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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 9, 1914

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Array THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL UNIT''  . STRENGTH.
SIXTH YE "/jSTo. 144
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADEB AND L+BOK COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR.
m
VANCOUVER, B. C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 9,1914."
EIGHT PAGES
^_* POLITICAL ttmiTT: TICTOSTIi'.j
('"ci^tr) o%MPER YEaI
RELI'M SAILORS
hi 8E FOUND
ijf.
Orientals Work for Mere
Pittance and Little
Food
Bigger Dividends Cause of
the Change—Not
Safety
Considerable public Interest has
been aroused over the matter of Chinese crewB taking the places of white
men on the C. P. R. steamers sailing
to the Ori?;it from tbls port. The
following correspondence to The Federationist by W. S. Burns, throws further light on the subject:
"Regarding the article on Chinese
erews for the Empress linen In the
lSBue of 2nd instant, I would like to
give the readers of your paper some
additional Information on this subject. The whole thing ln a nutshell
is that the Chinese are "cheaper";
in fact, the superintendent-admitted
that much, but I certainly do not
agree that they are reliable, as disasters ln recent years have shown that
they are not. The pay of the Chinese
ts from (7 to f 10 a month. Their
food costs next to nothing, and as tor
accomodation, well, anything at all
will do them. The pay of the white
crew was (30 a month and their food
costs about 30 cents a day. In fact,
taking^ everything Into comparison
They Are Paid Lest
than those sailing out of the old
country. Their pay there is: Across
the Atlantic, £3 10a. to £6 10s.; to
Australia and South Africa, £5 10s.;
on tramp steamers it-Is £4.10s. Firemen are usually paid £1 to £1 10s.
more a month, lt Is the usual old
cry that they cannot get reliable men,
but that story Is getting a little too
old for anyone of any common sense
to believe. It Is not a case of getting
men, but one ot larger dividends. Reliable men are still to be had right in
Vancouver as ln other parts of the
world. But until they are given a
living wage and decent conditions,
shipping companies cannot expect to
get them on their boats. Take the
Australian boats, for Instance: You
will flnd the same men there trip
after trip, from one year to another.
Good, steady and reliable men, always
Ready for Any Emergency
but I cannot say the same for the
Chinese. Mutiny at sea is a thing
ot the past as tar ae WWte erews are
concerned, but It is practically an
every-day occurrence to read of
Chinese crew mutinying.      The onl
Not a Single Labor
Candidate Was Placed
in the Municipal Contest
Be it said to the discredit of organized labor and
the socialist parties in Vancouver, not a single Labor
candidate was placed in the civic contes^ which
terminated yesterday. The choice was between tweed •
ledee and tweedledum, and no matter who won, the
wage-workers of Vancouver can safely depend upon
it that the "business" interests will be conserved
primarily, and the workers will receive what they
"petition" hard enough for. Unlike Toronto, Port
William, Port Arthur, Winnipeg, Medicine Hat, Edmonton, New Westminster, Nanaimo and Victoria,
Vancouver workmen did nothing in the way of securing direct representation. It is a reproach to the intelligence of the working-classjn Vancouver and one
that should be removed ere another year rolls around,
especially in view of the acute labor situation which
now prevails up and down the Pacific Coast.
UBOR CANDIDATES
Open the Campaign With
An Enthusiastic Meeting
in Royal City.
Half-Holiday By-law—Municipal Ownership—Employment of Citiaens.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C„ Jan. 9.
—On Tuesday evening an enthusiastic
meeting of workingmen wss held ln
Labor Temple, where Messrs. Barnard, Hogg and Cameron, labor candidates for aldermanlc honors, spoke.
The hall Was well filled and every
plank In the candidates' platform was
endorsed by the   audience.     School
Trustee R. A. Stoney made a capable        .._  ..    _     	
chairman.    Some of the things advo-; „ni the o p R will soon hn wnntlnir
Mind   n/nrA-      Dmnlnn^n.  „f .Itl.....    ""■  "•« S1,'     ...      , .       ? ,       „  ? ?*
a franchise?" (Applause). If labor
candidates were returned Chinatown
would be wiped out. He had it on
good authority that representations
were made to the city council to cut
ALD. WALTER DODO
8 a candidate for re-election an alderman for New Westminster. He Is an
employee in tlie 11. C. Electric car
simps, and lias done good work. as
member tor   ttie   city  council.
cated were: Employment ot citizens
only for civic work; the half-holiday
by-law; employment of-white labor
only In local Industries.
uninese crew mm.ny.ng.      ine ora- j£ ___*^t&___Xl_\ ST | *»» the wages of unskilled city em-
Km and   engineers  often   have-toj,™ -Jgg^Jg ^n had taken an'pl0!,ees'  -"An <Mtain,"B- *"^««*
work the boat to port themselves. In
fact, they are tn danger of their lives
most of the time.     In times ot dan-
Ser they are useless, too, always try-
lg to ..Bave themselves, never thinking of anyone else, Take the steamer
Rio de Janlero, sunk outside of Sah
Francisco; the Oceana, sunk ln the
English channel after a collision, and
many other instances, always attended with great loss of life, I suppose
until there le some big disaster in
'this part of the world, the public will
go on believing that Orientals are reliable. If this should ever happen
they will flnd out that they are not,
and the cost wjll be
A Toll of Human Lives.
The sooner the public wake up a little
and cla,lm their own and do away with
these profit-grasping corporations, the
better will it be for the travelling .public and the men that follow the sea.
The sailor and the miner have the
most dangerous occupations of any,
any they both have the worst conditions, and are bound down by harsh
and unjust laws. The sailors' union
Is trying to put a bill through congress in the United States to ease
their burdens a little, and also to
protect the travelling public by requiring that 76 per cent of the crew
shall be able to understand the language of their officers and for sufficient boats to save the passengers;
but they are being
Fought by Shipowners
from all parts of the world. The
most bitter ot all are those carrying
Chinese crews, for they can see that
if this bill goes through it will do
away with their pets and also reduce
their dividends a little. Yes, reliable
crews are still to be had In Vancou
ver; but not for the conditions that
the C, P. R. or any other shipowners
offer them, for Jack is human, like
his brother on shore, and likes to be
treated as a man and not a slave. All
this rot about a white British Columbia, sung by those patriotic (?) poll
ticians, should disgust the working
people of this country when they see
the hordes of Orientals Invading every
Industry and driving them to starvation. Will they ever wake up? I
suppose the only thing we can do Is
to hope they will."
KILLED IN RAILWAY YARD8.
A St. Tbbmas, Ont., dispatch says
that William Oray, a brakesman on
the Machigan Central railway was
killed Ui the railway yards »t Tilbury
Friday night by eome ean while
■huntlni.
'FRISCO'S UNEMPLOYED.
i About 8,000 unemployed appear
dally at the co-operative employment
bureau at San mnoleco, Ca., tor free
food. The city furnishes employment
to 1,500, but this hs only » drop In
the bucket when compared with the
total number being housed aad fed
i by the civlo authorities. The number
Appearing at the city headquarters Is
dally Increasing.
San Francises Labor council Is Investigating a feasible plan tor the
organization of migratory workers.
Among the most successful unions
that oame into being at Toronto In
1913 Bre: TeamBterB' unions (500
members); ornamental iron workers,
egg chandlers, Jewish painters, railway carworkera, new locals In the
garment trade and building Industry.
j are done here," he said, "was afforded
E
LABOR ON 01Y
Some
of  the Legislation
Initiated by
Workers
New West
Good
Oth
inster Sets
pie to
Cities
&_^iIS^'SS^--*_Tk^'m?! when a certain body of citizens asked
the license commission to submit the
bottle license question to the pegple,
but the commissioners said 'no, we're
going to do what we like anyway.' The
sooner people wake up and put demo-
the
ln politics, lt was time that they ex
erted themselveB, for If they wanted
anything done they must do It themselves. If workingmen in the city
were represented in ratio per capita
^!a.rmiid1be.S?TS'. °f them in !he cral'lc men in. instead of these,
council.   It is not union or non-union b tter „     ,Al)DiBU8e i
men who are running this campaign, i1)etter'   „ >APP|a"seJ
It   Is   the   workingmen,"   said   the Trustee R. A. Stoney
speaker. "It ia to the interest of the endorsed the points of all the speak-
workers to have municipally owned ers. Alderman Dodd was the best
commodities, but these things should the city ever had and these other
be operated at a saving to the people, candidates were men of his stamp.
not to make large profits," continued  (Applause).
the speaker. (Applause) "Residents The next meeting will be held ln
should be employed by the city. If Johnston hall, Sapperton, on Friday,
you can't get a man to All the bill in — -=.■...^■■—^-.-.---:--...:-
New Westminster I don't believe you
can get one In Seattle or anywhere
The labor party and Alderman
Dodd were responsible for the establishment of the employment bureau
and it has justified Its establishment."
(Applause),
T. A. Barnard
"I presume you have watched the
present council and agree with me
that the time has come when its personnel should be changed, that is If
the majority is to be rightly represented. Are our own men not capable? There have been no large petitions or strong delegations of business men wait upon my colleagues
and me, but we are here to represent
labor—modern democracy—and I ask
you to return one with those principles," said tlie speaker amidst applause. Ho did not expect to revolutionize everything In a single day, but
he did want workingmen to get the
full benefit of their labor. They should
have water and light at cost. He
also favored the municipal coal wharf.
Such things were coming and Nelson's
purchase of Its street railway was a
criterion. Mr. Barnard was particularly strong in favoring the half-holt-
day by-law. The petition against if
was supposed to have names of 80
merchants; half of them were of professional and real estate men. "When
that petition was presented," he stated, "a man said the merchants were
the real backbone of New Westminster. This Is an Insult to the working
man."
A voice—-"Where would the merchants be if it wasn't for the workers?"
Mr. Bernard—The only way to settle
this was by a olty by-law that workingmen, If elected, would pass. lie
opposed the recent grants to sectarian Institutions. If such could not
stand alone they did not deserve to
Btand at all. What kept Industries
away from New Westminster was in'
Dated land valu'es, Was the speaker's
parting shot (Applause).
D. S. Cameron
D. S. Cameron, president of the
Trades and Labor oouncll, said that although Aid. Dodd was the representative of labor, yet he displayed business ability on all questions coming
before the city council, and it caused
him to smile to see how delegations
were asking "business men" to run
and save the cttlens from the labor
people. "I see Mr. Annandale la to
run," he said. "In all the time I have
been here I never have known htm to
take a stand on any public question.
Mr. Goulet is an employee of the C.
P. R. Doesn't it seem queer a wealthy
corporation like the C. F. R. should
have a representative on the counoll
Just when our harbor Is being built
NEW WESTIfiNSTER, B. C„ Jan.
9.—That labor reptesentatlves on civic
bodies accomplish good work Is evidenced by the legislation enacted in
New Westminster; Although the labor
members of the elty council do not
take all the credit yet it was by their
initiative and untiring efforts that the
following work was brought about:
Had a referendum submitted to the
electors abolishing the tax on improvements; amendment to road tax
by-law exempting* those whose names
are on the household voters lists from
payment of the 12 annual road tax.
Introduction and passage of a bread
by-law providing ter a standard weight
for loaves of bread; prior to this a
loaf of bread could be of any weight
Reduced the hours of labor for civic
workmen from 9 to 8 and Increased
the pay from $2.60 per day to $2.75
per day and again to $3.00 per day.
This latter figure Ib now established
as a minimum wage. Had Inserted a
minimum wage clause in all city contracts a maximum hpur clause, also
a resident labor clause. This, In
other words, gave the city council
control pver the men employed and
the hours and wages the men were to
work and receive.on,all contracts let
by the city. Had a municipal garbage
collection and disposal plant established and made the collection of garbage from private residences free.
Curtailed very considerably the monopoly clauses in the trades license bylaw. Prepared and introduced the
half-holdiay closing by-law, giving to
those employed In retail stores one
half holiday per week. This however,
was defeated. Had an up-to-date
sanitary by-law passed by council.
Abolished the $2 irrigation tax. Granted and Introduced a resolution In the
council opposing the provincial government exempting the Canadian Northern railway's lands from all municipal and school taxes with the result
that the said lands have to pay all
local Improvement taxes, which will
amount to thousands of dollars. Had
by-law passed compelling owners of
buildings where girls are employed
to provide separate toilet conveniences with separate approaches for
tbem. Had a free municipal labor
bureau established.
. In addition tfritahe above they op
posed at ail times the granting of
city property tb private interests and
corporations, and worked on all occasions ln the true democratic Interests
of the city. This Is a record of which
New Westminster workers may justly
feel proud and ts an Instance of what
can be done when labor puts its shoulder to the wheel and pushes. How
much of that legislation would have
become effective had labor representatives not been on deck? Would that
other cities ln British Columbia would
do likewise!
D. 8. CAMERON,
Labor candidate aa alderman for New
Westminster. He Ib president of the
Trades and Labor Council of that city
and an active trades unionist, having
served five years as president of the
Amalgamated Society of Curriers ln
Glasgow, Scotland.
A
TO
Is It Trade Unionism
Or Law-breaking That
Court Is Now Trying?
•'Is it trade unionism or law-breaking which is on
trial at New Westminster!" is a question now being
asked among union men, in view of the daily press
reports of the past day or two. It just took ifour lines
to record what Judge Morrison had to say of J. Angelo
as a participant in a •■riot" in the strike zone. It re- ^
quired over a column to review all the nasty things the
learned judge had to say because Joe Angelo happened to be an official organizer of the United Mine
Workeira of America. That a mere Working man
should dare to pit his "strategy" against a coal baron
is almost treasonable, but that the coal barons do as
they d well like is so patent that he who runs may
read. To add to Angelo's crime he was a "foreigner,"
and inasmuch as at least a few of the "foreign mine
owners are even now unavoidably detained at San
Francisco, it was up to Judge Morrison to carefully
conserve "our" country from any further contamina-,'
v tion. Angelo was found 'guilty "on all counts' and ,w*ilr
get soaked in due course.
■ I.
ARCHIE HOOO,
.abor   oandldate    for   the     aldermanlc
board   at    New Westminster,    was   a
former   secretary   of   the   Carpenters'
union.
B.C.IWT0
COM IN I
Convention Will Be Held
in New Westminster
January 26th
Preparation  Well   Under
Way for Reception
of Delegates
To Look Over Local Situation and Return to Attend
Big Convention.
Resents Too Much Outside
Interference With Policies of the U.M.W. of A.
V. E. Chapman has been elected
president oi the San FranclBco Walters' union for 1914.
The Pressfeeders'-ball, held on New
'fear's night in Labor Temple, was a
success. Tbe programme comprised
16 dances, and the Musicians' union
orchestra furnished the music. Qeo.
Pfaff was floor manager, with the
committee comprised W. Smelling, C
D. Butts, A, J. Alnsley, Geo. Pfaff.
CONGRESS OFFICIALS
AGAIN INTERVIEW THE    .
MINISTER  OF JUSTICE.
According to dally preu report!
the executive council of the
Trades and Labor Congreaa of
Canada has again interviewed
Mlnliter of Justice Doherty at
Ottawa on behalf of the imprisoned minera of Vancouver Island.
But ao far as la known hart, no
move hat been made by tha
minister.
. Frank Farrington arrived in Vancouver yesterday from the east and went
on through to Nanalmo. He will return here to-day and proceed east to
attend the uig annual convention
of tho U. M. W. of A. In conversation
with The "Fed." Mr. Farrington said:
"Just came from the east.in order
that I might familiarise myself wltb
conditions on the island previous to
the convening of our international convention, which meets ln Indianapolis
on January 20th.
"I have been made acquainted with
the recent utterances of one Gosden.
It is evident that he Is one of those
fanatics who are afflicted with a
diarrhoea of words and a constipation
of ideas and who do more injury to
the organized labor movement than
the combined forces of the employers
could hope to do. Already his utterances have militated against the men
sentenced by Judge Howay and for
whom we are trying to secure a mitigation of punishment from the minister of justice at Ottawa.
"My information Is that heretofore
tha minister had displayed a disposition to deal justly with these men,
but, I am advised, that since Gosden's
utterances the minister has changed
front and It Is going to take a considerable effort to disabuse hts mind of
the belief that Gosden is a type by
which tbe Vancouver Island miners
should be judged. Gosden has no affiliation whatever with the United Mine
WorkerB ot America and does not express the policy or even the wish of
that organization, and we disclaim any
responsibility for his utterances, and
regret them as much as It is possible
for anyone to do.
The Big Convantlbn.
"I do not know whether the local
unions on the Island are going to send
delegates to the International convention or not, although I can see no
actual reason for their doing so. I
do not expect that the question of
continuing to finance the island strike
will even be discussed by the convention, and if It is, I do not think the
presence of local delegates will add
any strength to the argument that
will be introduced in defence of a continuance of the strike.
"There is no doubt whatever in my
mind that the Btrike will go on and
that the International union will finance it on the same basis as in the
past, that is, of course if those who'
have no financial responsibilities ln
connection with the strike will allow us
to devise the policies In connection
therewith. However, I am of the
belief that It those who are not Identified with the United Mine Workers
of America insist upon devising our
policies, and allow us to pay the
freight, there will be a radical change.
So, as I say, I can see no actual necessity for local delegates being In attendance at the convention and am
of the opinion that If the local unions
have a surplus of funds, such funds
can be used for a more useful purpose
than that of sending delegates to the
international convention.
Agalnat "Holidaying."
"In connection wtth the agitation,
by the Miners' Liberation league, ln
favor of a general suspension of work
throughout the dominion, I can
only say that I expressed my views
in that connection in a former issue
of The Federationist, and 1 have no
reason to chungo the opinion to
which I gave expression at that time,
if those who foster this idea are
anxious to have tlie United Mine
Workers of America eliminated from
Vancouver island and eastern Ilrltish
Columbia, 1 don't know of any more
effective plan they can devise than
to get the members of our organization involved in their plan for a general strike.
Congreaa Officers In Charge.
"The mutter of securing clemency,
or I might more properly say, justice,
for the men who wore sentenced to
prison by Judge Howay, is in the
hands of the officers of tho Trades
und Labor Congress <if Canada, where
lt properly belongs, and thoy are doing everything that can be done in
order to bring about the release of
these men, and matters looked very
encouraging until the minister of justice got hold of presB reports containing Gosden's senseless and vitriolic
utterances In Vancouver. However,
the officers of the Congress are endeavoring and working hard to placate
the minister or justice and to accom-
pllsh-.the results sought."
