
as possible, you may have noticed ln
the caBe if McGlauchlin that he
stated his children were sick in bed
with measles when the mob came to
his place. He certainly had a quarantine ticket on Mb house which should
have been taken down at least three
weeks before the 13th of last August,
the day of the so-called riot, According to Chief Allen's own statement he
had orders from Dr. Frost to do so;
but as the house is just outside city
limits, he told ConBtable Pallant, who
neglected to take lt down. Also the
house was never fumigated according
to law. When the men, or rather
boys, came there, one of them exclaimed, "Don't throw there, boys;
can't you see that ticket?" They desisted and moved on. There are plenty
who could bear me out In this statement, as we live in the next block.
Yet it was used in evidence against
us. The Judge remarked that all our
witnesses had committed perjury.
Again with regard to the evidence of
John Bores re the Temperance hotel;
the crown had plans in court to show
that It was impossible to see the back
window where he and several more
witnesses alleged they had seen a
light come out. It was explained that
these plans had been prepared by a
surveyor. Yes, he Is one of Mr. Cunningham's alleged tools, who ,was
heard to say at the commencement of
this strike, that if he were that gentleman, he would fill the d n mine
with Chinamen. Now John Bore's
store Is on the* opposite side of the
road from the Temperance house and
a little below the window in question.
I have lived here ten years and both
buildings are In exactly the same position as they were when I first came
here. This poor fellow exclaimed in
broken English, "Me no savvy papen
yon come Ladysmlth, I show you,
and he was sarcastically called that
RusBlan butcher. Tbe original photos
were withheld and new ones substituted which were taken from an angle
so as to make lt appear impossible to
have seen the light thrown out as alleged by our witness, and to baffle
our women when on the stand, ln the
face of all thlB I would like to ask'the
public through the columns of The
Federatlonist, who they think were
the perjurers? It only needs a visit
to Ladysmlth to be convinced. McGlauchlin is the man alluded to by the
lady from the platform at the recent
league meeting in the'Horse Show
building. He was a near neighbor at
the time, when he told her that he
knew there was gas In the mine, but
said he, you can't prove it. He also
said that if he were to report gas
every time he found It, he would soon
lose his Job. This man is a fire boss,
whose duty It is to see that the mine
is safe for the miners to go in and
blast the coal,-and on whom the lives
of our men depend. "Oh, when Bhall
we get Justice?" Ib the cry of the women whose husbands are in jail, put
there on evidence from such men? I
was in the court room from 10:30 a.m.
to 11:45 p.m. on the ljlth day of December, with short intervals for meals,
therefore I know that the above statements are facts. I ask you to please
publish this letter, as It seems the
only way that we can get our side of
the story before the public. The men
themselves are helpless, nnd if kept
In jail much longer will be physical
wrecks, lt Is up to the women to do
what they enn, with your valuable assistance. In tho name of the wiveB
of the poor prisoners, I sign myself
ONE OF THEM.
Ladysmlth, B. C, Dec. 30, 1913.
D«r* Night C.1U
Phone Bw. 943
Parlors A Chapel
2398 Granville St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Britlah Columbia
The   Central   Hotel
H. Freeman, Manager
European Plan Telephone  705
Rates 50c. per day and upwards.
Cuisine unexcelled. A la carte
moala at nil hours, Opp. B. C. H.
Railway Depot Columbia St.
NEW WE8TMIN8TER, B.C.
■"By W. J. GURRY, D.D.S.,
301 Dominion Building .
Last week I showed that there was
no "dental combine" ln British Columbia, but that the idea was exploited to gain the sympathy of the working class and. by men who are employing "scab labor." True, we have
laws regulating the practce of dentistry here as elsewhere. In this age
of cultivated and educated ignorance
of practically everything of importance, Including the laws of health
and disease, and, during this reign
of competition, certain laws such as
our Dental act affords at least some
protection against those who prey
upon human wants and human ignorance. There are in this city, a few
men posing as dental "experts" and
their chief stock-in-trade is bluff.
Some of these are employed because
they are cheap. Some here paraded
as "specialists" have never taken a
course ln dentistry. Men of this type,
and many others as well, look upon
the publlo as their legitimate prey.
Success to them, is synonymous with
getting cash. One of these "experts"
can gouge $50 from a victim, where
an honest man could probably only
find half that much work to do. I
could cite numerous cases of this kind
which have come under my observation and here is a sample: Last
week, a young man came to have his
teeth attended to. A careful examination showed they needed six fillings.
"Now, how in h is that?" said he.
"I juBt came from Dr. , the painless philanthropist, and he told me
there were fourteen and struck me
for a deposit the size of your whole
charge." Last month I removed a
worn-out, ill-fltting gold crown. The
young lady had been told by the
"expert" that only a gold crown could
save the tooth. This thing goes on
continuously in Vancouver and everywhere else, and the same methods
apply equally to the medical fraternity.
The diagnosis of the patient's condition Includes a consideration of his
bank account and whether the prescription calls for a dose of salts or
a removal of the appendix, frequently
depends on the size of the "wad," unless be is a new doctor after experience, and then there is probably
more property for the undertaker. It
is the same with the optician. Ten
years ago, two of these eye-crutch
specialists and an oculist assured me
I would always have to wear glasses
nnd strong ones at that. Five years
ago I threw them away for good, and
am now operating eight hours a day
nnd writing and reading every evening without tbe slightest trouble from
my eyeB. It is certainly time that
people stop laying their Bins and all
their troubles in the hands of the
"specialist" whose interests are opposed to their own, and began to use
their intelligence.
Tha Only Remedy,
The Western Fuel company did not
swindle its customers and the United
States government for the love of
theft, and men,do not feed children
on tuberculosis-milk out of any hatred
to infants; dentists do not fill or
crown sound teeth because they are
"bad," but men do these things because of poverty or the fear of poverty, because under this brutal social
system, money rules and because our
interests clash. To bring harmony
out of the present chaos, to have
peace Instead of warfare, social prosperity instead of suffering poverty,
we must have co-operation ln place of
competition. We must have the
socialization of all social utilities and
social service, including the professional dentistry. When we know
enough to make dentists and doctors
the salaried officials of the public, we
will have "ethical" dentistry and
medicine and not till then, and the
only question will then be: "What is
the right thing to do in this case?"
Only under co-operation will the rule
of gold be abolished, and tbe golden
rule become a standard of human
conduct.
WHY PAY SUCH HIGH PRICES FOR YOUR CLOTHES? We can turn out
SUITS TO MEASURE from $13.00 to $28.00, value $20.00 to $50.00.
MADE BY UNION TAILORS
We use only English, Scotch and Irish Cloth, buying direct from Mills, and we
positively guarantee FIT and WORKMANSHIP and STYLE. Phone Fraser
292, or call or write and I will be pleased to see you here or at your own house and
•how you the largest range of samples in" Vancouver then you can see what value
I can give.
DAVID ROSE      Cor. 47th Ave. and Fraser St.      SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
"FED."  FUND CONCERT.
Blue Bell Miners Ralae $230 For Vancouver Island Strikers' "Klddlea."
AINSWORTH, B. C, Dec. 27. — In
the Miners' Union hall here on Wednesday last the boys of Blue Bell mine
gave a grand concert and dance on
behalf of the B. C. Federatlonist
Christmas Box Fund for the wives
and children of the strikers on Vancouver Island and netted the splendid
sum of $23-. The hall was packed to
Its utmost capacity. Among such a
variety of talent, where everyone contributed of their best, special mention
must be made of the two children,
Miss Dearhin (aged six years) and
Miss Janie Lingard, the former for
her pretty Blnging of "My Darling
Baby" and the later for her excellent
dialogue. The Buperintendent of the
Blue Bell mine, Charles Sherwin, rendered two excellent < comic songs.
Aftar the concert the chairman,
'Buck" Taylor of Riondel, thanked
the artistes for their services and the
Tremont hotel, Melson, for a special
donation of $10. The company then
cleared the hall of chairs and thoroughly enjoyed dancing. -Captain F.
Cogle, of tug Ondot, made frequent
trips to and from Rionflel and Alna-
worth until a very e&rvp hour in the
morning.
A bishop without a tfocese Ib called
a suffragette (su.iragai).
A. Floret, the well known tonsorial,
is now at Rosebur?, Ore., spending
the holidays with his parents.
Professional charity organizations
promise to become an Institution ln
the coast citleB. They are an abomination insofar as the unemployed are
concerned. The same expenditure, if
made in carrying out much-needed
public works, would save hundreds the
humiliation of being recipients of
charity and at the same time shelve
a number of tbe "stern British
matron" variety of human species.
The recent Balkan war coBt in
deaths 44,892, beside 7,744 missing
and 10,000 crippled for life. These
are all wage workers and most of
them leave large families. This is
part of the brutality of war.
It will take a lot of golf games to
solve the international labor problem.
Mlnnrd'fl Liniment Co., Limited:
Sirs—I have used your MINARD'S LINIMENT for the pant 25 years and whilst
I have occasionally used other llnlmonls
[ can safely say that I have never used
any equal to yours. ^_
If rubbed between the hands and inhaled frequently, It will never fall lo
cure a cold In the head In twenty-four
hours.
It Is also the best for bruises, sprains,
3to, Yours truly,
Dartmouth. J. Q. LESLIE.
GET  ACQUAINTED  WITH   HIM
WHO?
THE  WESTERN   COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magazine,
breathing the spirit of our Great
West.   Emanuel Julius and Chester M.  Wright,  Editors.    11.001 a
year; single copies, 10 cents.   203
New High  St.,  Los Angeles,  Cal.
Box 186.
THE FAMOUS G0URLAY
Pianos can be purchased from ub
at 125 down and ten dollars per
month. This is the house that
protects the purchaser, in case of
loss of employment the payments
are postponed. Not one dissatisfied purchaser on our books, and
most of our business Is done by
recommendation.
AJELLO PIANO CO.
967 ORANVILLE  ST.
After New Year's Bargains
WATCH OUR WINDOWS
Girls' Boots, 11 to 2; reg. $2.50 and $3.00; now.... $1.95
Women's Boots; reg. $3.50 to $4.00; now. $2.95
Men's Smoking Jackets; reg. to $9.00; now $5.00
Women's 35c Underwear; now 25c
Women's 75c Underwear/ now 50c
54-inch Tweed Suitings; reg. $1.25; now 75c
54-inch Coatings; reg. $3.58; now $1.50
Bargains in Flannelette, Flannels, Wrapperettes, Linens, etc.
Girls' and Women's Coats reduced less than HalF.
FURS ALL HALF PRICE.
Toys, Chinaware, Brass Goods and Fancy Goods for
New Year—All Half Price.
THE SATURDAY AFTER NEW YEAR
WILL BE THE BIGGEST DAY OF BAR- '
GAINS THIS STORE HAS EVEN SEEN.
The Goods will be in the windows. In most
cases it will be less than half. GIRLS' AND
WOMEN'S COATS, FURS, SWEATER
COATS, BOYS' OVERCOATS AND
SUITS, MEN'S UNDERWEAR. Don't
take our word for it, come and see. Seeing
is believing.
BINGHAM'S
Cor. Main St. and 8th Ave.
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
Enlarged   and   Remodelled SOO ROOMS 100 BATHB
Comfort     without     Extravagance
American  Plan   •   18.00 Up European Plan   •   $1.00 Up
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor.
WINTER
THE SHOP OF-
LIMITED
Clearance Sale
A vast army of men have left our store since our Winter
Clearance Sale commenced with more than their money's
worth.   We are not making money, to be sure—but we are
getting our winter stock converted into cash, and that's what
 1 —.	
we want even though it costs us money to do it. Note these
price inducements—can you stay away?
$15.00 and $18.00 Suits and Overcoats for $10.00
Lonely Suits and Overcoats $12.00
$20.00 and $22.00 Suits and Overcoats for $15.00
25.00 and $28.00 Suits and Overcoats for $20.00
$30.00 and $35.00 Suits and Overcoats for $25.00
Extra tailors engaged, so there will be no unnecessary delay
in delivery.   No charge for alterations.
FASHION-CRAFT
Thos. Foster & Co.
512-514 GRANVILLE STREET OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
k
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PAPER MRsM COL.
a FEDER ATOM OF UUK*
SIXTH TEAR.  No. 143
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JANUARY % 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
vrCasrasr-) $1.50 per yeab
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EXTRA!
11
OUR WHITEWEAR SALE STARTS ON
FRIDAY, JANUARY 2nd.
Extra! Extra!
OUR CLEARANCE SALE STARTS ON
THURSDAY, JANUARY 8th. IP YOU
WANT TO GET THE BEST VALUES
POSSIBLE FOR THE MONEY YOU
SPEND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR
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DUCTIONS GENUINE
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
for miners, railroad construction,
;, etc.
VANCOUVER   -   -   B.C.
LANG SALES COMPANY
626 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmen'* Store"
Extra Special Thla Week, Men'. Cashmere and Wool
Sock. 15c., 20c, 25c.
The best value money can buy
To clear, 100 palra Grey Blanket., $3.00 value, for $1.75
100 pair Orey Blanket!, $2.60 value, for  1.50
THE BE8T VALUE IN THE MARKET
When In want cf Clothing, Furnlehlng, Boot, and Shoe. It will
' pay you to get next to our  price..   Com.  and get acquainted at'
625 MAIN STREET
We keep the largeet and most
oomplete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices which cannot be duplicated.
Everything Is to be found here,
HENRY D. RAE
Canada'e Sijap Specialist
104 and 106 CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN 8HOE   8T0RE   IS  THE   SPOT   FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Phone Seymour 995
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
717 GRANVILLE STREET *
Orpheum Theatre Building
Mn. Genevieve Contl  .
Mrs. Francos Lohrman
City Auction and Commission Company
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements,
Auctioneer.
Sey. 2973
Remarks of Crown Prose
cutor Taylor and His
Honor Analyzed
Jury Out About Five Hours
—Become Confused—The
Verdict Given   ,
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Allow
me to give the workers a true account of the trials of the South Wellington men at New Westminster. On
the opening of court proceedings, the
crown prosecutor applied for an order
to have the jury locked up during the
trial—to remove the jurymen from
the pernicious influence of the friends
of the accused. Justice Morrison
took a very broad-minded view of this
application and stated that in many
cases the crown was guilty of bringing influences to bear on the jury.
Now, let us analyze Mr. Taylor's
statement and his honor's remarks.
In the trial of the Ladysmlth men, the
jurymen were allowed to mingle with
their fellowmen, and, as Mr. Taylor
states, were subjected to this influence. Well, what happened? The
crown got convictions in eleven cases
out of fourteen. And ln the South
Wellington cases the jury was removed from this pernicious Influence.
Again, what happened? The crown
only got three convictions out of ten
cases, showing that the accused men
were benefited by the removal ot this
Influence from the Jurymen. The
only
Logical Conclusion
we can come to is: That the influence must have been used on behalf
of the crown in the preceding cases.
The statements of some of the crown
witnesses, that were made to some
of the accused and their friends, when
returning from Vancouver, gives an
Insight into tbe methods used to
obtain convictions. These statements
were voluntarily given, when crown
witnesses congratulated the accused
on their acquittal. One man stated
that he was summoned on three occasions and intimidated into giving
evidence and told to give lt of a certain character, which he absolutely
refused to do. others corroborated
his statements and stated that they
were threatened with jail If they
did not appear. I am simply giving
them as they,were told to me and
others. Those statements are borne
out by the fact that several of the
crown witnesses disappeared before
the trial. Time after time, crown witnesses were brought on the stand for
the express purpose of bidding for
public sympathy, but somehow or
other the rules of evidence prevented
the defence witnesses from bidding
for sympathy. Of course it was apparent and to one conversant with
the situation in all its phases that the
crown had got a line of action that
was
Fully Rehearsed.
