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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 5, 1913

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THF/ BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
INDUSTRIAL UJ.^   iTRENGTH.
SIXTB^V A  No. 139.
JUHNIIH OF A.F.
OFL CONVENTION
AM
Not Beady to Launch Party
—Hon Than Besolu-
tions Needed
Agreement of HcNuIty Faction Electrical Workera
Practically Endowed
HARRY NBBLANDS
Seoretary  bf Vancouver  Typographical
Union, Seeks   Re-election   aa   School
Trustee of South Vancouver for 1814.
' By JAS. H. MoVBTY
Thi American federation ef
Labor oan never be reformed by
ottaoklng Itl officer!. Thiy and
thilr policial in thl reflection
: of the wlihn of a majority of the
delegitu elected by the mem-
bin of the component organize-
tlons, ind until the membership
of ami of the organizations exchange thilr delegates for mm
of mora progressive Ideas, no
radial ohingu In thl A. P of
L, in to bi expected.
Whether In accord or not, one cannot but admire tbe ability of many of
the delegate!—men who have led
their organUationa for many yeara
through muy a hard struggle, appar-
atly to tbe satisfaction ot tbelr respective memberships, for they are
still tn ofllce. The movement sends its
best men and many of them, from a
managerial standpoint, are all that
oonld be desired,
The convention goes along with the
precision of a well-regulated machine.
Minor questions are settled by committees, while, matters of. larger. import—such a jurisdictional disputes
—are decided on the moit material
basis, organisations lining up on one'
, side or the other in return for some
assistance they. themielvei have or
hope to receive In similar disputed.
Queitlone of policy, where progression Ib urged, are settled, to a very
Urge extent, after the delegate! ot
one religious filth consult their splrl-
tuil adviser, who Is a fraternal delegate from a religious organisation,
and li continually on the convention
floor. Juat how wide and far-reaching la thla pernicious Influence will
be Understood only by seeing It In
operation. Bishop Carroll, one of the
fraternal delegatee, ln warning the
delegates agalmt "favoring any theory of eeonomlea, no matter what It
might be, that would run counter, tbat
would be useless to Labor Itself, that
would be harmful to lu best Interests,
ud st the ame time muit Incur the
•Baity of the Church," aid that he
would very much regret If the Church
had to follow In America the German
plan of organising Catholic unlona.
And for thla threat he wu not even
hissed.
Among the questions of local Interest wu the adoption of a resolution
ordering the International Brlcklayen to rescind an agreement wherein
they agree tb set marble, or be expelled from tbe state federations ad
central councils.
Official notice wu also taken of the
Pacific coast Immigration problem!,
both preient and prospective, ud the
Executive Council will make an effort to get accurate Information to
Europeans intending to emigrate.
By far the most Interesting question to Pacific cout unlonlit! wai the
practical endorsatlon by the convention of a agreement made by the
HcNulty faction of the Electrical
Worken wtth the Pacific Oai and
Blectric Co. wherein he agreed to
apply men to take the place of Reld
electrical workera on atrlke, the
agreement providing for 86 centi per
day leu wagea than the strikers went
out for and permitted the company
"at Its pleasure" to retain the plug-
uglies ud gunmen It had secured before HoNulty's vice-president arrived
on the acene. In thla itrlke with the
Reldltei were the machinists, lire-
men, gu worken and boilermakers,
and the Pacific ooaat delegatea were
a unit ln supporting resolutions looking for the censure of McNulty and
those associated with him ln breaking the etrlke, not only of the electrical workera, but ot the other organisations who are In the A. F. of L.
On a roll-call vote the resolutions
went down to defeat aiid it will be
worth the time of any local officer
to ucertaln how the delegates of
their organisation voted on the question.
Two organisations, the Brotherhood
of Carpenten and the Structural Iron
Workeri, went io far ai to write their
loul unlona threatening that tbelr
charters would he revoked If tbey
granted uy flnanclal assistance to
the striken.
1914
Election To Be Held On
Wednesday, December 17,
at Labor Temple
H. Hamlin, member ot the 'longshoremen'! union, li ln the general
hoipltal, hli Illness being kidney
trouble. He li expeoted to be around
again shortly.
At the request of the builders exchange the ichool board (Victoria,
B.C.) decided to change the words
"union wages" to "standard wages" in
all contracts entered Into for ichool
building!.—Libor Oasette for November,
Series of Lectures on Tech
nical Matters Appertaining to Trade
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND ll 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
VANCOUVER, B. 0., FEE&Af, DECEMBER 5,1913. EIGHT PAGES
: ■     , . ....'     ■'IiV'     ■   ■   ■'' iV''.'.     V        •"'.'., ' =
POLITICAL UN1TT. VICTORY!
(___-**) 11.60 PER IEAB
UNEMPLOYED
I
Thousands of Men Out of
Work in This Olty
and Province
Eighteen Thousand Idle At
Winnipeg—Mass Meeting of Out-of-Works
Preildent A, E. Robb preiided over
a large attendance at the regular
monthly meeting of Typographical
Union No. 186, held on Sunday,
November 80th, in Labor Temple. Secretary Neelanda wu abient at Victoria, owing to the demlie of hii
wlfe'i mother, ud Vlce-Preildmt Alt.
England acted aa aeeretary pro tem.
Amongst the principal Items ot buiineu transacted were the annual nom-
inatlone of offlcen for 1814. Voting
for candidates will take place on Wedneaday, December 17th, next, between
the houra ot 9 a. m. ud 7 p. m. In the
secretary's ofllce, Labor Temple. Following are tbe nominations: For pre-
ildent, R. P. Pettlplece. and Alt. England; vice-president, W. C. Metsger,
L. E. Dennlson and W. R. Trotter; secretary-treasurer, Harry NeeludS (acclamation); executive oommlttee, R,
Fleming, E. Ktrkpatrlck, F. Roy Fleming, J. B. Wilton, W. 0. Thomson, H.
Mounstephen, Robt 0. Manhall, W.
R. Trotter, H. 0. Barber, H. L. Corey,
W. .Lalng (Ave to be elected); truiteei, H. C. Benson, W, R. Trotter ud
0. Wllby declamation); sergeant-at-
arms, H. Connell and C. H. Proike;
delegates to trades ud labor council,
R. P. Pettipiece, W. R. Trotter, L, E.
Dennlson, Oeo. Bartley, Chas. Orassle
and Alt. England (acclamation); delegate! to allied printing tradea council,
Harry Neelands, Roy Fleming, L, E.
Dennlson and 3. Rankin (three to be
elected); sick committee, B. J. Trum-
per, W. C. Jones, J. R. Melsom, P.
Ttmms, E. B. Zschan (acclamation).
Chairman Oeo, Bartley reported that
arrangements were being made to hold
* aeriea of lectures on technical mat-
ten appertaining to the trade to apprentices ud Journeymen. The opening one will be delivered by F. J.
Freslie, of Chicago, III., ln the very
near futilre.
An Invitation was extended by Organiser Sam (Atkinson to the memben
to attend a convention ot thoae Inter
eited In the. forthcoming municipal
campaign, which will be held at Labor
Temple on Wednesday, December 17th,
at 8 p.m. Admission will be by current month's working card.
W, R, Trotter and Geo. Bartley were
appointed delegates to the Mlnen'
Liberation League.
Surplus of Out-of-Worke
J. D. MoNlven, fair wages officer ot
tbe dominion department of labor,
with headquarters at Vucouver, Is
In the elty today on a regular tour
of Inspection of labor conditions
through the western provinces on
which he has been engaged for some
time, being now working back toward
Vancouver. To a Newe representative
Mr. MoNlven itated that there could
be no question that there Ib at present a surplus of unemployment all
over the country, or, In other worda,
tbat the percentage of unemployment
thli year li considerably greater than
In previoui yeara.—Medicine Hat
Newa, •
A fortnight ago The Federationlit
printed a lengthy atatement of fata
regarding the dullness of the libor
market -In B. C, pointing out that
there were thousands .of Idle men
wanting employment ln thla olty and
province, which condition of affairs
still obtains, and If anything this
grut army of unemployed seems to
be on the Increase rather thu the
decrease. At Monday night's meeting
ot the olty counoll Aid. Crowe stated
that there were 478 names on the roll
for relief work st preeent The charl-
table Inititutlon! have all they can
do distributing supplies to needy
famUlee. ,;" ;
It may be Itated that similar condition sre prevailing all through
weitern'Canada. '
At Winnipeg it, is reported that
18,000 main are out of work. A large
mua mating of the unemployed held
lut wak puied the following resolution:
"We, the unemployed cltlieni of the
olty ot Winnipeg ln muting duly as-
rambled do uk the mayor, aldermen
and controller to use their influence
to relieve the serious situation which
confront! the city by open relief
work or ln any other way they may
oonalder lit. We do not uk for charity—we uk ud demand work."
And Pretest Against B. 0.
, (^vermnent Eahroading
Union OflWals to Jail
Collection W» Forwarded
to the Seoretary of the
Strike,fund   -
Thomas J. Williams, new president
of the building trades department of
the A. F. of L., wu In Vancouver on
Monday. He Is member of the Tile
Layera' union, and returned to his
headquarters at Washington, D. C,
Aid. Ramuy wants to have another
consideration of the question of civic
employees drinking during business
houn. He states that the resolution
ot the olty council Is not being enforced ln this regard. Very likely the
matter will come before the council
at its next meeting.