Members of organised labor In the
Royal City are at present omj with
preparations for welcoming the fourth
annual convention of the British Columbia Federation ot Labor. Hither
to these conventions have been held
ln Vitcorla, but it waa this year
deemed advisable to change the meeting place, and New Westminster was
chosen. A big amount of work devolves on the central labor body ln
the city where a convention Is held,
and on Tuesday night the New Westminister Trades and Labor council got
down to business ami started the*
preliminaries. D. S. Cameron was
appointed chairman of the reception
committee, with H. Gibb as secretary,
and Messrs. Aid. Dodd, W. Taylor and
C. H. Lugrln members. Arrangements
have been made with the Savoy hotel
for the headquarters of the delegates during the convention. This
hotel is situated within easy reach
of the Eagle's ball—where the
meetings will be held. Following
usual procedure, the mayor, with the
provincial and federal membera have
been invited to attend the opening.
His worship Mayor Gray will welcome
the delegates to the city and Thos.
Gilford, M.L.A., with Col. J. D. Taylor, M. P., will address tho convention.
There are over 12,0
rolled ln the trades unions of Toronto,
Ont.
James Hazlett, president of the
local Masons' and Bricklayers' union,
left Sunday night for Houston, Texas,
to attend the annual convention,
3. H. Conroy, of the Bridge and
Structural Ironworkers' union, will
probably spend another year In the
general hospital, as a result of an
accident twelve months ago.
"INDUSTRIAL HELL"
PREVAILS IN SOUTH
AFRICAN LABOR WORLO.
The union lata of South Africa
are having a few troubles of their
own theae daya and tha next few
weeks will determine, for a time,
whether they are to run tha business they alone make possible or
not. All "eptelata" will be designated as "acaba" for the pur-
potea of claudication In the ensuing claaa struggle.
IDES AND
HOLDS BUSY
President Robt. Poster
the District Minen'
Union Speaks
Civic Centre—Nomination*
of Officers—Other Important Business
T. A. BARNARD,
Who Is labor candidate for alderman at
New Westminster, Ik a well-known engineer, who haa served aa councillor In
the old country.
ThlB gathering of trades unions is—
so far as organized labor Is concerned—the biggest event of the year
and every local union should be represented. Apart from the "driving
force" such a convention represents,
the "get-together" spirit is of Incalculable good to labor. And the driving force is of some use. The delegatea to this convention represent
roughly, 20,000 workers in this province, and the provincial government
Is compelled to listen to their demands. The topics cover a wide field
—ln fact nearly every question affecting the wage-earners of the province
is discussed. There will be plenty of
apace for visitors and membera of or-
ganled labor who attend the meetings
will have an enjoyable and profitable
time.
The waiters' union ot San Francisco
has a membership of over 1,800.
Subscribe for The B. C. Federatlonist—only $1.60 a year.
The Masons' and Bricklayers' union
held their regular meeting Tuesday-
one new member initiated.
The Tradee and Ubor Cornell halt
lta regular fortnightly meeting lift
night President C, H. Benson ooct-
'pled the chair, and SecreUry W. J.
Wllklnaon wai ln hla plaoe.
- fcradanth.lt
Jmilgamated Sheet Metal Worken
Robb, A. J. Crawford and O. Ttat-
man    ■■:■_
Brewery Workers—L. O. My.
Preas Assistants—H. P. Allen.
. Home   and   Domestic   Employeea"
union—L. L. M. Coote.
Amalgamated Society of Carpentera
and Joiners—L. McLean.
Typographical union.—R. p. Pettlplece, Chas. Grasste, Geo. Bartley, Alt
England, L. E. Dennlson, W. R. Trot,
ter.
Builders' Laborers (No. «B).—Blast-
kle, Geo. Harrison, Geo. Nichol.
Steam Engineers, No. 397—Oeo.
Riley.
Bricklayers' and Masons' union—
Wm. Gillespie.
Street   Rallwaymen—W.   W.   Burrough, F. Jamea.
Clgarmaken.—A. P. Tletjen.
Electrical Workers, No. 213—0. S.
Phllpot, W. F. Dunn.
Journeymen Tailors—H. Nordlund,
F. Dolk, A. Beamish, C. McDonald and
MIbs Outtrldge.
Moving Picture fend Projecting Machine—H. Wardrope.
Delegate Foxcroft wu at thla Junction elected chairman of the meeting
vice President Benson retired.
Executive Committee
The executive committee reported:
C. Siverts wrote regarding extending use of union label.   Referred to
Label league.
J. McAllister, aeoretary • treasurer
district No. 28, U. M. W. of A., re
unions taking action to terminate
Btrike.
The Miners' Liberation league re
unions taking 48-hour holiday to commence January 30th ai protest against
Imprisonment, of miners.
Tradea and Labor Congress of Canada wrote re request for protest
against miners' sentences.   Filed.
From department of Justice, regarding telegram requesting release of
miners.   Filed.
Marble Workers, No. tt. wrote re
feoe.pt for their affiliation fee.»Piled.
From Vancouver -Labor Temple
company re yearly financial statement and notice of annual meeting.
Flled.
From Central Labor council, Lot
Angeles, warning workers to stay
away from that city. Filed.
Bills were ordered paid.
Business Agent Wilkinson reported
regarding Rex theatre re moving picture operators, trouble unsettled.
Hose and Brooks, liquor dealers, declined to negotiate with the Brewery
Workers for the present
The entire ventilating system of the
public schools will be overhauled.
The dominion government wharf
work at Prince Rupert will be investigated by Fair Wage Officer McNIven.
J. W. De B. Farris gave a written
opinion re Workmen's Compensation
act, and the case of Stephen Plecas,'
deceased, Insofar as affecting the
rights of workmen to recover for injuries received whilst working on Sunday.   Judge Grant holds he cannot.
A mass meeting of all laundry workers will be held tonight In Labor
Temple for organization purposes.
McKay Fripp spoke at length on the
civic centre scheme, and explained
what it meant to a large city. A
hearty vote of thanks was tendered
the speaker for his very able address.
Delegate Walker reported regarding
the proposed constitution and rules
of the Labor Representation league.
Received.
Delegate McEwen reported at
length regarding the work of the B.
C. Miners' Liberation league. He protested against an article appearing In •
The Federatlonist, alleging that It
stigmatized the efforts of the league.
A delegation from the B. C. Miners'
Liberation league, comprising C. V.
Cook, J. Johnson and Sam Atkinson.
The latter addressed the council briefly regarding the proposed 48-hour
holiday as a protest against the imprisonment of miners. The matter
was referred to next meeting.
Nominations of officers were made
as follows: For president, W. Foxcroft, H. P. Pettlplece, W. Burkhart;
vice-president, Walker, H. McEwen;
secretary-business agent, J. W. Wilkinson, II. J. McEwen; terasurer, J.
Campbell; statistician, Miss Brisbane,
H. Outtrldge; sergeant-at-arms, W.
Dunn, J. H. McVety, A. P. Tletjen, V.
Mldgley; trustees, Delegates Curnock,
Neville, Burrough.
Auditing committee waa appointed,
namely: Delegates Piper, G. Mowat,
A. Plckln.
F. Hoover, G. Curnock and A. Plckln
were elected a committee to report
on Federatlonist affairs.
President Robt. Foster, of dlatrlct
No. 28, was present and spoke briefly
regarding the situation on .Vancouver
Island. He said that the policy ot the
U. M. W. of A. was to live up to their
agreements, and lt would not be legal
for them to go out on strike for 48
houra u suggested. He alao referred
to the faot that the Minera' Liberation league failed to repudiate the
words or R. Gosden, which the authorities hold against the prisoners, and
until they are repudiated the mlnen
will not be released.
Delegate Kavanagh spoke strongly
against the stand taken by paid officials ln regard to their actions re-
gardlng the Miners' Liberation league.
A lengthy, and at times, heated die-
cusslon followed, participated In by
Messrs. Pettlplece, Mldgley, McEwan
and several other delegatea. PAGE TWO
NEW WESTMINSTER
Westminster Trust, Limited
Ba»m Fund, (100,000,00
Capital, ei,ooo,ooo.oo.
SablortbM, 1501,000.00
We have MONEY TO LOAN on improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or Invested. We act as agents only tor the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Office:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C.
J. 7. fonts, Managing Dlrtotor
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Telephone B-7B1
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Bnldnut B-10M
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THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
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FUNERAL DIRECTORS
run aaa
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LIBERAL CASH DISCOUNT PHONE 237
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BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
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Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
- FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.	
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
■ AT REGULAR PRICES
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
5408 phones seymour 5409
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS* LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STALEY'S PLANES, LEVELS, etc.. STARRETT'S
FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS, CORBIN LOCKS
SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR 6M , 1 HASTINGS ST. WEST
Tk
E BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 9, 1914.
Committee Report on Constitution and Rules of
New Party
WiU Be Submitted to Different Labor Bodies for
Their Ratification
The Labor Representation
met In Labor Temple on Sunday afternoon, w. E. Walker presided ln absence of Chairman Benson. Secretary Harrison was also present.
There was a good atendance of delegates. The committee on constitution and rules submitted a lengthy report which was duly considered and
passed. It will be sent to all labor
with the league for their ratification,
with the legue for their ratification.
The report follows:
Preamble.
Whereas, It is an undeniable fact
that the social and political welfare
of the state originates In and is perpetuated by the wealth-producing energy of the working class, it therefore
follows that the working class functions as the prime factor in the maintenance of the state, and may in justice claim, as a class, the right to a
direct voice in the administration of
tbe state. Again, as the recognition
of their identity of Interest on the
part of the working class compels
organized and collective action to promote and defend their class Interest
in the economic' Held, lt again follows
that the same motives and objects require organized and collective action
on the political field. The reason for
concluding this may he briefly stated:
Admlnlaterlng Lawa
So long as the laws under which the
state is governed are administered by
the class whose existence depends on
the exploitation of the working class,
so long will the law-making and administrative machinery of the state be
utilized solely with the view to furthering the interests and perpetuating the ascendency of the exploiting
class. This condition, from the viewpoint of the working class cannot and
must not be tolerated. Therefore, as
organized labor functions as the only
real manifestation of the working
class solidarity and identity ot interest, so also organized labor affords
the only real basis on and through
which the working class can function
ln the political administration ot the
state. To this end, conscious of our
position in society and realizing
our responsibility as the organized
expression of the interests and Inspirations of the working class, confident ln the justice of our Immediate
demands and triumph of our ultimate
alms;
Labor Representative League
Your committee, representing organized labor ln Vancouver electoral
district, with a view to providing a
necessary medium through which the
working class may direct political action, as their interests may dictate,
recommends as follows:
That a permanent body known as
the "Labor Representation League of
Vancouver Electoral District" be organized.
2. It shall be composed of the members of duly organized, national, international or local trades unions, or of
any other working class party or association, who may he deemed worthy
of affiliation.
3. An electoral committee shall be
constituted, composed of two members from each union for each 100
members or less, and one for each
additional 100 members or major fraction thereof, up to five members,
4. The executive committee shall be
chosen from the electoral committee
and shall number not less than five
nor more than seven members,
5. A fund shall be raised of not less
than 60 cents per member from each
organlaztion afflliated, the fund to be
raised In any manner best suited to
the organization contributing, and to
be known as the "emergency campaign fund."
6. The fund so raised shall be held
In abeyance by each organization until called upon by the executive committee. When a call is made for the
fund so raised or any part thereof,
the executive committee shall state
for what purpose lt is to be used.
To Nominate Candidates.
7. Each affiliated organization shall
have the right, when called upon, to
nominate one or more of their own
members or any member of another
affiliated organization as candidate or
candidates In any pending election.
Tho eleotoral committee, on receipt of
such nominations, shall Bubmlt to referendum vote ot the entire membership the names of those so nominated
and the nominee or nominees receiving the majority of votes cast, shall
be declared the regular candidate of
the Labor Representation league.
8. The electoral committee shall, ln
the event of an election, act as a
campaign committee and provide for
the nomination and election of such
candidates.
They shall immediately, upon
knowledge of a pending election, submit such knowledge to the affiliated
membership and call for nominations
of candidates as provided ln above
clauses.
JAMES SIMPSON,
Whose triumphant election at the head
of the poll last week aa Controller In
the city of Toronto. I pleased his countless unionist and soclatist friends
throughout all Canada.
Pledges Secured.
10. They shall secure and retain
the pledges of such candidates, and
in the event of the election of such
candidates they shall constitute the
medium through which the membership may Instruct their representatives re legislation affecting their interests.
11. They shall, when called upon by
twenty per cent, of the affiliated membership, proceed to take a vote of
confidence ln any member representing them, and unless such vote Is
sustained by a majority vote of the
membership, he shall no longer retain
the confidence of his party.
12. No permanent salaried official
shall be appointed by the electoral
committee without the consent of the
membership.
13. The electoral committee shall
have no power to make any alliance
with any political party or faction
whatever without a mandate from
tbe membership of the afflliated
organizations.
14. Any member of the electoral
committee of the Labor Representation league who may be known to be
using his position on said committee
to further the interests of atty party
or the candidacy ot any person other
than the Labor Representation league
or members thereof, may be suspended or expelled from the committee, or
recalled by the organization on request ot the committee.
JURY AT ASSIZES
S
In Connection With Strike
Troubles at Extension,
Vancouver Island
. —-*-*•-
J.  Place, M.  P.  P., and
Other Witnesses Testified for Defence.
D.rANIihtClli
Phone B*y. 043
Pftrion A Chapel
239a Granllli Si.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
WHY PAY SUCH HIGH PRICES FOR YOUR CLOTHES? We can turn out
SUITS TO MEASURE from $13.00 to $25.00, value $20.00 to $50.00.
MADE BY UNION TAILORS
We uie only English, Scotch and Irish Cloth, buying direct from Mills, and we
positively guarantee FIT and WORKMANSHIP and STYLE. Phone Fraser
292, or call or write and I will be pleased to see you here or at your own house and
show you die largest range of sample* in Vancouver then you ean see what value
I can give.
DAVID  ROSE       Cor. 47th Ave. and Fraser St.       SOUTH VANCOUVER, B.C.
T
The assize court jury at Ne* Westminster on Wednesday night, after
four hours deliberation, found Joe
Angelo, organizer of the United Mine
Workers of America, guilty of riot in
connection with the disturbances at
Extension, Vancouver island. He was
charged on six separate counts and
tound guilty on all. Justice Morrison summed up after counsels addresses, which occupied a considerable portion ot the day. Sentence was
deferred. Amongst the witnesses for
the defence, of whom there were 22
In all, was J. Place, socialist member of the provincial legislature. 'An
attempt to set up an alibi In favor
of the accused failed to convince the
jurymen.
WILL CARRY APPEAL
IF
E
Miners' Liberation League
Still Active on Behalf
of Prisoners
Will Have Peasants' Ball
and Tag Day to Raise
More Funds
RADICAL VIEWS ON  PUBLIC
QUESTIONS
By W. J. CUBRY, D.D.S.,
801 Dominion Building
Why Do Our Taeth Decay?
We must be able to answer this
question correctly before we can ever
hope to improve the dental structures
of our race. Yet this question is not
even considered seriously by the public or the pathologists of today. The
chief concern of the dentist is to treat
the symptoms of what is really a
social disorder; he Ib not interested
in attacking the source of his revenue.
This shows the impossibility of truly
serving society under our competitive
and Individualistic system ot industry.
Today we not only know the origin
of the disease which affect the organs of mastication, but we also know
how our race could once more have
as perfect teeth as our ancestors of
1000 years ago possessed, so perfect
in fact that the patchwork dentistry
now In' vogue would be a forgotten
art. Something has happened to our
race. Our ancestors of even 100 years
ago were comparatively free trom
diseases ot the teeth. A recent report
shows that 98 per oent. of the school
children In Vancouver are suffering
more or less from defective teeth.
This interferes with mastication, with
nutrition, and the proper physical and
mental development of the school
children. Some years ago I examined
a number of skulls' up the Fraser
river from an ancient burial place'
which a land slide had uncovered. It
was quite easy to distinguish the
young from the old by the degree the
teeth were worn down by mastication,
and it was done chiefly with dry salmon, but there was no evidence of decayed teeth in these skulls, and yet
the descendants of these people have
teeth as defective as our own. Even
the oia Indians of today have sound
teeth while their grandchildren are
as defective as ourselves in this respect. Before our coming the Indian
waB holding his own and gradually
advancing. In a generation or two
more the race will be extinct, and with
our own present rate of decline the
white race would also be gone in a
couple of centuries, but we are going
to escape the fate of the Indian.
Why the Indian Had Good Teeth.
Because these tribes had abundance of food, fresh air, exerolse and
rest, but particularly, because they
The British Columbia Miners' Liberation league held a fairly well-
attended meeting under the chairmanship of Robert Gosden In the
Labor Temple on Sunday afternoon
in furtherance of their efforts to obtain the release of the Imprisoned
miners and also to provide means of
sustenance for their wives and children. The question of the igroposed
48-hour strike was discussed at
length, but aB nothing was known as
to what action the labor organlaztions
would take, a " mmittoe composed of
Messrs. C. V. Cook, S. Atkinson and
J. Johnson was appointed to interview
the' Trades and Labor council ln the
matter. A visiting committee was appointed to see the prisoners In New
Westminster penitentiary. The objects of the visits are to Inform them
of the strenuous etforts being made
to release them and also generally to
try to hearten them up. This committee will endeavor to see the prisoners as soon as possible. It was decided to hold
' A "Tag Day" In Victoria
on January 15th tor the benefit of the
wives and kiddies. This is also the
date fixed for the opening of the local
legislature and for the municipal elections, and Is a most suitable day for
such a purpose. Several hundred women and children will give their services and a big total is confidently
expected. The various signs, etc.,
used for the Vancouver "tag day"
will be taken over to the Island. Another committee comprising C. V.
Cook, J. Hoenke and J. Narod was
appointed to organiea "prisoners'
ball," the object being to raise money
to keep up the agitation for the prisoners' release. This will be run on
the old continental idea of a peasants'
ball and as it will be somewhat of a
novelty in the West it will doubtless
be successful.
As it was considered that the workers in the old country were not fully
posted In the present state of affairs
In the striking zone, the secretary
was Instructed to write to
English Periodicals
and keep them posted aB to the situation. The papers selected were:
John Bull, Truth, Dally Citizen and
Clarion. It Is hoped by this means
to prevent miners coming out without a full knowledge of the industrial
trouble now going on. i
In discussing further means for obtaining the strikers' release it was
decided that lt was hopeless to deal
any longer with the minister of justice.
Oreat disappointment was expressed
at that minister's failure to comply
with the demands ot organized labor
throughout the dominion, and regret
was voiced ■ that elementary justice
was not to be had by the strikers
from the powers that be.
An Appeal to the Throne.
Communications will be sent to the
British home secretary, several labor
members of the imperial parliament,
and, if necessary, an appeal will be
carired to his majesty the king, claiming fair play.
During this week every minister of
the gospel in Vancouver will receive
a letter and pamphlets trom the
league asking for their co-operation.