A certain individual connected with
the crown, was heard to remark to
some officials of the coal company:
"We'll soak them!" Now, sir, I am
not a lawyer, and do not quite understand what a leading question is.
Would some one kindly tell me if the
question that Shoebottom put to several crown witnesses at the preliminary hearing Is a leading question,
namely: "Now, look at the accused
and pick out any one you recognize
PATENTS
Trade Marks. Designs, Copyrights.
FBTHER8TONHAUOH  a  CO.
The Old Established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
1020 Rogera Bldg., Oranvllle Street
City.  Phone Seymour 3796.
Tke Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
42! GRANVILLE ST.
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il'.x  134* Provlocp
S" TEXuon.u-HEii wanTeu-di-si.v
aollexo mailuM.. Vniaaunl npporiu.
for tlie nnnj- .ho ceo mnke gooil At
liy leucr only to Mr  Kliu   314 Colo Dl
Inn. i
as taking part in the trouble at South
Wellington. Did you Bee 'Big Louie'
there?" We will now discuss the addresses to the' jury and his honor's
summing up. The three counsel for
the defence had concluded their addresses. They emphasized the fact
that there were a body of strangers—
300 or 400 strong—visiting South Wellington on the night in question. Ten
men were appearing to answer the
charges, all of them being residents
of South Wellington. In passing,
allow me to say that several of these
men have been threatened with discrimination by officials of the company, so that I am forced to conclude
that the coal company tried to
Use the Courts
for the purppse of venting their petty
spite on men who fought them fair
and honestly on the industrial'field. I
am not accusing Justice Morrison of
being In any way a party to these
tactics, but the prosecuting counsel
has been a party and they, ln conjunction with the company officials,
have rehearsed the play until they
could give the Dual performance with
very few hitches. Now comes the
address for the prosecution. Before
commencing lt Mr. Taylor had to
leave the court to procure a document
and from the mix-up he made of his
remarks he could have left that document in the bottle—I mean the
pigeon-hole. He dilated on each of
the accused in turn and repeatedly
brought in evidence that had not been
given against said accused. The last
accused he treated was your humble
servant. He caused me to say things
to crown witnesses who swore on the
stand that I bad no conversation with
them. He got so tangled that my
counsel told him he was getting
mired, when he said: "I beg your
paddon," and then sat down. In fact,
he
Made 8uch a Mess
of things that one of the crown witnesses afterwards accosted me outside the court, and asked me what
Taylor was getting at. He said that
the evidence quoted by Taylor, as
coming from him (the witness) was
never given at all. His honor in
summing up, while upholding the principles of trade unionism, condemned
the direct-action methods. I heartily
concur with him in this regard, as we
have a better way of overcoming the
evils of capitalism, namely, by the
ballot. I will comment on one statement his honor made, although he
stated It, through not knowing the
true conditions., He said that Fred
Hilley was driven out with all his
worldly possessions on his back,
namely, his bed. When this strike
was called he was uetter able to
strike than 90 per cent, of the men
Involved. If he lost his substantial
worldly possessions during the three
months he had been working for the
Pacific Coast Coal collieries, then it
must be a very unprofitable proposition to be a strike-breaker. I think
that lt Is bo, as the majority ot men
working there say that they are up
against lt; that the company is
"busted"; and that one of the crown
witnesses died destitute, leaving his
wife and family without enough to
bury him.   Let us consider
Tho Verdict:
The gentlemen of the jury had been
out five hours. Their minds had apparently become so confused that they
thought they had only four counts to
consider. Consequently, they brought
in a verdict of "guilty" against one
man on the second and third counts;
also against two men on the fourth
count. Thinking no doubt they were
the two minor counts, i. e., unlawful assembly and intimidation. They
were told, however, to consider the
one of intimidation. They did so, and
brought in a verdict of "not guilty" ln
all cases, and the fact remains that
three men nre guilty—of what? The
Jury was told that the purpose of the
riot, unlawful assembly, was to Intimidate the strike-breakers and drive
them away, if the men are not guilty
of intimidation, then how can they be
guilty of being assembled together for
the purpose of Intimidation? This
law business "has got me guessing."
Now, there are, besides those three
men, eleven from Ladysmlth, also in
jail, uot yet sentenced, owing tn the
sickness of Justice Morrison. A few
words regarding
_ Louis Nuenthal
or "Big Louie," as his enemies,
Messrs. Taylor and Shoebottom are
pleased to call him. They would have
the world believe tbat Louis is an
inhuman monster. One can hardly
say that Justice Morrison believes
that. If my own brother swore by
all he held sacred that Louis had
struck bim, I would not believe lt.
In fact, the young fellow who swore
against Louis (when removed from
the Influence of Mr. Taylor) tells a
very different story. Anyone who
has had dealings with Louis will bear
me out. Dave Stephenson, the chief
of police, always lind a good word for
him. As for the other two men, their
enthusiasm might get the better of
their judgment ond so say things they
I did not mean. However, let this
fact be borne ln mind: One of the
two men has a family of eight children, the eldest of whom is 13 years
pld. Then would he willingly do
anything that would keep him away
from home? Yours for fair play,
WALTER HEAD.
South Wellington, B. C,
Dec. 30, 1913.
njE   HIVE   AN   OPESI.NQ   l-'On ""=
"i_erfll   0    '- nun     mual He  ' 3=-
="** Every day you see ad- 1=
= vertlsements  like  the *S
j= above. :=
| DON'T ANSWER |
| Unless You Are |
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== Merely "having a try S
= at it" won't do.   You ==
= must   be   certain   of s=
= making good.   Gradu- ==
= ates  of   this  school— s=
•= tho largest ln Canada 55
== west  of  Toronto—are 25
= filling important'post- ==
== tlons    because    prop-, ==
as erly trained, s=
= Write for Prospectus HE
= Phone Sey. 1810 g
jg Vancouver Business
_   Institute
***** VancouvtrK,
LABOR LEGISLATION.
Convention Held at Washington, D.C.
—Secretary Wilson Presided.
The seventh annual meeting of the
American association for labor legislation was held ln this city at the
Shoreham hotel, Washington, D.C,
Tuesday and Wednesday, December
30th and 31st. The programme Included joint session with the American Political Science association. The
plans of the federal industrial relations commission, recently appointed
by President Wilson were discussed.
Addresses, were delivered by Frank
P. Walsh, chairman of tho commission; Mrs. J. Borden Harriman, and
Pro. John H. Commons, also members
of the commission; an address on
labor law enforcement, through administrative orders, by Chairman
Crownhart, of tbo Wisconsin industrial commission dealt with this significant new development which, in
two years' time It was claimed, has
revolutionized the method of factory
inspection over one-half of the industrial field. A large number of subjects relating to the welfare of labor
were discussed. Secretary Wilson,
of the department of labor, presided.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES GARGET IN COWS
I
OF THE MINERS'
(E
The Situation Might Have
Been Saved—The Mot-
tishaw Case
Seiiure of Ammunition at
Ladysmith—Dealer Had
Ten Times as Much
William Merchant, of Victoria, B.C.,
recently addressed at length the
Young People's society of the Emmanuel Baptist church of that city,
regarding the miners' strike on Vancouver island. The strike had had
its inception ln the refusal to employ
MotUshaw again by the Canadian Collieries limited, MotUshaw apparently
found himself barred out from all
avenues of employment, and while
other grievances existed, the resolution of the men to take a holiday
after September 16, 1912, could be
traced to tbe MotUshaw incident. No
doubt had the matter been taken ln
hand by either the federal or provincial authorities at the time when lt
was ln that condition, the situation
might have been saved. It was to be
deprecated that the revolutionary
spirit spread from these small beginnings, for revolutions are seldom
good for society, unless directed by
a general sentiment such as marked
the commonwealth in England or the
appeal to William of Orange, he observed. During the events of the
strike Ihe most extraordinary wero
the arrest of Israel Rnbinowitz, the
Vancouver lawyer, who was merely
in the district in a professional capacity, the animus of the magistrate
during the cases, and the seizure of a
supply of ammunition at Ladysmlth at
a time of year when ten times as
much would bd carried ln stock for
the hunting season by any sports
dealer in the city. Mr. Marchant went
on to speak of the introduction of the
militia into the disturbed area. Looking at the situation from the standpoint of the duty ot the churches he
ventured to suggest that a thorough
inquisition should have been held, and
the attitude of both parties sought,
It would then have been learned, that
even if the men were directed by an
alien federation there was no proof
to show that they were working in
combination with American mine
operators.
Proud of Their Union.
The editor of this paper Ib ln receipt of season's greetings from Jere
L. Sullivan, general secretary-treasurer of Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' unions. He
says in part:
"I know full well I speak for all our
boys and girls when I say with emphasis that we are deeply grateful to
yourself and co-organizers in the great
lA. F. of L. for the" magnificent work
which you and they have accomplished during the year just coming to
a close. Our International Is an excellent illustration of what all of you
with the splendid po-operatlon of the
rank and file can produce; without
your generous help we would have but
little to boast of and I think you will
agree with me when I assert that our
boys and girls have an organization
of which they should feel proud."
A SUGGESTION.
Do you know anyone whom you
think would become a subscriber to
The Federatlonist, if he saw it?
If so, mall his name to this office
and The Federatlonist will be sent to
him for one month free of charge and
accompanied by a letter inviting him
to become a subscriber.
Send ln the name of that friend of
yours NOW. *    „
E.BURNS&CO.
AUCTIONEERS AND
FURNITURE DEALERS
135 Cordova Street, East
Mldwny between Columbia nnd Main
GOODS   SOLO   BY   AUCTION
OR COMMISSION.
A large assortment of Cook
Stoves and Heaters In dock.
Weekly Sales every Saturday
evening at 8 p.m.
Phone 8ey. 1679.
Ii Your Furniture Showing
Signs of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot ot
difference to one's comfort.
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture Is selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come ln and aee the
new arrivals—they will bring
many hours' comfort to some
lucky persons.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
»1 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNA,Iid.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,
one block west ol Court House.
Use ol Modern Chapelnnd I'uneral
Parlors free to all patrons
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Rough Weather Apparel
for Workingmen
"THE clothing described below ii made especially
ieti teamsten and men who work outside during
the winter weather.
Mackinaw Clothing—Heavy
all wool Mackinaw suits in
black only. Coats are
made with large storm
collars, leather faced pockets and belts	
Coast for  tl.00
Pants for  1.10
Drivers' Duck Coats—This
coat is made of heavy
brown duck, with large
storm collar, furlined. The
body is lined with lambskin, and the sleeves with
stout flannel; double-
stitched throughout, reinforced in the armpits;
clasp fasteners; two pockets,
Price U.75
Drivers' Leather Coats —
These coats are in two
qualities and both are
made reversible. You turn
them to suit the weather
conditions. Both have
corduroy on one side. The,
better coat is finished with
smooth dark green leather. The cheaper grade has
a mocha finished leather.
Pockets on both sides and
dome fasteners.
Prices S7.B0 and 19.50
Drivers' Reversible Coat —
This coat can be worn
either side out. One side
is dark 'fawn whipcord
and the other a golden
brown corduroy; pockets
on both sides. Patent
dome fasteners.
Price only .'. IS.96
Heavy Sheep Lined Coats—
A coat for cold weather
and hard wear. The body
is full sheep lined; the
outside heavy brown duck;
leather faeed pockets,
clasp fasteners, fur lined
storm collar. Price.. W.M
Oilskin Coats at 13415—This
is a three quarter length
coat. Comes to just below the knees and is intended for the man who
wears gum boots or leggings. It is first quality
and in the new gloss finish.      Price 33.25
Long Oilskin Coats — Made
in first quality and dull
finish. Comes down to the
shoe tops.
Price only  .33.75
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
*.$fefe
s  THE MUSICIANS  UNION s
wish to announce that Mr.
Franklin and members of hia
orchestra are not members of the
Musicians' Union. When engaging music for your next dance or
social, make sure that your'
Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
For full Information Phone Musicians Union
Seymour 7315.     640 Robson Street
Heintzman & Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Can.'iilinn labor
SOLD ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street West.
Stanfield's Underwear
Blue Label, Suit $3.00     Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight O veralls of all kird
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Cordova St., Weit
I..V*> CUSHION
f  ::i'i.i;SSE5liBBI
TOES
z irvro:. iuppcrts ar.ctp
4 u.:.Witi:;-::...;:,-.,, n-,«:.*>
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
Dressing Robes and House Coats
We are showing a beautiful line of House Coata In Woo), Silk and Velvet;
alio Dressing Robei ln Wool.   All sizes from 3-4 to 48.
PRICES OF  HOUSE COATS RANGE  FROM 15,00 to 122.60
DRESSING ROBES FROM 17 to 125
Theae make handsome Christmas gifts for Husband, Son or Friends.
Call and Inspect our stock.   By paying a deposit we will lay one aside for
you for a reasonable length of time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tsl. tsy. 702
JM-S15 HASTINGS STRICT W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleaiant headquartera for Carpenters' Tools and ill
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street i' *■
PAGE FOUR
TEpB1 BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDER'ATIONIST.
FRIDAY ....JANUARY 2, 1914.
3r.
the Saturnalia of December was from
the first discouraged by the'Church.
Christians were expected to spend
the day ln quiet meditation, reading of
scripture and acts of charity. When
about the 6th century the 26th of
December had become a fixed festival
commemorative of the Nativity, the
1st of January assumed a specially
sacred character as the octave of
Christmas Day and as the anniversary of the Circumcision. lAs such it
still figures lu the calendars of the
various branches of the Eastern and
Western Church, though only as a
[east of subordinate Importance. The
first mention of it in Christian literature as a feast occurs in Canon 17 of
a council which met at Tours in 547.
The oustom of giving and receiving
strenae for luck at the New Year
survives ln Fiance (where New
Year's Day Is. known as le jour
de'etrennes) and the continent generally. In England Its place has been
taken by the Christmas-gift, In
Scotland, where New Year's Day Is
more generally observed than Christmas, the custom Ib still universal.
The Persians celebrated the beginning of the year by exchanging presents ot eggs. The Druids distributed as New Year's gifts branches of the
sacred mistletoe. In Anglo-Saxon and
Norman England New Year's gifts
were common. According to Matthew
Paris, Henry III. followed the Roman
precedent by extorting New Year's
gifts from his subjects. These ln
later reigns became voluntary, but
none the less obligatory, on those
who wished to stand well with the
throne. The custom ' reached its
climax in Tudor times. Wolsey one
New Year gave Henry VIII, a gold
cup valued at £117 17s. 6d. in the
coinage of that time. An MS account
ts preserved of money gifts given to
King Henry by all classes of his
subjects on New Year's Day, 1533. The
total reached many thousands. Bishop Latimer, however, handed Henry
instead of a purse a New Testament
with a leaf doubled down at Hebrews
xlii. 4, as apposite to the king's then
impending marriage with Ann Bole-
yn. In Edward VI.'s time, If not
earlier, it was usual for the sovereign to give "rewards" to those who
presented New Year's gifts. Elizabeth is related to have been most conscientious in this regard. The custom of offering New Year's gifts to
'the sovereign became obsolete during
the Commonwealth and was not received at the Restoration.—Encyclopaedia Brltannica.
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 185$
Capital and Reserve,
49.700.000
85 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Business
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches.   Interest Allowed at Highest Current Rale.