SOCIAL DEMOCRATIC MUNICIPAL CAMPAIGN.
M $S ".° ■aterested and can agree to the following conditions,
are cordially Invited to attend  a  Convention. which  Ib  called on
Wednesday evening, December 17th, at 8 p. m., In Room 401 Labor
Temple, Vancouver.
Pinoni entitled to participate ln the Convention shall be:
(a) Memben of the various Locals of the Social Democratic
Party In Vancouver Dlstriot;
(b) Memben of Tradei or Industrial Unions, disclaiming political
affiliation with any other parties ud recognising the necessity for an Independent working class party: the object of
whloh shall be to make possible a Political and Induitrlal
Democracy, In which the land, mines, factories, railroads, etc.,
(the social toolB of wealth production) shall be owned by the
; community and operated for the common good.
Admlsilon to the convention will be granted to any penon show-
ing a Unloa Card or card of membership In the Social Democratic
P,^t,,• SAM ATKINSON,
(Ad»o,  Organiser.
Garment Workers
The garment workers of Vancouver
at their last regular meeting decided
to affiliate with the B. C. Federation
of Labor. A committee wai elated to
visit the unions regarding their union
label, aa opposed to tbat of the Pacific garment workera, C. F. Burkhart of the barben, was present and
addressed the meeting on organization affairs. lAlso Miss H. R. Outtrldge spoke on the question ot votes
for women. Secretary Mrs. E. Jar
dine reported tbat organisation attain were prosperous. Preildent
Mrs. MaoRae presided.
No "Labor" Party
There la no llkllhood that a labor
party will be formed by the A. F. of
U, and certainly not without the cooperation of the socialist party, An
examination of the report submitted
by the committee on resolutions on
this subject at the Seattle convention
will reveal the fact that the proposition wai killed by kindness— that
Is, the Ida was diplomatically praised
ud then Indefinitely postponed until
such time u the labor organisation!
are strong enough to embark on the
troublous ia of Independent political action. It would require aomethlng more thu the passing of a. resolution to start a new political party,
u the workera of Europe can teatlfy.
—Max Hayea,
The bartender! held a social union
after dlipoelng of business at their
regular meeting on Sunday. J.
Campbell, 3. Imlaoh, F. Lavlgne, H.
Davis ud F. J. W. Dove were contributors to the programme. President Laurie made an efficient chair
mu,
Alex, McSorley, International president of the lathers' union, wu here on
Monday on bis way eastward.
' EDMONTON, Alta., Deo. 4.-iAt a
recent meeting of tie trades and labor
counoll It was decided to hold a mus
muting in conjunction with the looal
branch of the I. Wl W. and the local
branch of the «. P.; of C. The mating wa arranged by a committee appointed by the central labor body and
committees of tbe other organisations.
It was held in the Lyceum theatre,
when the following speakers addreu-
ed a large and enthualaatlc audience:
A, Farmllo, seoretary Edmonton
trades and. labor council; W. Webster,
I. W. W„ ud J. R. Knight, S. P. of 0:
Preaident Geary presided, ; The aum
of Its, collection, lares forwarded to
the secretary of the deteue fund.
Following nutation wu unuimouily
endoread: ; n
"Whereas—Tbe mlnen of Dlstriot
No. 88, ot the United Mine Workers
of America on Vancouver iiland, have
heen struggling for more than twelve
months to establish their right to or
ganlie; and 't
"Whereas—The mlnen have been
subjected to every form of persecution
ud oppression; and yet today In
spite of tbe uie of mllltla agalnat the
minera by the government of Britlah
Columbia, more determined thu ever
to continue their itruggle; therefore
belt'   !
"Resolved—Tbat this mus muting
express lta admiration and endorsatlon of the efforts that are being made
by the United Mnle Workers to establish a white man's itondard of living;
and be lt further
"Reiolved—That we protest agalnit
the action of the Britlah Columbia government who have Sought to coerce
striking minera by Introducing the
mllltla and railroading unton official!
to Jail, and further we demand that an
inquiry be immediately Instituted by
the dominion government, ud pending Its decision that all miners awaiting trial be given their freedom, and
further that a copy ot this resolution
be forwarded to the minister at
Ottawa and to the labor presa
Cauda."
Bowser Rebuked
Mr. Harold Robinson of Victoria,
instructed by ihe attorney-general to
resist the appeal, Joined with Mr.
Woodworth in asking their lordships
to hear the case at an early date.
"The attorney-general full that lt
Is In the Interests of the admlnlitratlon of Justice that all appala In
criminal cases should be given sh
early hearing," said Mr, Robinson,
Chief Justice Macdonald Intimated
to Mr. Robinson that the Court of Appeal were themselveB fully concerned
with the administration of Justice and
required no special urging on those
ground!. Mr. Justice Martin, who followed, uld tbat the Court of Appeal
did not require the prompting ot anyone to make lt attend to the admlnlitratlon of Juitlce.
"I quite concur with what hu been
aald," added Mr. Justice Irving, and
the matter waa dropped.
Tbe members of the Brotherhood of
Carpenters are pleased to aee Sam
Kernighan again ln their mldat He
haa not been around lately owing to
the Illness and death of hla wife.
ADAM TAYLOR
Preaident Pioneer Division No. 101. A.
A, of 8. and SI. R. a.'of A., ona of the
laneat unions In Vancouver, afflliated
aad closely IdentlSed with every labor
«*ulsaUon maklni for profrese.
'■ V*     *     '''■ '   '* '
THE WAITERS'UNION
INCREASING IN
Meeting 'of Local Ko. 2
Transacts Some Improt-
ant Business
/'
Nominations of Officers for
1914—Elections Last
Week in December
The, Wilton held their regular
mating on Tueaday evening in Labor
Temple. Pruldent Chu. Davie preiided ova a good attendance of member!. The chief employen more
fully reallie that union men are the
only reliable and capable walten employed in the elty. Business Agent
W. B. Walker states that bis organization la lneraulng rapidly in num.
ben, and that ere eprlng time arrives
there will be at leut 90 per cent, of
the walten In Vancouver In the
union: The general public are, too,
beginning to reallie the necessity of
employing union memben. Hardly a
day passes but Mr. Walker receive! a
telephone all for mra to serve at
banqueta, which la another healthy
Sign of the growing popularity and
strength of the Bociety. Mut of tbe
boyi are working,
Frank Steel ud Ernest Howard
were elected delegatea to the labor
representation committee,
The election of officers for 1914 will
take place during the lut wuk of
December. Following are nominated:
For pruldent—Chu. Davis, Frank
Steel; vice-president—L. B. Foil,
Howard, M, Brown; recording aeeretary—C. Huiell, M, Brown, Frank
Steel; chaplain—D. Corry, A. A. McKay; treuurer—Chu. Davis, W.
Lines; inside guard—D. Corry, R,
Murray; Inspector—R. Murray, D.
Corry; flnanclal aeeretary ud business agent—W. E. Walker; delegate
to T. and L. Council—Frank Steel,
P. H, Scullln, general aeoretary of
the Canadian Industrial Peace aiioclatlon, was In Toronto thla wuk, and
delivered an addreu to about a score
of clergymen. The Lance waa not
present, nut from the reports published in the daily papera we incline
to the opinion that Mr. Scullln la In
the employ of the manufacturers' association.—Toronto Lance.
AT ROYAL nr
HUB12
The First Shot To Be Find
at T. and L, 0. Concert
and Social
The Funeral of Late Mrs.
Dodd Largely Attended by Ottbens
To Speak at B% Protett
Hue Meeting Monday
Night
In Bona Skew Bnflding—
Other Speaker! Will
!   BePitietii
ANDCI1YMEMBERS
Workers of the World
ARE OFFICIALLY ADVISED BY THE OFFICERS OF DISTRICT 28, U. M. W. OF A., WITH HEADQUARTERS AT
NANAIMO, THAT THE
STRIKE ON VANCOUVER
ISLAND IS STILL IN FULL
FORCE AND EFFECT
AND IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO SCAB, KEEP AWAY
FROM CUMBERLAND, LADYSMITH, SOINTULA, SOUTH
WELLINGTON AND NANAIMO. WHEN THE STRIKE IS
OVER, OFFICIAL NOTIFICATION WILL BE SENT OUT
THROUGH THE LABOR PRESS. THIS NOTIFICATION
IS MADE NECESSARY BY FALSE REPORTS, SPREAD IN
THE OLD COUNTRY PRESS, THAT THE STRIKE HAS
BEEN SETTLED IN FAVOR OF THE MEN, THUS
CAUSING MANY VICTIMS TO COME TO VANCOUVER
ISLAND UNDER GROSS MISREPRESENTATION. UNION
MEN AND THEIR FRIENDS WILL KEEP AWAY FROM
VANCOUVER ISLAND UNTIL THE STRIKE IS SETTLED.
NBW WESTMINISTER, B.C., Dee. 4.
- The municipal campaign at pre*
lent le the uppermost matter of Importance in the mlnde of the elector!
—especially so In labor circles. The
laborltei will open- the campaign on
Friday, December llth, at • Labor
Temple, when a concert ud aoeial
will be held under the auspices of the
T. and L, Council, The programme
will comyrlae vocal ud instrumental
muslo, recitations, eto:, abort speeches will be mads: by the aldermanlc
candidate!—Meure. W. 8. Cameron,
A. Hogg. T. A. Barnard. It is to be
tegretted that Aid. Dodd will be un-
sbls to take part owing to hie recent
Sad bereavemnt.