The pamphlets were written by the
Rev. J. Hedley and J. Kavanagh, and
deal fully with the subject. The meeting's enthusiasm showed that the
cause of the imprisoned miners Is being vigorously carried on, and lt Is
hoped that before long success will
crown their efforts.
made their teeth work, the dry salmon compelled lt. The women of the
tribe were good mothers to their Infants; they wore no hobble skirts or
corsets. They nursed their babies until they, too, could eat salmon; ln
fact, only our perverted methods of
living, and especially city life, have
caused the trouble. The deer, the
cow, still have as good teeth as ever
and the savage tribes unpolluted by
our civilization are as physically and
morally as whole sb ever. It Is largely a case of "use or loose." Nature
Is the great economist. We lose our
teeth because we do not make use
of them and we lose our hair because
we wear hats, and why do we need
hair when our heads are covered with
tight-fitting hats and caps? Why
should we have teeth when we feed
on pastry and food that does not
require mastication? Today our so-
called statesmen can spend millions
on bonuslng useless railroads or
building "murder ships," even millions
to Improve the breed of cattle and
pigs because they pay but they do not
even consider that the breeding of
men and women needs attention. True
there Is no dividend or graft in this
wrok. In countries such as Prance
and Germany, however, there Is the
beginning of the applied solence of
eugenics. The state Is beginning to
feed the school children where necessary and also supplies free dentistry.
Even here In Vancouver we have now
the free examination of children's
teeth In the public schools, while in
Toronto two dentists are constantly
employed working for the schoolchildren who are too poor to pay.
This Is the entering wedge of socialized dentistry ln Canada, and this will
be universal before we can have a
scientific treatment of our teeth and
"ethical dentistry." There Is no
doubt but that with our knowledge
of the laws of health and disease the
rapid course of dental deterioration
we see In a coast Indian could be reversed In our race. Three generations of proper treatment and we
could once more all have sound teeth,
and this applies to all the physical
and moral defects of our race. With
a scientific faith we can today look
behind the dark clouds of our social
life and realize that In time our race
will be clean and healthy without disease of flesh or brain—"shapely and
fair, ,the married harmony of form
and function." What we need Is
knowledge. The truth will make us
free.
To the Electors of the City of Victoria
A WISE PRUDENT
AND EFEECnVE CIVIC
POLICY FOR 1914
Ladies and Gentlemen:—
I have consented to be a candidate for the third
time for a seat on the Board of Aldermen.
I am in favor of the immediate commencement
of Pandora Street and other improvements which
have already been passed;
The bridging of the harbor to the Reserve from
the centre of the city, as well as from Laurel Point;
The establishment of a city-owned public
market;
The building of a new gaol;
The reorganisation of the finances of the Jubilee Hospital, so that the city shall bear its appropriate share of the up-keep;
The completion of the Sooke Lake Water
Works and sewerage system;
The encouragement and patronage of our own
industries and business men wherever possible;
The employment of our citizens on city work;
The improvement of our present public playing grounds and the extension of the area for such
purposes, especially in Beacon Hill Park, for the
accommodation of our ever-increasing football and
other athletic clubs, which can be done at very small
cost and taken out of the present park appropriation;
No new work except of an urgent character to
be constructed this year and the strictest economy
practised in the carrying out of civic business.
When I first went into the Council I was inclined to believe that
the Contract System was the best for city work. My experience in
the Council has proved to me beyond doubt that my previous views
were wrong, and that the city gets better value for its money at an
expense which is certainly not greater, by doing its work by day
labor, and I have consistently, especially during the past year, advocated day labor, not because I was asked to, but because I was
convinced tbat it was the best policy.
I have also, perhaps, more than any other man who has even sat
in the Council, advocated the employment of our own citizens and
British subjects on all city works—in fact not only advocated but insisted upon it; and there are scores of our citizens engaged on our
public works to-day who would not have been there had it not been
for the action which I have taken in the Council.
I am appealing to all classes of people because I claim to represent them all and to give everybody fair treatment; at the same time
I confidently look to the workers of the city to actively support me
in a policy which must contribute most directly to their own individual prosperity.
Yours faithfully,
HERBERT CUTHBERT,
Present Alderman.
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
your purchase, and any balance will be returned to you.
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA, B.C.
LET IT RAIN!
LET IT HAIL!
Let it Snow if it will,
Royal Crown is Supreme!
And is easily still
The best Soap in the West
for the Laundry, and
ROYAL CROWN
WASHING
POWDER
OLEANSES-PURIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDlERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PAPER Mtl-BH COL.
UmiAFEDOUTIONOFLAlOR
SIXTH YEAE. No. 144
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 19i€
=3=*;
EIGHT PAGES
(^oSnOSr) $1-50 PER YEAB
OUR
January Sale
is now on
AND YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY
TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE
PRESENT PRICES
Past experience has taught you that our
sales are GENUINE.
You know when we advertise a special you
are going to get it. We do not say special
unless our price is lower than you can get
the same goods for elsewhere.
DURING THIS SALE
All our prices are special, except on wines
and spirits, groceries and contract lines.
We Are Selling Many Lines
Below Cost Prices
The goods we are selling are our regular
stocks—quality lines—every one of them.
Our sale prices cannot be matched anywhere.
SPECIAL SALE WINDOWS
EVERYDAY
Goods taken from the windows if you want
them.
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Vv'e manufacture every Lind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
for miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C.
LANG SALES COMPANY
626 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmen's Store"
Extra 8peolal This Week, Men'a Cashmere and Wool
Socks 15e., 20c, 25o.
The beat value money can buy
To clear, 100 palra Grey Blankets, |3.00 value, for $1,75
100 pair Grey Blanketa, 52.60 value, for  1.60
THE BEST VALUE IN THE MARKET
When In want of Clothing, Furnishing, Boota and Shoea It will
pay you to get next to our prlcea.   Come and get acquainted at
626 MAIN STREET
We keep the largest and moat
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prices which cannot ba duplicated.
Everything Is to bs found ben.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada'a Snap Specialist
104 and 106 CORDOVA 8T. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE  STORE   IS   THE   SPOT   FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Phons Seymour 995
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
717 ORANVIIaLB STREET
Orpheum Theatre Building
lira. Genevieve Centi
, Mrs. Frances Lohrman
City Auction and Com-
miasion Company
Cash paid for hout.es and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
Oreat strides have been made ln
advanced legislation for the masses
In the neighboring state of Washington. For some months past organized
labor there has been active with the
initiative and referendum. The other
day W. H. Klnger, of Shelton, socialist
member of the Btate legislature for
Mason county, on behalf of the socialist party, filed with the secretary of
state at Olympla, an Initiative petition proposing a law that provides for
a universal eight-hour day for all work
performed ln the state of Washington except in cases of farm laborers,
who may work ten hours, In emergencies defined by the law In which
the eight-hour period may be lengthened, the proposed law provides! for
extra payment at the rate of time and
a half. 1*1.6 penalty set forth In the
proposed law Is a fine of not less than
ten and not more than one hundred
dollars for each violation of the law
If continued.
IN
FOR AIL
The Socialist Party's Initiative Petition Filed at
Olympia, Wash.
By W. H, Kinger, Socialist
Member of Legislature
for Mason County
UNEMPLOYED PROBLEM,
Calgary Albertan Holds City Official*
Should Not Disguise Its Existence.
The Morning Albertan, of Calgary,
Alta., editorially comments on the
conditions of the unemployed ln thai
city. "Despite the castigations and
censures ot the mayor and the patronizing advice of the members of the
board of trade and some others, there
is unemployment ln Calgary, and
something that must be reckoned
with," lt says. "If the mayor or aldermen are ln doubt about it, they might
get information from the city's employment bureau. To advise a man
to save his money and not get ln such
a sad condition of affairs, such as
some of the members of the board of
trade gave to the unemployed, Is foolish and unfair. The wealthy who
gave the advice did not earn all of
their money by saving what they got
from hard labor. The unemployed
problem Is with us, not as strenuous
as in some places, but the city officials
wonld do better by meeting lt than
trying to disguise the existence of
It."
8HINGLE WEAVER.
After Nomination For Seat In House
of Repreaentatlvea.
An Everett, Wash., dispatch says
that J. E. Campbell, state senator,
will enter the race for the nomination
for a seat In the national house of
representatives from this district. He
has served three terms ln the state
legislature, having been elected twice
as a member of the house ot representatives and once as state senator. Mr. Campbell was formerly the
seoretary of the Shingle Weavera' International union, and still retains his
membership In that organization.
The greatest thing ln the world is
for a man to know that he la his own,
MINARD'S LINIMENT RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FETHERSTONHAUOH   A CO.
The Old Established Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
1020 Rogers Bldg., Oranvllle Street
City.  Phone Seymour 3796.
^Auctioneer,
Sey. 9971
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO  •
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
TlOOKKEISPEH  —  SALARY      *>
•*■■   start     Muit come vvelt return..
J"x  1344  Province
STESOOR.U'HEft    WANTED—PUfJI.X __\
rol lego  siailuotp.   l*nur*ua|  n-iporiu. __\
for tlit* pnriv ,*hu can make goo*.   Ar __\
t-y letter only to Mr King  314 Cole Di =
Int.                           t ==
■TO
jJB   HAVE   AN   OPEKINQ   POtl =§
'* n»na     must Kp  ' B
f       Every day you aee advertisements like  the
—_        above.
|      DON'T ANSWER
1   Unless You Are
Merely "having a try
at lt'r won't do. You
must be certain of
malting good. Graduates of this achool—
the largest In Canada
weat of Toronto—are
filling Important positions becauee properly trained.
Write for Prospectus
Phone Sey. 1810
EVancouwBusinMs
I   Institut»_JE^
i\moimt___=—
THE EDITORIAL WRITER.
(By 3. W. W.)
He works on the staff of one or the
great dally newspapers. A ministerial organ with a circulation of
100,000 copies, ; Public opinion Is
fashioned from hla phrases. His words
breathe the policy of the paper and
the powerful economic interests
which own it> Men ot affairs, trained
to that high pitch of common sense
which borders so closely on specialised stupidity, nod with fatuous approval ad they read his latest efforts
to prove that black Is white, and that
Tweedledum Is greater than Tweedle-
dee. For Inasmuch as they pay him
to perform services which have such
an Intimate relation to their most
vital interests he is one ot themselves
co-partner In the great Conspiracy of Lying.
He la no common fellow. There la
nothing of John Smith or Jim Jones
about him. He la the only other being
on earth who can share with kings
the royal plural "We.".
I recently visitad one of him In his
sanctum sanctorum, entering the sacred presence with becoming dread and
humility. He does not sit with the
oommon herd of "cubs" and reporters
wbo journalize the fragments of news
gathered from the streets, the courts,
the houses of law-making, and the
hundred and one places where the
drama of human life unfolds Its daily
scroll of laughter ana pain. He sits
in a place apart, 'mid an atmosphere
of lofty generality whence he can
survey and condense to words the
daily antics of humans with that precious partiality In which he la ao
partial.
I had expected to aee a man of some
years with at least middle age to his
credit. But I found me a man of thirty,
with face clean shaven and alert, and
with the requisite physical and mental vigor u> have earned his living
with comparative honesty had he been
ao minded.
We spoke of many things In general
and some few in particular, until we
reached the question of what a man
knows to be true and what he knows
to be untrue, and how justification
could be found for taking advantage
of public Ignorance to spin lies for
dally bread by slandering the most
essential part of human society—the
workers.
Having catechised him on fundamentals, I confided to htm that In my
opinion that part of his work which
was not due to plain Ignorance was
rendered doubly despicable by his
knowing better yet doing worse. In
that way a frankness of Intercourse
waa established between us which is
only possible when one has a thoroughly good humored charlatan to
deal with.
I pointed out to him some ot the
silly things, and many of the vile ones
which he had written during the past
year-or so about the minera who are
on strike tor nothing more than the
right to shield from unnecessary danger the life power which they dally
mold into profits iv.- his master and
theirs. I pictured to him their living
conditions and the life-long peril amid
which they labor for the mere bread
that perisheth.
In his diatribes he had lustily condemned them for wanting to be apart
of the great international association
of those who toll ln the darkness and
dangers of mines, whilst at the same
time he knew full well that their masters recognized no flag, no religion,
no nationality, no anything before
profits.
He said that his paper stood for
the larger things of life. For the
development of national destiny, and
the realisation of Imperialistic conceptions which were too high and
great to have patience with what he
called the "extortionate obstinacy" of
a comparatively small section of the
community which was not capable of
glimpsing the magnificent possibilities
of confederated power as exemplified
ln empire.
I asked bim what consolation there
was in "empire' for the hundred widows and the wide-eyed orphans of the
hundred blasted and blackened victims over whose fate he had but
yesterday sniffled his crocoHlle condolences. And what it would avail
that same "empire" ln the day of
trial if Its foundations had been sap
ped ln the piping time of peace to
provide purple and flne linen for the
few, whilst the many, upon whose
virility its ultimate destiny depends,
were forced to struggle with disgusting persistence for the crumbs which
fall from the table of swine-like surfeit
and satiation.
Rather than enter Into any considerations which would tend to interfere
with the steady flow of his ponderous piffle, he chose to do himself the
honor of honesty, as follows: "The
world offers bread tor plausable lies
pleasantly told; and bricks for well-
meaning fools who have learned nothing but truth. In order to live I and
mine must have bread. To get that I
must have something to sell whloh
someone is willing to buy. Clever
lies are always ln demand, the market-place of truth Is ever dull. Ergo,
young man, don't run away with the
idea that you came Into this life with
a mission to tell the world what It
ought to want. Find out what lt
likes, then set to work to furnish tbat
need."
I bethought me of Montaigne who
said: "Mankind Is a damned rascal;
the world lives by humbug; so will I,"
and what a precious pair ot cronies
they would have made. Having disgorged himself thus, the need for
fresh air became too insistent, So I
wished him "Good day" and joy of
his labors.
HEAD OF POLL IN
Magnificent Vote of 20,600
Gives Labor Champion
3,000 Majority
Shows What Unity of Purpose Oan Do for the
Workers
While the workers of the west were
hoping for and expecting the election
of "Jimmy" Simpson aa a controller ln
the city ot Toronto on January 1st,
the result waa one of those surprises
which thrill and Inspire, It certainly
shows what united action would spell
to the working class were It possible
at all other elections in Canada. It
is enough to make Vancouver workmen crawl ln out of sight and shame.
The daily press conveniently failed to
say anything about Simpson's election, though the aldermanlc results
were given ln detail. In fact not a
word haa as yet appeared ln the local
press concerning the achievement of
Simpson and hla friends.
The glad news reached The "Fed."
in the form of a lettergram:
"TORONTO, Jan. 1.—Oreat victory! Simpson elected at bead of
poll with 20,500 votes; 3,000 ma-'
Jorlty, Largeet vote In history of
city, Oreat organization; plenty
of enthusiasm. Greetings from
all. JOHN BRUCE."
That Simpson will make good and
prove worthy of the confidence imposed In him by the electorate, Is the
verdict of his thousands of friends
throughout western Canada. May his
kind ever Increase. And may the
workers everywhere emulate the
splendid lesson of Toronto,
BARTENDERS MEET.
Elect Officers—Ex-Mayor Taylor and
Chaa. Boardman Preaent,
Local No. 676, Bartenders' International league, held Its regular meeting in Labor Temple on Sunday. President Laurie presided over a large attendance and Secretary Curnock waa
In his place. After disposing of two
initiations the election of officers for
1914 resulted as follows: President,
F. F. Lavlgne; vice-president, R. Dal-
ton; treasurer, C, R. Leer; flnanclal
secretary, O. W. Curnock; inspector,
L, A. Monroe; guard, J. S. Hall; trustees, H. A. Davis, F. F. Tunk, J. A.
Smith; delegates to local joint board
hotel and restaurant employees,
Messrs, Davis, Dalton and Lavlgne,
Ex-Mayor Taylor was present and addressed the gathering at length regarding his proposed policy if elected
as mayor. Chas, Boardman, ex-presldent ot the Trades and Labor councU
aldermanlc candidate for ward Iv., and
also spoke on his candidature. Both
candidates were given a good reception, The balance of the afternoon
was devoted to a social session, tbe
Terminus orchestra also taking part.
A good programme of songs, recitations, etc., was carried.
Charles S. Hall, of Beilingham,
Wash., flrst vice-president, Washington State Federation of Labor, was
a visitor at The Federatlonist offlce,
last week. He Is also organizer of
tbe A. F. of L., and takes a very keen
Interest ln Pacific coast labor affairs.
A SUGGESTION.
Do you know anyone whom you
think would become a subscriber to
The Federatlonist, if he saw lt?
If so, mall his name to this ofllce
and The Federationist will be sent to
him for one month free of charge and
accompanied by a letter inviting him
to become a subscriber.
Send In the name of that friend of
yours NOW.
E.BURNS&CO.
AUCTIONEERS  AND
FURNITURE DEALERS
13S Cordova Street, Eaat
Midwny '. clween Columbia and Main
GOODS   SOLD   BY   AUCTION
OR COMMISSION.
A large assortment of Cook
Stoves and Heatera In atock.
Weekly Sales every Saturday
evening at 8 p. m.
Phone Sey. 1879.
Idle Men Deceived.
lAt Portland, Ore., a few days ago
unidentified persons, including one
woman, Invited 500 unemployed men
to go to a church, where lt was said
they would be fed. The men went
in the rain to find that they had been
directed to a luncheon of the Rotary
club, a business men'a organlaztlon.
The police drove them away.
The   publisher   of   the   best   farmer's
Faper In the Maritime provinces ln wrung to us states:
"I would say that I do not know of a
medicine that has stood the test of time
like MINARD'S LINIMENT. It has been
an unfailing remedy ln our household
ever since I can remember, and haa outlived dozens of would-be competitors
and imitators."
Ii Your Furniture Showing
Signs of Weir and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot of
difference to one'a comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture la selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come In and iee the
new arrivals—they will bring
many houra' comfort to aome
lucky persona.
Haitingi Furniture Co.
Limited
♦1 HASTI' IS STREET WEST
Rcniov.il AnnottBccnu-at
CENTER&HANNA,Iid.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,
one block weBt of Court House,
Ute of Modern ChapelandFuneral
Parlors free to all patrons
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
SPENCER'S
JANUARY
SALE
STANFIELD'S UNDERWEAR
AT REDUCED PRICE
BLUE LABEL; reg. $1.75 for  .$150
FULL    WEIGHT   NATURAL, reg.
$1.50, for    .96
WHITE SILK AND WOOL, regular
$2.00,for ... 1.45
FULL WEIGHT   NATURAL COM-
BtNATIONS, reg. $3.50, for....... 1.90
WHITE SILK AND WOOL COMBINATIONS, reg. $4.00, for. .2.90
EXTRA HEAVY NATURAL, regular
$1.75, for  1.26
EXTRA HEAVY NATURAL COMBINATIONS, reg. $3.50, for....... 2.60
EXTRA HEAVY PURE WHITE, reg.