East End Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A. W. Jarvis, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1819
Paid-up Capital --■% 11,900,00
Reaerve     12,500,000
Total Aetata 180,000,000
WE ALLOW IN-
TERE8T ON DE-
P08IT8 IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
bualneaa will be welcome be It large or
amall
FOURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
185$
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reaerve 111,178,978
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In the BANK OF TORONTO
are proving to be a great convenience to many of our
friends. With these accounts
either of two persons ot the
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest is paid
on all balances twice a year.
In event ol death of either
party the survivor may withdraw the money.
Main Office—
488 HASTINGS 8T. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinga and Carrall Sta.
New Westminster
Victoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONEY   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    CITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
833 HASTINGS ST. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
11 c.
FuMIslud svsry Friday moraine by tie
B. O. FeUeratlonlet, ttt
R. Parm. Pettlplece ■
Manager
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, preeldent;
Christian Slvertz, vise-president; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer, end R. P. Pettlplece.
Offloe! Boom 217, tabor Temple.
Tel. Exchange ley. 7495.
Advertising Manager
M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.60 per year; ln Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, $1.00.
"Unity of Labor; ths hops of the world."
FRIDAY JANUARY 2, 1914.
NEW YEAR'S DAY
The flrst day of the year. In the
Oregorlan calendar this date occurs
twelve days earlier than in the
Julian; thus ln Russia, Greece, etc.,
where the latter is still employed,
New Year's Day is celebrated on. the
English 13th of January.
The ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians
and Persians began their year at the
autumnal equinox (Sept. 21), and the
Greeks, until the 5th century B, C, at
the winter solstice (Dec. 21). In
432 B. C. the latter altered their New
Year's Day to the 21st of June. The
ancient Romans celebrated the beginning of the year on the 21st of
December, hut Caesar, by the adoption of the Julian calendar, postponed
it to the 1st of January. The Jews
have always reckoned their civil year
from the flrst day of the month—of
Tishri (Sept. 6—Oct. 5), but their ecclesiastical year begins at the spring
equinox (March 21), The 26th of
March was the usual date among
most Christian peoples ln early medieval days. In Anglo-Saxon England,
however, the 25th of December was
New Year's Day, At the Norman conquest owing, at is believed, to the coincidence of his coronation being arranged for that date, William the
Conqueror ordered that the year
should start on the 1st of January.
But later England began her year
with the rest of Christendom on
the 25th of Maroh. The Gregorian
calendar (1582), which restored the
1st of January to Its position as New
Year's Day, was accepted by all Catholic countries at once; hy Germany,
Denmark and Sweden about 1700, but
not until 1751 by England,
The Romans, after the adoption of
the Julian calendar, kept the 1st of
January as a general holiday. Sacrifices were made to Janus, gifts and
visits were exchanged, and masquerading and feasting were general. Con.
gratulatory presents were made to
the magistrates who entered upon
offlce on this day. The emperors at
the new year exacted from their subjects tribute of a pound ot gold. This
quasi-present was called strena,
term (extended to all New Year's
gifts ln Rome) traditionally derived
trom a custom Initiated by the legendary King Tltius, to Whom branches
of vervain gathered in the sacred
grove of Strenua, the goddess of
strength, were presented as a good
omen on the flrst day of the year
747 B. C. The Imperial strenae later
became so excessive that Claudius
found it necessary to limit the amount by formal deerees. "
Participation in the ordinary New
Year's Day observances as well as ln
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Full information snd
explanatory pamphlet on
request
WE WILL SAVE FOR
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association. That lt has been accused of starting the Christmas panic
which brought auch horror to Calumet, is perhaps due to the bitterness
aroused by Its other actions. But,
guilty or not of that crime, the responsibility would be a small addition to
the weight of Infamy already borne
by the criminal alliance.
If any proof were needed of the
character of this outlaw aggregation,
tt is furnished by the insulting offer
ot a fund to bury the dead children!
Money! to assuage the grief of heartbroken mothers. One marvels at the
restraint exercised, by the strikers.'
There seems to be an almost fanatical
desire to keep the peace.
It may seem somewhat high-handed
to condemn at this distance the individuals involved lu these deplorable
happenings. But what Intelligence
has come from any source which
would Indicate the Citizens; Alliance
to be actuated by any good motives?
The fact that lt has arbitrarily injected itself into a labor dispute and
proven openly willing to do the dirty
work of the mine-owners is sufficient
warrant for condemnation.
Labor universally mourns with the
stricken parents of Calumet in their
inconsolable bereavement. Sympathy
is also extended to President Moyer.
It Is sincerely to be hoped that he
will soon recover and that some sort
of justice will overtake his assailants.
The one redeeming feature of the situation is that the sort of opposition
now facing the copper strikers pro
vldes Its own defat. Union labor will
win.
gations and displays its great love
for the (Chinese) Empire.
RISKS.
If "Peace hath her victories," so
also has she her causaltles. Industrial
activity in Canada during 1913 was
attended by 1220 fatal and 5,780.serious accidents. Seven thousand workers fell in the effort to provide humanity with food, clothing, shelter and
luxuries—and capitalists with dividends.   Principally the latter.
It is well known that most of the
safety appliances on railways and in
factories have been installed under
the most bitter protests from the
owners of those industries. It is
easy enough for railways to inaugurate a "safety flrst" campaign among
their employees; campaigns are
cheap. They also help to cover up
the campanies' responsibility for accidents. Efficient material and modern
safety devices are not quite so chpap.
It would cost more money, too, to'
ease up on the economic pressure
which forces employees to take
chances.
Profits are the main consideration,
and profits demand economy and
speed. Speed in construction and
operation, together with economy, produces death-traps. These provide
statistics as above. In' connection
with these statistics, lt would be ex.
tremely Interesting to know how
much money was paid out in compensation, and how much more was paid
to lawyers to avoid paying compensation. It Is peculiar, but there are
concerns who would much rather pay
lawyers than widows.
There are numerous companies,
also, who would rather lose dollars
in accidents than spend cents ln
equipment. This policy is to be seen
ln operation on Vancouver island. The
Western Fuel company prefers to do
anything, no matter the cost, rather
than make its own mine safe. Fundamentally, capitalism is bound to
protect profits ln preference to
workers. Under capitalism, then, lt
becomes necessary for the workers
to assume the responsibility of their
own safety. Not in the sense that
employers desire, ln which all the
blame for accidents is placed on the
employee and nothing Is done between accidents to prevent them; but
ln the larger sense which demands
that all possible measures shall be
taken to guard against accidents.
To do this adequately, the workers
must act together. Unorganized la-
'bor is powerless. Only an organization powerful enough to dictate terms
can ensure protection of life and
limb.        	
"CITIZEN" OUTLAW8.
It is really pleasant to observe that
the authorities are "Investigating" the
kidnapping and assaulting of Charles
Moyer, president of the Western Fed
eratlon of Miners at Hancock, Mich.
That the first step In the "investigation" was the suppression of a socialist paper and the arrest of Its
staff, will not surprise many of our
readers who are accustomed to the
administration of mining-company law.
President Moyer Is the victim of an
infamous organization calling Itself
the "Citizens' Alliance." Ood help
Michigan if this Is a sample of its
citizenship. Nothing, apparently, la
too low, nothing too criminal to preclude its commitment by this black
AN  OVER -SUPPLY OF SAVIOURS.
It Is unfortunate that the misfortunes of those striking miners who
have been thrust into prison should
prove the occasion for certain individuals to advertise themselves. On
the Btreet corners—and elsewhere—
are "orators" aplenty whose one all-
consuming desire in lite, apparently,
is to free the Imprisoned men, and
who have been especially designed
for that purpese, if their oratory is
accepted as a criterion.
The principal method by which
the prison doors are to be thrown
wide seems to be the promotion of
a vigorous agitation ln which everybody else Ib loudly called upon to do
something and, Incidentally, a fund is
started to keep the agitation going.
It would be too bad if the minera
were allowed to go, and thus deprive
these worthy folk of satisfactory employment which brings them Into
slight prominence and causes money
to circulate where previously there
was none. If, however, any of the
prisoners are set free it will be in
spite of and not because of such agitation which Is peculiarly calculated
to perpetuate Itself and support the
agitators.
It Is true that the Imprisoned men
are the victims of maladministration
on the part of the attorney-general's
department. It is also true that the
whole trouble, right from the beginning, is due to violations of the law
by the mine owners and the government itself. This makes lt perfectly
obvjous that the best way to get re.
suits ln the men's defense is to flght
the cases on their legal merits. Everyone who really desires to help, then,
should assist in every possible way
to secure the best legal talent for the
defense and then leave the flght to
be fought where the fighting will accomplish something, which is in the
courts.
Right from the start lt has heen
proclaimed that the miners have wilfully committed no illegal acts, and
neither they have. That. being the
case, the least any friends of men can
do Is to refarin from embarrassing the
lawyers by wild utterances and
absurd. agitations.
The Federationist is heartily in
sympathy with, and will materially
aid any movement that alms to assist
the legal defense of the cases, or any
movement really calculated to bring
about the liberation of the men already sentenced.
GRATITUDE.
The history of Canada, particularly
'Western Canada, is closely associated
with that of the Canadian Pacific Railway. ' The people of Canada claim
to have built the C. P. R., and that
the C. P. R. claims to have built Can.
ada. Both are justly proud of their
work. The kind of pride felt by the
C. P. It., however, expresses Itself ln
monetary terms.
In pointing to the work lt has done
In building up the country, the railway company cannot refrain from
also drawing attention to how very
well lt got paid for the work. Like-
wise to the fact that it is likely to get
paid perpetually. The relations between the country and the railway
are not so evenly balanced but that
gratitude is due trom one or the
other.
Now, there was some Canada before
there was any C. P. R„ It was the
people of tbat Canada who made possible the company. So that the country was the prime mover, so to speak,
In which case we should expect to flnd
the C. P. R. animated by an intense
patriotism, arising from gratitude toward the country that brought it into
existence and has provided lt with
ample support ever since.
Anyone who desires to find evidences of suoh patriotic feeling should
go aboard the trans-Pacific "Empress"
steamships. Here the mellow tones
of many Oriental voices will greet
the ear, and further Indications of
a Chinese crew will not be long making themselves felt. No British seaman profanes those spacious decks,
Thus, in providing itself with the
cheapest possible form of human
labor, the G. P. R. discharges Its obll-
Huerta has nothing' on Bowser.
"What "would YOU do if you were
starving?
When are the mining inspectors of
this province going to inspect?
It takes a lot of philosophers to
make a potent working class political
party.
Breathes there a man who doesn't
know all about how to run a labor
paper?
'Law and order" means working
class submission to Industrial barons'
rule and robbery.
According to some people's ideas a
Christmas "feed" should last the unemployed till spring.
When are the striking miners of
Vancouver island, who have been Imprisoned without trial, going to be
tried?
Now watch how the U. S. ruling
class will NOT rush into the Michigan
strike .zone to maintain "law and
order."
Why Is the statutory eight-hour day
for metallferous miners in British Columbia going to be enforced at the
Britannia mines?
If the workers were to unite for
about two minutes some of these election days short shrift could be made
of the necessity for strikes.
Judging from recent elections there
doesn't seem to be much of an
"alliance" between the Liberal and
Labor parties of Great Britain.
"Doctor's advice" is a handy thing
to have on tap at times: Otherwise
certain other mayoralty candidate
stories would prove so embarrassing.
James Larkin, strange to Bay, is a
devoted adherent to the Roman
Catholic church. Which, in the light
of other events, explains a number
of things,
It Is time the retail clerks of the
coast cities followed the example set
by New Westminster, by lining up
with the international trades union
movement.
Here's that "Jlmmie" Simpson may
have heen elected to the board of
control at Toronto. (ThiB issue of The
Federatlonist went to press Wednesday evening.)—Ed.
The Pecksnlffian tactics of a small
element in the B. C. trade union movement ts not enough to down organized
labor, but It certainly retards progress along rational lines,
As an Instance of the overstocked
condition of the labor market ln British Columbia lt is said that local
Chinese have sent word home advising others not to come here. Pretty
tough when the Chinese coolie cannot
make a living.
So Bowser Intends' to establish a
real strike-breaking agency, under the
guise of a permanent provincial police
force, patterned atfer the fashion of
the Royal Northwest Mounted Police!
This because militiamen refuse to do
the dirty work satisfactorily.
How does the federal immigration
department figure that the coal barons
on Vancouver island are to secure
strike-breakers it-that recent order-in-
councll prohibiting "artisans" to enter
British Columbia until after March
31st is enforced?   Slip somewhere.
Two weeks more and the workers
of New Westminster will have four
representatives on the aldermanlc
board of the Royal city. Meantime
Vancouver workers continue to jangle
among themselves, attributing every
cause but themselves as the reason
for it all.
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED     »     ____ A MONTH     	
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets tn annual convention ln January. Executive o-.ii.cers, 1913-14: President, Christian Siverts; vice-presidents,
i Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, Q.
. Burnes,1*. W. Oray, Jas, Cuthbertson,
J-*J. Taylor; sec-treas., V. R. Mldgley,
Box 1044, Vancouver.   	
TRADEB AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets first and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H, C. Benson, president; Jas. H. McVety, vice-president; J.
W. Wilkinson, general secretary, Room
210 Labor Temple; Jas. Campbell, treasurer; Miss Brisbane, statistician; V. R.
Mldgley, sergeant-at-arms; R. P. Pettipiece, J. H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
trustees.
LABOR" . TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, 3J H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKenzle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manag-
Ing director. J, H. McVety. Room 211.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADE8   COUNCIL—Meets 2nd Monday ln month.
President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary. F, R.
Fleming, P.O, Box 66f
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners—Room 209.
Sey. 2908. Business agent. J. A. Key;
offlce hours, 8 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.
Secretary of management committee,
Jas. Bltcon, STS Hornby street, Branches
meet every Tuesday and Wednesday ln
Room 302.
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. CI 7—Meeta
Monday of each week, 8 p.m. Executive
committee meets every Friday. 8 p.m.
President, Ed, Meek; recording secretary, Thos. Lindsay, SOB Labor Temple; flnanclal secretary, W. Leonard, 108
Labor Temple.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO-
cal No. 46—Meets second and fourth
Saturdays, 7.30 p. m. President, A. M.
MacCnrrah; corresponding secretary, W.
Rogers; Business Agent, J. JIack, Room
220, Labor Temple.
BARBERR* LOCAL. NO. 180—MEETS
eecond and fourth Thursdays, 8:80
p.m. President, Bam. T. Hamilton: recorder, Geo. W. Isaacs: secretary-business agent, C. F. Burkhart Room 808.
Labor Temple. Houra: ll to 1; 8 to 7
n.nv
"Thou shalt not kill"—on a small
scale.
The Nanaimo strike has at least
made it impossible for the government to secure "volunteera" for the
Pacific coast mllltla. The patriotic
C. P. R. might be Induced to lend the
local "commanders" their recently
adopted Chinese crews on Pacific
liners.
The earnest efforts of the federal
government to solve the cost of living
problem are to be commended. A
commission has heen appointed which
will relieve the situation considerably
—for the members of the commission.
This Is a good start. Now, if the
rest of us could get appointed to
something that would pay as well and
produce as little, the cost of living
could soar and be durned.
Some of these days the lands department of this province should take
a lesson front the C. P. R. ln the matter of land clearing and give competent wage-workers an opportunity of
securing a start on from five to forty
acres of land. British Columbia consumes half of the eggs imported Into
Canada, not to mention many other
commodities which could be produced
along the coast. The C. P. R. has
made a«huge success of Its ready-
made farm colonization scheme In Alberta. Why not the lands department repeat the plan in some of the
nearby valleys round Vancouver?