The campaign committee li already
active, the chairman being R. A.
Stoney ud the eecretary R. Fell.
Meetinga will be held Is different
parts of the dlitrlet, ud the voten
will be circularised,
The proposed re-submission of the
gu by-law will be one of the IM
iuuu. A former, bylaw wu carried
authorising tbe city counoll to Install
a gu plsnt not to exeeed 1225,000.
Since Its pauage another one for
1150,000 to buy the pruent privately-
owned concern wu debated, lacking
35 votol ot ths necuiary three-fifths
majority. A petition to again submit the latter bylaw to the electorate
at the approaching election hu been'
largely signed, ud It Ii quite possible
thit the 1150,000 money, bylaw will
again be submitted.
The Progreulve Aiioclatlon held a
largely-attended muting the other
night when Mayor Oray spoke strongly tn favor of tha proposition to pur
dhue tbe present gu plant.
Preildent Cameron, of the T. and L.
Counoll, a candidate, favore -the buying of the gu plut for $150,000, ud
holds tbat It la a good business proposition
About 50 per unt a the workeri
In the elty are Idle.
Regarding the municipal employment bureu, Hla Wonhlp Mayor
Oray apeaki of the Inititutlon In
termi of highest prstoe.  It may be
Sided thst-tne ixta* it Heluoi*
on In the T. Ud L. Council wu
Pruldent Cameron. Tha contracton
generally take kindly to the civic
labor bureau. It will certainly be a
big aucceai, providing employen of
labor cooperate to make It io.
The funeral of Mn. Dodd, who
passed away on the 26th Instant, wu
held on Saturday lut at i p.m. The
Impressive services were conducted
by Rev. Mr. Petrle in St Aldu's
Presbyterian church, tha edifice being
crowded though the weather wu
most Inclement The pall-bearers
were: Hla Wonhlp Mayor Oray, Aid.
KelUsgton, R, A. Stoney, W. 8. Cameron, R, Drysdale ud 0. Geeson. The
Interment took place In Fraaer Cemetery. The deceased lady wu very
popular with all who knew hpr, as the
massive and large number of floral
tributes testified. Among the public
bodlu undlng tokens of respect we're
the City Council, .radea and Labor
Council, Labor Temple! Company
Limited, Daugnten of England, Street
Rallwaymen'! unton, staff of tbe
Board of Works, besides from numerous friends and acquaintances. Blood
poisoning, resulting from an operation, was the immediate cause of
Mrs. Dodd's demise, who leaves to
mourn her loss her husband and three
smalt children, two boys and a girl.
A committee of the T. ud L. Counoll, comprising Messrs. Cameron,
Orant and Maiden, recently appointed
to Investigate the food supplied to
the Imprisoned Nanalmo mlnen will
report at the next meeting.
Married Forty Yura
A very interesting event In the history of one of Vancouver's most respected pioneer families took place
on Tuesday evening when Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Oeorge, Haseldean, West
Burnaby, celebrated their ruby wedding. A large gathering of the family
and friends were entertained to dinner and with music and dancing
afterwards. The host and hostess
were the recipients ot many beautiful and valuable gifts, Principal
amongst these were a magnificent
ruby ring tor Mra. Oeorge and a gold
watch for Mr. Oeorge presented by
the family. Mr. ud Mrs. Oeorge
were married In Scotland forty yeara
ago, coming to Canada soon afterwards, where nearly the whole of
their married life has been spent.
Mr, Oeorge was an old member of the
Tradei and Labor Council, being a
former president.
The a. C Minns' Liberation
Lugui will held mother gigantic
nl|y. Heretofore ivelleble hails
hive not bun lirge enough-for Hi
audience* ind u thie time She
proposed ihaee protest masting
will be held In the Homo Chow
building, u thst everyone inter.
eated may have Sn opportunity ef
hearing the Spukire. The Pre«4er,
Sir Richard McBride, ind the sitting numbers fer Vanoouver have
been Invited to be preunt ind
The public le cordliUy invited to bs
preeent sts maw protest meeting
which will be held in too Hone Show
building on Monday evening, December 8th, at I o'clock. The chair win
be taken aharp on time by V. MMgtef.
Tbe following representative weaken
have bun Invited to make addreeses.
They are all well-known to the worn
ud othen' snd need no Introduction'
to a Vancouver audience: J, W. Witt-
fnaon, _ T,;K|ngsley. B.deaden, J,
Kavanagh.- J. Place, MJJ.P,. Parker
WiUlans, M.P.P, G. Pettigrew, Baa
AtHaioa.
The following lis copy of the Invitation unt to tbe Premier, the attorney-general ud the local representative! in the legislature:
"Ofltee Secretary-Treuurer,
"74 Hutlngi itreet west,
"Vsncouver,B. C„ Nov. is, ltlt.
"To the Right Honorable Sir Richard
McBride, Mlnliter. of Mlnu, B. 0.,
"To the Right Honorable W. Bowier,
Attorney-General, B. o„
'To Dr. O. A. McGuire, Member of
Parliament,
"To Mr. Charlu B. Tledall, Member ot
Parliament,
"To Mr. A. H. B. MacQowan, Member
ot Parliament,
'To Mr. H. H. Watson, Member of
vv"*P^M>sve »s* (attracted bjr
the B. C. Mlnen Liberation League
to invite you to be present and speak
at a Mass Muting, to be held on Monday, December 8th, at 8 p.m., In the
Hone Show building, Vucouver, B.C.
The purpose of this muting la to put
before the cltlieni of Vucouver the
bete pertaining to the action which
hu bun taken by the Britlah Columbia Government In relation to the
striking mlnen ot Vucouver Iiland.
Ai memben of tha Provincial Legle-
latere, we aak you to give to thli public muting tbe reasons for tbe action
taken, and why you oonalder the continuance of auch action necessary.
The many thouundi of memben of
thli organisation would be pleaaed to
bur your lide of the caie, ud we
can assure you a respectful and attentive hearing, Awaiting an early reply,
respectfully youn,
"H. J. McEWEN,
"Secretary-Treuurer.
"B. C. Minera Liberation League.
'Attested:   R. Gosden,
"Executive Chairmen."
To-day the Trades and Labor Coun
oil enters Its 26th year, having been
Instituted on December 5, 1889.
"Yes, we break the seventh com.
mandment once a week," replied a
waiter to a prominent clergyman the
other day,
J, W. Stebblngs, foreman ot the
Linguistic Press, printers, Is all
smites these days. It's a new boy
who arrived on Monday.
The municipal council of Burnaby
has notified many of Its road employees that their service! will not be
required after January 1st.
The 'longshoremen are atlll open for
a game of loccer football with any
unton team In the city. Alio the
chess olub li prepared to arrange a
match.
John Sully, business agent for tbe
civic employees, paid a flying visit to
Portland, Ore., on Saturday, where he
met his brother whom he hid not leen
during the put 15 years. He will take
up bis residence In Vancouver shortly.
ENTICED TO VANCOUVER
Sydney Buxton, M. P, Expoeu Cue
of Durhem Minora
Thoi. Rlehardion, labor M.P., who
recently addressed a mass muting
ln the Labor Temple In thla city, recently received the following letter
from Sydney Buxton, pruldent of the
board of trade, dealing with the enticement of miners to Vancouver, en
route to Nanalmo, by false representation—admitting that the case would
come within the act If sufficient evidence were available:
"Dear Mr. Richardson: In August
you called my attention to the cue of
some Durham mlnen who had left
their employment In this country for
work In the mines at Vancouver on
the strength of a atatement that there
was no dispute tbere, and I promised
that enquiries should be made with a
view to seeing whether there wu sufficient evidence to enable proceedings
to be taken against uy penon In
connection with the case. Very full
and careful Inquiries have now been
made In the district on behalf of the
board of trade, and lt appurs clear
that these Durham miners were Induced by false representations to
emigrate to Vancouver, and the cue
would therefore come within the act
If sufficient evidence were available
for proceedings. Tbere were apparently four person! engaged ln securing these miners, but only one of
these was In this country at the time
the Inquiries were being made, ud he
left the country before the evidence
wae complete. The evldenve available
when hp, leit waa not sufflclent to obtain a conviction on a criminal charge
ud It would therefore have served
no useful purpoie to detain ud prosecute him. I regret that It haa not
been possible to bring this cue Into
court and secure tbe punishment of
the guilty parties, but I think the attention which has been called to the
case, and the tact that enquiries with
a view to prosecution have bun made,
may do some good.—Tour very truly,
"SYDNEY BUXTON.
"Board of Trade, Whitehall Garden!, g. W."
Every wage-worker ln Vancouver
should attend the big mua protest
meeting it the Hone Show building
next Monday evening. PAGE TWO
THE BRJTISH COLUMBIA FEPERATION^T.
FRIDAY.
...DECEMBER (, ltll.
Westminster Trust, Limited
satoon-Md, SMlWlU,,^"• *"** 9mmu*
We have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payment! col-
luted and forwarded of inveated. We act as agents only for the
purchau ud uie ot real estate.
Deposlta accepted and lntereat at t% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Ofllce:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C.
J. t. lonse, vaaatlaf Director
t. A. ■enmlii Secretary Tieasaiw.