$3.00, for... 1.96
E^TRA   HEAVY   PURE    WHITE
COMBINATIONS, reg. $6.00,,for.. 3.96
David Spencer Limited
•Ttt.'   I
-1
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Heintzman&Co.
PIANOS and
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLO ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street West.
Stanfield's Underwear
Blue Label, Suit $3.00     Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight Ove rails of all kirds
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Cordova St., Weit
.."..l-CUSHION
<■■ :;riti:J!t..,.,.a!J
HEL^llALLidfrEtTMH
TOES
8-CTSHIOWaiPKRTSMOn
4'CUUUOH TU& I. WM IU'..\S
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
Dressing Robes and House Coats
We are ahowlni a beautiful lln. of Home Coata ln Wool, Silk anl Velvet;
alao Dreaalnf ftobea in Wool.  All alaea from M to 41.
PRIMS OP HOUSE COAT* RANGE PROM M.0O to IBM
DRES8IN0 ROBES FROM IT te IM
Thaaa make handaome Cbrlatmaa ilfta for Huiband, Bon or Fri.nda.
Call and Inapect our atock.   Br paying a d.poslt we will lay one uld. (or
you for a reaaonable length of time.  ,
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
T.I. 8ay. 702 tN-ltl HASTINGS STREET W.
T.I. Say. 702
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleaiant headquarter! for Carpenten' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT JANUARY 9, 1914.
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 1855
Capital and Reserve,
$6,700,000
85 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Business
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches.   Interest Allowed at Highest Current Rate.
East End Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A. W. Jarvis, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1869
Paid-up Capital ■ ■ • » 11.500,00
Raaarve      12,500,000
Total Aaaata 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
tha account, and your
bualneaa will be welcome be it large or
email
FOURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE.
INCORPORATED
1855
BANK OF
TORMTO
Capital and Reaerve 111,178,578
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In tha BANK OF TORONTO
ara proving to be a great convenience to many of our
friends. With thoae account*
either of two persona of the
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest la - paid
on all balances twice a year.
In event of death of either
party the aurvivor may withdraw the money.
Main Offlce-
488 HA8TIN08 ST. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinga and Carrall Sts.
New Weatminster
Vlotoria
Herrltt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONET   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    OITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
837 HASTINGS ST. WE8T,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morula* by tke
B. O. Federationist, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece -
Manager
DIRECTORS: Jaa. Campbell preaident;
Christian Slvertz, vlce-prealdent; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, aecretary-
treaaurer, and R. P. Pettipiece.
Office: Boom 817, Labor Tempi*.
Tel. Exoliaago Bay. 74SB.
Advertising Manager   -     M. C. Sbrader
Subscription: 11.60 per year; ln Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, 11.00.
"Unity or Labor; the hope of „ta.o woria."
FRIDAY JANUARY 9, 1914.
PROVINCIAL  MINIMUM  WAGE
LAW
The legal enforcement of an arbitrary minimum wage for workers in
the province of Alberta is beginning
to exercise the minds of leaders of
thought in the ranks of organized
labor In tbat province. Whether or
not such an enactment will have
beneficial effects upon the wage-
earners as a body, whether or not
such a law might help some classes ot
workers while working to the detriment of others, on what principles
such a law should be framed, and
whether or not such a law should be
flrst made to apply to the great body
of women and girl workers who have
lately made their appearance In the
industrial centres of what has heretofore been considered a frontier
province, are among tbe first considerations in approaching the question
of a minimum wage law for the province. To many ln Britlah Columbia
lt would appear that the flrst consideration to be faced Is political ln
Its nature. That Is, whether after
mature deliberation and decision It
would be possible for the labor men
to prevail upon British Columbia government and legislature to grant tbem
such a measure. Judging by past
actions on the part of what has come
to be regarded by the workers as the
most reactionary government ln Canada, if not ln the whole English-
speaking civilization, it would be im-,
possible to obtain auch a law in British Columbia so long as the Bowser-
McBrlde government stands. But
the workera In other provinces, and
particularly ln Alberta, are in a better position to command consideration, and lt ts altogether likely that
If organized labor presents a demand
for a minimum wage law In that
province lt will be cheerfully granted
them. So ln Alberta the labor men
can proceed to consider the details
of a measure that In British Columbia would be a waste of time.. With
tbe advent of the big departmental
stores In the larger cities a large
number of women and girl workers
have made their appearance, and
though this has taken plaoe within
the last five years, already and for
the past three years at least the hellish social diseases bred by extreme
exploitation and meagre wages have
caused their reflex of political and
Industrial unrest, In the legislature
and government and In the publlo life
of the province ot Alberta tbere are
many men, who, while unconnected
with the organized labor movement,
are nevertheless at one with us ln
desiring to remedy auch conditions
411 RICHARDS STRUT
Phones Bey. CES4-65SE
Loans Without
INTEREST
BY THB CONTRACT PLAN
!.6.00 per month • 11,000 Loan
12.00 per month - f},000 Loan
11.00 par month - 18,000 Loan
For the purpose of Building
Homes, Paying off Mortgages or
Improving Real Estate.
Repayments 112.50 per month on
eaoh 11,000, without lntereat
MAIL THIS AD FOR FULL
INFORMATION
Seven Per
Cent, on Your
Small
Savings
CANADIAN
FINANCIERS
LIMITED
4* Paid en Deposits Subject te Cheque
Head Offlce, SN Hastings Street hast,
Vansouvsr, B.C.
QINIRAL TRUST BUSINESS
Patrick Donnelly-Oeneral Manager.
Bring your Savings Account np to not less than
$200, and it will «arn 7%
if you transfer the ajnount to
a Fractional Mortgage.
Through the Fractional
Mortgage system of Canadian Financiers, Limited, the
small investor can acquire
exactly the same rights and
rate of interest through his
Trustee at the large capitalist
with his many thousands.
Full information and
explanatory pamphlet on
request
WE WILL SAVE FOR
YOU.
\
as far as it Is possible to do so. The
active labor man in Alberta, so far
from being designated a criminal and
an enemy to society, is actually considered and consulted In the framing
of legislation bearing upon the conditions of tbe wage-earners. But just
bow to frame legislation and provide
for its administration so as to provide
the maximum of protection for tbe
unorganized women and girl workers,
without endangering either of tbem
or the organized workera, is in itself
a very knotty problem.. In this connection a bill introduced Into tbe Illinois State Legislature ln March,
1913, by Representative O'Rourke, is
enlightening because ol the manner
In which lt Is proposed to frame and
enforce such a measure in tbat state.
Tbe bill first of all provides for a
state commission ot labor headed by
a state official known as the commissioner of labor and two other commissioners, both appointed by the governor, one to be an employer of women and the other to be a woman.
This commission has discretionary
power to Investigate wage conditions
for women and minors at any time
and ln any part of the state; It can
subpoena witnesses and examine the
wage rolls of employers, who are
bound under penalties to furnish correct Information. After the board
has determined, by enquiry Into the
cost of living, what tbe minimum
wage shall be placed at, the employer
haa no choice but to comply, as lt
does not matter If the employees
agree to work for less than the minimum, lt does not aoaolve the employer from liability to pay the minimum wage. The commission Is further empowered to establish "advisory boards" ln various Industries
wherein employers and employees
shall have representatives for the
purpose of considering points ln dispute. On these advisory boards provision Is also made for the appointment of persons who are to represent
the Interests of the publlo outside of
the parties particularly affected. One
at least of the latter must be a woman. The commission has full powers
to review the findings of the advisory
boards and determine all points ot
procedure and validity regarding
same, but can delegate to such boards
full powers to subpoena witnesses,
cauae the production of company
books and other evidence and material that might bear upon a wage
dispute. The whole trend and spirit
of this act would seem to be the legal
establishment of a meana to protect
the minimum wage for women and
minors, along similar lines to what
has already been accomplished by the
organized workers, without the interference or aid of the state. It would
be far better If tbe workera would or
ganlze themselves ln unions to cope
with conditions, but unions of women
workers are notoriously hard to form,
and when formed are erratic and unstable and seem unable to steer a
consistent course making tor permanent organization and their own betterment. However, lacking as they
are ln union organization, the opinion
seems to prevail that a provincial
minimum wage law for women and
minors would be an Improvement on
present conditions and a check on
employers who take every advantage
to beat down wages below even a subsistence point. One advantage of the
plan as embodied ln the bill above
referred to Is that lt doea not try to
flx for once and all time the amount
in money which the minimum wage
shall be. The application of the act
is elastic, and the work of the com-
mlalson goes on from day to day
throughout the year. The minimum
wage schedule Is thus being constantly revised, to suit conditions as
they change. The weakness of many
minimum wage laws enacted elsewhere Is that the amount'' of wages
was arbitrarily set down ln the bill
as presented and passed by the legislative boi'y, and their relations to
the changing circumstances of industry were out of harmony with what
is reasonable and possible within a
short time from these wage schedules becoming law. The lines on
which this bill Is drafted would seem
worthy of being followed, because the
application ot the act could be widened to Include male workers and
artisans providing It won approval by
its effect upon the wage-conditions of
the women and minors. Whether the
act could be made the meana of gradually lifting the minimum for all
workers, so that in time a comfortable wage could be assured all willing workerB, is a matter of speculation, but If lt serves to abolish even
a part of the wretched conditions at
present existing, lt will be welt
worthy of a fair trial.
THE VEXED QUESTION.
Anyone seriously desirous of learning something about the cause ot the
high cost of living should begin his
investigations by reading a little volume from the pen of Karl Kautsky,
entitled "The High Cost of Living."
(Chas. H. Kerr & Co.)
When Herr Kautsky tackles a problem he does so with characteristic
German thoroughness, but with a style
entirely his own. In this Instance
be Bets out to prove that changes ln
the production of gold have a marked
Influence on prices, and that therefore
increased gold production Is a definite
cause of high prices. He succeeds,
but does not leave the reader with
the Impression that gold Is the sole
cause of high prices. Many other
factprs contribute toward the production of that phenomena.
As for a solution of the problem,
Kautsky Is, of course, a revolutionist.
This does not, however, color his
treatment of the subject   After per
using the book, the reader is left free
and has plenty of material to form
his own conclusions.
The book Is nicely bound and is of
a convenient size for carrying ln the
pocket. It can be obtained from
Harry Slbble, 304 Labor Temple, Vancouver, for 501 cents, postpaid to any
address.
Captains of Industry do not always
provide as well for their pastors as
they do for their lawyers.
The .trade unionist who has alwaya
to flght "enemies" has little time to
undertake constructive work.
'When tn doubt blame it on "the
clique the runs the union." So much
easier than to do anything oneself.
Organize. Organize first. The rest
can be safely left to the collective
wisdom of the membership.
The other name for "the increasing
cost of living" Is "the increasing burden of the man who lives without
work upon the product of the worker."
"There is no schoolroom so strong
or Bweet as the mother's arms."—
Father Bernard Vaughan. That's why
liberty-loving capitalists -send the
mothers out to work.
We have lived long enough for others; let us, at least, live out the small
remnant of life for ourselves; let us
now call ln our thoughts and intentions to ourselves.
It Is a wretched and dangeroua thing
to depend upon others; we ourselves,
ln whom Is ever the most just and
safest dependence, are not sufficiently
sure. I have nothing mine, but myself.
It Is not enough to get remote from
the public; 'tis not enough to shift
the soil only; a man muat flee from
the popular conditions that have taken
possession ot his soul, he must sequester and come again to himself.
Anent the municipal elections in
Nanalmo: "Cltizena' Ticket" sounds
like the Canadian name for "Citizens'
Alliance." If bo, lt should be crushed
as a viper ln the early stages of Its
inception.
The next time you hear a fellow unionist belating "the clique that runs
the union" take a look at hla hat and
other wearing apparel. See whether
lt bears' the union label or not Then
join the "clique" at next meeting of
your union. Save your criticisms for
the floor of the union.
"An Injury to one Is the concern of
all" Is an excellent trade union motto,
but the policy of sporadic and irresponsible strikes is one that may be
fitly described as that of "an injury to
all Is no concern of the few."—
Justice.
Events In the labor world everywhere are forcing the necessity of
independent political action upon the
workers, whether they like it or not.
Nothing short of a complete change
tn the form of property ownership will
fill the requirements of the case,. Cor
poration rule Is becoming Intolerable.
My trade and art la to live; he that
forbids me to apeak according to my
own sense, experience and practice,
may aa well enjoin an architect not to
apeak ol building according to hia own
knowledge, but according to that of
his neighbor; according to the knowledge of another and not according to
hia own.
Keir Hardle says the commercial
and ruling classes are spending four
hundred millions yearly ln Europe on
armaments, and not tor the fun of
the thing. There was a good reason
—the growing unrest throughout tbe
world. Democracy was now becoming a reality. The movement In favor
of conscription was to prevent workers from fighting for their own emancipation.
Aa for the fine saying, with which
ambition and avarice palliate their
vices, that we are not born for ourselves but for the publlo, let us boldly
appeal to thoae who are In public affairs; let them lay their handa upon
their hearts and then say whether, on
the contrary, they do rather aspire to
titles and offices and that tumult of
the world to make their private advantage at the public expense.
Michigan copper i..ine owners are
busy digging their own graves. Not
satisfied wltb the damnable plot that
resulted ln the horrible death of
eighty children, being entertained by
the union, the thugs and gunmen beat
up and drove from the strike zone
President Moyer a few days ago. But
lt will avail them naught. The Western Federation ot Minora are going
to win out
So popular has The "Fed." become
ln the Boundary district that a couple
of impostors are collecting subscriptions from the miners and pocketing
the proceeds. The secretary of the
W. F. of M. at Greenwood has been
instructed to have tbe crooks pinched.
If the subscribers will forward their
phoney receipts to The "Fed." they
will be recognized. Union officials
are warned to look out for these alleged agents and report them to the
police Immediately.
When the great Titanic met her
fate fifty little bellboys went down
with her to the bottom of the sea.
They were ordered, according to the
account, to their regular posts in the
main cabin and warned by their captain not to get Into the way of the
escaping passengers. James Humphries, a quartermaster and eye witness, said: "Throughout. the first
hour of confusion and terror those
lads sat quietly on their benches. Not
one of them attempted to enter a lifeboat Not one of them was saved."
Can you read this without being
moved to tears? Brave, noble little
lads! I almost feel as If lt had been
a privilege to go down with these
great little souls to their ■ watery
grave. The little boys who perished
were poor boys, many of them without fathers, and others obliged to
support widowed mothers and Uttle
brothers and sisters younger than
themselves. What a lesson this
touching, deeply pathetic incident
teaches and what a world of meaning
there Is In the sad circumstances of
their tragic death! Had they not
been poor children, little waifs, they
would not have been locked In the
cabin to perish like rats. They would
not, ln fact, have been there at ail,
and had It not been for the pride and
pomp, the greed and luxury that paraded the upper deck, the Titanic
never would have gone to the bottom
of the sea.—Eugene V. Debbs.
7
BUSINESS AGENT   DIRECTORY
Aak for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7489  (unleu otherwise atated)
Amalgamated Society Carpentera—Room
209; Wm. Currie.
Bartenders—Room 208: Geo. W. Curnock.
B. c. Federatlonist—Room 217; R. P.
Pettlplece.
B. C. Federation of Labor—Room 208;
Victor R. Mldgley.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L. Yule, Room 208.
Brotherhood of Carpentera—Room 804
and 805; W. Leonard. '       '
Bricklayers—Room 216; Wm. S. Dagnall. -f
Bakerfl—Room 220.
Barbers—Room 208; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1776.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Room 220: John Sully.
Cooks. Walters, Waitresses—Room 208;
„W. B. Walker; TeL Seymour 3414.
Electrical Workera (outside)—Room
207; W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room 207;
F, L. Eatlnghauaen.
Engineers (Steam)—Room 216; Ed.
Prendergaat
Labor Temple Co.—Room 211; J. H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Offlce,
146 Alexander street; Oeorge Thomaa;
Tel. Seymour 6869.
Moving Ploture Operators—a. R. Hamilton, Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey,
Musicians—H.   J. Braafletd, 640   Robaon
street; Seymour 7816.
Palntera—Room 303; W. J. Nagle.
Plasterers—Joe    Hampton;    Tel.    Seymour 1614.
Plumbers—Room  218;  Melvln    Engolf;
Tel. Seymour 8811.
Street    Railway    Employees—Fred.    A.
Hoover.
Trades and Labor Council—Room 210;
J. W. Wilkinson.
Typographical—Rooma  212,    213,    214;
R. H. Neelanda,'
Western   Federation   of   Minera—Room
217: R. P. Pettipiece.'
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied  Printing  Trades  Council—F. B,
Fleming. P. O. Box 66.
Amalgamated    Carpenters—Jaa.   Bttcom
Room 209, Labor Temple.
Bakers—w.   Rogers,   Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
Bartendera—Oeo.   W.   Curnoch,    Room
208, Labor Temple.
B. c. Federation of Labor—Room 206
V. R.< Mldgley, Box 1044.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm   Porter,    View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 616  Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1161 Howe St.
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Boom
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood   ot   Carpenters—A.   Paine,
Rooms 304-306, Labor Temple,
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborera—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Btreet
Cooks,   Walters,   Waitresses — W.   E.
Walker, Room JOS, Labor Temple.
Elevator Constructors— \
Electrical   Workers    (outside)—W.   F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Eleotrloal  Workers  (Inside)—Room 207;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Room   116,
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment  Workers—Miss  McRae,   Lsbor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles   Roberta,   Labor
Temple.
Groundmen'a Union (I. B. E. W.)—
Horseshoers — A.  C.  MacArthur,  City
Heights, B.C.
Letteroarrlers—Robt. Wight, District 2!.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco.   Firemen   and   Engineers—James
Patrick, 1183 Homer street.
Loco.  Engineers—A.  E.  Solloway,  1038
Paclllo.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Oeo.   Thomas, 146  Alexander Street,
Machinists—J. H. McVety,   Room  ill.
Labor Temple.
Metal   Trades   Council—EYed.   Barclav,
Labor Temple.
Marine Engineers-
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld. Room 6, 640
Robson Street.
Marbleworkers—J. Bullock, 822   Pender
8treet West.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Moldera—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—A. 0. Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo   Engravers—A.   Kraft,   Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Block.
Painters—w. J. Nagle, Room 303, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
PreBsmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John   James   Cornish,   1809
Eleventh Ave, East
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 943 Broad.
way Weat.
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—O. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvllle,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,   420  Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Stage  Employees—C.  Martin,  care  Orpheum theatre.
Structural  Iron  Workera—W.  L.   Tula,
Room 208, Labor Temple.
Stonecutters—Jamea Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
6. Fifteenth Ave. West.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2636 Trinity Street.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln. Box 432.