ELECTRICAL  WORKERS.   LOCAL NO.
(12t (Inside Men>—Meets first "nnd
1 third Mondavs of each month. Room 205,
R P.m. President. H. P. McCoy: recording secretary. Geo. Alhers: business
apenf. F. L. EstlnRhatusen. Room 207,
LONG S whRTWE WS™TNTERNATYDVA L
ASSOCIATION. No. 38 x R2-^Tpf«|fl
every Frldav evening, 14fl Alexander
street.    President,    P.   Peel;   secretary,
Geo. Thomas.	
MACHINISTS.   NO.   182—MEET8   SEC-
ond and fourth Thursdays, 7.15 n.m.
President, Chas. Mattlnson: recording
secretary. J. Brookes; financial secretary,
J..H. McVety.
MINARD'S   LINIMENT  CURES   DISTEMPER
Geo. E. McCroMui A. M. Harper
McCrossan & Harper
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Offices 32-36 Imperial Block
539 Pender St., W.    VueoiT-r, B. C.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B.C. Federationist
Ivabor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.   Phone Sey. 4490
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 876.—OF-
flee Room 208 Labor Temple. Meets
first Sunday of eaoh month. President.
Wm. Laurie; flnanclal secretary. Geo. W.
Curnock. Room 208. Labor Temple.
bridge  and  structural  iron
WORKERS' International Union,
fjocal 97—Meets second and fourth Frt-
<1ay. Labor Temple. 8 p.m, President
r. A. Senlev: secretary, A. W. Oakley,
738 Semlln Drive, phone Sey. 889,
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'. NO. 1
—Meets every Tuesdav, 8 p.m., Room
307. President, James Haslett: corresponding secretary, W. 8. Dagnall. Box
53: flnanclal secretary, V. R. Brown:
business agent, W. S. Dagnall, Boom
215.
ROOtfRTvntfRR' T.OPAL UNTON NO.
105—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, tn Room 205, Labor Temple.
President, F. ,T. Milne; vice-president, IT.
Perry; secretary, Oeorge Mowat, 515
Dunlevy avenue.
BROTHERHOOD OF ROILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. 191—
Meets first and third Mondays, 8 P. m.
President, F. Barclay, 358 Cordova East;
seeretary^A. Fraser. 1151 Howe street.
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 357—Meets
flrst Tuesday each month,. 8 p.m.
President, Walter Hosklns; vice-president, F. J. Brandt; secretary, Robert ,T,
Craig, Kurtz Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson.
COOKS, WATTERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets first Frldav tn each
month, 8:80 p.m., Lalior Temple. W. T3.
Walker, buslnes representative. Office:
Room 203. Labor Temple. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10.30: 1 p.m. to 2.80 and 5 p.m. to 6.00
p.m. Competent heln furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
COMMERCIAL     TELEGRAPHERS
British Columbia Division, C. P. System. Division No. I—Meets 11:30 a.m,
third Sundav in month, Room 204. Local
chairman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Rox 432,
Vancouver. Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 432, Vancouver.
ELECTRTOAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
213—Meets Room 30t everv Monday
8 p.m. -President, Fred Fuller; vice-
nreslrtent, T). Fink: recording fleertnry
Roy Elgnr, Labor Templo: financial secretary. E. C. Knight: treasurer. George
Hessell! business aeent, W. F. Dunn.
Room 207. Labor Temnle.
VANCOUVER REALTY &
BUSINESS  EXPANSE
We Sell and Exchange
Houses, Lots, Homesltee, Acreage, Fruit and Chicken Farms,
Hotels, Cafes, Rooming Houses,
Retail Stores, Livery Stables,
Saw Mills, Shingle Mills, Grain
Elevators,  Boats,  Automobiles,
'Loam and  Insurance.
401   HOLDEN   BUILDING
16 Hastlngi 8t. E.
Mr. Edison and His
Diamond Disc
has set a new standard In the reproduction oY sound. You can not
conceive how great thid advance
has been until you hear it. The
writer has tried a dozen times to
put Into words a description of
what this new instrument is like,
but fails every time he tries It. If
he*" could convey for five minutes
the exclamations   and   expression
:of wonder that came from visitors at our store during the past
few weeks we wouldn't have supply enough to last the week out.
A comparison of the tone of the
Edison with other makes of machines reveals the fact Instantly
that something has been missing
and we are hearing it now for
the flrat time. Tou owe It to yourself to hear the new Diamond Edi-
' son before deciding on any make
of Instrument.
■ 5*Oldest Music HouMtoB.0
558 Granville St.
I0I-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hasflhgs Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge. Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A.M. TO 6 P.M.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 233, I.A.T.B.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President* J. H. Fletcher;
secretary-treasurer, A. O. Hansen; business agent, O. R. Hamilton, Offloa;
Room 100, Loo Bldg.    Tel. Sey. 8046.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.—
Meets second Sunday of each month, lit
Robson street. President, J. Bowyer:
vlee-presltjent, f. English; lecretary, C.
P. Howett; treasurer, __ Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 8»—
Meets flrst and third Wedneaday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, Or. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; financial secretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I, Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phone
PATTERS     MAKERS'     LEAGUE     OP r
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st, room 205. Robert C, Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ave,; Joseph o.
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1721 Orant at; Tom
Smith, Rec. Sec, 848 Broadway west,
STONECUTTERS',       V A N C O IT VER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, 1:00
Fi.m. President, J. Marshall; correspond-
ng secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
financial secretary, K. McKensle.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 138—Meet every
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President Skene
Thomson; finanoial secretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour street; recording seoretary, George Powell, 1650 Fourth ave.
west; bueines agent, W. J. Nagle, Room
803, Labor Temple.
HTEROTYFBRS' AND ELECTROTYP-
ers' Union, No. 18, of Vancouver
and Victoria—Meets second Wedneaday
of eaoh month. 4 p.m., Labor Tempi*.
President, Chas, Bayley; recording aeoretary, Chris Homewood, 249 13th Ava.
Eaat.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple, second and
fourth Wednesdays at 8 p.m., and flrat
and third Wednesdaya, 8 p.m. Preaident
Adam Taylor; recording secretary,
Albert V. Lofting, 2636 Trinity Street,
phone Highland 1672; flnanclal secretary,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Claflt Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATION-
al Local 397—Meets every Wedneaday, 8 p. m.; Room 204, Labor Temple.
Financial secretary, E. ■ Prendergaat,
Room 216.
TAILORS. JOURNEYMAN TAILORS'
UNION OF AMERICA, Local No. 171
—Meetings held flrst Tuesday In eaoh
month, 8. u.m. President, J. T. Ella-
worth; recording and corresponding aeoretary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanolal
secretary, L. .Wakely, P.O. Box 60S,
TILE LAYERS' AND HELPERS', LO-
cal No, 62—Meets flrst and third
Wednesdays each' month, 8 p.m. Preaident, J. Kavanagh; secretary, A. Jamla-
son, 64 Fifth Ave. East
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 126—
Meets last Sunday each month, I
p.m. President A. E. Robb, vlce-prealdent A. H. England; secretary-treasurer,
R. H. Neelands, P.O. Box 66.
i B, O.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p.m., In
Labor Hall. President D. S. Cameron:
flnanolal secretary, H. Olbb; general
secretary, B. D. Grant, P. O'. Box 934,
The public Is Invited to attend.
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS meeta every
second and "fourth Thursday of each
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St, at 8 p.m. President J- L. Hogg, Hankey Blk., Sapperton; Secretary, A. McDonald, 881 Royal
Ave.. New Westminster
PLUMBERS' and STEAMFITTERS* LO-
cat 496—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:30 p.m. President, D. Webster: secretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 966, Now
Westminster, B. C.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
penters. Local Union No. 1689—
Meets every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Temple, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, M. C. Schmendt; saoretary, A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westminster, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEETS IN
\ Labor Temple, New Westminster, corner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of each month, at
1:30 p. m. President, E. S. Hunt; secretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
VICTORIA, M
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets first and third Wednesday, Lahor Hall, 731 Johnson atreet
at 8 p.m. President, A, Watchman, secretary, T- H, Norrls, labor Hall, Vlc-
tnrla. B.C.        "
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners—Meeta every Tuesday,
8 p.m., at Labor hall, 781 Johnston St.
President, J. B. Bryan; recording secretary, Geo, L. Dykeman; business agent
and flnanclal secretary, W. A. Parkinson, Box 236. n
 MCTEBar _______ ^**
KIMBBRLBY MINERS' UNION. NO. 100
Western Federation of Miners-
Meets Sunday evenlnirs, In Union HaU.
President, W, Fleming*; secretsrv-treaa-
urer.  M. P. VHIeneuve. Klmberley B.C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 2888. U. M. W. of A.—Meets
Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President, Sam Outhrle; secretary, Duneaa
McKensle. Ladysm'th. B. C.
MANATMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.of A^
—Meets every Monday at 7:80 p.m. ln
the Athletic Club, Chapel Street Arthur
Jordan. Box 410,_Nanlamo, B. ft-	
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNTON. No.
SS99. U. M. W. of A.—Meets every
Sunday 7 p.m., In U. M. W. of A. hall.
President. Jos. Naylor; secretary. Jamea
Smith. Box 84, Cumberland, B. O.
TRATL MILL AND SMELTERMBN*i
Union, No. 106. W. F. of M-—Meeta
every Monday at 7:30 p.m. President,
F. W. Perrln: secretary, Frank Camp*
bell. Box 28. Trail, B. &
LOCAL     VANCOUVER     OF     SOCIAL
DEMOCRATIC   PARTY   -   ftSJfi
meetings In Dominion Theatre, Granvlllo
Street, Sunday eevnings. Secretary; j"
Adams. Room 804, Labor Temple.
sTKoPBis or ooal mutwo miav-
i    LATIOHS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and ln a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of fl an acre, Not mora than
2,660 acres will be leased to one applicant
Application for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district ln which tha
rights applied for are situated,
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall ba
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of 16, which will be refunded If
the rlghta'applied for are not available,
but not otherwise, A royalty sha'l ba
paid on the merchantable output of tha
mine at the rate of five centa per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returna
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returna
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but-the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of $10 an acre.
For full Information application
should be made to the Secretary of tha
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands, _
W. H. CORY, .
Deputy Minister of the Interior,     '
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
ttfiSNB
Union j_WfL 'Ale
MADE   'pSmsS,     AND
5eer(2®$^Porter|
*!&> Of America iJ&rf* j
.coprmoHT *ti*abi jJB&iBajaSluSgj FRIDAY JANUARY 2, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATTONIS'
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS
•/      -■
Thia is on make of underwear in which you can secure good
quality and a perfect lit. The makers studied these two
requisites Aid have produced garments that clearly show
much thought along these lines. -Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally associate themielvet with underwear that fib the figure.
If you want real underwear.comfort this winter we would
recommend that you try Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino leparate garments at
$1.00 and $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool'Union Suits at*
$3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to 14 yean, and all sizes
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garments in
'light or medium weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
LIMITED
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
\
It will pay yon to see onr showing for winter wear.  Prices that
cannot be beaten or repeated in the city.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2  - Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADVT. AND WE WILL
LEARN to be an expert milliner and trimmer. ,
Learn to trim your own hats; make and curl
plumes, etc. A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
ilave for a few dollars a week, when you can leant
a profession with short hours and easy work that
payi a high salary) i\((e guarantee positions to our
graduates. '
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For particulars iee Madame Mills, 112 Hastings St. W.
or Phone Seymour 7450L.   Hours daily from I to 5 p.m.
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men  .
THREE STORES IN VANCOUVER
00 Hastings St.    * Phone Sey. 988   ,      401 Granville St.       Phon. Sty. 8727
782 Granvlll. St.    Phone Sey, 8813
VICTORIA STORE, (18 VIEW ST.
GREENHOUSES
2l.t Ave. and Main St. Victoria, B. C, Hammond, B. C.
Phone Fairmont 796,
Long Distance Phone 17
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THEN
UNION LABEL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Hardware and
Sporting Goods
Phones Sey. 2329-2328 111 Hastings St., W.
Phone Seymour 1390
Always Open
The T. EDWARDS Co.
SUCCESSORS TO '
ARMSTRONG & EDWARDS
Jfanwral liratnra, Embalm? ra
612 MAIN STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
A. M. McNeill
O. J. Benedict
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
\    ,-
We specialize in
Moving Furniture (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons for all description of work
Estimates cheerfully given
Telephones: Seymour 620, SS20 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 2S14-R
Reports B. C. Immigration
Stopped—Miners' Strike
on Vancouver Island
Various Other Matters of
Vital Interest to Canadian Workers
Following la an extended report of
officers of tbe Trades and Labor con
gress, of their work at the capital elty
regarding labor legislation:
OTTAWA, Dec. 20, 1913,
To the afflliated membership of the
Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada:
Fellow Workera: Following Is a
summary of some of tbe matters engaging the attention of your parliamentary representative since the adjournment of tbe Montreal convention:
1. Immediately following the adjournment of the convention, Hon,
Dr. Roche, minister of the Interior,
and Hon, Mr. Crothers, minister of
labor, were Interviewed relative to
the judgment rendered by Mr, Justice
Graham of Nova Scotia, Betting forth
tbat an immigrant must have in his
possession the necessary landing
money—even though advanced by an
employer for tbe specific purpose of
allowing such Immigrant to land-
could not be deportuu. At tbls interview Secretary Draper and Assistant
Secretary Simpson were present.
The assurance was given by tbe minister of tbe interior that the decision
rendered by Mr. Justice Graham
would not affect the administration of
the act, but that, ,a,s, formerly, every
Immigrant would be required to possess in his own right the requisite
landing money.
Fair Wage at Kingston,
2. Complaints from Kingston early
ln October relative to the non-
enforcement of the "fair wage" provisions ln the contract for government work on causeway construction
were taken up with the labor department. Tbe contract stipulates for an
eight-hour day. Ten hours are being
worked. A sworn statement, alleged
to be signed by each Individual employed on the work above mentioned,
has been received by the labor department, setting forth that with their
own free will, without Influence of
any kind, they desire to work ten
hours per day, as they receive for the
extra two hours, more (ln the shape
of board) than tbe equivalent of the
pay for overtime. . Efforts have been
made to secure something definite
to work on, ln the form of a sworn
statement, to the effect that the provisions of the*~contract are not being
complied with. Up to he present time
no statement, as desired by the department, has been made and the matter is still ln abeyance.
3. Relative to resolution No. 104,
dealing wltb the Hugh Carson com.
pany of Ottawa, and the agreement
which the employees of the said company were compelled to sign and by
which they were deprived of any possibility of protecting thetaselves, dl
rectly or indirectly, through organization, several Interviews took place
with Mr. Carson, at which Secretary
Draper was present. On a definite
refusal on ihe part of the company,
at whose shops some of the leather
work for the militia department is
turned out, to withdraw the agreement, tbe services of the labor department were enlisted. After repeated interviews and some strenuous work in securing reliable Information relative to the standing of tbe
company, its methods of doing business, the alleged Infractions of tbe
Immigration act, its relations to any
combine, the amount of work contracted for from the government and
the securing of sworn statements,
sufficient pressure was brought to
bear to cause the company to unconditionally   withdraw   the   obnoxious
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
Vhc Vhcalre Beautiful
SullWftn A Conaidini Vaudeville
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGE3 VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, 9,15      .
Season's Prices-
Matinee 15c, Evenings 15c, 26c.
Phone Stjmonr 876S
DIXON & MURRAY
OAWPBNTMt, BIO.