Get the Habit
foveYwEferTrMUs?   No?   Well, lie
' yob will hts nonejr
have become trjita, the trusts Me
gow owned by a few financiers; the
next Stop* will meu the taking over
of the trusts by the nation, bo that
ail Industry will be under the direct
control of the people, and tbat will
mean an Industrial republic
There can be no Justice until tbls
taku place, Labor produces all
wealth. Laat year there were 8,566
men employed In Cobalt mines. The
wages paid thue men amounted to
12,638,617. That does not repreient
the wealth produced by them. They
ought to have all tbey produced.'
People who never went near Cobalt,
who never spent an hour In the work
of the mlnea received from theie
anune mlnu ln dividend! 18,788,868.
If you will consider padded expense
account!, directors' feu, dinners,
special can, ud ao forth, you will
flnd that the mlnen, without whom
there would be no Cobalt, received
juat about one-flfth of the wealth
which their labor produced,
Our politicians are mailing oondi-
tlons worse, They are the servant!
of the capltaliat clui. The tact that
there are 50,000,000 loclalliti In the
varloua countries of the world denote! that there to a mighty movement toward! thi emancipation of the
worken, ud Karl Marx, the father of
ulentifle loclillim, uttered no greet-
er truth than thia, "One movement to
worth ten programme!."  The remedy
Crockery, Chins, Olssswsre, Toys and Dolls, Stationery,
Graphophonei snd Records, Fsncy Goods.
646 COLUMBIA STREET
J. P. GALVIN
High Clsss Ladies' and Gentlemen's Tailor
U SIXTH STRSET
THE FAIR
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
waamw^amrmmw ^W *m*a~ema~ am aaStammtaaa. aataat
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
LIBERAL CASH DISCOUNT
""-HEATING STOVES
FROM
M.  J.  KNIGHT  COMPANY,  LIMITED
NSWWE3TMW3Tai,S.C
Hand Sewn ghosa Made to Meuure
^W*0»<sinteid
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
McMillan * patehson
NBW WESTMINSTER, B. a
epywHa Wee^laelu Tiart Stteaa.    - •
Low Fares to the Old Country
Ate You Going to Spend
CHRISTMAS
With the Old Folks at Home?
He Northern Pacific Railway
Vhe %nite of the Famous Great $lg!Bd*& VotaU
On 010. 7, will run a PERSONALLY CONDUCTED Pullman Tourist Sleeping Csr, 16 Sections, Electric-lighted, trom
Vancouver, B. C, direct to PORTLAND, Maine, the nearest
winter port for Canadians, connecting with the White Star
Line Stesmship "TS0TONIO," sailing December 13, tending
the passengers at the Steamer Dock, thus ssving Hotel and
other incidental expenses.
slu«siswHfc4sWlutoStoSt-MMai^,'0lrs^"frs«
New York, Dece»berl3tk
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY AND GET FIRST CHOICE
H. SWWFORD
C.E.LANG
CITY PASSENGER
AGENT
Vaneouvar, B. C.
207 Hastings St W„ Corner Cambie and Hastings
S.S. "Marine Express No. 1"
HOWE SOUND ROUTE
Lmvm Betloaal aasteaotig Oo.'e Wkuf, feci ef llama St, Ooal
ALD.  WALTER   DODD
! A Member of New Westminster Division
'   ot    the    Street   Hallway   Employees'
Union, who will aaain leek re-election
u Alderman ot the Royal Cltv next
month,
Isaac Portrey and M. Lynam, Ladysmlth, at present spending most of
their time in New Weitmlmter In
connection with the auini, were Fed.
ealleri yuterday. Naturally enough
they are well pleued with the remit!
so far, and are anxiously awaiting
their own turn to reenter u "prlaon-
ers at the bar."
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still oft at the
1 Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollsr, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to ally
away until the itrike Is Settled
Order Ys* Misers' Usics
Getting on in the Wend
depends mostly in specialized
ability
ARE YOU A SPECIALIST?
K not lake up our ipeciil course
oi buaineas inalruclion
Modem Business School I
SIS Cela.AU St.        He* WastsdHar ||
> SO BOW-
wt aas aarmtMm tatam
____ ——tiaa ttnsoars,
easjusmss, gaa ami rtm*
us InteiawSlMi iten.
uuraie tabooutbb
Week Diyi  8:00 a.m.
Sundaya 11:00 a.m.
usmss tabooutbb
Week Daya .......... :. 6:00 p.m,
-~        Sundaya „ 6:80 p.m.
Sundaya   * 10:00 a.m.
N.B.—This boat open (or eharter for Evening Trlpi.
Phones: Sey. 6332   ::    Fair. 2199   ::   Bay. 602L
O. J. Rognon F. P. Stevens
Phone Sey. 7171
Canadian Photo Co.
COMMSRCIAL
PHOTOORAPHBRS
Photos Tiken Anywhere, Anytime
111-816 CROWN BUILDINO
Stl Pendar Street West
Atlantic Steamship Agency
0. P. B. Olty Ticket Offlce, 434 Hastings St. W.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
CUNARD LINE
ALLAN LINE
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD
WHIT* STAB
HAMBURG-AMERICAN
DONALDSON LINE
AND ALL OTHER LINES
J, MOB, OEO. B. OOOMBE,
City Passenger Agent City Tickst Agent
Phons, Ssymonr 1710
Is Yonr Furniture Showing
Signs of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evening! to come. A comfortable
rocker, an euy oouoh, a book-
caae or rug, can make a lot of
difference to one'i comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture la ulected to
withstand the round ot season
after season, and many ot
them. Come in and au the
new arrivals-'they will bring
many hours' comfort to aome
lucky persona.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
tl HASTINGS STREET WEST
A World Bartow of MellUsa—Br ths
best writers ln Europe snd America
will bo Jound tn THB NBW BBVIBW
whieh deals In sn authoritative war
with all phases et loelallim—net fer
saltation, but edueatloo. Publlihed
monthly. 11.00 per rear; Canadian subscriptions M.SO. lendlOe for a sample
copy. NBW BBVIBW, 110 Kessea
street. New Te* City.
On Sunday, December 7th, Oeorge
. Winkler of Victoria and Harry
Mettle of Nanaimo, will be the speak-
era at the meeting In the Dominion
theatre, Oranvllle atreet Harry
Mettle hai Just come out of jail and
will have an interesting atory to toll
about the treatment of the prisoners.
On Thuriday, December llth, the
ladles of the Social Democratic party
are having an informal dance and
whist drive in the Labor Temple. TUe
dancing will commence at 8.30, We
tnat oar friends will make thla aa
great a success aa the lait
On Wednesday, December 16th, the
convention Of the Social Democrats
municipal campaign will be held ln
the large hall of the Labor Temple,
Admission will be by card of membenhlp In the S. D. P., or a union
oard. If you are not prepared to dli-
olalm allegiance to any other political
party, don't come.
It la rather amusing to lind socialists who apologise for their actions.
Tactics muit be very questionable
when they require to be explained
away. Socialism is an economic queitlon, but lt li alio much more. It ll
Indeed the philosophy of life. If yon
would win and not repel yon muit
deal with It from every angle.
OANADA AND SOCIALISM
When I came to Canada a few
weeks ego people aald my visit would
be a waate of time. Canadians are
under the Impression that they have
tee beat country in the world and
they do not need socialism. In 18(5
Abraham Lincoln made the following
statement: "I aee io the near future a
crisis approaching that unnerves me,
and causes me te tremble for the
safety of my country. Aa a result of
war, corporations have been enthroned, and an era of corruption ln high
places will follow, and the money
power of the country will endeavor to
prolong lte reign by working upon
the prejudices of thi people, until all
the wealth le aggregated in a few
hands, and the republic la destroyed."
That prediction, made leu than fifty
yeara ago, ia how being fulfilled In the
States, and that prediction may be
used In Canada today. We find here
there la still a chance for the man
with a little money to get ahead. We
bear a great deal about the prosperity of this country, but even under
preient condition! thli. country la
only good for the man with money. It
la as-poor aa any country on the face
of the earth for the poor man, The
wealth of Canada Is even now under
the control ot about twenty-three
men. There la aa muoh corrupt government here aa anywhere. In
Ontario, for example, there li a law
tor the rich and another for the poor.
Is the mlnei In Porcupine we find.a
condition that beggars description,
and actually Worse than conditions in
Siberia. Four foreigners were In the
Central prlion, Toronto, for unlawful
aaiembly. I lubmttted evidence to
the attorney general wblch proved
they were Innocent, and that the
magistrate and police had connived te
make a case. Three other men were
paroled by the mlnliter of Justice.
Theie men were charged with breaking the so-called Lemleux Act, At
the trial the mine manager admitted
that ha bad polled a notice of a reduction ot wagei amounting to fifty
centi per day per man to take effect
Immediately, thui breaking the very
law these men. were charged with
breaking, but he who was directly responsible for the strike was allowed
to go without a censure. The men
who struck, however, were treated
differently. Three hundred and fifty
men were summoned. Sixty, of them
were told they would be fined fifty
dollars and costs, and three, supposed
to be leaders and agitators were sent
to jail for three months because they
could not pay a fine of five hundred
dollars Imposed upon them. . The
man who created all this disturbance
went free. Tet workingmen say tbat
you do not need socialism In Canada.