Trades and Labor Council—J. W. Wilkinson, Room 210. Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box 66,
Tailors—C. McDonald.
Theatrical    Stage    Employees—Gordon
Martin. 667 Prior Btreet.
Tllelayers and Helpers—
TTnh'ol.Hterers—A. Duthle, 1069 Homer St.
Weslorn   Federation   of   Miners—R.  P.
Pettlnleee.
WANTED—A few reliable trade union-
lsts, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for The "Fed.". Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple.	
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2,46, 7,20, t.16
Season's Prices—
Matinee 16c, Evenings 15c, 25c.
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
tT/ie tShtaln StcmUful
SollLui A Cotuldine Vaudeville
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
DANDRUFF.
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED     »     $1.00 A MONTH	
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets in annual convention ln January. Executive ouicers, 1913-14: President, Christian Slverti; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. FerrlB, A. Watchman, G.
A. Burnes, J. W. Oray, Jas. Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; sec-treas,, V. R. Mldgley,
Box 1044, Vancouver.
TRAPES AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrst and third Thursdays,
Executive board: H. C. Benson, president; Jas, H. McVety, vice-president; J.
w. Wilkinson, general secretary, Room
210 Labor Temple; Jas. Campbell, treasurer; Miss Brisbane, statistician; V. R.
Midgley, sergeant-at-arms; R. P. Pettlplece, J. H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMP.ANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H, R. Free. Managing director. J. H. McVety. Room 211.
ALLIED  PRINTING   TRADES   COUN-
OIL—Meets 2nd Monday In month.
President, Geo. Mowat; sscretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box 66
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
n penters and Joiners—Room 209.
Sev. 2908. Business agent, J. A. Key;
offlce hours, 8 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Secretary of management committee.
Jas. Bitcon, 878 Hornby street. Branches
meet every Tuesday and Wednesday ln
Room 302.
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
Monday of each week, 8 p.m. Executive
committee meet* every Friday, 8 p.m.
President, Ed. Meek; recording secretary, Thfts. Lindsay, 306 Labor Temple; flnanclal seoretary, W. Leonard, 191
Labor Temple.	
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO-
__ cal No. 46—Meets seeond and fourth
Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President, A. M.
MacCnrrah; corresponding secretary, W.
Rogers; Business Agent, J. Black, Room
220, Labor Temple.
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 120—MEETS
second and fourth Thursdays, 8:89
p.m. President. Sam. T. Hamilton: recorder, Geo. W. Isaacs: secretary-business agent. C. F. Burkhart Room 298.
Labor Temple. Hours: 11 to 1; 8 to 7
p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 979.—Office Room 298 Labor Temple. Meets
flrst Sunday of each month. President.
Wm, Laurie; flnanclal secretary. Geo. W.
Curnock. Room 208. Labor Temple.
BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL IRON
WORKERS' International Unton,
r.ocal 97—Meets necond and fourth Prt-
■Jay. Labor Temple. 8 p,m, President
r. A. Seelev; secretary, A. W. Oakley,
738 Semlln Drive, phone Sey. 189,
BRICKLAYERS' AND MA80N4', N6. 1
—Meets every Tuesday, * p.m.. Room
807. President James Haslett: corresponding secretary. W. S. Da-mall. Box
BS: financial secretary, F. R, Brown:
huilness agent, W. 8. Dagrall, Room
21B,
BOOWWTwnmRR' LOHAL UNION NO.
106—Meets third Tuesday ln every
month, In Room 205, Labor Temple.
President, F. J. Milne; vice-president, II.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat, 615
Dunlevy avenue.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. 191—
Meets flrst and third Mondays, 8 n. m.
President, F. Barclay, 358 Cordova East;
secretary, A. Fraser, 1151 Howe street
CIGARMAKERS' LOCAL No. 867—Meets
first Tuesday eaoh month,, 8 p.m.
President, Walter Hosktns; vice-president, F, J. Brandt; secretary, Robert J.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson.
COOKS. WATTERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets first Friday In each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, buslnes representative. Offlce:
Room 208. Labor Temple. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10.30; 1 p.m. to 2.30 and S p.m. to 9.00
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 3414.
COMMERCIAL TELEGRAPHERS
British Columbia Division, C. P. System. Division No. 1—Meets 11:30 a.m.
third Sunday In month, Room 204. Local
chairman, T, O'Connor, P. O. Box 482,
Vancouver. Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 432, Vancouver.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
218—Meets Room S01 everv Monday
8 p.m. President, Fred Fuller; vlce-
nresldent, D. Fink: recording seertary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; financial secretary. E. C. Knight; treasurer. George
Hessell: business agent, W. F. Dunn.
Room 207, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
621 (Inside MeM—Meets flrst and
third Monrtavs of each month. Room 205,
8 p.m. President H. P. McCoy; recording seoretary. Oeo. Albers; business
agent, F. L. Estinghausen. Room 207.
LONOSHOREMENS* INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No. 88 X 62—Meets
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander
street. President, P. Peel; secretary,
Geo. Thomas,	
MACHINISTS. NO. 182—MEETS SEC-
ond and fourth Thursdays, 7.15 p.m.
President, Chas. Matttnson; recording
secretary, J. Brookes; flnanclal secretary,
J. H. McVety.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B.C. Federationist
I^abor Temple, cor, Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
Geo. E. McCi-mmb A, M. Harper
per
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Offlo 3246 InparUI Block
5M Feeder St., W.    Veacoaw, B. C.
Mr. Edison and His
Diamond Disc
haa set a new standard In the reproduction of sound, you oan not
conceive how great this advance
haa been until you hear lt. The
writer has tried a dozen times to
put Into words a description of
what this new Instrument Is like,
but falls everv time he tries lt. If
he could convey for five minutes
the exclamations and expression
of wonder that came from visitors at our store during; the past
few weeks we wouldn't have supply enough to last the week out.
A comparison of the tone of the
Edison with other makes of machines reveala the fact Instantly
that something has been missing
and we are hearing lt now for
the first time. Tou owe lt to yourself to hear the new Diamond Edison before deciding on any make
of Instrument.
fill* Olitaf M-Mle HocimIdBA
558 Granville St
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 288, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every seoond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President, J. H. Fletcher;
aecretary-treaaurer, A. O. Hansen: bualneaa agent, G. R. Hamilton. Office:
Room 100, Loo Bldg.    Tel. Sey. 8041,
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.—
Meets aecond Sunday of each month, 841
Robson street Preaident, J. Bowyer:
vice-president, F, English: secretary, c.
P. Howett; treasurer, W. Fowler,
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 88—
Meeta flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, O. Dean: corresponding seoretary, F. Sumpter: flnanclal eecretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phons
a—. 1514.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vanoouver and
vicinity. Branch meets lat and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer at, room 205, Robert C. Sampson, Pre.., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph G.
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1721 Grant at; Tom
Smith, Rec, Sec, 848 Broadway west
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday* 8:01
P.m. President J. Marshall; corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
flnanolal aeeretary, K. McKenale.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meet every
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President Skene
Thomson; flnanolal seoretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour street; recording secretary, George Powell, 1660- Fourth ave.
weat. 	
STEHOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTVP-
ere' Union, No, 88, of Vancouver
and Vlotoria—Meeta eecond Wedneaday
of eaoh month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple.
President, Chas. Bayley: recording secretary, Chris Homewood, 248 18th Ave.
East,	
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple, aecond and
fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and flrat
and third Wedneadaya, 8 p.m. Preaident
Adam Taylor; recording eecretary,
Albert V. Lofting, 2888 Trinity Street,
phone Highland 1672; flnanclal secretary,
Fred. A. Hoover. 2408 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATION-
al Local 897—Meete < every Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204, Labor Temple.
Financial eecretary, E. Prendergaat
Room 218.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal), Looal No. 178—Meetinga
held first Tuesday in eaoh month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording aeoretary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanclal
Secergtary, L. Wakely, P. O. Box r"
TILE  LAYERS'   AND  HELPERS',   LO-
oal No. 82—Meeta flrat and third
Wednesdays each month, I p.m. Presl-
dent, J. Kavanagh; aeeretary, X Jamleson, Bi Fifth Ave. East
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 828—
Meets last Sunday each month, I
p.m. Preeldent A. E. Robb; vlce-prealdent, A. H. England; aecretary-treaaurer,
R. H. Neelanda, P.O. Box 88.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meete every eecond
and fourth Wedneaday at 8 p-m., In
Labor Hall. President, D. 8. Cameron:
flnanolal secretary, H. Olbb;. general
eecretary. B. D. Grant, P, O. Box III.
The public la Invited to attend.
AMALGAMATED   SOCIETY   OP  CAB'
PENTERS AND JOINERS meeta every
second  and  fourth   Thursday of  eaen
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
A t,m      mm A     CS^m.mM.a\*     tta a A     *     _   —_ •»_-_ a
Ave. and Seventh St, at 8 n.m. President J. L. Hogg, Hankey Blk., Sapperton; Seoretary, A, McDonald, 111 Royal
Ave.. New Westminster.
PLUMBERS' and STEAMFITTERS' LO-
• S?t <*S—Meeta every aecond anl
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:80 p.m. Preeldent D. Webster; secretary,  A.  McLaren, P.O. Box III,  New
Westminster, B. C.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CA1U
. penters, Local Union No. 1111—
Meets every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Temple, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
otreet Preeldent, M. C. Schmendt; aee-
{••ary, A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Weatminster, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEE#S IN
Labor Temple, New Weetmlnater, corner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every eecond Sunday of each month, al
J:,° '-"li. l"«sldent, E. S. Hunt: secretary, F. w. Jameaon. Visiting brothers
Invited,
 VXCYOBXA, B, O.
VICTORIA     TRADES    AND     LABOR
Council—Meets flrat end third Wednesday, Labor Hall. 731 Johnaon street
at 8 p.m.   President A. Watchman, sec-
t rV BC ' ' '•*•*■"' Via'
BROTHERHOOD     OF    CARPENTER!
and Jolnera—Meets every Tuesday,
l£S_£ }*i?TJ">Jl' ™ Johnston It
Preeldent J. E. Bryan: recording secre.
tary, Geo. L. Dykeman; business agent
and flnanclal secretary, w. A, Parkla-
eon, Box 288. ..
 «jrw tmo»«.
KIMBERLEY MtNERB' UNION. NO. Ill
Western   Federation   of   Minera—'
Preeldent W. Fleming; e.cretary-treas-
urer, M, P. 'villencuvo, Klmberley SIS
LADYSMITH MINERS'UNION. LO&ii
_   No.  1381   y. M. W. of A.—Meets
Wedneaday, tlnlon Hall. 7 p.m. Pree™
J""-t nun Outhrle: aeeretary, Duncan
McKensle, Ladyaro.th, B. o.   ■*•
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.Of A.
.k^¥ff.•,..•vs*?,vM9Jld'«'.,, i*i *"••-■• 1»
Jordan, Box 410. Nanlamo. B. C,
ct,""S.RLAND    laOCAL   UNION,    tto.
8111, U. M. W. of A—Meets every
p«.m!»; p,'m",J" P' *•• w- -a. h3i
Preeldent Jos. Naylor: aeeretary. Jamas
Smith, Box 14, Cumberland, B.U
™Aiki.¥Ihh ,£ND_SMBLTB»Mtoini
Union, No. 101, w. F. of M.—Meets
everv Monday at 7:10 p.m.   Preaident,
____TkraTSrS. Fr""* Cm>-
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL
DEMOCRATIC PARTY - Prtlls
Etf'"*".'".Banilal-m Theatre, Granville
Street, Sunday eevnlnga. Seoretary, J.
Adama, Room 104. Labor Temple
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hailing, Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A.M. TO 6 P.M.
amorai or com.Jam* sacra-
i-cA*' .I"!?'"* r!«h.ut »' ">• Dominloa,
In Manitoba, Saakatcbewan and Alberts,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
Sf'Sffl.V'Jl a P?rtlo*> of the Province
or British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of »i an acre. Not more than
2,510 acres will be leaeed to one applicant
Application for leaae muat be made by
the applicant In pereon to the Agent or
Sub-Aent of the district ln whfch tha
rights applied for ara altuated.
...15 HSI**** '•""orr the land must bs
deecrlbed by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and ln unsurveyed ter-
l!l°J'i!, ih6.u,rMt .CM)"-"! 'or shall ba
staked by the applicant himself.
Eaoh application muat be accompanied
by a fee of 15, which will be refunded It
ihe rights applied for are not available,
but^not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of ths
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
..,?,.el.pe.t.*onaop,Pl"l?S.'h• ■»'"• •"all
furnishi thei Agenf with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghta
are not being operated, auch returns
should be furnished at leaat once a year.
The leaae will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the leesee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for ffie working of the mine at ths
rate of f 10 an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands. '.
W   H   OOHV
Deputy Minister of th'e Interior.
. N.   B.—Unauthorised   publication   of
thla advertisement will not be nald for.
ppgJ^
if America J&r
.tOWIIIMt ___o_ M>m>KlsT.^y*5.a
'!.1.'.iL-:'j/-f :!:::•- " FRIDAY JANUARY 9, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.   -
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS
This ii one make of underwear in which you can secure good
quality and a perfect fit The makers studied these two
requisites and have produced garments that clearly show
much thought along these lines. Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally associate themielvei with underwear that fits the figure.
If you want real underwear comfort this winter we would
recommend that you try Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino separate garments at
$1.00 and $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
$3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to 14 yean, and all sizes
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garments in
light or medium' weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
LIMITED
575 Granville Street     Vancouver, B. C.
I will pay yon to ice our showing for winter wear. Prices that
cannot be beaten or repeated in the dty.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 • Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADYT. AND WE WILL
' LEARN to be an expert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hats; make and curl
plumes, etc A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for a few dollars a week, when you can learn
a profession with short hours and easy work that
pays a high salary** We guarantee positions to our
graduates.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For particulars see Madame Mills, 112 Hastings St W.
or Phone Seymour 7450L  Houn daily from I to 5 p.m.
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
VICTORIA STORE, 111 VIEW ST.
ORBENHOUSES
lIstAye. and Main St. . Victoria, B, O. Hammond, B.C.
Phone Fairmont 718.
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phon* 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.    •
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware and
Sporting Goodi
UI Hastings St., W.
Vl-WaS,}*
A.M. McNeill
O.J, Benedict
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
We specialize In
Moving Furniture (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons lor all description of work
Estimates cheerfully given
Telephones; Seymour 620, SS20 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 2514-R
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THREE STORES IN VANCOUVER
« Hsstings «.      Phone Sey. IM 401 CrunMe St      Phone Ssy. •711'
TH Granville St    Phone Sey. HII
laonf Dlatance Phons 17
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
THE  MUSICIANS   UNION a
wish to announce that Mr.
Franklin and members of hia
orchestra are not members of the
Musicians' Union. When engaging music for your next dance or
social, make sure that your
Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
For full Information Phone Musicians Union
Seymour 7815.     640 Ronton Street
PATRONIZE UUffl TEMPLE POOL ROOM
ANNUAL MEETING
LABOR TEMPLE
The Business and Finances
Satisfactory to the'
Shareholders.
The Board of Directors and
Officers for Current
Yea"r.
The third- annual general meeting
of the Vancouver Labor Temple company, limited, was held on Monday evening, January 5th, at the registered
offlce, Labor Temple, President James
Brown presided, and there was a good
atendance of shareholders. James H.
MoVety, secretary-treasurer and managing director of the company, presented the annual finanoial statement
for the year ending October 31, 1913,
as prepared hy Messrs. Crehan, Mouat
& company, chartered accountants.
The Items were thoroughly discussed
and explained to the satisfaction of
those present, the directors being tendered a hearty vote of thanks by the
meeting for their valuable services
during the past year. Following directors comprise the executive board for
this year: President, Jas. Brown;
vice-president, B. P. Pettipiece; secretary-treasurer-manager, James H.
McVety; P. A. Hoov •, Ed. Lothian,
Jas. Campbell, H. H. Free, Fred. Blumberg, Murdoc McKenzle, J. W. Wilkinson, directors. The balance sheet for
the financial year reads;
"VANCOUVER, B.C.,
"Deo. 16, 1913.
'To the Directors and Shareholders of
The   Vancouver   Labor   Temple
oompany, Ltd., Vanoouver, B.C.:
"Gentlemen: We have audited the
books of the company for the year
ending October 31,1913, and herewith
present you with the result of our examination, set forth ln the following
exhibits: Exhibit IA—profit and loss
statement for year ending October 31,
1913. Exhibit B—balan&e sheet as
at Ootober 31, 1913. Profit and lose
statement: On Exhibit A we present
a detailed statement ot this account,
which shows a proflt for the year ending October 31, 1913, of $4,695.70. No
depredation has been written off the
building and furniture; Balance sheet
—On Exhibit B we present a detailed statement of the company's
flnanclal position as at October 31,
1913. Mortgages (123,100.00 are secured on the company's property situated on lots 21, 22 and 23, block 35,
S. D. 641. Bank of Montreal, $29.25—
We have reconciled the bank balance
with the pass book and confirmed the
correctness of tbls amount. The bal-.
ance sheet annexed and signed by us,
as relative hereto, is In our opinion
a full and fair balance aheet, containing the particulars required by the
regulations of (he company, and is
properly drawn up so as to exhibit a
true and correct view of the company's
affairs according to the best of our information and the explanations given
to us, and as shown by the books of
the company, subject to the qualifications contained in onr report
We have obtained from the directors
and officers of the company all the information and explanations we have
required.    Yours respectfully.
(Signed) "CREHAN, MOUAT & CO.
"Chartered Accountants and Municipal Auditors."
Assets
Cash  on  hand    I        i
Sundry Debtors:
Unexpired   Insurance...... 568.75
On Open Account.14,840.75
Less   B, & D. Accounts written off   227.05
        4,813.70
New Building  flB3.526.41
Furniture and
fixtures     3,530.30
Real Estate:
Lots 21, 22 and 23,
Blk. 35, 8.D. 541
-Cost 150,000.00
Addition    on   Revaluation    (added
Oat.  31,  1912).,, 80,000.00
I   6,168.46
167,050.71
180,000.00
Incorporation expense
I2'87,056.71
828.50
1292,553.06
i   Liabilities
To the Public:
Sundry Credltore:
First Mortgage, B.C. Trust
Corporation ..1107,000.00
Second   Mortgage,  C.   Dowering    10,100.00
Bank   of- Montreal,  Overdraft  29.25
Bills payable       4,900.00
Accrued  salaries           180.00
Accrued Interest          355.26
On open account     2,247.39
•130,811.89
To the Shareholders:
Capital Stock Account:
Authorized capital. 1100,000,
divided   Into  100,000  shares
of 11 each.