OfflM ud Stort Httlnf,   Oemml
Jobbing
Offloe and Shops
io«s snamuia ansa*
THE BELGRAVIA
FLORISTS
1015 ROBSON STREET
Phone, Sev. 5475
FLORAL DESIGNS, WED
DING ORDERS AND
HOME DECORATIONS
OUR SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
agreement. The employees of tills
company have now the right to organize, It they so desire, with the assurance of 'being lree from discrimination. -
Carpentera oo.Welland Canal.
4. Early In Ootober, at the request
of Organizer ThomaB Moore, of the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
and Joiners of America, an interview
was arranged with .the minister of
labor. It developed -at this Interview
that the "fair wage" schedule for carpenters ln the construction of the new
Welland canal was below the standard
rate. The minister has given assurance that, as soon as work of the
class referred to commences, the rate
of 40 cents per hour shall be the minimum, Instead of 86 cents as now specified. The minimum rates for carpenters has also been raised on government buildings In course of construction ln Preston and Toronto. The
standard rate ot 46 cents per hour
in Toronto Is tbe minimum for government work.
6. With regard to resolution No. 1,
dealing with the refusal of the Montreal barbor commission to pay the
minimum rate to carpenters as provided for tn other government work,
the department of labor and marine
and fisheries were interviewed. The
Information gleaned was to the effect
that the Montreal harbor commissioners, ae now constituted, places them
in the category of private employers,
and to wblch the fair wage clause
does not apqply. However, a strenuous effort will be made during the
coming session of the house to extend the provisions of the said clause
to Include work done for harbor eom-
mlsisoners.
Quebec Bridge and Iron Workera.
6. The subject matter of resolution
No. 63, relative to the payment of a
minimum wage to structural Iron
workers employed on Quebec bridge
was taken up with the department of
labor. As a result the "fair wage"
officer made inquiries and, according
to the report submitted to the department, after explanations were being
made the men affected are satisfied
with the attitude of the department.
Assurance Is given by tbe minister
that the minimum rate asked for by
the structural Iron workers shall bu
paid as soon as tbe erection of the
bridge proper commences.
Regarding Immigration.
7. As tbe result of tbe care exercised by W. R. Trotter*, of Vancouver,
tn watching closely all matters relating to immigration., attention was
drawn to the Canadian tour of Mr.
Campbell, agent In Great Britain of
the immigration department at Ottawa, and statements appearing in the
press credited to him with regard to
the class of Immigrants that should
be encouraged to locate lh, Canada.
The superintendent of Immigration
being approached tflth regard to the
matter, and asked to state definitely
the policy and programme of'his department, the following' letter was
received:
.".'OTTAWA, Ont,
"Nov, 20, 1913.
"J. C. Watters, Esq., President Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada:
- "Sir: With reference to our conversation this morning regarding
newspaper Items which have recently
appeared in the press with reference
to the policy of the department, I beg
to state that the present policy Is to
encourage tbe Immigration of only
agriculturists and female domestic
servants. Persons of other occupations coming to Canada do so entirely
upon their own responsibility and
without any advice to come being
given by any officer of this department.   Your obedient servant,
"W. D. SCOTT,
"Superintendent of Immigration."
Regarding Labels,
8. With regard to resolution No. 11,
relative to the more rigid enforcement
of the regulations providing for the
destruction of the stamp and package
containing cigars, as a means of preventing deception on the part of cigar vendors, the department of inland
revenue gives assurance that the matter will be closely looked into with
a view to the strict enforcement of
the inland revenue act.
9. The Recommendation of the label committee to make inquiry from
the dominion government aB to whom
and under what conditions the clothing, shoes and caps purchased for the
postal department employees, militia
and dominion police are made has
been attended to. The information
sought has been readily and courteously furnished by the justice and
postal departments. Up to the present
time the militia department has not
yet furnished such information. For
the dominion police the shoes are
supplied b ythe Slater Shoe company
of Montreal, clothing by the Two
Macs, and Rooney and Cooper, Ottawa, Maxwell company, Halifax, and
D. F. Sprinkling, Victoria; helmets
are manufactured in England. For
the postal employees, clothing Is
made under a four-year term contract
on competitive tender; the present
contractor being Messrs. Mark Workman and company, Montreal, and
clothing is made under the anti-sweating regulations. Shoes are purchased from a long list of local firms
scattered throughout Canada at $5 per
pair. The list'supplied has been forwarded to E. W. A.-O'Dell, representative of the boot and shoe workers
in Canada. Caps, also, are made under the anti-sweating regulations.
Vancouver Island Miners' Strike,
10. Tbe miners' strike on Vancouver Island has commanded.much consideration, not alone from your parliamentary representative, but from
the whole executive council. The
whole course of the struggle has been
followed as closely as circumstances
would permit. While recognizing that
the congress Is primarily a legislative
body and that Industrial struggles
must be directed by the organization
or organizations affected, yet it was
deemed wise by your representative
to keep fairly well informed on the
situation, to glean information from
every available source with a view
of being ln a position to act with
some measure of intelligence should
circumstances arise calling for action
by your representative or the executive council of the congress. Following instructions contained ln resolution No. 77, adopted by the convention, the minister of labor was interviewed at the earlicBt possible moment for the purpose of enlisting the
services of the labor department ln
an exhaustive effort to bring about
a settlement of the strike. At this
interview Secretary Draper and Assistant Secretary Simpson were present. On this occasion the minister
stated that his department could do
nothing because of the uncompromising attitude adopted by
- Both Parties to the Dlapute.
A few days subsequently the minister
was again Interviewed at which interview an understanding was arrived
at, providing for the appointment of
two men, under the direction of the
labor department to negotiate, if pos-
PAGEJIYB
sible, a baslfc tt jgSiement of the
strike; such mto mM_ be acceptable
to the parties to th* dispute, respectively. On tie strength of this understanding the president of the district affected by the strike was communicated with. A reply waa received
<k> the effect that the miners agreed to
refer the points at issue to such a
bqjird as proposed, reserving the right
to ratify or otherwise, any agreement
jeaehedhy the board by a vote of the
men affected.. Whether the mine
owners were communicated with for
a like purpose, I am unable to aay.
On stating to the minister tbe willingness ot the miners to agree to the appointment of two conciliators he refused to go any further with the matter, giving as a reason that too muoh
time would be consulted in finding
two men acceptable to each of the
two parties to the dispute—If two
such m«n could be found at all. He,
however, sent the- deputy minister,
Mr. Acland, to the Island to arrange, If
possible, a settlement of the strike.
Nothing Definite
haa yet transpired to show whether
his mission has proved successful.
The minister at thla Interview, at
which Vice-president Bancroft was
present, committed himself to the
statement that In view of the decision rendered br the Quebec court of
review, setting forth that no board
could be granted, under the provisions
ot the Industrial Disputes Investigation act, to the Montreal street railway men, as they were not In the employ of the company when application
for a board was made, no board would
be granted under the aforesaid act
were application made by the minera.
Pressed for an answer as to whether
be aocepted, as final, the decision of
the Quebec court of review on 'the
question raised, the minister stated
that the act could be amended to
clearly specify that discharged workmen or workmen on strike were still
employees within the meaning of the
act; and tbat such an amendment
could be made and put into operation long before it would be possible
for a decision on the case ln point to
be rendered by the higher courts. In
connection with that section of resolution No, 4, dealing with the miners
who are
Now Lying in Jail
without having been tried, and ball
having been refused, should be given
their immediate release, no time was
lost in interviewing the minister of
justice about the matter, The minister
pointed out that his department could
not order the release of these prisoners on bail. It is only through the
machinery In the jurisdiction of the
province that such procedure can be
taken. Immediately following tbe
trial of some of the men before Judge
Howey and, the heavy sentences passed, a protest against the severe punishment imposed was made to tbe
minister of justice. Vice-president
Bancroft was present when the protest was entered and formal presentation made for the e xtenslon of clemency to the men, whom, on tbe advice of their counsel, had pleaded
guilty and whom, In our opinion, had
been most harshly dealt with. On
this occasion the minister stated he
would secure at the earliest possible
date all the data ln connection with
tbe trial and Imprisonment of these
men and If circumstances justified,
would recommend to the governor-ln-
counctl such measure of clemency as,
ln bis opinion, would suit each case.
Every effort has been made to expedite matters, the minister of justice
having been interviewel frequently to
that etad. Secretary Draper has accompanied me on several occasions, and
bas Interested himself keenly in tbe
case. The minister bas given the
assurance that no consideration other
tban that of absolute fairness to the
prisoners will Influence him in deciding on any recommendation of clemency to be made.
Do Prenzo Brothers.
11. In the case' of the De Prenzo
brothers convicted ln Fort William
and imprisoned on a charge of attempted murder, formal presentation,
was made to tbe minister of justice
for clemency. Every effort is being
made to secure the speedy release bf
these men, as it is felt ln the circumstances much too' severe a penalty
was Imposed. The minister has the
matter under his personal consideration and just as soon, in his opinion,
as the men have served that length
of time in prison commensurate with
the nature of the crime and the extenuating circumstances connected
therewith, a recommendation will be
made for'their release on parole.
12. Immediately on receipt of information that the full text of tbe decision rendered by Justice Hunter, relative to the right of Hindus to land ln
Canada had reached the department
of justice, the minister of justice and
the minister of finance were consulted
by Secretary Draper and myself. The
success of our mission, together with
that of every other force throughout
the dominion, working to the same
end, is clearly manifested in tbe accompanying order-in-councll, which
has Just reached me from the department in time for insertion ln this
report: "H. R. H. the Governor-gen-
eral-ln-council, under and in virtue of
the provisions of subsection 3 of section 38 of the Immigration act, 9-10
Edward VII, and ln view of the present overcrowded condition of the labor
market in British Columbia, is pleased
to make the following order:
Immigrants Prohibited,
From and after tbe date hereof,
and until after the 31st day of March,
1914, the landing at any port of entry
ln British Columbia, hereinafter specified, of any immigrant of any of the
following classes or ' occupations,
namely, artisans, laborers, skilled or
unskilled, shall be and the same is
hereby prohibited." The order then
specifies all of the ports of entry in
British Columbia as coming under its
terms,
Advantage was taken of Vice-president Bancroft's presence In Ottawa attending sessions of the executive
council to enlist his services in visiting tbe department of public works,
railways and canals, justice and labor.
Of the matters taken up with the
heads of the different departments,
that of contracts made with the Pol-
son Iron Works of Toronto and the
assurance giving that the "fair wage"
schedule would be rigidly enforced,
particularly wltb regard to the pattern-makers, proved of some Interest.
An Interview with the government is
being arranged at which the members
of the Executive Council, together
with other representatives of organized labor, will be present. A report
of the Interview will be printed and
distributed to the affiliated membership.   Respectfully submitted,
J. C. WATTERS."
The entire staff of press feeders at
the government printing bureau, Ottawa, has made application for membership ln the local of International
Printing Pressmen and Assistants'
union.
JAMES STARK Sffi
usnaoei
Mwesss Aa:
■ten mtmtt, euo *a. «• SOS Mi,
latasfay'SiSO "■—i f
THB STOBB THAT SERVES TOD WELL    .
Re-organisation of Business Sale
CONTINUES >
Sensational Reductions Bring
Sensational Results
OUR DEPENDABLE MERCHANDISE, TOGETHER WITH OUR CLEAN AND BUSINESB-
UKE METHODS, HAVE MADE OUR BALK
THE MOST IMPORTANT MERCHANDISING
EVENT OF THIS or ANT OTHER WESTERN
„     OITV.
Space forbids items j read evening papers.   We give you details and
prices.   We stand at the back of all our advertisements.
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Beit Flour, 49-lb.
•acb  $1.45
Rolled Oats, fresh milled
8 lbs. 25
Butter. Finest Creamery,
3 lb.     1.00
Com Starch, Johnson's,
3 packets. 25
Lard,   Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each 35
Hams, by the whole htm
per lb.	
Bacon, machine sliced,
per lb	
Eggs,   absolutely   loctl
new laid,, per dozj..
Applet, Winesaps, 5 lbs.
Castile Soap, 35c. bars.
Ham-mo   Hand Clem-,
ser, per tin	
■23
.25
755
.25
. .20
.05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.      ,
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 8301, 8302
/  1276 ORANVILLE STREET
.JBhi
COLD  WEATHER  IS  COMING
GET ONE OF OUR HOT WATER BOTTLES
Vta Gwuwnte* Thtm to Lut Two Ytwn
Z-Qt, reg. $2.00, Special $1.50      3-Qt., Reg. $2.25, Special $1.75
BRING THig-sAD WITH YOU
marett&reid
157 Htitingi St Weit
Phone Seymour 1583
iDRUGGISTS 7tkl!fe^g^r
The Burning Question
la your Cook Stove or Range
one that glvea satisfaction, or
Is lt the kind that wastes tht
fuel, burns the cakea and plea
on the top and leaves them
raw on the bottom,
IF SO, now Is the time to make
the' change, and when you
make the change, there It no
better range you eould get
than
"The Stay Satisfactory Range"
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
W. C STEARMAN
Hardware Merchant
548 ORANVILLE STREET
Increase the Earning Power
of Your Family
Is your son or daughter able to command a good salary? Are
they revenue producers, or revenue reducers? Are they' qualified to
hold an important position? Can they do any one thing so well thai
their services ,-irc in good demand?
IF NOT, WHY NOT?
Don't you think it would pay you to invest a little money
in practical training forThem? During the past six years
thousands of our students and graduates have secured
responsible positions in the business world. Our training
gave them a start. You will find Success trained students
holding good positions in every town or city of importance froirl Winnipeg to Victoria. What we have done for
them wc can do four your son or daughter.
OUR WINTER TERM OPENS MONDAY, JANUARY S
DAY AND NIGHT SCHOOL
Write us now for full information, or call and see us—
Success Business College
Corner Main Street and 10th Avenue Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Fairmont 8076
SYSTEMS
/
We carry everything
for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD,
331 Dunimuir Street
Phone Exchange Sty. 3526-3527
EVERY   UNION   MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM PAGE SIX
I
HOTEL STRATFORD
VANCOUVER'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTEL
200 Bedrooms. 50 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Each Room
Equipped with Telephone, Hot and
Cold Water, Steam Heat, etc. Our
Beds are the Best tn any Hotel ln
America.
CORNER GORE AVENUE
AND  KEEFER 8TREET
Vancouver, B. C.
RATE8
(Weekly) Single, $3.00, $4,00, $5.00
"        Double, $4.50, $6.00, $7.50
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day.   No
More.   No Less.
Hotel Stratford Co., Ltd.,
Props.
John B. Teevens, Man. Director
BERGMAN'S MODEL KITCHEN
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity visit me for a First-Class Meal at
Moderate Prlcee.    White Help Entirely
The hest products obtained that the market affords. First-class
accommodation. Only modern system of cooking on the Pacific Coast,
second to none when compared with other American Cities on the
Coast Nicely furnished rooms in connection, Just perfected in the
most modern style and now ready for occupancy, at GOc. per night
and up.
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3, 25c.
Short Orders Day and Night
GO WITH THE BUNCH T°THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout. Hot and Cold Water in Every Room
Hneit Oaf* and Grill Boom on tba PaoUlo Ooaat In Connwtton
HOTEL ASTOR
C. J. MARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager,
Bates: $1.00 ud np—Special Weekly Bates.
lUBOPSAir PLAIT 147-149 KASTHTOI gTBEST WWT
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL JKi^KSSffi.
Sandeomtly Purnlihed        8QS Seymour St.