If there was do trouble of this kind
you would need socialism. Socialism
is bound to come whether you need lt
or not. It Is not a matter of theory
but a law ot evolution. The human
race has been contlnulngly advancing,
We have passed through various
stages ln that advancement, The
workers of tbe world have always
been the under dogs. We have come
through chattel slavery, feudalism,
the Individual age ln which we had
the village shoemaker, the tailor,
and the hand loom weaver, then with
the Invention ot machinery these Industries were gathered Into factories,
afterwards the factories were operated by corporation!, theie were
formed Into combine!,  the combines
T, A. BARNARD
One ot the four Aldermanlc Labor Candidates In the Coming New Westminster
Civic Eleotlon.
for exlitlng condition! Ilei with the
workere themielvei. They cannot afford to trust old partlea. Their motto
must ever he "Workers ot the world,
unite; you have nothing to lose but
your chains, and the world to gain,"
It labor ia contented With the crumbs
that fall from the master'! table the
crumbi will be fewer and fewer.
Labor cannot afford even to listen to
the cry that half a loaf la better than
none, Since labor makes the whole
loaf, labor muat hare the whole.
Thie world* ti a world for workera.
We have apent centurlei In wresting
from nature the thingi which nature
had hidden. We an not going to
apend much time In wresting from
our brother man that which belong!
to all men-equally. For nineteen hundred yean brotherhood haa been
preached but never practlaed. I have
lived nearly forty yean and never
met a Christian. That la not the
fault of thoae who try to he inch, but
under preeent conditloui lt li lm-
posslble for any man to live an Ideal
life. No man can be a Christian who
'la not a socialist. The ethics of Christianity and socialism are the ume.
The socialist, however, la much more
practical than the Christian because
he la scientific. The mlnen of Nanalmo and Porcupine bave been able
to preeent an objeot ieaion to the
wofken of Canada whloh muat not be
lost sight of.
RsstsvslAaaisecisMsi
CENTERs&HAHNAplhL
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. After December
6, 1913, at 104* Georgia Stmt,
one block west ol Court House.
Use oi Modern Chipeland Funeral
Parlors free to all patroni
THE BELGRAVIA
FLORISTS
1010 BOBSON STBEET
Phons, Ssy. 6475
FLORAL DESIONS, WED
DING OBDEBS AND
HOME DE0OBATIONS
OUB SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
Rhone Seymour 88S
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
767 GRANVILLE STREET
Orpheum Theatre Building
lira. Genevieve Contl
Mrs. Fiances Lohrman
none Saymoar S7ST
Bit Artona £tufcio
f I)nt08rsn||tr Artists
SSS BOBSO* ITBBBI
VANCOUVER, B. C.
G.B.KERF00T
Peabody's Overalls
Union-Mad*
SHIRTS
UNION LABEL HATS,
CLOVES, Etc.
165    HASTINGS   STREET
Opp. Pantagea Theatre
=aasaa=
Watch Our Windows
IT MEANS MONEY IN YOUR PURSE i
Every week there arc BARGAINS there for those who
take the trouble to look. Spend, work and win. Don't let
tomeone-else-ljsalyoi*,. It's not what yoa spend; it's what
you can get others to spend.   That's the tyitem.
FANCY GOODSr-Jurt time to do a little Fancy
Work for Chriiunai.
Cushion Tops, Special '.'. ,25c. each
Stamped Linen, Twilled Centerpieces at prices lets than
elsewhere.
We have nearly every known Embroidery Thread to
work with. y.
Big assortment of Toys, Dolls. .Games.    The Big
Special Jointed Doll. each $1.00
Special English-bound  Books for Boys and Girls.
They are Standard works by standard authors.
Special, each 25
Free Xmas Boxes with any article of 50e. or over—
such as Ties, Collars, Gloves, etc
Kid Gloves jn Boxes.   Special, per pair     I.flO
Furs at Chrittmat Gifts—Nothing better for wife, titter,
Sweetheart or Daughter.
OOk PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
III THE SHOE DEPARTMENT
Men's and Women's Boots, value to $5.00, now on
sale for per pair    $3.95
Other bargains all through the store
Hat Shapes   | ,25
Trimmed Hats. each    1.00
Flannelette......'.;........ 10 for 8,15 for 10,20 for 15
New December Patterns now on sale 10c. and 15c.
The Pictorial Style Book thit winter is a beauty.
With free pattern, only...    ..   $ .25
BINGHAM'S
Cor. Main St. -and 8th Ave.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, limiting Director.)
at^oaa—aria—vat inat. avstaamv—
Between Abbott and Carrall, alao ■**
n'i
Corner Columbia Avenue.
SSTJO
i OTBBAU, IS 1
icrati
■SB     sBB^^^^sB^^^^^^_   !^
_wa_9_U_.^ H      I
We, the undersigned working class organizations, affiliated
with 45,000 tradesmen and laborers in this city, after due investigation and deliberation, have determined that our brothers, the
imprisoned miners of Vancouver Island, are suffering a grave
injustice in the' fearfully long sentences and additional penalties
that have been inflicted upon them and thereby upon their wives
and children.
Our representative will call and, upon your securing our
card, please arrange it in a conspicuous place in your window so
that we may not overlook you while making our many thoussnds
of daily purchases.
These miners have already suffered more than enough, and
we see no reason why they should not eat their Christmas, dinner
with their wives and children as Free Men,
Very sincerely yours for Justice,
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATION OF LABOR
VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA
INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD
THE SOCIAL DEMOCRATIC PARTV
THE SOCIALIST PARTY OF CANADA
CITIZENS OF VANCOUVER
B. C. MINERS LIBERATION LEAGUE
H. J. McEWEN, Secretary-Treasurer.
Office—208 Labor Temple.  Phone 749J.
League Buttons, 5c. each
Tea ad year oriioliitioi ahonM
hiTS llssi. . . SappBtd for sale
by LSjus Setreliry-Tresiarer
Individusl protests and envelopes to be tent lo the Miniiter of*
Justice may be obtained in the office of the Secretary-Treuurer.
W- .. .'.-J
No stamps required. *aa*-fa
WT'
HP
1
OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR C0UNCB.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
IOFFKUL PAfd mittM— cot.
]
KSIXTHYBAB.  No. 139.
VANCOUVER, B. 0.,. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1913.
EIGHT PAGES
Christmas Gift Slippers
t \
for every member of the family
WOMEN'S BOUDOIR
SLIPPERS
ot kid, .with large pom-poms,
In blaek, red, grey and brown,
eto.   Prloei $1.25 and S1.50
WOMEN'S FELT AND
QUILTED SLIPPERS
of satin, finished with pompoms; a large variety of colore to plok from. Pair...SSo.
WOMEN'S JULIET
SLIPPERS
ln assorted  colors,   with or
without  Imitation  fur  trimming,  Price per pa'r...»1.25
It's quite likely that
slippers are included in
your list of holiday gifts-
If so, come direct to thia
store, you'll be saved
needless worry, and we're
confident of pleasing you,
because we've just received a big assortment of
slippers for the holiday
trade and have marked
them at prices that will
please the most thrifty.
For instance:
MEN'S COSY FELT
SLIPPERS
ln plain or plaid, effects. Price.
per pair, $1.00 to $1.60
WOMEN'S PLAID
FELT SLIPPERS
Very   cosy   and   serviceable,
finished with   a   softener at
the  heels.   Per  pair,  $1.00,
$1.25 and  »1.«0
CHILDREN'S
COSY SLIPPERS
ln good selected styles at
prices ranging from, per pair,
45c. to  ...96c
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILLE AND GEORGIA
LANG SALES COMPANY
626 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmen's Store"
Extra Speclil Thli Week, Meh'i Ciihmin and Wool
Sock! 16c, 20c, 25c
Thl. beet value money em buy
To cleir, 100 piln Gray Blinketi, $3.00 value, for $1.76
100 pair Orey Blankets, $2.50 value, for  1.60
THE BE8T VALUE IN THE MARKET
Whan In wint of Clothing, Furnlihlng, Boot! ind Shoes It will
piy you to git next to our prices, Comi ind git acquainted af
126 MAIN STREET
We keep the largeet and moat
oomplete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prlcea which cannot be duplicated,
Everything la to be found here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canadi'i Snip Specialist
       104 ind 106 CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE  STORE   IS   THE   SPOT  FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THREE STORES IN VANCOUVER
41 Haitian St.     Phone Sey. NI 401 GraatSU St.
711 Oranvllle St.    Phone Sey. 8811
Phone Ssy. 6717
VICTORIA BTORB-, 818 VIEW ST.
GREENHOUSES
Slat Ave. and Main It. Vlotoria, S. O. Hammond, B. 0.
Phone Fairmont 718. Loni Distance Phone If
EVERY  UNION MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
casnsr-) &w per ^jbab
'Tiie'New Home of the Social-Democratic Party and Labor Unions of Milwaukee
GAS PLANT fiY-WW
The Royal City Ratepayers
Asked to Endone the
Proposed Purchase
Works to Oost the Sum
of One Hundred and Fifty
Thousand Dollars.
NBW WESTMINSTER, Deo. 4 —
Indications are that tbe gas plant bylaw will be resubmitted to the people
of this city. A number ot resident
workers are not permitted to vote on
thia question, owing to ,a lack of pro-
pery qualification, but all are Inter
cited. It has been largely due to the
efforts of Alderman Dodd that the
civic gas proposition hai been brought
to lta preient stage, be being a consistent advocate of the public owner
ship of all public utilities and of the
distribution of the product! ot the
same to the consumers at the cost of
production. Last year the ratepayer!
voted a sum of $226,000 for the erection ot a civic gaa plant The point
of discussion now Is whether It li
adviaable to purchase the plant of the
Westminster Ota Company at a price
of $150,000 In preference to the expenditure of the $226,000 In the construction of an entirely new plant.