Subscribed 180.346.00
Less unpaid     1,745.50
178,600.50
Less   shares   cancelled      185.00
_ \ .  1 78,415.50
Paid on cancelled shares...        50.00
frost ALobs Acct.:
Balance from statement of Oct. 31,
1912 178,580.57
Profit for 12 months
ending Oct, 81, '13   4,695.70
I 78,406.50
1292.
1.56.1.68
,653.60
Profit and Loss Account
i Dr.
Salaries  11,665.00
Janitor's wages and expense..,. 3,118.18
Fuel  1,286.00
General  expense     29.60
Ofllce expense   118.85
Light expense   474.84
Water  841.80
Insurance  802.75
Taxes...  1,312,94
Elevator power and repairs  216.65
General repairs    171.84
Legal and auditing expense  218.65
Telephone expense    101.20
Directory board expense  25.00
Switch hoard Installation expenae 40.65
Towel service expense  142.00
Scavenging   72.35
Interest on mortgages  7,368.95
Tnterest and  exohange  875.71
Office rental    867.00
Rending and tonl rooms rental.. 227.05
Bad and doubtful sects, written
oft  227.05
Balance, being profit carried to
balance Bheet    4,095.70
12.1,832.80
Cr.
Rental receipts  , $23,692.75
Telephone receipts        140.05
Proceedings terminated.
123,832.80
PATROMSSU    B     O.    1T0DBHATIONIST
ADVERTISBBS-AND TELL THEM WHY.
IS THI8 BROTHERHOOD
Any Different From lta Predecessors?
—New Electric Railway Society.
The Union Leader, official Journal
of the electric employees of Chicago,
has this to say: The latest so-called
organization to attempt to cut into
the field of electric railway employees of Chicago has the euphonious title of Brotherhood of All Railway Employees. Its officers are
known aB the national engineer, national fireman, national brakeman,
national motorman and so on down
the line, and lta monthly journal declares it to be 'not a lahor, political or
religious organlaztion.' , . . It Is
claimed to be an Insurance organization,- It is reported aa having
Its organisers ln the field by trying
to Induce our members to become
afflliated with lt. In the light of our
experiences ln the past, is lt unreasonable to believe that this so-called
'Brotherhood' is any different from
its predecessors?"
Men Arrested Merely on
Suspicion Kept Months
Without Trial
Many Stories of the Oppression of Bowser the
Dictator '
JURY RETURNS OPEN VERDICT
On Christmas Eve Panic at Calumet,
Mich.—Alarm Raised Inside.
An open verdidf, including a finding
that the Christmas eve panic, which
cost 72 lives in Italian hall, at Cain-
met, Mich., was caused by an alarm
of fire raised within the hall, was
returned New Tear's eve by the coroner's jury, wblch for three daya had
been hearing the evidence of participants In the disaster. Allegations that
enemies of the Western Federation ot
Miners were responsible for starting
the panic or-In any way hindered the
work of rescue, was rejeoted hy the
six men ln an unanimous decision.
The Jurymen wrestled with their problems for six houra. "By the evidence
of the witnesses, we flnd that the
cause of death was suffocation, the
same being caused by being Jammed
on the stairway leading to the entrance of Italian hall, where a Christmas celebration waa being held under
the auspices of the women's auxiliary
of the Western Federation of Miners,"
the verdict aald, "The stampede was
caused by some person or persons unknown to the jury at this time, raising an alarm of Are within the hall."
PRODUCERS MU8T ORGANIZE
Vice-president of C. P. R. Saya Is
Greatest Need In the Weat
Oeorge Bury, vice-president of the
C. P. R. ln a review of the^sltuatlon
in the Canadian West as published
this week, saya; "What Ib needed in
this Country Ib a strong organization
of producera, led with moderation and
sagacity, which will make for proper
methods of production and distribution, and which will make prices and
all other conditions more stable and
uniform. If we really believe the
statement we are always making, that
the future of this country is bound up
ln the productivity of its soil, why
should we hesitate at anything which
would mean the largest possible return to the producer? We talk much
of the ultimate consumer, let us also
think of the primary producer."
drastic Measures,  '
Threatened by tha I. W. W. If Release
of Prisoners Refused.
The following oommunioation from
Ottawa, dated December 22nd, has
been received by Attorney-General
Bowser and published this week ln
the dally press:
"Sir: I am directed to inform you
that the minister -has reoelved a typewritten communication from the Press
committee, local union 327-3, Industrial Workers of the World, box 368,
Kamloops, B C, referring to the case
of James Munroe and Mike Brennan
who were said to have been arrested
on 22nd October last on a charge of
vagrancy and committed to jail ln
Kamloops for three and four months
by the judge, Dr. Hamilton. These
people state that if the men are not
released by Christmas day 'there are
10,000 men ready to use drastic measures that will make your country
famous all over the world.' and other
observations to the like effect:
"E. L. NEWCOMBH,
"Deputy Minister of Justice."
B. C. LABOR COMMISSION.
Report Will Be Presented To The
Coming -Legislature,
A dispatch from Victoria, B.C., states
that the report of the commission
ers appointed by the provincial government last year to enquire into the
conditions of labor and general industrial problems ln this province, will
be presented to the coming legislature. The following members comprised the board: P. O. Parson,
(chairman); K. A. MacKelvie, R. A.
Stoney, A. M. Harper, John Jardlne,
with F. R. McNamara as secretary.
The number of places visited by the
commissioners was 02 and altogether
498 witnesses appeared to give evidence. The distance travelled by the
commissioners amounted to approximately 9,400 miles, Including a Journey along the O. T. P. as far east as
Tete Jaune Cache. A number ot em'
ployers and employees were Interrogated in an effort to secure reliable
data on the rate of wages, hours of
labor and general conditions. It Is
the general opinion of organized labor
that the report will be of little or no
value Insnfnr as forming a logical
basts for lahor legislation goes, the
majority of the members of the commission being intensely partisan.
Discussion Elicits Truth,
Indeed, no opinion or doctrine, of
whatever nature It be, or whatever be
Its tendency, ought to he suppressed.
For It Is either manifestly true, or lt
Is manifestly false, or its truth or
falsehood Is dubious. Its tendency is
manifestly good, or manifestly had, or
lt Ib dubious and concealed. There are
no other assignable conditions, no other functions of the problem.
In the case of Its being manifestly
true, and of good tendency, there csn
he no dispute. Nor ln the case of Its
being manifestly otherwise; for bv the
terms It can mislead nobody. If Its
truth or Its tendency be dubious, lt Is
clear that nothing can bring the good
to light, or expose the evil, but full
and free discussion. Until this takes
nlace, a plausible fallacy may do
harm: hut discussion Is sure to elicit
ithe truth, and fix public opinion on
a proper basis; and nothing else can
doit.
Criminality can only he predicated
where there Is an obstinate, unreasonable refusal to consider any kind of
evidence bnt what exclusively supports
one side of a question.
It follows that errors of the understanding must he treated by anneals
to the understanding. That argument
should be opposed by argument, and
fact by fact. That flne and Imprisonment are hail forma of svllogism. well
calculated to Irritate, but powerless
for refutation. They may sunnress
truth, they can never elicit It—Thorn-
Cooper.
PAGE FIVE
PROVINCIAL JAILS
S
'From Monday's Dally Province amended to meet local conditions) from report
of conditions, under Lisbon date line,
prevalent ln Portugal.—Ed. "Fed."]
NANAIMO, Jan. B.-While a large
part of the world fancies that British
Columbia Is now one of the homes
of liberty and a place where apeech
is unrestrained and freedom of
thought encouraged, yet in reality
ten years ot conservative rule since
King Bowser drove Joe Martin from
his palace, have reduced the country
to a
Frightful Condition.
The conservatives are more autocratic than any king could be and
Nanalmo and all the big oltiei are
filled with spies, representing the
government and known as specials or
''Jakes," The jails are packed with
men arrested merely on suaptcion and
kept for months before being tried.
Speech .and all forms of expression
are checked If they are against the
views of "d'Coeta" Bowser, a lawyer,
who Is now attorney-general,
In Stats of Terror,
Spies search the houses at will tnd
keep the people In a state of terror
by dogging the footsteps ot any one
suspected of nntonlst or syndicalist
tendencies, constantly framing up indictments against them. There are
all aorta of stories of men of high
standing ln lahor union circles being
kept In dungeons, being unable to
communioate with friends or relatives,
seeing no one and seldom having a
ray of light, except when a jailer
thrusts ln food through a narrow slit
Terrible Oppressions.
It is absolutely impossible, except
at great length, to recite the terrible
oppressions and shockingly wrong
arrests and imprisonments which have
crowded the prisons and penitentiaries of the coaat cities, from which
men are taken away who are (
fined to spend the remainder of their
days haunted by the memories of Inhuman and unjust treatment.
We ought to hold with all our force,
both ot hands and teeth, the use of
the pleasures of life that one after
another our years snatch away from
ns.
To speak leas of one's self than
what one really Is, Is folly, not modesty; and to take that for current
pay which is under a man's value is
pusillanimity and cowardice.
Retire yourself into yourself, but
flrst prepare yourself there to receive
yourBelf; lt were folly to trust yourself In your own hands lt you cannot
govern yourself.
T. Grimes, business agent of the
Fishermen's Protective union, and a
socialist, has been elected to the Newfoundland legislature from St, John's.
He defeated Speaker Warren of the
House of Representatives. He was
not eleoted on a strictly socialist vote,
however, as he received the support
of other radicals.
The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners ot America has
Increased Its membership 21,000 In
the last year, according to Frank
Duffy, general secretary of the union,
He points to the continued progress
bf the union, and says that 200 trade
movements were begun last spring,
practically all of which were successful.
The laws keep up their credit not
by being just, but because they are
laws; 'tis the mystic foundation of
their authority; they have no other,
and it well answers their purpose.
They are often made by fools; still
oftener by men who, out of hatred
to equality, fail tn equity; but alwaya
by men, vain and Irresolute authors.
There Is nothing so much, nor so
grossly, nor so ordinarily faulty, as
the lawB. Whoever obeyB them because thisy are Just, does not justly
obey them aa he ought—Montaigne.
Whether or not the, anthracite miners will go on strike again next spring
will depend upon the attitude of the
operators, with whom a conference Is
to be held tn the near future. The
miners will demand principally that
the "check-oft" system be enforced at
all collieries, and It Is expected that
the operators will do their utmost to
block that move. The miners' officials
claim that the refusal of the operators to check off the unton dues at
each payday serves to encourage the
more penurious and Ignorant members
to drop out of the organlaztion despite
the fact that their conditions were
greatly benefited by tbe union. They
want the deadbeato to be forced
to stand their just share of the expense of running the organization or
get out of the mines. Naturally the
operators, who want the open shop,
will not make the concession unless
they are forced to yield.—Cleveland
Citizen.
THE BELGRAVIA
FLORISTS
1016 ROBSON STREET
Phone, Sey. 6475
FLORAL DESIGNS, WED
DING ORDERS AND
HOME DECORATIONS
OUR SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
Phone Seymour 87M
DIXON & MURRAY
otMitaatMaM, vto.
Offloe aal tton nttug.   oeneral
Jobbing
Offloa aad Shopi
loss Dinma itbist
JAMES STARK S«
Mots BMsa, too tM. tt ttaa Mt.
■atastav IWuLkMlia
THB STORE THAT SERVES TOU WELL
January Clearance and White Sale
We are making substantial price reductions all
through our .store. The prices that maintained in
our Great Re-organization Sale made us famous.
Our values are to-day identical and prices in many
cases lower. We are closing out £togs entirely.
WE OFFER
$30.00 Brussels Bugs,4x12, For  .$18.50
$40.00 Axminster Bugs, 9x12, For  26.00
Tou will save money, get value and good service at
"THE STOBE THAT SEBVES TOU WELL"
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Best Flour, 49-lb.
tacks... $1.45
Rolled Oats, fresh milled
8 lbs.       .25
Butter. Finest Creamery,
3 lbs.     I.O0
Corn Starch, Johnson'i,
3 packets       .25
Lard,  Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each 3$
Hami, by the whole ham
_ perlb./.... .... .. .23
Bacon, machine sliced,
perlb...,  .25
Eggs,   absolutely   Iocs]
new laid, per doz... .55
Applet, Winesapa, 5 lbs. .25
Castile Soap. 35c. bats. .20
Ham-mo   Hand Cleanser, per tin  05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 8301, 8302
1275 ORANVILLE STREET
COLD  WEATHER  IS  COMING
GET ONE OF OUR HOT WATER BOTTLES
Wa CaaraatM Tina to Uu Two Yeafa
2-Qt, re|. $2.00, Special $1.50      3-Qf., Reg. $2.25, Special $1.75
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU
MARETT & REID
157 Hastings St. West
Phone Seymour 1583
l!»ffi»SJ#SBS
The Burning Question
Is your Cook Store or Range
one that gives satisfaction, or
is lt the kind that wastes the
fuel, burns the cakes and pies
on the top and leaves them
raw on the bottom.
IF SO, now Is the time to make
the change, and when yoe
make the change, there Is no
better range yon eould get
than
"The Stay 8atlafacto,'y Rings"
, SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
W. C STEARMAN
Hardware Merchant
MS ORANVILLE STREET
Dorner Main Street and 10th Avenue
Phone Fairmont 2078
Vancouver, B.C.
Increase the Earning Power
of Your Family
Is your son or daughter able to command a good salary? Are
they revenue producers, or revenue reducers? Are they qualified to
hold an important position? Can they do any one thing so well that
their services are in good demand?
IF NOT, WHY NOT?
Don't you think it would pay you to invest a little money
in practical training for them? During the past six years
thousands of our students and graduates have secured
responsible positions in the business world. Our training
gave them a start. You will find Success trained students
holding good positions in every town or city of importance from Winnipeg to Victoria. What we have done for
them we can do four your son or daughter.
OUR WINTER TERM OPENS MONDAY, JANUARY 5
DAY AND NIGHT SCHOOL
Write us now for full information, or call and aee us—
Success Business College
QV ^ TF 1\4 Q   Wt ca"* ^rything
iJ I tJ  I JUlVllJ        for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest uiers of office equipment
LOOSE LEAP SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunsmuir Street Phone Exchange Sey. 3526-3527
EVERY   UNION   MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE*
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 9, 1914.
HOTEL STRATFORD
VANCOUVER'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTEL
200 Bedrooms. 60 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Each Room
Equipped with Telephone, Hot and
Cold Water, Steam Heat, etc. Our
Beds are the Best In any Hotel in
America.
RATES
(Weekly) Single, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00
"        Double, $4.50, $6.00, $7.90
Vranslsnt Ratss, $1.00 per day.   No
More.   No Less.
CORNER   GORE   AVENUE
AND  KEEFER STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
Hotel Stratford Co., Ltd.,
PropB.
John B. Teevens, Man. Director
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOT, MOB. FREE AUTO BUS
BERGMAN'S MODEL KITCHEN
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity visit me for a Flrst-Claae Meal at
Moderate Prlcea.    White Help Entirely
The best products obtained that the market affords. First-class
accommodation. Only modern system of cooking on the Pacific Coast,
second to none when compared with other American Cities on the
Coast. Nicely furnished rooms in connection, just perfected in the
most modern style and now ready for occupancy, at 60c. per night
and up.
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3,25c.
Short Orders Day and Night
GO W,TH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
. Richly Furnished Throughout Hot ud Cold Water ln Bvtry Room
Tints. OUT* ud (Mil Boom oa tbs Vaotfio Com. la Ooaawttoa
HOTEL ASTOR
C. I, MAKSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, ltanagar.
Battel Sl.00 aa« np   iildal weekly Bates.
atmoi-aur nut 147-1111
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL ^ J»™«KL
gaa Homely -fsnlaaea        656 SWymour St. Partially Localsd
CLARENCE HOTEL
Cm PENDER aad SEYMOUR STREETS	
SKABOIaD & McBIaOROY
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
:: s  HOTEL s  ::
C0NNAUGHT
nminiaun Props.
PHONE SEYMOUR 70J7-70II.
■nnpsu nan, Sl.00 aee Bay *o>
Up-to-Date    First-Class   .Dining
Room and Cafe tn Connactlon
110  ROOMS:   10   ROOMS  WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone In Every
Room—Elevator   Services;    Bath
and Shower Bathe on all Floors.
ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS NEW AND UP-TO-DATE
Lounging and  Smoking Room.
Special   rates   to   permanent
guests.
Rates:   93.50 per week and up.
Kingston Hotel
7S7 Rickird, St. Phon Ssy. 125511
CLIFTON ROOMS    »•'•''« » *f "»**■ J.™*-
HSS Cruiilll. Stmt       Phon. Sapwair 4026*  *™"j {"v" ,*' *? ft-    ■"•"■
Th. Houn of Comfort HUM, aot ft cold watar ia Smyrna
WORKERS UNION
UNIOl^TAMPl
factory
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what lta name, unless it hears a
plain and readable impression or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT A 8HOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
J. F. Tobln, Free.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
Berry Bros.
Agent, (oi
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bloycle with the Reputation
Full  line  of   accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
Diseases of Men
We issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from all other remedies.
Price 13.00, Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova 8t W.
Vancouver, B. 0,
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
MARKET
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET •
AT ANY
PRICE
Price - $3.50
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
10 Years
Ctnilt and
Hutingi Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
1138 Granville Si.
Nsai Davie
Land Grabbing.
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: I read
with a great deal of interest ln your
valued paper, the astounding revelations of the "land-grabbing business"
as carried on In this province. To
make a start to end lt, I would suggest to the Labor Representation
league that lt adopt a single-tax policy, which would be, if pursued, a
stepping stone to socialism, and ln
the right direction. Thanking you for
this space, I remain,
GEORGE WALKER.
Vancouver, B. C, Jan. 7, 1914.
Little Children of the Poor
Little children of the poor,
My heart goes out to you;
Little lives that must endure,
Where miseries accrue;
In the factories and mills,
There robbed of play and health,
Suffering a world of His.
For parasites of wealth,
Little children of the poor,
You tender, precious flowers,
Bloom for gardens sweet and pure,
Yet robbed of play-ttme hours,
Is it strange the blood runs wild
And hands are clenched ln wrath,
When we contemplate a child
Upon the thorn-strewn path?
Little children of the poor,
Brave hearts shall place the blame;
For the lives that you endure,
And point the nation's shame;
Boasting here of Freedom's reign
With scorn for royal commands,
Forging then a master's chain
To shackle baby hands,
Little children of the poor, ,
Pearls for trampling swine,
Cast and mired, that they secure
The wealth from mill and mine,
There are those that hear the call,
From Him, of Galilee,
Heeding, until Mammon fall,
And you, His jewels, are free.
Little children of the poor,
A future day shall break,
When no one can e'er secure
Your lives for profit sake;
When the people's rule shall fill
The world with melody
And  childhood's  joys  and  laughter
thrill
The world with ecstacy.