Centrally Looated
CLARENCE HO^fL
Conn PENDER and SEYMOUR STREETS
SBABOLD & MCEI.OKOY
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
:: ~  HOTEL :: at
C0NNAUGHT.
fUntflMSUl Props.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7087-70S8.
ALL OtlTSIDE ROOMS
■nropean Plan, fi,00 Per nay Vp.
Up-to-Date     First-ClaBH     Dining
Room and Cafe ln Conneotlon
120 ROOMS; 80 ROOMS WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone ln Every
Room—Elevator   Services;     Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
NEW AND UP-TO-DATE
Lounging and  Smoking Room.
Special   rates    to    permanent
guests.
Rates:   $3.50 per week and up.
Kingston Hotel
757 Richards Si.
Plant St;. 12550
clifton rooms 5-,r*?£W,wrk i'-
1125 CrutUI. Strati      Pbont Stjmoiir 402S* **•''! '«''•.J1 >," *11''    NM"
Tht Houtt of Comfort heetea, lot ft cold water ii erery roon
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
UNION
LABEL
THE USB OF THB IaABBI, ON YOUR PRINTING-NO EXTRA COST TO YOU-
WlUa HEI.P US DO OUR DUTY IN FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
SUSi
.WORKERS UNION,
UNI0NOTTAMPI
.Factory
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter wbat Ub name, unless lt bears a
plain and readable Impression or tbla stamp:
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT ». 8H0E WORKERS' UNION
245 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
J.'F. Tobln, Pres.   0. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
Berry Bros.
Agents for
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
u  Tbe Bicycle with tbe Reputation
I       Full  line   ot   accessories
D      Repairs promptly executed
b
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back. \
Differs trom all other remedies.
Prloe 13.00, Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THE   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. C.
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
'MARKET
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
AT ANY
PRICE
Price - $3.50
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
10 Years
Cintll tnd
Halting* Stnet
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
1136 Grin* St.
Neat Davie
SHOES FOR MEN
SHOES FOR 8ERVICE
SHOES FOR DRE83
UNION SHOES FOR COMFORT
FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at the servioe of every man who desires the best shoes his money can buy
W. J. ORR (Opporite City Hall) 204 MAIN ST.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY  .JANUARY 2, 1914.
Philosophy of the Social Problem. *
Edito.' Federatlonist:   I would like
very much a chance to express my
sentiments as to the social problem.
Why I pick on Tbe Federationist is
that organized labor has not any very
well defined creed,   and   my ideas,
which*are not orthodox with regard
to any known standard, are less out
of place ln it than ln  most other
papers which have a creed.   My opinion with regard to the social state,
expressed in the fewest words possible, Is thaf'it is in a pretty bad
mix; so bad, that lt cannot be repaired.   In order for lt to conform to
my conceptions of the proper state
of humanity, all 'it requires is to be
torn down to the ground, thrown over
the dump and a new structure built.
I sometimes observe when discussing
it with people, that after talking a
while they seem to see that there
Is a line of truth in what I say, and
they begin Immediately to try and
reconcile it with    their    established
conceptions.     The result is a confusion of mind that I am sometimes
a little sorry for.   The Ideas mix just
like lire and water, and the resulting
state of mind of tbe victim resembles
somewhat the  vapor  of smoke.    A
man must have ideas, right of wrong.
There is nothing more pitiable than
a man without them.      There are
people whose mental makeup Ib such
that you can drag them out of one
set of ideas Into another.'   There are
others who when you demolish the
structure they possess, act like' ants
when yojt wreck their nest—they are
ln confusion for a while and pretty
soon go back and fix up the old work.
In not a few cases the latter are men
who are much disposed to be satisfied with the present order.   At first
they are shocked to find that their
structure is false.     Later their prejudices outweight their honesty and
they go back to the old notions.    I
have no apology to make that the fundamentals   of   my   conceptions are
taken from the scriptures.   I am not
attempting to teach religion. The ideas
which inhabit my mind are, very few
of them, my own manufacture.      If
each man had to make his own ideas
it looks to me as though the bulk of
mankind would go very lightly mentally clotheu,     Our education is the
result of the investigations of almost
all who have gone before us, and of
a great many still living.     It is obtained by means of the transfer and
Interchange of Ideas.     So that anybody's education is mainly an accumulation of the results of other people's.]
mental efforts.     Those ideas which
appeal to me most are my own, regardless of their source.    You have
the same option with regard to accepting them  as  I had myself.     In
order to understand society, which Is
mankind's collective state, lt Is necessary to understand  man himself.
Perhaps he Is a descendant of the
ape—a brother to the ox or the ass.
Surely ln the great majority of cases
he acts like lt,    But that theory interferes with my whole conceptions
with retard to him.    The best exposition of man's nature and character
and position ln the universal scheme
of things that I know of occurs in
Moses' story of creation.     It Is the
general practice, ln getting out some
new device or construction, to design
it and get out plans and specifications.     God Almighty, according to
Moses, did this when He proposed to
make man.   He said:  "Let us make
man ln our image, after our likeness,
and let him have dominion over aU
the earth and the inhabitants thereof."   The image cpuld not be physical   since   the   greatest   teacher of
these things of all time said: "God
is a spirit, and a spirit hath not flesh
and bones."   Man, then, according to
this  conpeptlon,  must   be   a   spirit,
which is to say a mind, an' Intelligence.   His likeness to God Is that
he was to be lord of creation   and
creator and master of his environments.     The evolutionary hypothesis, It seems to me, presumes him to
je the   highest  Intelligence  ln  the
universe.  So much the worse for this
hypothesis.   We know very well tbat
he is not.   We are perfectly aware
that he is subject to laws, the recognition ot and obedience to which on
his part make for his welfare or mis-
ery ln this world.   His position,   In
contradistinction to the rest of the
inhabitants of the earth, Is that tt Is
distinctly mental.   He comes Into the
world naked, both mentally and physically and lt is up to bim to clothe
himself both mentally and physically.
The lower animal, en the other hand,
has these provided completely by nature. It comos Into the world with a
perfect education.  It cannot err.  Its
position is not one of responsibility.
Man, on  the   contrary, is pre-eminently Callable.      His  welfare  is  dependent upon himself—upon his perfecting bis   mental   equipment with
his knowledge.   Tbe laws and powers
wblch are over man are of a government order.   Earthly government Is
only necessary and in direct proportion to, lack of knowledge.      Since
there can be no lack of knowledge ln
tbe animal kingdom there can be no
government.    And since man  Is   a
mind—an Intelligence,  and the function of the mind Is to rule—of  an
Intelligence   to get   knowledge, the
violating of either  of  these responsibilities or duties Is the violating of
the laws of his being. Now, a law Is
no good without a penalty for disobedience, and the penalty seems to
be earthly. government.   Earthly government must, then, be primitive—
which we know lt Is.   The "ordinances of heaven"—the  laws of  nature
with regara to man—carry reward as
well.   Earthly rule must be primitive
purely,  to those  under  lt, to those
whom heaven's judgment has found
obedient to Its  laws,   and   who are
therefore not under earthly government, but over It Is recompense.   So
that the happiness of a man may be
definitely measured by his measure-of
subjection to human government.     I
want to give a couple of Illustrations
to show  that  subjection   to human
control or government Is in direct relation to lack of knowledge upon the
part of tho victim.   First, take tho
case of the individual.   A child, when
lt first begins to aot of Its own vol- ,
itlon needs the constant control of Its j seems
parents. As it grows up and Its mental equipment broadens, this outside
control decreases ln exact Inverse
proposition as its own knowledge Increases, until when It Is as well
equipped as they, this control ceases
automatically. This rule, If by Its
true parents, Is beneficent, also as
well as primitive. It Is a natural
government not an artificial one.
Men have, however, sooial or collective responsibilities as well as Individual, In the collective state we find
control, just in proportion to ignorance. In the most degraded—which
Is to say the most lacking ln know
ledge, as for Instance a cannibalistic
community, the Individual Is most subject. In the rising order of Intelligence
In the rising older of intelligence
we can Imagine chattel slavery, serfdom, wage-slavery,   wage  emanicpa-
tlon and rule,   In*the more enlightened countries, government is.not so
apparent as In the less enlightened.
And ln the most enlightened a considerable' number are not under government' at all, -they are over It.   It
Is a mere Instrument ln their hands,
to use for their own benefit.   Kind
reader, allow'me-to introduce to you
'the. master class.    They are  those
who   have   obeyed   the   injunction
Moses mentioned to "subdue lt; and
bave dominion "   Earthly government, then, we perceive, is class rule.
Now the basis of power is economic.
Its foundation Is dominion over the
earth and Its resources.    The reason
of the master and servant construction of society is the ownership of the
earth by a section   of   society—the
master class.     And the basis of all
human   affairs    Is credence.      How
wonderful a thing Is stupidity!    The
workers are not aware that they are
born and bred ln subjection to another elaSB,     The shrewdest deception that was ever perpetrated since
mankind inhabited the earth is this
thing called 'popular government." It
Is the greatest illusion of all time.
And yet lt Ib so simple that a laboring man, though a fool, need not err
therein.   It Is all right as long aB
they serve these masters ln Industry
and obey the laws they lay down for
the maintenance   of   their masters'
position.     Let them show any dissatisfaction toward this, however, and
the veneer of popular rule Is dragged
or thrown aside, and class rule stands
forth in its naked vlciousness, bared
upon rifle, bayonet and machine gun.
"Having no eyes to see they see not,"
or "seeing they   do   not   perceive."
Solomon said:     "Betaot like the ox
and the ass, which have no understanding."   He said, "Go to the an,t
thou sluggard, consider her ways and
be wise, which bath no guide, overseer or ruler."    The ant Ib the reverse of the ox and the ass in every
way.    She Is communistic—a type of
collectivism.     They   are   a   divided
class, with no bond of unity except
servitude to a common master. They
are useful to others—like the "useful
portion of society."   The ant, like the
master class in society, is not under
government and is, of no use to any
except her own kind.    Popular government, besides '-being a contradiction ot terms, Is essentially a farce
and Impossible. ' The wisest of men
said that "for three things the earth
is disquieted; and for four which it
cannot bear," and the chief of these is
"a servant when he reigneth."     A
servant reigning is a paradox—an impossibility.    A,servant class cannot
have political power, nor can it have
any other kind of power.  If it thinks
lt can > by any means of organization
upon the industrial field, lt is essentially "off Its base."    The present Industrial status is maintained by the
militia—the recognized antidote prescribed ln the social pharmacopoeia
for unionism.    Without doubt, if the
unions controlled the available supply
of labor they could'dictate terms to
the masters.    In Hep of this, they
seek to prevent others over whom
they have no control from going to
work at jobs which belong to the
masters of the earth, and who have
the right to give these jobs to whomsoever they will.    It Is apparent that
If any of this process Is legal, lt Is
to the portion of it which is Illegal,
very nearly allied, and then partitions
do  their bounds  divide.    And  that
ignorant bunch of imbeciles—the mllltla—have the power of Inducing the
unionists to see it from the master's
standpoint.   Why do they do it?   I
claim that the "heavens do rule."   I
have a right to deduce a natural law
"from a uniform   occurrence   of natural phenomena, ln the same way,
under the same conditions."   The unions' actions are based not upon education, but upon physical force. Physical force may accomplish physical
results, but not social progress.    The
union will effect real progress when it
Uses the right means.   Make the union an educational institution, and lt
will he the van which will lead the
workers out of the wilderness of servitude Into the land of emancipation
—a land not filled with poverty and
misery, but a land flowing with milk
and honey to put In your tea.     Let
It continue as it is and its loudly-
boasted attainments will be bought
with sufferings and privations, and
not infrequently at the price ot blood
itself. Man is a mental being; he has,
of course, muscle.  There is no denying that the use of the mind makes
for the saving of labor.   And to what
extent he neglects the use of the
mind, he must make up by the excessive use of the muscles.   The workers live mainly by the exercise of
their muscles.     This   characteristic
pervades   that   essentially   working
class, and practically useless (at present) institution—organized labor.   It
will have nothing to do with education.   Hence, it does not understand
even its own business.    Success in
business is not usually accompanied
by lack of understanding of the business. The Union, by its unionist action
repudiates despotism In Industry.   By
Its political actions It upholds lt. Thus
lt "builds up again the thing which lt
has destroyed, malkng Itself a transgressor" and It sometimes occurs that
"the ways of the transgressors are
hard."   it attempts to declare a measure of independence from the bosses
ln  the  matter of control, and  yet
holds unswervingly to Independence
upon them for the means of existence.   It Is, ln fact, more or less of a
paradox and a nuisance.   Its position
re independence Is correct and good.
Its position of dependence and interference Is wholly evil. It Is a queer
mix, no less.   Would the Introduction
of education Into the scheme of unionism produce   discord,   and confusion!   Nay, lt would disclose lt.   It
would disclose the fact that wages
are but the half which catches those
of the animal kingdom, whether files,
fishes or foxes, which have some measure of liberty except for that bait. It
is the beans that the swlneherder uses
to lead his hogs   to   the slaughter
house, when he finds that they object
to being driven.     It would disclose
that lt Is the price   of   prostitution
which the worker receives when he
places hia physical efficiency at the
disposal of the master class.   But lt
that    men   love   darkness
rather tban light because tbelr deeds
are evil," and  they don't wish  to
change them.    And yet the powers
above punish men only for Ignorance;
reward them only for knowledge.   I
could prove this, but I won't. "Tempts
fuglt." What Is the means employed by
wholly evil. It Is merely the love for
the sooial institution.    And working
class  patriotism under the present
state of society means the preservation of that state of Bociety, and tbelr
own subjection.    It should be realized
that men were made to be masters,
not servants.     The likeness of God
inhibits such a thing,    still they repudiate the likeness to God and cling
to it; and mey get in return hard
labor for life.    Hard labor was flrst
given to mankind as a curse.   It was
always a curse whether pronounced
upon men by the judges ln this judge-
ruled land, or by any other master.
Yet lt is looked upon by the working
class as a blessing.    Even death Is
sometimes bo regarded.   "They are of
those that rebel against light;  they
know not the ways thereof, nor abide
in the paths thereof"     One of the
things union men ought to learn is
that the private ownership of such
property 'as God created is a crime.
No man made the earth or Its resources. ' The title to anything ethically comes from the production of
lt.    God Almighty gave the earth to
mankind as a whole, not to certain individuals.     They were ordered distinctly to subdue it, and what would
be the use of subduing It and not
holding lt ln subjection?   They were
distinctly ordered to have dominion
over it—which means control or ownership of It.   Society as a whole it
means—not by proxy, in the form of
the master class.    And the portion
of society which falls to obey heaven's
commands need not hope to escape
its   punishment.     Is   the   Master's
title to the earth perfect?   Nay.   The
heavens do rule, and it is a crime
according to its ordinance for men
to dispossess,   or   worse yet, allow
themselves to be dispossessed of ownership of the earth.     Earthly ordinances are aimed nevertheless to accomplish   and   maintain   this   very
thing.     But 'earthly   government is
only an instrument in the hands of
heaven for the punishment of violation of Its edicts, through misgovern-
ment and oppression.   It is no substitute for the laws'of heaven and
when these are recognized it will be
unnecessary and cease to be.   Even
according to earthly standards, the
masters' title to the earth is defective.
Tbe deeding of the earth to the master class by the master class is one
considerable joke,.but lt Is not legal.
Suppose a man of considerable estate
has a family of swen, one of the boys
goes out West, gets into the ways of
the country and fails to write home.
After a while they hear that he is
dead.     The old man dies Intestate.