Thla latter proposition ihould bi viewed by the elector! from a purely busl-
nen standpoint, regardless of who
now owns the present plant or who
will benefit by Its sale to the city. The
price of $160,000 hai been declared
hy an expert, a civic appointee, to be
reasonable for the plant and franchise.
The franchise Is yearly growing more
valuable, and can never again be secured to the olty at anything like the
present price. The elty will be taking
over a business whloh li now paying
a handsome annual profit, and which
Is supplying the down-town consumers, the most profitable section of the
community for. any gaa company to
handle.
If the city turns down thli proposition and proceeds to the erection of
a plant lt will necessarily be forced
to run at a loss until iuch time aa
sufflclent customers can be secured to
assure consumption of gas but the city
having all the business of the congested down-town district it will be
possible to furnish gu to the outlying
district! at a much lower price than
otherwise would be possible. To duplicate the present system of mains Is
not only a wasteful proceeding but
will doubtless lead to costly litigation. The city should become the
owner of a franchise which never
should have been granted, and thus
forever remove any chance of dliputei
over damaged highways. It li to be
hoped that when thla by-law again
comes before the people lt will reoelve
the eupport It deserves.
Unlvirul Working Cird.
NELSON, B.C., Dec. 4.—Some few
monthi past two circulars were
few monthi put two circular! were
received by the central labor body
from the B. C. Federation of Labor,
calling attention to the principle! of
lnduitrlil unlonlim and unlvereal
working card. Brotherhood of Car
pestera carried the flrat of these by
nearly a unanimous vote. The matter
of the universal card, however, met
with the disapproval of fully three-
quarters of the local membership.
This has, however, completely changed, as, on receiving a withdrawal card
from a late member of the Western
Federation of Minera. The following
reiolutlon waa passed after consider
able discussion: "Reiolved—That on
and after thli date any member of any
union affiliated with the A. F. of L„
presenting a paid-up card of six
months' standing, ahall be admitted
to thla local on payment ot current
month's dues, Any iuch member of
less than six months' standing shall
pay as initiation fee the difference be-
tween the fee oharged by union granting withdrawal card and thla looal.
Other local unloni plane copy."
R. P. Pettlplece went to Victoria on
Saturday, returning on Monday, While
there he discussed affairs In connection with the printer! N. W. district
oonferenco with Secretary-Treasurer
Phil. Howard, of Seattle, and memben
of the Vlotoria Typographical union.
From Nanalmo.
Editor B. C. Federationlit: Many
and cruel navo been the thrusts aimed by a renegrade.press against the
striken on Vancouver Island, Dli-
tor tlon of fact! and general misrepresentation of the Incidents connected
with the gallant flght going on have
been the evident object of such organs
of a dominant class. However, proud
of the heroic light put up and of the
magnanimous supply of funds by the
union, the memben stand with undaunted hope of winning out. Nothing can surpass the courage manlfeit-
ed, and nought can convince them
that there la any reuon why they
should loosen their grip for one moment ln the flght for Uie recognition
of the union. Assuredly no more
heroic stand for justice has ever previously been witnessed on thli island.
Denied the right of oitlienlblp ln their
home olty, shadowed at every turn by
the legions of law and order, bustled
to prison upon the most trivial matter, restrained from free public speech,
scrutinised at boat and train, accosted on the way to their homes, and
often arrested on suaplolon: These
are some of the more simple forms
of provoking conditions the mlnen
have been made to suffer at the hands
of a government, the memben of
which talk io glibly of British Justice
and fair play. The strikers are amply
satisfied with the progress made In
tbe face of the combined effort of all
the forces of the government, eoal
combines, subsidised press, and petty
business Interests arrayed against
them. They feel quite confident of
their eventually winning out. The
Held ot battle has broadened and ia
now not only an Induitrlal light but
a political one aa well The itate
flnda lti political prestige much Jeopardised and li now leaking itrenu-,
ouily to deliver Itself trom the hor
rlble pit Into whloh It hu fallen.
Thia spells for such a deserving cause
Juitlce and a right to recognition of
the union. Certainly the battle muat
be fought now until victory la gained
It would be sheer madness to think
of or even anticipate defeat. However, no such thought occuplei the
mind! of union men, They are wlie
enough to know that the shortest distance between the present struggle
and complete victory Is solidarity. The
second party to the success of any In
dustry ts tbe worker, and at leut It
must he said the most Important
party, then who will have the hardihood to say. that labor should not be
conceded Its choice of protection u
a party to the deal, In the form of
recognition of a union under which
alone lt may demand such protection? One more point, namely, the
relationship of the church to the
itruggle, lome portion of which, tt
may be uld, protests agatnit the
Inlqultoui oppression of thi weak by
tbe powerful. However, the spectacle
hu been and le one to be much regretted, that other portion! of thli
Inititutlon have remained callously
Indifferent to the matter, and In lome
Instances are found to be aiding and
abetting the oppressor. Extenuating
circumstances In the history of ill
struggle! for better condition! have
resulted In discourteous acta and trivial violations of law, on the part of
the victim! In inch struggles. However, no such Incident! ever proved
tbat the object sought wu not Juit
and righteous. Nothing should deter
any Institution, and especially that
of the church, from doing Its duty tn
every crisis so long u the object la
a rlghteoua one.
PRESS COMMITTEE, LOCAL 2166,
Nanalmo, B. C, Deo. 3,1913,
The Federatlonist will pay two-bits
eaoh for four coplea of February 6,
1913.   Needed for flies.
Why Not Use Union
Made Printing?
It's better than any other kind,
and generally the BEST.
ITS ONLY KNOWN   ^m*.
BY THIS LABEL    *S—7~
We can furnish this libel,
•tso paper bearing the
water-marked label of the
International Association
of Pspermiken.
Send ui your next order
ind get both libeli.
B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Room $17 Libor Temple
Vincouver       ■       •       B. C.
HOURS
Strike   in   Michigan the
Greatest in History of
Metal Miners
Men Beaten Up and Arrested—Twa Murdered and
Many Wounded
The itrlke of the copper minera of
Michigan wu called on the 23rd day
of July, 1913, doling the mlnei in the
copper dlitrlet. The strikers and
their dependents number fully fifty
thosuand people. Thla la tbe great
eat atrlke ln the hlitory of metal mlnen, The varloua mining companies
Ignored and treated with contempt
their employeea' requests for a conference to adjust the condltlona of em-
ployment. The houn of labor were
longer, the pay smaller, and the
amount of work required greater than
in any other copper district of North
America. The corporations have used
every weapon ot tyranny. The troops
were brought ln on the second day ot
the strike. They are atlll on the
ground, and have been constantly used
to aid the companies ia operating the
mlnu and not tc protect the people.
The lnfamoui Waddell, Of the Waddell-
Mahon detective agency, with hla coterie ot henchmen, have directed the
iherlff'i ofllce. They have beaten
men under arrest, murdered two strikers and wornded two othen. They
are assisted by some fifteen hundred
local deputies, who vie with the Imported monsters In brutality; they
have also murdered a striker and
wounded a little girl. One of the most
sweeping Injunctions ever directed
against a labor organisation wu Issued against the Western Federation
of Miners. Later it wu set aside, but
the supreme court of the state of
Michigan restored It. More than live
hundred arrests have been made for
lta violation. Henchmen of the mining companies have now organlied a
citlsens' alliance, an organlutlon
whose pathway la marked by the blood
of the worken and the ruin of prosperous communities. It announces lta
Intention of driving the representatives of the Federation from the atrlke
lone. They will not go. It ll the
threat brought about by duperatlon
Of the mine operaton. The striken
have withstood every auault with
unbroken rank!. They cannot be
beaten, or Jailed, nor ihot Into lub-
mlislon. Cold and hunger are the
only forces thit can poulbly drive
them back to work. It may be added
that fundi are needed and It Is
now up to orgmised libor to lend lti
substantial assistance. Ernest Mills
Is secretary-trauurir, hli address being 606 Railroad Building, Denver, Col.
Reglna Palntere, $10,
Editor B. C. Federations
Is cheque for $10 on behalf of the
above local for the Wires and Kiddles'
Fund, which The B. C. Federatlonist
Is collecting. We hope you will succeed ln obtaining the amount you set
as your goal, ln order that a little
sunshine and comfort may lighten the
load of the victims of industrial oppression. At the meeting of the
Trades and Labor Council last night
we voted $10 for the Miners' Liberation League, which will be sent on
hy Bro, Einmlni, We hope tbat the
minera themulvei have decided by
now that the only euro liberation li
through political action. Youn iln-
eerely and fraternally,
WM. E. COCKS,
Bro, of Painters, Decorators and
Paperhangers, No. 609.
Reglna, Sask., Nov. 26, 1913,
They were talking ot the vanity of
women, and one of the few ladles preeent undertook a defense.
"Ot coune," ihe uld, "I adinlt that
women are vain, and men are not.
Why," ihe idded, with a glance
around, "the necktie of the handsomest man In the room ia even now up
the back of his collar."