—ELLIS B. HARRIS.
FURUSETH  RESIGNS.
Grant on Taxation.
Let us all labor to add all needful
guarantees for the more perfect se-
curity of free thought, free speech,
and free press, pure morals, unfetter
ed religious sentiments, and of equal
rlghta and privileges to all men, irrespective of nationality, color, or religion. Encourage tree schoolB, and
resolve that not one dollar of money
shall be appropriated to the support
of any sectarian school. Resolve that
neither the state nor nation, or both
combined, ahall support Institutions
of learning other than those sufficient
to afford every child growing up ifti
the land the opportunity of a good
common achool education, unmixed
with sectarian, pagan, or atheistical
tenets. Leave the matter of religion
to the family altar, the church, and
the private schools, supported entirely
by private contributions. Keep the
church and the state forever separate.
I would call your attention to the
importance of correcting an evil that,
if permitted to continue, will probably lead to great trouble in our land
before the close of the nineteenth
century, It Is the acquisition of vast
amounts of untaxed church property.
In 1850,1 believe, the church property
of the United States, which paid no
tax, municipal or state, amounted to
about $83,000,000. In 1860 the amount
had doubled. In 1875 lt is about II,-
000,000,000. By 1900, without check,
lt is safe to aay this property will
reach a sum exceeding $3,000,000,000.
So vast a sum, receiving all the protection and benefits of government
without bearing Its proportion of the
burdens and expenses of the same,
wtll not be looked upon acquiescently
by those who have to pay the taxes.
In a growing country, where real estate enhances bo rapidly wtth time as
ln the United States, there Is scarcely
a limit to the wealth that may ba acquired by corporations, religious or
otherwise, if allowed to retain real estate without taxation. The contemplation of so vast a property aa here
alluded tc, without taxation, may lead
to sequestration without constitutional authority, and through blood. I
would suggest the taxation of all property equally, whether church or corporation.—U. S. Grant.
From Sea Safety Congreaa At London—Wanted More Lifeboats,
Andrew Furuseth, president of the
International Seamen's union the
other day ga e another indication of
his strict integrity and adherence to
the cause of laoor by resigning as
United States delegate to the International Congress on Safety at Sea,
says a London cablegram. Furuseth
cabled his resignation to President
Woodrow Wilson at Washington, D.C.
Furuseth's reason, and the one he
gave to the president ln resigning, is
his firm conviction that the present
reactionary congress will do all ln
its power to lower the standards of
safety at sea, instead of raising them.
The international president of the organized seamen was a member of the
committee on Life Saving Appliances,
and as such was directly concerned
with tbe imrortan. Item of proper
manning and furnishing of lifeboats.
A TALE OF TWO CITIE8.
Virtue lta Own Reward—Difficulty la
Few People Philosophers.
The Public points out that the average man, and particularly the average business man, wishes to know
if a given line of action pays. He
demands his reward ln this world,
and ln a material form. Soldiers
stand ready to give life or limb for
their country; yet if their pay be
stopped for even a little while, there
is an alarming Increase ln the number of desertions. Ministers preach
the gospel for the love of God; yet
lt will be noted that a "call" to a
pulpit is almost invariably from a
lower to a higher salary. This is not
to the particular discredit of the soldier or the minister. It is the inevitable expression of human nature. It
is man. lt is man even at his best.
And lt it be true of those professing
extreme devotion to their country or
to their God, what must it be of those
who serve themselves and Mammon?
Aa To Truth,
Every new truth which has ever
been propounded has, tor a time,
caused mischief; lt has produced discomfort, and often unhappiness; sometimes by disturbing social or religious
arrangements, and sometimes merely
by the disruption of old and cherished
association of thoughts. It is only after a certain interval, and when the
frame-work of affairs has adjusted itself to the new truth, that its good effects preponderate; and the preponderance continues to Increase, until, at
length, the truth causes nothing but
good. But, at the outset there Is alwaya harm. And if the truth is very
great aa well aa very new the harm is
serious. Men are made uneasy; they
flinch; they cannot bear the sudden
light; a general restlessness supervenes; the face^of society Is disturbed,
or perhaps convulsed; old interests
and old beliefs have been destroyed
before new ones have been created.
These symptoms are the precursors of
revolution; they have preceded all the
great changes through which the world
has passed.—Buckle's "History of Civilization."
TRUTH NEVER OIE8.
Truth never dies.  The ages come and
go;
The mountains wear away; the seas
retire;
Destruction lays earth's mighty cities
low;
And empires, states and dynasties
expire;
But caught and handed onward by
the wise,
Truth never dies.
Though unrecelved   and   scoffed at
through the years,
Though made the butt of ridicule
and jest;
Though held aloft for mockery and
jeers,
Denied by those of transient power
possessed,
Insulted by the Insolence ot lies,
Truth never dies.
Truth answers not; it does not take
offense;
But with a mighty silence bides Its
time.
As some great cliff that braves the
elements,
And lifts through all the storms Its
head sublime.
So truth, unmoved,   its    puny foes
And never dies.
WHY?
He couldn't write, he couldn't read.
He little knew nor cared
About the people's wrong and need;
How others lived he took no heed,
Nor how they fared.
The big saloon he couldn't pass,
Nor pools of any type,
He couldn't live without his glass,
And he was miserable, alaa!
Without his pipe.
On publlo streams, whlche'er the way,
He could do naught but float;
And on the questions of the day,
He couldn't think, he couldn't pray-
But he could vote.
She   couldn't   drink,   she   couldn't
swear,
She couldn't even smoke;
Nor could she open wrongs declare,
Nor with a ballot did she dare
The right Invoke.
She loved the people, and ahe knew
The questions passing by
Were     weighty;    her     conclusions
drew—
And out of these convictions grew,
The how and why.
She kept herself outside the rut;
From leading minds conld quote;
She had opinions clearly cut;
Could write and read and reason—but
She could not vote.
—Hattle Horner-Louthian.
Freedom,
There is only one cure for evils
which newly-acquired freedom produces, and that cure is freedom. When
a prisoner first leaves his cell, he cannot bear the light of day, he ia unable
to discriminate colors, or recognize
faces. The remedy is, to accustom him
to the rays of the sun.
The blaze of truth and liberty may
at firat dazzle and bewilder nations
which have become half blind in the
house of bandage. But let them gaze
on, and they will soon be able to bear
lt. In a few yeara men learn to reason. The extreme violence ot opinions
subsides. Hostile theories correct each
other. The scattered elements of
truth cease to contend, and begin to
coalesce. And, at length, a ayetem of
justice and order Ib educed out of the
chaos.
Many politicians of our time are ln
the habit of laying lt down as a self-
evident proposition, that no people
ought to be free till they are fit to use
their freedom. The maxim la worthy
of the fool in the old story, who resolved not to go into the water till he
had learned to swim. If men are to
wait for liberty till they become wise
and good ln slavery, they may Indeed
wait forever.—Macauley.
Lloyd George has warned Premier
Asquith that the socialist victories
won in the recent municipal elections
are the handwriting on the wall of
what will happen If the government
does not make a radical change ln its
policy. There was a total gain of 75
seats, while 15 seats were lost, leaving a net gain of 60. There are now'
368 socialists in city municipal bodies.
IBB
DEWARS
"White Label"
wm
w
Whisky
Elect and Instal Officers.
The Amalgamated Sheet Metal
Workers' held their regular mee'lng
on December ISth last. The principal business was the election and
installation of officers which resulted
as follows: President, John Fraser,
(re-elected by acclamation); vice-
president, W. Galbraith; financial
secretary, R. J. Wardrop; recording
secretary, H. Spear; treasurer, S.
Scarlet; business agent, J. Hamilton;
(the latter four officers wero, reelected by acclamation); warden, A.
G. Gibheart, conductor, E. Leahman;
trustees, W. Heath, W. Fisher, A. J.
Crawford; North west district council, H. Spear, A. J. Crawford; trades
and labor council delegates, A. J. Crawford, G. Freeman, J. Robb; building
trades council, J. Hamilton. Trade
was reported dull.
To cover the floor faster during the
holiday rush, some clerks ln the
Chicago postofflce used roller skates.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
.    BURNS, ETC.
none Seymour S7S7
% Artotta $titbta
fljntOBra-iIiir Artists
938 bobsov snunx
VANCOUVER, B. O.
FOR EXPERT
Watch and Jewelery
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
. 143 Hastings Street West
Iptolaltltii
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread ,
Wedding and Birthday Cakea.
Wa VH Union flour.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks and Lunches
All Gooda Fresh Daily.
see susniii it.
ttL Ssy. 7104.
WHENORDERINGASUIT
See that this Label is Sewed
In the Pockets
It stands for all that Union
Labor Stands for.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Minen' Union
HOTEL   CANADA
' C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room.      :-:      European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
Latest Addition to Vancouver** Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent
Gueiti
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietor!
GRAND CENTRAL HOTE
GAUER k DUHARESQ, Pr.pri.ton
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Leading Hotel. :: Auto Parties catered to.
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Comer Fourth Street and River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C.
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
Pirst-elass Grill in Connection
F.  L.  W ALLIN GFORD,   Manager
PENDER HOTEL >^Sg2SM
SIS P1I.SBB STM1T WIST
*
Rates 11.50 per Day and Up.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Room $3 ptr  w««kf
Up-
D. F. Faaasltis, Fro. <■
3345 HASTINGS 8TREET WEST
——— " ~ ■ 1 Ttlipkoa.,  Hot ud
Good Service Throughout      cm Water ii <.ck
VANCOUVER, B. 6.
RAINIER HOTEL
Cafe open trom Six o'clock'
     a.m. till Midnight   The Best
Meals ln the City, at Popular Prices;   White Cooks only employed.
Rooms Rented by,the Day or Week,   First-clasB Liquors and Cigars,
JOHN 8NIDAR, Prop, Corner Cordova and Carrall Sta.
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
ASK POR THEM, SEE THAT YOU GET THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS PLIM-PLAM YOU WITH CHEAP TRASHY SUBSTITUTES
Phoa. Sty. 7653
Da; or Nifht
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Richudt St.        Vaaconer, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Ofllce and Chape],
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3(B«.
North Vancouver — Office and
ohapel, 116 Second St. E. Phone
134.
e&sfo
<fceer
*_ Now brewed and'bottled
in a union brewing plant
by union workmen.
flAnd juit ai pure—as
good—ai well aged as
ever.
*_ All retail liquor itorei in
Vancouver sell it at three
(or a half and six (or a
half.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY    W__
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited    E3
V v.
FRIDAY.... .JANUARY «, 1914.
THE BBITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
SHOES FOR MEN
8H0E8 FOR SERVICE
SHOES FOR DRESS
UNION 8HOE3 FOR COMFORT
FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at the service of every man who desires the best shoes his money can buy
W. J. ORR (Opposite City Hall) 204 MAIN ST.
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
Capital : 116,000,000        Rest...:. 112,500,000
Main Offlee: Corner Hastings and Oranvllle Street!, Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
HASTINGS* and CAMBIE. .Cor. Hastings and Cambie Streets.
BAST END .....  u Cor. Pender and Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIEW - Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KITSILANO _ Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue" and Fraser Road.
Also North Vancouver Branch, cor.   Lonsdale  Ave.  and   Esplanade.
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B.C.
Enlarged and Remodelled 100 ROOMS 100 BATHS
Comfort     without    Extravagance
American Plan   •   11.00 UP                    European Plan   •   11.00 Up
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor. 	
FIGHTING  TUBERCULOSIS
UNION
LABEL
THB DBS OF THB laABBL ON YOUR PRINTING-NO BXTRA COST TO YOD-
na HEW OS DO OUR DUTY in fighting tuberculosis	
AIM FEDERATIONiST
Workers of South Vancouver
RE-ELECT YOUR OWN CANDIDATE
R.H. NEELANDS
FOR SCHOOL  TRUSTEE
^m^__UW)I\m SUFFDAGfr
Edited by MISS H. R. QUTTERIDOE, Room 219, Labor Temple.
PAGE SEVEN
THE B. C. WOMAN'S 8UFFRAGE
LEAGUE.
The above organization is for tbe
purpose of obtaining the parliamentary franchise on the same terms as
men. If you think the interests of
tbe mothers in the home are well
looked after, if you think that the
girls and women ln the labor market
are protected and their interests safeguarded by the legislature; If yon
think tbat the wage of three, four or
fire dollars a week la sufflclent for a
woman or girl to live on, even If she
does bave to accept gifts from a friend
from time to time to relieve the monotony of underfeeding and no pleasure;
you, man or woman, think this is as
It should be, leave votes for women
alone. If, however, you are a sane,
reasoning, progressive human being,
join our "votes for women" organization, and help the working woman
to gain the right to help herself to
better conditions, better wages and
not have to depend on the help of
charitable organizations, or owrse, for
their daily bread. Sir Richard McBride said if woman had tbe vote
they would neglect tbelr homes. In
tbe last ten months ln the elty ot
Vancouver, nearly 700 widowa or
deserted wives, .with children to keep,
applied for work at the offices of the
associated charities, the creche and
to other organizations. How many
there are who have found work for
themselves Ib not known. Sir Richard McBride has no fear that the
homes of these women will be neglected by them going out to earn a living
for themselves and their ohlldren.
The woman's place is the home where
she should be attending to her children—the nation's greatest asset we
are told. When are our anti-suffragist friends going to make provision
for "the greatest asset of a nation"
to the extent of 700 to bave their
mothers' care and attention at home?
Every one should live up to what he
preaches, and Sir Richard has a splendid opportunity to prevent the home
that he thinks so much of being neglected, by providing mothers with
pensions adequate to keep themselves
and their children without going out
of the home. —H. Q.
HOW  MEN  PROTECT WOMEN  IN
THE LABOR MARKET
There is a difference of opinion between tbe National Unton of Bookbinders and Machine Rulers and the
employers, the point at issue being
the "limitation of female labor ln the
bookbinding trade."
It was shown tbat the work the
members of the union were claiming
had been done by female workers
and the work was not unsuitable for
those who were doing lt, many operations in binding and. ruling being actually better suited to women than
men. It was then that the cloven-
hoof showed Itself, and incidentally
the manner ln which woman's natu-
ural protector, "man," protects her if
it is a question of his own particular
welfare or comfort being upset.
Mr. Campbell, the secretary ot the
council of the union, stated, "We
know that the females can do the
work as well as men, and many of
the girls referred to are capable of
doing work which would stagger the
older binders, capable of doing work
better than some of the men, because
they have had the opportunity. We
want to do away, with that opportunity. We want to keep the craft to
ourselves, and that is simply the
aim we have in view." That is British
fair play ln the lahor market. Woman la the bottom dog—keep her there,
how dare ahe enter a skilled trade
when the sweated Industries are open
to hert Let her go home and starve,
a woman's place is at home! Thank
heaven the women are awakening,
and not much longer will they be exploited by employers and kicked under by their natural protectors.
-H. O.
SUFFRAGE DANCE
The postponed Suffrage dance will
take place on Wednesday, January
28, 1914, at 8.30 p.m. In tbe large hall
of the Labor Temple. Tickets pur
chased for the date previously arranged—December 3rd—will be good
for January 28th. Tickets can be
obtained of any membera of the committee, or at room 219 Labor Temple,
the headquarters of the league.
MEETINGS.
The regular weekly meetings of the
B. C. Woman's Suffrage league will
be held ln the Labor Temple, Dunsmuir street, every Wednesday evening at 8 p. m.
A dance has been arranged by the
B. C. Woman's Suffrage league for
Wednesday, January 28th, at 9 p.m.
ln the large hall, Labor Temple,
Dunsmuir street.    Tickets, 50 cents.
A meeting is held every Monday
evening at 8 p.m. in the Lee hall,
Main street, near Broadway, under
the auspices of the Mount Pleasant
branch of the B. C. Woman's, Suffrage
league.
NEW BOOKS.
Mrs. Colmore has just published a
life of Emily Wilding Davison, orders
for which may be sent to room No.
206, Labor Temple, the office of the
B. C. Woman's Suffrage league. Price,
25 cents.
Orders will also he taken for Chrlst-
abel Pankhurst's new book, so kindly
advertised by Mr. Anthony Comstock,
"The Oreat Scourge and How to End
It." Price, 50 cents.
ANTI-SUFFRAGE ITEM8.
Let us not try to imitate man, let
us be content to reproduce them.—
Lady Free.
If all other countries emanlcpate
their women, then let England ln
splendid isolation, stand firmly against
it.—Anti-suffrage speech.
Do not give votes to women, they
would all vote conservative.—The
liberals.
Do not give votes to women, they
would all vote socialist—The conservatives.
Do not give votes to women till we
bave had time to instruct them to
vote for us.—The socialists.
Do not give votes to women till we
bave converted them all to our particular creed.—All the churches,
A woman's place is home. The fact
that a man goes out to work for the
support of bis home is the cause of
his virility.—Anti-suffrage speech.
Do not give votes, to women: the
vote Is what makes the difference between men and women; and if both
parents voted It would be so confusing for the children.—Anti-suffrage
speech.
We are always happy to learn from
our friend the antl. We now know
the reason for the virility and militancy of women. Men became
parasites and forced the women out
to work for the support of the home.
So much has this become the custom
that the magistrate at Willesden
police court told a woman that she
would be very unpopular If she objected to support her husband, aa bo
many wives were willing'to do ln
these days.
EMILY DAVISON'S FUNERAL
'.'Except a grain of wheat fall into the
ground and die ... ."
Grain of wheat,
Grain of wheat,
Borne along the throbbing street;
Borne a willing* sacrifice,
Proud to pay the martyr-price,
For the blind, unknowing street-
Grain of wheat,
Grain of wheat.
Into earth,
Into earth,
Among the hills that gave her birth;
Far from surging ribaldry-
Prisoned souls she fell to free-
She will wait a greater birth
On the earth,
On the earth.
She shall rise,
she shall rise,
Splendid ln a nation's eyes,
With a cloud that wltnesseth
To the harvest of her death;
Transfigured in a nation's eyes
She shall rise,
She shall rise.
—JOHN RUSSELL,
In The Christian Commonwealth.
The Election Campaign In Burnaby.
On Wednesday evening at Alta
Vista, the flrst of a series of official
meetings of the reeve and councillors
of 1913 was held. Judging by the attendance greater Interest in the
affairs of the municipality Is being
taken by the ratepayers than before.
Besides the present council the aspirants for the reevesnlp and council
for 1914 addressed the meeting, and
a lively time ensued. Each section of
the municipality will be visited before
election day, and by tbat time the
electors will bave heard more "inside
Information" In the few days than
could have been gathered during tbe
whole of the year. Hugh M. Fraser
and the present reeve seem to have
the largest number of supporters,
while a change ln the constitution of
the council seems to be regarded as a
necessity for tbe welfare of the municipality in general. Polling day is
Saturday, January 17th.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Grant Hanatfng Director.)