The heirs sell the estate and get the
full price for it.   Years later It transpires that the son out West left an
heir.     The titles are all null and
void until the latter signs away his
rights.    Most ot the people were not
even considered   in   this   dispossoss-
ment deal.   I haven't signed away my
rights to any part of the earth, and
when  enough  more of the  rightful
claimants appear I am going to contest the masters' claim to it.   Then
the working class  will be relieved
from that curse and that class will
cease to exist.   But the master class
cannot exist without a servant and
subject class, lt too wll cease to exist,
and classes, aiid with them government, which Is only class government,
will have ceased forever. Respectfully,
SAMUEL P. GOW.
Dec. 30, 1913.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
DIPHTHERIA
FORBES A VAN HORNE LTD.
Importers of
TOOLS
and Fine Cutlery
114 CORDOVA ST. WEST
that part of nature which rules over
men, to neutralize the efforts of the
union, so long as they are Incorsect?
It Is another fool thing called patriotism. Patriotism In a proper state
of society would be the collective expression or self preservation. But
based upon a fundamentally false and
wrong   condition   of   society, lt Is
Then. Seymour 8737
ma Arietta %tiib\a
"Pttntngrnttiftr Arttsta
S3S BOBSOB IIBEBT
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PATRONIZE    B     O.     FEDERATIOXIST
ADVERTISERS—AND TELL THEU WHT.
FOR EXPERT
Watch and Jewelery
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
143 Hastings Street West.
fptolaltltii
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakei,
We Vie Union Jlonr.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OP
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink* and Lunches
All Goods Fresh Dally.
•SS OBABVILLB ST.
1.1, Say. 7104.
WHENORDERINGASUIT
See that this Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
It stands for all that Union
Labor Stands for.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Union
HOTEL   CANADA
C. a MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room.  -   :•: ■:  European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly:Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
,    Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
—— ■ ■ ■ j | -  »
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP \
Attractive Rates to Permanent
Guests f.
C0TTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
 ...v GAUER * DUMARESQ, Proprietor.
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
. The Leading Hotel. :: Auto Parties catered to. ■
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Corner Fourth Street and River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C.
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.Tj.   WAlt'lNOPOED,   Manager
PENDER HOTEL
613 PEWDBtt gTBEBT WEST
New, Modern, First-Clan
Steam Heated, Electric Lighted
Telephone Seymour less.
Rates 11.10 per Day and Up.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Room $3 per week
I Teleplose,  Hot nt
-  -   _    ;   —     ;   r~i itiepsoie, not •■<
Up.     "   I   Good Service Throughout      Md Water is nek
D. F. Pennebera, Pro.
33-35 HA8TINGS STREET WE3T
Rooei.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
RAINIER     UrYTEI      Cafe open from Six o'clock
l\<rVlllld\    aT\J A __.   a.m. till Midnight   Tbe Best
Meals In the City, at Popular Prices;   White Cooks only employed.
Rooms -Rented by tbe Day or Week.   First-class Liquors and Cigars.
JOHN SNIDAR, Prop. Corner Cordova and Carrall Sts.
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
ASK POR THEM, SEE THAT YOU GET THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS FLIM-FLAM TOU WITH CHEAP TRASHY SUBSTITUTES
Pkose Sey. 76S3
Diy or Nifht
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Richards St.       Vascoaver, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1084 Oranvllle St., Phono Soy. 8488.
North Vancouver — Ofllce and
chapel, 118 Second St. B. Phone
184.
fe^
jfrtV
fl Now brewed and bottled
in a union brewing plant
by union workmen.
<JAnd just as pure—as
good—as well aged as
ever.
Q All retail liquor stores in
Vancouver sell it at three
(or a half and six (or a
half.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY     PKj
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited    O FRIDAY....
'\
PAGE SEVEN
S.S. "Marine Express No. I"
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
LMVM National _ngrinsstiitt Co.'i WhMf, foot of BldwoU St., Ooal
HMfcor,
_____*<* DAILY IMP TO BOW-
BIT    »Bfl    OAMBIBB    MUW)
yonrw,   lnomanir   enwors,
QBAHTBAMl, —A WDB »A»»
ana lntTBUdlat* ■topg.
N.B.—This boat open for charter for Evening Trips.
Phones: Sey. 6332   ::    Fair. 2199   ::   Bay. 602L
LSATDTO TABOOUTBB
Week Days ........................ 9:00 a.m.
Sundays ™...,..„..™_..™....10:00 a.m.
ABBXVIVO TAHCOVTBft
Week Days ........................ 5:00 p.m.
Sundays ...........,.....;  1:30 p.m.
Sundays . 10:00 f).m.
Vancnuvcr wage-workera can materially assist The Federatlontst hy calling or
writing for a few cards which have just been printed, reading:
1 came here because I read your
advertisement in our paper,
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Owned   and   published   by   organlied
labor, In our own quarter-of-a-million
dollar Labor Temple, every Friday
morning;' and I always give preference
to   goods   bearing   the   Union   Label,
Whin out shopping go to Federatlonltt advertisers, and before leaving leave a
cord where it can be found by the clerks ar(d probably reach the principals. It is
an easy way to help The Federationist get results—hence more advertising—and a
bigger and better paper to champion the cause of Labor.
Remember, too, when you are in need of pointing of any kind that The Federatlonist accepts orders.    Union paper—union printers.
PATRONIZE UBOR TEMPLE PI ROOM
CLEVER COUPLE AT COLUMBIAN THIS WEEK
There is appearing
at the Columbian
theatre this week
an act of more than
passing interest to
union members of
this city. We refer
to the talented
team of Libby &
Trayer presenting
"Buffalo Bill and
the Lady." This
theatrical combination, which in private life is Mr. and
Mrs. J. Aldrich Libby, have been prominently connected
with the union
movement and are
now members of
the Actors' union.
Mr. Libby was formerly an international organizer for
the R. R. Mail
Clerks' association,
a delegate and
member of central
bodies in several
cities where he formerly resided. Neither of them has ever forgotten their earlier associations
and in many parts of the country where industrial conflicts have been in
progress where they happened to be playing, they have turned some evening of their engagement into a benefit for the strike sufferers. Mr. Libby
follows closely the trend of events in the trade union world and is never
happier on his hours off duty than in talking over unionism with local union
members. **
*ND 4t~_K££XS,1
Edited by MISS H. R. GUTTERIDGE, Room 219, Labor Temple.
SQUEALER8
Man has alwayB been a squealer
himself, and a victim of others of the
same kind. The first squealer was
our respected papa, Adam, when he
gave away Eve, in hopes of getting
an easier sentence, which he did.
Since then everything and everybody
has turned squealer on man. He shut
woman up, and kept her in dense
ignorance, yet she escaped amid a
perfect storm of squeals. He held
himself up as a model and guide to
others, both ln natural and spiritual
strength, yet from Samson downward men have always trapped other
men by means of female' slaves; and
the male lawyer says it is Impossible
tor men to have the force to curb
their vices, therefore, woman, the
weaker vessel, who is too feeble ln
mind and body to vote, must carry
unaided in her fragile hands tbe
standard of the mora) virtues and
honest qualities of the race. To make
it easy for her, man has put the age
of oonsent as loyal as ten (in some of
the states) haunts and harries the
street walker, bul winks at her.companion, and Is frightfully indignant
when disease squeals on htm and his
to the fourth generation. He pats
himself on his manly bosom, and proclaims himself lord and master on
account of his superior height and
strength, whilst ln the great cities,
the male five-foot nothing trots beside
six-toot' something of athletic womanhood, who has to stoop to kiss him.
Nature has squealed on him, and, cur
lous to say, the little man Is generally
the most vehement declalmer against
votes for women, and blows the most
about being her protector. Medicine
has behaved shamefully. When men
found things were likely to leak out,
they took all midwifery cases and
intimate sicknesses of women out of
women's hands and placed them In
man's who before had considered lt
beneath their dignity to care for females. Well, some people began to
say that women could not vote or
work because of their physical Infirmities, and medical science retorted
that women would not have these ills
If lt were not for the vices of the race.
Some of the hardest work is done
by women, whilst finicky businesses
are ln the hands of men. A woman
makes chains, carries coals, ln Germany cleans streets and ploughs,
whilst men dress hair, sell pins and
needles, thread, beads, etc. Thus
trade and medical sclenee nave
squealed on man. Women, going out
after the vote, have studied conditions, found out that they bear children who are riot theirs, unless they
are Illegitimate; that there is not a
single law ln their favor; that they
are forced by economic conditions to
marry the first man- who offers or
some of them are thrown into the
pit; they pay taxes, but are not allowed to vote, because they do not
go to war, yet soldiers do not vote,
and very few men are in active service. They are told to be modest and
retiring, yet millions of women are
obliged to work. Their virtues and
vices are regulated and exploited by
men.     In the law courts their most
private deeds and thoughts are.dragged out of them by men. They are
condemned, by men who believe in
the double standard. They are stripped, examined, operated on by pen,
whilst men with vile diseases are generally In the care of girl nurses. They
are arrested by men, etc., etc., until
honest medical men and myses have
defied the etiquette of the profession,
and boldly denounced injustice. Man
always made a great fuss about
squealing on men, but lt he saw-a
wife out with a strange man, or a
girl with a lover, he squealed louder
than an elephant, for as a tale-bearer,
scandal-mOngerer, or dirty story
teller, man has never been surpassed.
The libertine and secret sinner is the
first to squeal about woman's dress
and manners, whilst the normal man,
who Is of clean mind and morals,
thinks It a pity that society and laws
are so hard for woman. Last of all,
woman, whom he had fed, kept shut
up, guarded in body, soul and dress,
never allowed to work for'herself, but
only for him, woman , ungrateful woman, got up and squealed on him, and
what was more, common sense and
aU right thinking men and women
squealed with her.
EMILY ADAMS.
VOTES FOR WOMEN IN AUSTRIA.
In Austria women are forbidden by
law to take an active part ln politics
or to Join any political association.
Last spring the chamber of deputies
decided to cancel the prohibiting
clause, and the political committee of
the upper house has now endorsed
this vote of the deputies, with the
explanation tbat "the part taken by
women in associations with political
tendencies is well known, and under
the circumstances can scarcely be
prevented. This bill has been sent
back to tre deputies for further consideration.
MINIMUM WAGE LEGISLATION.
Judge Cleeton of the circuit court
of Multnomah county, Oregon, has decided that the Oregon statute creating an industrial welfare commission
Is constitutional. The Oregon act
gives the commission power to decide
hours of employment, standard conditions of labor, and minimum wages
for women and children. Judge Cleeton has decided that these questions
come within the police power of the
state. He says: "The statute must
necessarily have a liberal construction, and by considering this statute
from this standpoint, it In my opinion
that the regulation of the minimum
wage for women and minors, aB announced ln the act, is within the
police power of the state, and Is
therefore constitutional." California
and Washington are other equal suffrage states with industrial welfare
commissions similar to that In Oregon.
"Fed." of February 7 Wanted.
The "Fed." needs three more copies
of No, 96, February 7th, for its files.
Will give one year's subscription for
each copy sent to this office.
Richard Stalker sustained a fracture of his leg while working for the
city near Stanley Park.
A 'department of child welfare has
been inaugurated in the university of
Kansas. BeBides giving Instruction In
ohild Welfare work, the department Is
to take the entire state as Its field
In arranging healthful vacation employment for city school boys, In
organizing "parents' clubs," "parent
teachers' associations," and civic improvement associations that will look
after the welfare of children ln small
towns and in the establishment of
playgrounds and social centres. The
department will make courses ln
ohild psychology available for par
ents all over the state. Kansas
granted suffrage to Its women ln
November, 1912.
FIR8T WOMAN SEA CAPTAIN.
In Copenhagen, tbe widow of a doctor, Frau von Bandits, has passed the
last examination of tbe school of
navigation with great success, and
has received permission to act as sea
captain. She has succeeded In getting an appointment, and will, at the
end of this, month, take command of
a 3,000-ton 'ateamer to English and
Russian ports.
FROM A WOMAN'S POINT OF VIEW
I sawva paragraph ln last week's
Federationist about street-cleaning in
Victoria being done' by the chain-gang,
fifty years ago. The chain-gang was
a familiar sight on Vancouver streits
at a muoh later date, and caused much
distress of mind to a recent arrival
from the old country, who used to
turn away her eyes on passing the
men, in order not to humiliate them.
One day she heard the familiar "clank
clank" and at once became interested
in the remote distance. At the same
time she could not help noticing that
the men looked a little different, and
seemed more cheerful, which rejoiced
her tender heart, till an officious person informed her that these were the
"electric linemen," and not convicts
at all. Moral: It Is not always the
heaviest chain that clanks the loudest.
J. DOUGLAS FEARN.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd. I
(Kenneth Grant, Managing Director.)
Two Store*—
ao-M eomsovA moat wm   rr I
ratai.
Carpentera' White  Duck Overalls,
with 12 pockets, union label »1.7t *
Men's Heavy Tweed Pants, union
label ;.»M0 to IMS
Wa  aak for your patronage  In our   Suit   and   Overcoat   Depart-
mente, when we give value evoryllme.
NOTICE
WILSON & RICHMOND
who handle all classes of Union Goods for Men, have acquired the
business formerly carried on by BURTON BROS., 37 HASTINGS
STREET W.. along with the handling of all the noted brands of
clothing, including the famous L System Clothes carried by that firm.
We are offering at our Cordova Street store special reductions on all
stock prior to our moving. STANFIELD UNDERWEAR. STETSON HATS. CURRIES RAINCOATS. SWEATER COATS.
OIL CLOTHING LINEMEN'S GLOVES. ETS.. at prices
never equalled.   Come and bring the family..   .
MENTION THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST AND WE WILL   I
GIVE VOU A BEAUTIFUL CALENDAR
Wilson & Richmond
36 CORDOVA ST. W.
37 HASTINGS ST. W.
ANSWER TO  MRS.  PANKHURST'S
ARREST.
The burning down of much valuable
property ln various paHs of the country was the answer of the militant
suffragettes of England to the government's arrest of Mrs. Pankhurst on
her return from the United States.
In addition the sums of £15,000 ($75,-
000) was collected at one meeting to
carry on the flght with. "O, what
fools these Asqulths be!" Who can
break a movement able to raise a
aum of money like tbat in a few minutes, and with hundreds of women in
the Tanks prepared to face death If
needs be /      H. O.
B. L. Marks of the Barbers' unton
is spending the holidays with his parents at Spokane, Wash.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
COLD8, ETC.
United Undertakers
LIMITED
NOT MEMBERS OF THE UNDERTAKERS TRUST
225 12th Avenue, West
Telephones
Fairmont 738 and 1153   .
North Vancouver, 427 Lonsdale Ave. Phone 640
Union Prices, NOT Trust Prices.
■   A BOOK TO M.AIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
This ia a gift that will ba appreciated In any part ol tha world.
Tastefully bound in three bindings.    Cloth, |1.M; Ooie Calf, *LM;
Burnt Leather, $..71.
THB ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32S HASTINGS STREET, WEST ——
STEADY EMPLOYMENT
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic Servants
THESE ARE THE ONLY CLASSES ADVISED BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
COME TO CANADA. ALL OTHERS ARE ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
AFTER THEMSELVES IN CASE OF FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
FARMING IN CANADA OFFERS TO SKILLED WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET AWAY FROM THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
AND ALSO TO ESCAPE IN A LARGE MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
IN CITIES.
IN THE VAST WHEAT FIELDS OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
OFFERED TO EVERY MAN, WHILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
BE ACQUIRED AT PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPI-
TAL AND PREFERS FARMING IN ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES.