And then ihe smiled—for every mm
preient hid put hli hind up behind
hli neck!
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Rough Weather Apparel
for Workingmen
THE clothing described below is msde especially
for tesjniters sod men who work outside during
the winter westher.
HicUniw Clothing—Heavy
all wool Mackinaw suits in
- black only. Coats are
made with large storm
collars, leather laced pockets and belts	
Coast for  SI.0O
Pants for  ISO
Driven' Duck Coata—Thii
coat ii nude of heavy
brown duck, with large
storm collar, furlincd. The
body is lined with lambskin, and the sleeves with
. stout flannel; double-
stitched throughout, reinforced in .the armpits;
clasp fasteners; two pockets; '
Price.; $3.76
Driven*   Leather   Coats —
These coats are in two
qualities and both are
made reversible. You turn
them to suit the weather
. conditions. Both have
corduroy on one side. The
better, coat is finished with
smooth dark green leather. The cheaper grade has
a mocha finished leather.
Pockets on both sides and
dome fasteners. .
Prices $7.60 and $9.60
Driven1 Revenible Cost —
This coat cm be worn
either side oSt. One Side
ii dirk fiwn whipcord
and the other a golden
brown corduroy; pockets
on both aides. Patent
dome listeners.
" Price only  $$.M
Heavy Sheep Lined Coata—
A coat for cold weather
and hard wear. The body
is full sheep lined; the
outiide heavy.' brown duck;
leather faced pockets,
clup fasteners, fur lined
storm collar. Price.. $160
Oilskin Coiti it (tUS-This
is a three quarter length
coat. Comes to just below the knees and Is intended for* the man who
wears gum boats or leggings. It is first quality
and in the new gloss finish.     Price .....$S4l
Long Oilskin Coata — Made
in fint quality and dull
finish. Comes down to the'
shoe tops.
Price only  $$.71
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
THE  MUSICIANS  UNION s
wish to announce that Mr.
Franklin and members of his
orchestra are not members of the
Musicians'Union. When engaging music for your next dance or
social, make sure that your
Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
For fall Information Phoaa Mtuidaae Unfa.
27th Annual Clearance SALE
of Ha'nbman ot Co. Pianos, Player Pianoa, Grand Piinoi.     ,
Abo our entire  Mock  of  Violini,   Mindolini, Binjos,
Guitars, Autoharpa, Accordions, Concertina* and all musical
merchandise.
25,000 Sheets of Popular
Sheet  Music  at  2   copies
Sc.
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street West
Stanfield's Underwear
Glue Libel. Suit $3.00     Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight Overalls of all kinds
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 Cordon St., Weil
US-CUSHION
cuipresses una
KEZULWLSOTftCTAM
TOES
laifflionaiippOriTs Mm
4'tuiwi ruunoacN tucu
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
Dressing Robes and House Coats
PRICEI OF HOUIE COAT! RANOg FROM 85.00 to 822.80
DRISSINO ROBES FROM 17 to 818
These make handsome Christmas lift! for Husband, Bon or Friends.
Call and Inspect our stock.   By paying a deposit we will Uy one aalde for
you for a reasonable length of time. ,~       '
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd
Tel. Sey, 701
188-118 HAITINOI ITREST W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleuint heidquirteri for Carpenten' Tools ind ill
kinds of Builders' ind Contractor!' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Street PAGE FOUR
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY DBCBMBBR 6, lilt
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 1855
Capital and Reserve,
$6,700,000
85 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Busineu.
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches. lntereat Allowed at Highest Current Rate.
Eaat End Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A W. Jarvii, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 18M
Paid-up Capital
Reserve 	
Totil Anete • •
. $ 11,100,00
12,600,000
• 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Om Dollif will opin
thi account, and your
bualneaa will be wil-
comi be It large or
email
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
fflCORPOIATED
1S55
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve 111,176,578
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In the BANK OF TORONTO
are proving to be a great convenience to many ot our
friends. With theie account!
either ot two penoni ot the
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest la paid
on all balances twice a year.
In event ot death of either
party the aurvlvor may withdraw the money.
Main Offlee-
466 HASTINQ6 ST. WEST
(Near Rleharde)
Branchei—
Cor. Haatinge and Carrall ate.
New Westminster
Vlotoria
Merritt
The Systematic
Saving
of small sums will help a great
deal la time of Illness or accident.
Thie Company paya
4%
Compounded Quarterly
(Subject to Cheque)
OPEN AN ACCOUNT NOW
And Deposit Regularly.    One
Dollar is sufficient to start
National Finance Co.
Limited
(Comer Pander and Hamilton.)
Paid-up Capital and Reserve,
81.100,000.
IB. C. FEDERATIONIST
rabllabed every ntlajr morning by th.
a. o. -reamuoaist, mZ
R. Parm. Pettlplece -  *   -  -   Manager
DIRECTORS: Jaa. Campbell, preaident;
Christian Siverts, vice-president; J.
Kavanagh; 3. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer, and R. P. Pettlplece.
Ofllce: Boon 817, Labor Sample.
TeL Eiohure Sey. 741S.
Advertising Manager   -     M. C. Shrader
Subscription: 11.60 per year; ln Vancouver
City. 18.00; to unlona subscribing
In a body, 81.00.
"Unity ol Labor j lha hep* of tba world.1*
FRIDAY DECEMBER  5,  1913.
Your article at this point will bo
so powerful, so convincing, and withal,
so caustic that you will deem' It dangerous to be let looie and you will
therefore burn lt up and retire to
rest.
THAT LAND POLICY.
A vast deal of criticism Is directed
dally against the land policy of the
conservative party. Most of thli
criticism Is Bred Into the air. The
government has no land policy. It
has a mere attitude—sort of poie, ai
It were.
It declare! land open tor aettlement,
and walta. It knowi that the settler
will pin his faith to the venerable
mattock, or grub-hoe, for a time, until
this frail lupport gives way, and will
then be driven to aeek employment
with the government "road-gang."
Here he will, In some subtle manner,
be acquainted with the relationship
between S3 per day, and voting the
conservative ticket.
At road-work the happy yeara will
roll speedily by, the settler making
aome Improvement! on hli "place" In
hli ipare momenta. He thus hopes
to get a crown grant and perhaps sell
hli quarter-section for enough to
start out ln a amall way upon a live-
acre plot He ll a despised but honeit ipeculator.
Occasionally a settler comei along
with enough money to comply with
the regulations and start a nice farm
on wild land, without working for
wages. But he does not settle, aa a
rule. He generally Invest! In a private yacht Inatead and apenda hli
declining yeara ln peace and comfort
INSPIRATION.
To write an article that will be
widely read and have an Important
bearing upon the serious activities of
the world, lt la only necessary to retire to a room that Is already occupied
by two boya aged 16 and lt. These
young men will voelferouily, and with
a good deal of ipirlt discuss a wide
range of subject!, including the latest
murder trial, the most recent model
ot automatic plitol, the merits of varloua makea of motorcycle!, and the
Individual prowen of thli "gang" or
that They will alternately, and sometime! simultaneously, aubmlt their
varloua viewpoint! to you tor arbitration, until you afflrm iternly that you
are buiy. '
Thli will occasion a lull of about
thirty secondi' duration, at the expiration of which, long, tuneful ahlvers ot
lound will luue bom an harmonlcum
and you will grin lavagely aa you
dream ot blood and deitructlon. Fin-
ally the harmonlcum will eeaae and
you will hall with Joy the' posilbllitlei
of calm momenta ot reflection. Your
Joy will be shortlived, however, tor
the harmonlcum will have given place
to two applei, In the mastication ot
which, an aaaortmant of round wavea
li produced that would reduoe even
the concertina to a pale squeak..
The "Province" says that weddings
are usually supposed to add a touch
of romance to life. We have It on
excellent authority that this is where
romance is subtracted from life.
One of the causes of the "high cost
ol living" might reasonably be attributed to the number of "experts" who
are "commissioned" to "investigate'
the subject
At all events there seems to have
been unanimity among all concerned
that the Nanalmo "special" ln question
got his. Even the doctor felt constrained to admit lt.
The per capita tax of organisation
affiliated directly with the American
Federation of Labor haa been raised
from 10 to 16 cents per month, each
member to he furnished a copy of the
American Federatlonist
It li aa dangeroua to etare at a
policeman In Berlin as at a strikebreaker In Nanaimo, although the
punishment la not quite so severe.
Three weeks It what a Berlin man
got for allowing hli lyei to misbehave
In thli manner.  '
The labor movement hai made wonderful progreu because a sufficient
number of lta memben have been willing to do more than talk, They have
been willing to do things, to work, to
persevere in the face of discouragement Loud talk Is not only useless,
hut Is only Indulged in by incompetents Incapable of producing results,
His Lordship Mr. Justice Morrison
may or may not have had Judge
Howay ln mind when be remarked
that, "Nothing is more despicable than
a Judge or Jury looking for publlo
favor," but the latter Judge, who appealed somewhat fervently through
the press for public favor, will not
feel complimented.
"In Bait Middlesex the government
majority was reduced from 661 to
368 ln the very heart ot Ontario ln a
by-election whose result waa io conceded that the liberals did not extend
themselves."—The Sun.
At thli rate, an entire cessation of
activity on the part ot the liberals
would result in utter conservative
rout
Hla Inflammable Majeity, King
Petroleum, leemi likely to bestow
hts manifold favors upon America'!
capitalists after all, Huerta appeared
to have been received graciously Into
to royal' pretence, slong with hli
European frlendi, but later report!