SO-S4 OOBDOTA
Carpentera' White Duck Overalls,
with li pockets, union label 11.71
Men's Heavy Tweed Pants, union
label  MOO to 1140
We ssk for your patronage In our  Suit  snd   Ovarcost   Departments, when we give value everyllmo.
NOTICE
WILSON & RICHMOND
who handle all classes of Union Goods for Men, have acquired the
buiineu formerly carried on by BURTON BROS.. 37 HASTINGS
STREET W.. along with the handling of all the noted brands of
clothing, including the famous L System Clothes carried bjr that firm.
We ue offering at our Cordova Street itore special reductions on all
stock prior to our moving. STANFIELD UNDERWEAR STETSON HATS. CURRIES RAINCOATS, SWEATER COATS.
OIL CLOTHING, LINEMEN'S GLOVES, IJTS.. at prices
never equalled.   Come and bring the family..   .
MENTION THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST AMD WE WILL
GIVE YOU A BEAUTIFUL CALENDAR
Wilson & Richmond
3S CORDOVA ST. W.
37 HASTINGS ST. W.
United Undertakers
LIMITED
NOT MEMBERS OF THE UNDERTAKERS TRUST
225 12th Avenue, West
Telephones
Fairmont 738 and 1153
North Vsncouver, 427 Lonsdale Ave. Phone 640
Union Prices, NOT Trust Prices.
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR 8ALE
EVERYWHERE.
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
Thla ii a gift that will be appreciated in uy part of the world.
Tastefully bound in three binding!.   Cloth, (MO; Ooze Calf, SIN;
Burnt Leather, SS.7I.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32S HASTINGS STREET, WEST
STEADY EMPLOYMENT
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic Servants
THESE ARE THE ONLY CLASSES ADVISED BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
COME TO CANADA. ALL OTHERS ARE ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
AFTER THEMSELVES IN CASE OF FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
FARMING IN CANADA OFFERS TO SKILLED WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET AWAY FROM THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
AND ALSO TO ESCAPE IN A LARGE MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
IN CITIES.
IN THE VAST WHEAT FIELDS OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
OFFERED TO EVERY MAN, WHILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
BE ACQUIRED AT PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPI-
TAL AND PREFERS FARMING IN ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES.
IF YOU ^OULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS, WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED
LITERATURE TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT:
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 9, 19
Alexander Stewart
CANDIDATE FOR MAYOR
OF THE CITY OF
VICTORIA
MR. STEWART IS AN HONORARY
MEMBER OF THE STONE CUTTERS'
UNION, WAS AN ACTIVE MEMBER
FOR 23 YEARS. BELONGED TO THE
FIRST BRANCH ORGANIZED IN VICTORIA.
TO THE ELECTORS OF
THE CITY OF VICTORIA
HAVING BEEN REQUESTED BY A
NUMBER OF THE CITIZENS OF THE
CITY OF VICTORIA TO OFFER MYSELF AS A CANDIDATE FOR THE
POSITION OF ALDERMAN IN OUR
CITY COUNCIL, I HAVE CONSENTED
TO DO 80.
I HAVE BEEN A RESIDENT OF VICTORIA FOR SEVEN YEARS, AND
HAVE KEPT MYSELF THOROUGHLY
IN TOUCH WITH THE PUBLIC INTERESTS OF THE CITY.
FOR THE PAST FIVE YEARS I
HAVE REPRESENTED YOU ON YOUR
SCHOOL BOARD, AND HAVE FOR
THE PAST YEAR ALSO HAD THE
HONOR OF OCCUPYING THE POSITION OF PRESIDENT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA TRUSTEES ASSOCIATION.
THE CITIZENS OF VICTORIA
KNOW MY RECORD WHILE REPRESENTING THEM ON THESE IMPORTANT EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WHERE WE HAVE HAD MANY
IMPORTANT MATTERS TO DECIDE.
WHILE I REGRET LEAVING THE
SCHOOL BOARD, I FEEL THAT VICTORIA MUST HAVE A COUNCIL
COMPOSED OF BROAD MINDED, CAPABLE BUSINESS MEN.
I THEREFORE SOLICIT YOUR
VOTE AND INFLUENCE IN THIS
CAMPAIGN, AND PLEDGE MYSELF
IF ELECTED, TO SERVE THE CITY IN
EVERY DEPARTMENT TO THE BEST
OF MY ABILITY.
(Sgd.)   DAVID McINTOSH.
UTTERS TO tf
gHEflfcj;
OIT   ACOUAINTID   WITH   HIM
<*HOf
THE WESTERN COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magaclne,
breathing the spirit of our Great
West. Emanuel Julius and Chester M. Wrlfht, Editors, 11.00 a
Rear; single copies, 10 cents. 208
few High St.,  Los Angeles,  Cal.
The   Central   Hotel
H. Freeman, Manager
European Plan Telephone 705
Rates 10c psr day and upwards.
Cuisine unexcelled. A la carte
meals at all hours, Opp. B. C. M.
Railway Depot Columbia St,
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
Commissioner Price's Report.
Editor a. C. Federationist: In all
labor disputes that have arisen the
unfortunate as well as the fortunate
has appeared, no matter how forcible
and justifiable the circumstances
which have led to the step undertaken
and Irrespective ol the wisest measures of precaution observed before
such a decision was adopted. But lt
is an eaualiy remarkable fact that all
such disputes have always beeu of
sufficient significance to the business
concerns, and old party government
departments to be good reasons for
enquiry, and immediately steps have
been taken to obtain Information regarding the same. The method usually pursued is tbat of sending into
the trouble zone some representative
of the party in power who makes a
sw|tt journey from place to place
gathering piecemeal as best he may
information respecting the trouble. In
other cases commissions are instituted for this purpose. If the concern
of the parties to the enquiry was sincerely that of getting to know the
facts, and tor. the purpose of finding
a solution for the questions under dispute, then all such enquiries would
be of a more searching and Impartial
character. We have had no less
than three commissioners of labor
who have visited Vancouver island
during the present dispute to date,
and practically nothing has been accomplished. It seems they come to
gather certain data that might be
used to discourage the efforts of the
striker in his attempt to compel the
employer to a recognition of hiB Just
demands. If we take up the statement of Commissioner Price lt
simply consists of statements condemnatory to the stand of the men, and
is simply filled with complaint and
railing. It Is profuse with reasons
why the men should not have done
this or that, tt Ignores and belittles
the various grievances involved, lt
denies the validity of the cases of
discrimination against certain men by
the company, lt supports almost to the
last point the case of the employers,
it intimates that the employer has
just grounds for not conceding, or
being expected to concede, recognition
of a foreign union and it rehearses at
length objections ofv employers respecting the thought of foreign Interference and of the organization being a
socialistic Institution, lt drags in the
questions of loss to the province Industrially, interference with business,
it points out the alleged willingness
of the employer in a general way to
concede the right of organization to
the workers and specially hints at
bitterness of the employers to the
U. M. W. of A. Why these partial
and one-sided comments on the situation, if the object of the commissioner
was at all that of aiding in a settlement and how does lt come that the
employer should be so significantly
defended by such comments? There
is but one Inference that can be drawn
namely, that such work is not undertaken with a proper spirit and pur'
pose to deal fairly with both sides of
the issue, but is accomplished to give
all consideration to the vested rights
of private property as against those
who own none. It Is simply gambling with matters, and a sad mockery
both to the parties directly affected
and further still to the public at large.
Not only so, but such a coloring of
matters in the Interest of the employers is mischievously misleading to the
public mind. The demand for recognition of the workers' union which Is
the issue, at present, is both a sane
and just one, and all other matters
raised by the commissioner and put
Into his mouth largely by the employers are but side issues brought in to
excuse the employer for not being
willing to grant the real demand. If
our governments were ln earnest to
reach a settlement, they would find
lt both wise and Just to try some more
sane and practical method than that
adopted.
Why does not the government give
the employers so much time to arrange a settlement with the men? If
they still refuse, then take over the
mines and operate them in tbe Interest of the parties concerned. Of
course, this would be doing something
practical. The next th'.ng we desire
to speuk of Is the subject of Orientals
at present employed underground at
Cumberland. Mr. Price stated in hln
report a short time ago tbat there
were employed below ground ln Cumberland for the month of May, 191,1,
432 Orientals out of a total ot 690.
Since this time the chief inspector of
coal mines for British Columbia stated
In answer to a question inquiring how
many certificates hud been Issued to
Orientals underground ut Cumberland
from September 15, 1912, to July 11,
1913, nnd he replied Hint 35 certificates only had been Issued—27 Chinese nnd 8 .laps. Also tn the same
report he corroborated the statement
Hint 4112 Orientals wero working below
ground In tho month of Muy, 1913.
Then ho proceeded further nnd says
thai up to September of 1912, 315
Orientals worked below ground. This
gives an increase from this dato to
May, 191,1, of 117 Orientals. It would
thuB appear that 82 aro working below ground unaccounted for, that Ib
the number permitted to work without
certificates. Since this statement It
is stated that there are 402 Orientals
working below ground at Cumberland
tor tho month ot November, 1913,
and these figures show that for this
date there are Borne 52 unaccounted
for below ground, that Ib as not having certificates Of course, thla Is
not Baying that some plausible reason
cannot be found for the conflicting
figures given. Probably the real
quantity cannot and never will be
known to the public, because If auch
could be known the game would be
up. It Is essential to deceive the public In order to rule them, and keep
them In their abject condition. Any
circumstance calculated to assist the
toller to a better understanding of hla
practical relationship to the powers
that be, thereby fitting him to a better
protection of hla own lntereat, would
be suicidal to the party granting It,
and with such conceptions dominating these powers, how can the publlo
know the truths or how can Justice
or fair play prevail?
PBESS COMMITTEE
Local 2155.
Nanalmo, B, C, Jan. 8, 1914.
"Specials" Not Soldiers,
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Since
writing my letter of the 5th Inst, we
have made a full Investigation and
tt transpires that the men who accosted Mrs. Tllley were special police
•nd not soldiers. I simply gave the
statement as lt waa given to me, but
Mra. Tllley recognized the two constables and on the afternoon In question theBe two men were dreBsed In
long coats and peaked caps and to
Mrs. Tilley's inexperienced eye they
OF
Regarding the Release of
Striking Miners Now
in Prison
"He Had to Hold the Scales
Between Capital and
r Labor," He Said
The old adage that "wonders never
cease" was well exemplified on Tuesday evening, December 30th, at Victoria, B.C., when a meeting took
pjace between Sir Richard McBride
and representatives of the Miners
Liberation league. The objoct was
the liberation of the striking miners
who are now ln prison. The action
of the labor men surprised no one,
hut ln view of the severity that has
marked the attitude of (Attorney-general Bowser all through, a meeting
wtth the government was considered
nigh impossible. John L. Martin,
president of the Liberation league, introduced the deputation and tbe
speakers who sought the Intervention
of the government with the department of justice were Messrs. M.
Nagel, Watchman A. E. Wells, J. C.
Turner and John Day. Particular
stress was laid on the cases of the
men and boys from Ladysmlth who
are serving two years.
Holding the Scales.
In his reply the premier reviewed
the position of the labor situation iu
British Columbia and of the hazardous
nature of the miners' occupation. He
felt there were reasons which Justified their action in seeking to better
their condition. However, he had to
hold the scales between capital and
labor. The government, said Sir
Richard, could only intervene through
the application to the minister of justice, and any recommendations which
they desired to make would be forwarded to the department of justice.
Mr. Martin undertook the preparation
of a memorandum on the subject for*
transmission through the government
to Ottawa.
ADVERTISEMENT
looked like soldiers. In the course
of one Interview with' Mayor Harrison he stated that he fully realized
that he had a dirty job but was trying to make the best of it, and would
certainly not allow his men to insult
anyone. Hoping this will make matters clear, yours for fair play,
WALTER  HEAD.
Union Man in the Making,
The following self-explanatory letter haa been addressed to John McAllister, Cumberland, B. C, and the
amount forwarded to The Federation-
ist's "kiddies' fund:"
. . Enclosed you will find >2,
money that I have made for selling
United Mine Workers' Journals. I
wish to have it given to the little
children of the striking miners of
your district. It will help to get some
little things for them. I hope they
will have a happy Christmas snd a
bright and prosperous New Year. I
am a small boy, seven years old. We
had a strike here ih Nova Scotia three
years ago, so we know what a strike
means. I hope by next Christmas
those little brothers and sisters will
be free from strike-worries. I am
sincerely a little Mend of the striking children.-
"KENNETH J>.' MACLENNAN.
"Box 86, Olace Bay, N. S."
ELEOTION  RESULTS.
Over 11,000 Votes Polled In Vaster-
day'a Conteat—Thoae Elected.
Following are results of yesterday's
civic elections:
Mayor.
Mayor Baxter  6,494 votes
Ex-Mayor Taylor 4,666   "
Majority for Baxter.
.1,1
Aldermen
Ward One—Hepburn and Ramsay.
Ward Two—Crowe, Hamilton.
Ward Three—Kirkpatrlck^and Enrlght.
Ward Four—Evans and Hosklns.
Ward Five—Mahon and James.
Ward Six—Cottrell and White.
Ward Seven—Woodside and McBeath.
Ward Eight—Rogers and Trimble.
School Board—Clubb, McNaughton,
Seymour, Welsh.
Hark Board—Hutchlngs, Lees and
Stewart.
License Hoard—Patterson and Pyke.
Proposnl to have board of. control
adopted.
Central school Bite for new city
ball passed.
Three money by-laws Aggregating
$264,000 and one to ratify the agreement with the B. C. Electric ln regard
to Venables street agreed to.
STATUTORY HOLIDAY
Deputation of Retail Employees Walta
On Premier, Who Replies.
A delegation from the Retail Employees association watted on Sir
Richard McBride on Wednesday evening at Victoria for the purpose of laying before him the needs of membera of the organisation throughout
British Columbia. The general secretary presented a petition expressing a desire that a statutory holiday
should be granted to all retail employees. Charles Bruce ot Vancouver, In supporting this petition, described the favorable attitude taken
by the employers and the public in
the matter ln Vancouver. In reply
the premier said that so convinced
was he of the justice of their request
that lt had the eupport of public
opinion that were lt not a fact that
a labor commission was now engaged
in Investigating these conditions he
would seriously have considered the
advisability of bringing in a government bill embodying the provisions set
forth by the deputation.
"Fed." Klddlea' Fund (lossd.
Previously acknowledged .... 16,973.56
John Perry, Nanalmo         6.06
Collected by A. Meuller, Buds-
vllle, B. C      21.00
Grand total $7,000.66
The above fund has been closed and
cheques issued to Robert Foster, president of District 28, U. M. W, of A,
Br 8AM ATKINSON.
On Tuesday evening, January 13th,
there will be a high class concert and
impromptu dance in the Labor Temple
under the auspices of the Social
Democratic party. David Ward, the
celebrated baritone, has been engaged, and a number of well-known
local singers. The price of admission will be 25 cents.
On Thursday evening, January
16th, the regular weekly meeting of
the Social Democratic party will be
held. The public are cordially invited
to be present.
Watch this column next week for
an Important announcement.
Sunday, Jan. llth
MASS
MEETING
Colonial
Theatre
Cor. of Dunsmuir and
Granville
Streets
SPEAKERS
Sam Atkinson
AND
Rev. Dr. Fraser
ON
The Unemployed
Question
\
Organ Recital at 7:45
Special Music
AW. W. A. Gleason
CANDIDATE FOR VICTORIA
MAYORALTY
RESIDENT OF VICTORIA FOR 27
TEARS. BUSINESS-BUILDING CONTRACTOR.
BAS BEEN IN THE CITY COUNCIL
FOR FIVE TEARS; HAS SERVED ON
ALL COMMITTEES AND CHAIRMAN
OF EVERT IMPORTANT COMMITTEE
SAVE ONE.
AT PRESENT CHAIRMAN OF FINANCE COMMITTEE, WHICH, DURING
HIS ADMINISTRATION, HAS THE
FOLLOWING COMMENDABLE RECORD TO OFFER.
ON ASSUMING THE FINANCE
CHAIRMANSHIP, THERE WAS A DEFICIT OF $1,200,000 TO MEET. BANES
HAD REFUSED CREDIT ADVANCES.
AS A RESULT OF A POLICT ADOPTED AND PERSISTENTLT SEEN TO BE
ADHERED TO BT ALD. GLEASON
THE PRESENT SITUATION IS THAT
THE CITT'S OBLIGATIONS TO
BANKS HAVE BEEN MET. MOREOVER, THE CITT OF VANCOUVER
(THANES TO THE JUDICIOUS ADMINISTRATION OF THE FINANCE
COMMITTEE) HAS BEEN ABLE TO
RENEW THE CITT'S BONDS IN LONDON AT A RATE OF 5J/2%; ALSO
THROUGH ALD. GLEASON'S INSTRUMENTALITY ARRANGEMENTS
HAVE BEEN MADE WITH LOCAL
BANES TO ADVANCE MONET FOR
EMERGENCT PURPOSES DURING
THE NEXT 12 MONTHS.
MR. GLEASON FOR TEARS HAS
BEEN A LARGE EMPLOTER OF LABOR, AND VOUCHES FOR THE FACT
THAT HIS RELATIONS WITH UNITED LABOR HAVE ALWAYS BEEN
OF THE MOST CORDIAL, AND IN
CIVIC WORE HE HAS ALWATS
STRIVEN/ WITH APPARENT SUCCESS, TO PLACE LOCAL WORKMEN
ON WORE IN PREFERENCE TO OUTSIDERS.
H. J. SANDERS
For Alderman, Victoria, 1914
To the Electors of the City of Victoria:
I respectfully solicit your votes and influence for my election as Alderman for
the ensuing year. I have been a resident
of this city for seven years and have taken
a strong interest in civic affairs during that
time.
PLATFORM FOR 1914
CLEAN FINANCE
NO NEW EXPENDITURES UNTIL
WORE ALREADY UNDERTAEEN IS
FINISHED.
EMPLOYMENT OF DAY LABOR
WHENEVER POSSIBLE, ALWAYS
HAVING DUE REGARD TO COST.
COMPLETION OF THE SOOEE
WATER SYSTEM.
H. J. SANDERS,
Adelphi Building.
Interest the
Non-Union Man
Every loyal member of a labor organization
should try to induce fellow workers who are not now
members to join. ■' The dangers which seem to
threaten one union threaten-all, and are not confined
to the organized, nor to the unorganized. The members of the union may look to the union for protection and feel somewhat safer than those who are not
members. Still, if those who are not members have
their wages reduced, competition may bring wage
troubles upon those who are members. For this reason THE FEDERATIONIST believes it is to the
interest of every member that he shall induce the
largest possible number of non-union workers to
become members of the union.
':V •
ar-

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