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS* WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED
LITERATURE TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA
Z V
PAGE EIGHT
§
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUAKT t, 1114.
L D.TAYLOR
FOR MAYOR, 1914
YOU KNOW THE RECORD OF
WORK ACCOMPLISHED DURING MY TERM OF OFFICE IN
1910-1911.
Platform for 1914
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A
PROPER CITY MARKET TO-
GETHER WITH BRANCHES,
BRINGING PRODUCER AND
CONSUMER TOGETHER-NO
MIDDLEMAN.
FREE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.
STANDARD WAGES FOR
STANDARD DAY'S WORK.
ELIMINATE OVERTIME ON
CITY WORK.
OFFICE BUILDING ON CITY
HALL SITE TO BE USED BY ALL
DEPARTMENTS OF THE CITY
HALL.
MAINTENANCE OF EXEMPTION OF IMPROVEMENTS AND
AMENDING CITY CHARTER,
THAT NO FUTURE COUNCIL
CAN RETURN TO THE OLD SYSTEM OF TAXATION.
POLICE AND FIREMEN TO
HAVE ONE DAY'S REST IN
SEVEN.
ANNEXATION OF SOUTH
VANCOUVER.
STRICT ENFORCEMENT OF
LAWS.
(Sgd.)
L. D. TAYLOR.
LAND GRABBERS
NOW EXPLOITING
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(Continued trom page 1.)
light poplar, spruce' and pine with
open spaces the end ot lake.   '
(23) Prank Paul Kane and (24)
Oliver Sigurdson—Dark; covered with
light growth of young poplar and
alder; fronts south side of lake;
fairly level.
Il„? AdOalFi—t-..3treess,falrly ) ) )
(25) Charles Whatman—Dark; covered with poplar, pines and willows;
fairly level anj good land.
(26) Edward Little—Same as 25;
at east end of Nation lake.
(27) "Walter Penn—Dark; covered
with pines, willows; land level and
rolling.
(28) Charles Henry Parker, (29)
Henry Skelton and (30) William
Channings—Same as 27, but level.
'(31) Louis Carlton 'Clark and (32))
Robert Dalzlel—Dark; land is level;
fronts on Nation lake; covered with
fine spruce and timber.
(34) Rao Edward Bray, (35) Archie
Frederick Letts, (36) William Campbell, (37) Arthur Maynard, (38) Edward Irvine, (40) Willaim Arthur
Carpenter, (41) Hugh McLeod, and
(42) Pasquade Ologue—Dark; perfectly level; first two 2' miles from
Nation river; balance fronting on Nation river; well covered with spruce.
Good hay land; good land.
(43) Sydney Richard Mallett, (45)
Henry Vrascos, (47) Darius Galuis)
and (48) Thomas Backus—Dark; covered with good milling spruce; land
fairly level on north side of Nation
lake, rising gently to north.
16,. .(49) Nick Tomides—Dark; covered with good milling spruce; land
fairly level rising gently to the
north.
(60) Phil Paddles—Same as 49, but
2 miles north lake.
(51) Alkls Gatos—Same as 50, covered by spruce, averaging 6,000 feet
per acre.
(52) Deonias Rados—Same as 43,
but 3 miles north lake.
(53) Domis Sasos and (64) Potty
Epthimlus—Dark; well covered with
spruce; fronting with gentle rise
from lake front to north.
(55) Nick Prestos, (66) Lervey Kol-
pluthas, (57) Eplros Angelos and (68)
Prank Nicklas—Dark; covered with
good spruce; 2 miles from lake.
(59) Jim Mavogenls and (60)
George Davis—Dark; covered with
good spruce; fronts on Nation lake:
slopes to norm.
(61) Jonas Alias and (62) Rheodore
Kalsaua—Covered with good spruce;
ts 2 miles north of lake.
(63) Jim Peters (64) Nick Pappas,
(65) Tom Moore, and (66) Thlros
Patros—Well covered with milling
spruce; fronts on Nation lake, rising
gently to north.
(67) George CaroB, (68) Sam Mo-
cals and (69) Mastls Vaujas—Dark;
covered with good spruce; one mile
from lake.
(70) Henry Tseronis — bark; is
good hay land rising gently from lake,
with good spruce timber.
(71) Sam Bllols, (72) Alevros Mo-
gliss, (73) John Rapas and (74) Salon
Beys—Light clearing, covered with
poplar, birch, pine and willows.
.(75) Bill Socradis, (76) Nick
Baptes, (77) Aaron Plakas and (78)
DrosoB Kapas—Easy clearing, rolling;
covered with light poplar.
(79) Gem Gerdos, (80) Chris Perer,
(81) George Poleolgus and (82) Donos
Mocres—640; sandy loam, clay. In
this section good sized pieces of open
land covered with wild grass are
found, 10 to 20 acres open.
(83) John Conls—640; Bandy loam,
clay; land ts rolling and covered with
poplar, willows and pines. Easy
cleared.
(84) Chris. Papas, (85) Enquil Con-
toglance and (86) Tom Katabius—
640; sandy loam, clay; land is rolling
and covered with poplar, willow, birch
and pine.   Easy cleared.
(87) Harry Moshos—640; Sandy
loam, clay; rolling land; has over 20
acres of open grazing land, balance is
covered with poplar, pine, birch and
willow, and is easy cleared.
(88) Glorg Tonis and (90) George
Cavadas—640; sandy loam, olay;
same as No. 87; has from 20 to 40
acres open grazing land.
(91) George Demos—640; sandy
loam, clay; same as No. 87; has from
10 to 20 acres open grazing land;
balance easy cleared.
(92) Menos Stavros—640; sandy
loam, clay; open patches 10 to 20
acres; balance easy cleared, wooded
with pine, willow, birch; Is rolling
land.
(93) Alex. Sargis—640; sandy loam,
clay; same as 92 with 19 to 20 acres
open land.
(94) Arthur Carras—440; sandy
loam, clay; same as No. 92 with 10
to 20 acres open land.
(95) Arthur Carras, (96) Jim Miller, (97) John Rexakas and (98) Gost
Pegaros—640; sandy loam, clay; rolling land, covered with small pines,
willows, poplar and birch. Land easy
cleared; small creek running through.
(99) Peter Gray—640; sandy loam,
clay; rolling land, covered with small
poplars, birch, willow and pines; easy
cleared; 10 to 20 acres open grazing
land. j
(100) Theodore Thomlnas — 640;
sandy loam, clay; 25 acres, grazing;
same as 99.
(101) Thomas Papas — 640; sandy
loam, clay; 10 to 30 acres open grazing land; same as No. 99.
(102) Henry Thompson—640; sandy
loam, clay; 15 to 30 acres open land;
same as 99.
(103) Bill Doss—640; Bandy loam,
clay; rolling land covered with small
poplars, pine, birch and willows, some
20 acres grazing land ln open patches.
(104) Demetrl Katronis—640; sandy
loam, clay; same as No. 103.
(106) Nlclls Pallos—640; sandy
loam, clay; same as No. 103; 20
acres open grazing land.
(106) Peter Baros—640; sandy
loam, olay; same as No. 103.
(107) Jack Banester and (108)
Aleck Johnson—640; Bandy loam
clay; rolling land, covered with poplar, pine, willow and birch; easy
oieared.
(109) Tony Paulldes—640; sandy
loam, clay; 20 to 30 acres grazing
land.
(Ill) George Llltes, (112) Tom
Sofooles, (113) James Lycos and
(114) George Loukas—640; sandy
loam; rolling land covered with poplars, willows, pines and birch; easy
cleared.
(115) Gost Pagonls and (116) Flip
Ranpas—640; sandy loam, clay; section one mile north of Nation lake
covered with poplar, pine, birch and
willows; easy cleared; land level and
rolling.
(117) Sean Calogeros and (118)
Zanas Drulcas—640; Dark; sandy
loam, clay; land rolling, covered with
small poplars,   birch,   willows   and
ROBERT  COLLIER
President of Medicine Hat Typographical
Union No. 451, elected Alderman for
the City—Candidate of the Tradea and
Labor Council.
On August 81, 1869, on a farm ln Wellington county, Ontario, Robert Collier
first aaw the light of day. After receiving a country schooling of a few years
ho entered the employ of the Erin (Ontario) Advocate as an apprentice. When
he had mastered the rudiments of tho
art preservative, he left for Toronto,
where he was employed for some Ume,
later following the trade ln Rochester,
Cleveland, Buffalo and other American
cities. In 1000 he came to Medicine Hat,
and has since that time been connected
with the Medicine Hat News. Mr. Collier Is a charter member of No. 451,
which was organized over four years
ago, and has been president during this
entire period, also holding ofllce in the
Trades and Labor Council as treasurer.
Mr. Collier was a delegate from Medlcjne
Hat Typographical union to the Nashville, convention this year of the I. T. U.
It was upon being urged by the labor
forces that Mr. Collier accepted nomination for municipal honors, and the
campaign was placed In the hands of
Secretary Bellamy of the Typographical
union, also past president of the Trades
and Labor Council. This was the first
attempt of the trades unionists of Medicine Hat to elect a labor candidate, and
the fact that the victory was won over
a member of last year's council makes
the win a notable one.
pines;   easy cleared;   near east end
Nation lake.
i17. After No. 43 all appear as
Illiterate foreigners. Did any of the
43 or 118 ever intend to take steps
to cultivate any of the land or really
buy any for themselves? Has any
one of them gone to live upon, or
used that rich land? Were they not
pawns used to get land .by fraud?
Block ef Land at Nation Lake,
18. This block consists of 75,500
acres of wild land situated in the
Peace river district of British Columbia, north of the Grand Trunk Pacific
railway, being located on Nation
river, a tributary of the Peace. The
country Ib of a rolling character, being lightly^ timbered for the greater
part with poplar, willow, birch, alder,
spruce and cottonwood, with many
open patches of from 10 to 300 acres
in extent, that are practically ready
for the plough. On this block of land
Is also growing good patches of merchantable spruce timber, which will
be very valuable in the manufacture
of lumber and timber products. I
would say that about 25 per cent, of
the land is covered with good timber,
while the most part of the remainder
is covered with poplar, birch, alder,
willow and small patches of open
land.
19. The country Is well watered.
Irrigation is unnecessary, there being
sufflclent rainfall to mature crops.
Nearly every section is watered by
a small creek while there are several
small lakes. These lakes are the
haunts of wild fowls ln abundance,
while they also teem wtth fish. There
Is also wild grass ln abundance ln
the valleys. The soli Is a, rich sandy
loam, generally, while the river and
creek bottom soil is a very rich black
loam. Wild grasses grow in great
abundance, rank as high as a man's
head. The country is covered with
pea-vine, red-top, blue joint and
sugar cane grass ln great profusion;
while wild berries of several kinds
are found growing ln abundance; the
vegetation on this indicating rich soli
and good climate.
20. Spring opens here ln April and
the growing season comes on quickly
after. The days lengthen rapidly
and at their longest afford eighteen
hours of sunshine, which accelerates
the growth of crops and brings them
rapidly to maturity. All kinds of
grain do well, wheat growing to perfection, as also do potatoes and other
root crops,
21. I saw a sample of wheat grown
by Indians that was as well headed
as could be found ln Canada, the
grain being hard, large and plump,
The Indians know nothing of farming,
merely planting their seed and giving
lt little or no care, yet I saw as fine
potatoes, carrots, cabbages, turnips,
wheat, oats and barley grown by
them as could be found anywhere.
22. The winters here are somewhat milder than In tbe same latitude
east of .ho mountains, as the winters
everywhere here in British Columbia
are, this being due to the warm
winds that blow from the Pacific
ocean, tempering the eltmate. The
snowfall Is from a foot to twenty
Inches.
23. In the mountains of this section of the country have been found
minerals and precious metals, and
when these mining camps open they
will afford a good market at good
prices for farm products here. There
is also coal ln this section of the
country ln several places. For mixed
farming or dairying or for wheat, I
think this block of land would prove
excellent, and ln my estimation
would be just what Is wanted for a
large colony of settlers.
(Signed) ENGENE CROTEAU.
24. The foregoing further evidences of the British Columbia government's disastrous neglect to reserve
land until surveyed, also to survey land
before aale or pre-emption, and publish such concise descriptions as these
for the guidance that all Incoming
settlers need to receive. Their policy
seems designed to propagate such exploiting syndicates and schemers, who
thereby supply debauching funds to
buy political favors now resulting in
crushing down the worthy men who
are striving for fair access to purchase or pre-empt land on which to
live, and also those trying desperately hard to make a living on
patches of land under hard conditions the government policy is
aggravating past the limit of endurance.
(To be continued.)
Capitalism seems to be frying in its
own fat. The colossal political stupidity of the workers themselves is
the cause of lt all.
ADVERTISEMENT
PSK
By SAM ATKINSON.
Next Sunday evening, January 4th, |
Sam Atkinson will lecture in the Colonial theatre, Granville and Dunsmuir I
streets, at 8 p.m. "Law, Love and
Liberty" will be the subject. There |
will be an organ recital by Prof.
Woodland at 7.45. Mr. P. L. Jeffry
will render vocal selections.
On Thursday evening, Janaury 8th,
Prof. J. R. Morton, of Warrington, |
England, will speak ln room ',
Labor Temple. He is the author of
"A National Minimum Wage." The
public are cordially invited. The
meeting commences at 8 p.m,
Tuesday, January 13th, there will
be a musical and impromptu dance
In the Labor Temple. There will be
a high-class concert at 8 p.m., when
some of the leading musicians lnthe
city will appear. After the concert |
there will be dancing. Tickets may
be obtained from any of the women
comrades or Dr. W. J. Curry, 301
Dominion building, for the small price
of 25 cents.
"There is no
darkness but
ignorance."
We need to
clear the cobwebs from our
brains.
If you attend
the series of
ledures being
delivered in
the Colonial
Theatre, cor.
Granville and
Dunsmuir Sts.
. ADDRESSED BY
f
SAM ATKINSON
LECTURER
SOCIAL DEMOCRATIC
PARTY OF CANADA
you will be
better able to
analyze modern
society.
T. S. BAXTER
FOR MAYOR, 1914
To the Workingmen of the City of
Vancouver.
During my term of office as
mayor of the city for the past year,
the following matters of special interest to workingmen have been
taken up:
The conditions covering hours
and wages of all workmen engaged
on work being done either by the city
or for the city, have been amended,
and for the first time provision has
been made for the observance of Saturday afternoon half-holiday. These
amended conditions have also been
adopted by the School Board.
During the year an attempt has
been made to deal in some measure
with the need for inspection of scaffolds used by workmen, and in
August last a by-law was adopted by
the City Council whereby this work
is to be done by the building inspector's department until such time as
city finances are more plentiful and
the building trade becomes busy
again.
A clause was put in the agreement between the City and the Canadian Northern Railway Co. providing for* payment of wages on same
scale as is done by the city.
It was decided by my casting vote
that the new partnership water main
shall be laid by the city with day
labor instead of by contract.
Much criticism has been aroused
as the result of the payment of $2 per
day for relief work by the city. There
is only $20,000 to be spent, and whilst
I regret that we should have to resort
to relief work at all, yet I believe that
if it became known throughout the
province that work could be obtained
in Vancouver by all comers at $3 per
day, the city would soon be swamped
with so many men that we could not
handle the number at any rate of
wages.
The elimination of aliens and the
employing of white residents and citizens on city work has also been a
part of my policy. In November,
1911, the proportion of aliens in the
city gangs was 28 per cent., while in
November, 1913, the proportion was
but 10 per cent, all of whom are British subjects as near as can be
ascertained.
T.S. BAXTER,
Mayor.
_____

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