Indicate that lt wai only to receive
an Invitation to beat lt The king la
like moot other monarch!. He smiles
upon the strongest party; and, aa
America haa a large body of working-
men foolish enough to fight for 60
centi a day and J. D. Rockefeller,
Oarrania will no doubt be Mexico'!
next preildent
known ln the labor movement of Canada, particularly the Weat than the
Voice. Arthur Puttee, former labor
member of parliament, le the editor,
which fact ahould be sufflclent guarantee ae to the etabllity of that Journal's utterance! on mattera affecting
the great cause ot the working maiiea.
The Federationlit wishes these two
old reliables continued succees and a
growing mailing Hat,
THE WORLD MOVEMENT OF OUR
TIME
(Arthur Morrow Lewis.)
Happily for ub, society evolve! Independently bf anybody's opinion. Our
opinions follow blindly and gropingly
In the rear, The opinions of Individuals do not manufacture social laws,
according to certain ethical requirements; they Interpret and explain
those laws which they discover ln operation. The fundamental question Is
not, "Is Individualism better than socialism?" but "Ie loclety moving In
the direction of the one or the other!"
To aniwer thli queitlon It li only
neceuary to compare the world of today with that of ten or fifteen years
ago. America moves steadily toward
socialism, while Europe advances ln
great leaps, Erery civilised country
tells the same story, and the recent
development ot Finland and Austria
astonished the world.
Society moves forward, as irreaalit-
lbly aa the ocean tides, and It moves
In a direction predicted hy those
greatest thinkers of this or any age—
the men wbo linked their Uvea with
the blood end the tears and the itruggle! ot half a century ln tbe greateat
cause that ever throbbed In the brain
of man—the cause of socialism.
Portland Labor Prle.
The Labor Press Is the official publication of the Central Labor Council,
of Portland, Ore., and vicinity, alao
of the Oregon State Federation of
Labor, The letterpreu regarding facta
of the labor movement la carefully
prepared, and the paper Itself la s
welcome exchange with the Journal!
that champion the cauae of International tradea unionism. It is renewing
lti efforts to secure tbe support of all
organlied labor of the Web-foot State,
which It Is entitled to. No wage-earner ln that country ahould tall to be a
subscriber. A. H. Harris, the managing editor, la well and favorably known
among Pacific Coast Journalists. Hla
paper merits Its continuoui liberal ad-
vertlalng patronage ai well aa the largeet llit of lubicrlben.
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS WSERTED     n     11.00 A MOUTH
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meeta in annual convention In January. Executive oaaacers, 1818-14: President, Christian Siverts; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, O
A. Burnes, J. W. Oray, Jaa Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; aec-treaa.. V. R. Mldgley,
Box 1044, Vanoouver.
TRAPES AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrst and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H. C. Benson, presl-
miJ.P.' H- MoVety, vice-president; J.
nf.. Wilkinson, general secretary, Room
pie; Jaa. Campbell,
dent
W. 1
210 iaabor'Teihpl
  —ia Brlsl
sergeant-at-arms: R.
-- ,.._, ..__. campLw.., ..«„.,-
urer;. Mlai Brisbane, statistician; V. R.
OURS IS THE WORLD
(August Bebel.)
Every day furnishes fresh proof of
the rapid growth and spread of the
ideas we represent. On all fields there
Is a tumult and paih. The dawn of a
fair day Is drawing nigh with mighty
stride.
Let us then ever battle and strive
forward unconcerned aa to "where"
and "when" the boundary.poiti of the
new and better day tor mankind wtll
be raised.
If In the course of this great battle
for the emancipation of the human
race we should fall, thoee now In the
rear will step forward; we shall fall
with the consciousness of having done
cur duty as human beings, and with
the conv'ctlon that the goal will be
reached, however the powers hostlli
to humanity may itruggle In reilit-
ance.
Ours Is the world, despite all—tha*.
The Mlner'e Inch
On the Pacific coait, the unit for
measuring water ln mining Is known
as the miner'! Inch. Thl! varlea
greatly ln different localltlea and Is
now generally defined by legislative
enactment The statute inch ot Colorado, for example, Is defined ae "an
Inch aquare orifice, whioh ahall be under a 5-lnch presiure measured from
the top of the orifice to the aurface
of the water. In a box aet ln Hie banka
ot the ditch. Thli orifice ahall In all
cases be six Inchei perpendicular Inside measurement and all altdea doling the same lhall move horliontally,
while from the water In the ditch the
box shall have a deicent greater than
one-eighth of an Inch to the foot"
In Brltlih Columbia, under the Water Clauses Consolidation Act 1897,
Section 143, a mlner'a Inch la declared
ta be a flow of water equal to 1.68 cubic felet per minute. Therefore, a
mlner'a Inch ll equal to ,028 cubic feet
per eecond, asd 1 cubic foot per eec-
ond li equal to 86.71 miner"! inchei,
approximately. One cublo foot per
aecond would be equal to 38.4 Colorado
mlnar'a Inchei.—A.V.W.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
« „D'"ctors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing director, J. H. McVety, Room all.
Work Is reported aa being fair on
the waterfront.
LABOR TEMPLE DIRECTORY
IM RICHARDS STRSST
Phones Sey. 8884-8881
Loans Without
INTEREST
BY THB CONTRACT PLAN
1.1.00
11100
111.00
per month
psr month
per month
For   the   purpose
11,000 Loin
*,000 Loin
1,000 Loin
of   Building
Homee, Paying off Mortgages or
Improving Real Estate.
Repayments 111.80 per month on
each 81,000, without Interest.
MAIL THIS AD FOR PULL
INFORMATION
Whan Civilization Overreaches Itself.
Civilisation, as we know it Is generally assumed to be an Improvement
over barbarism and savagery. But in
lta Integral nature, It ia really a
compromise and a bargain. In his
lavage itate man had little beyond
the eevereit necessities, and frequently he did not have them, but on
the other hand, he had a great deal of
freedom and leisure. Civilized man,
In order to obtain varloua luxuries and
greater security of life, haa eubjected
hlmielf to a laborious discipline which
no lavage could aurvire. He pays
an adequate price for all he geta.
Civilization la always bordered with
a fringe of frank barbarlam. We
reach barbarlam as soon as we come
to a stage where men are denied the
ordinary necessities of life or the
means of procuring them, and a fluctuating percentage of tbe world's population Is alwaya living ln thla state.
Some of them die. Some of them are
driven to commit crime. Others slip
quietly back Into the state of mind of
the savage, and having Uttle desire
but little. Their needs are reduced
to the primitive ones of food and
shelter, and the lash of discipline
whieh makes men willing to lubmlt
to exhausting toll, no longer cut!
them. Their kind may be found on
the Thames Embankment ln London,
on East itreet In San Franelieo, aa
Robert Hansford tells us, and ln every
other large modern city. They are
nomadi, who, denied the right to be
useful, no longer have the capability.
Civilization hai overreached itself;
that li all.—Frisco Bulletin.
Aak lor Labor Temple -Phone
Bxehaage, Seymour 7411.
Amalgamated Society Carpenters—Room
808; John A. Key.
Bartenders—Room 208: Geo. W. Curnock.
B.  C.  Federatlonist—Room 117;  B.  P.
Pettlplece.
B. C. Federation of Labor—Room 108;
Victor R. Mldgley.
Brotherhood ot Carpenters—Room 104
and SOS; W. Leonard.
Bricklayers—Room  lit;  Wm.  8.  Dagnall
Bakers—Room 820. .    ,.    .
Barbers—Room 208; C. F. Burkhart.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Room 220: John Sully.     ...
Cooka, Waltera, Waltreeaea—Room 801;
W. E. Walker; Tal. Seymour 1414.
Electrical    Workers     (outside)—Room
207; W. F. Dunn.
Eleotrleel Workers (inalde)—Room 102;
F. L. Estinghausen, Seymour 2148.
Englneera    (Steam)—Room    8SI;    Ed.
Prendergaat      '  _        ...    ,    „
Labor Temple Co.—Room 111; J.    H.
MoVety,
Longshoremen's   Association — Ofllce,
148 Alexander atreet; Oeorge Thomaa;
Tel. Seymour 6881. --„_.,
Moving Picture Operatora-41. R. Hamll-
ton. Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey.
MueWana — P.   Howltt   140   Robeon
street; Seymour 7111.
Painters—Room 808; W. J. Nagle.
Plasterers—Joe   Hampton;   Tel.   Sey-
Plumbers—Room ill; Melvln   Engolf;
Tel. Seymour 8611.
Itreet Railway Employ*
phone Fairmont 181.
Street Railway Employees—H. Schofleld;
L
Seven Per
Cent, on Your
Small
Savings
CANADIAN
FINANCIERS
*     LIMITED
4% Paid en Deposits Subject to Cheque
Said Offlce, 888 Haatinge Itreet Weat,
Vancouver, B.C.
OINBRAL TRUST BUSINSSS
Patrick Donnelly—Oeneral Manager.
Bring your Savings Account up to not leaa than
$200. and il will earn 7%
if you transfer the amount to
a Fractional Mortgage.
Through the Fractional
Mortgage syatcm of Canadian Financiers, Limited, the
small investor can acquire
exactly the aame rights and
rate of interest through his
Trustee as the large capitalist
with his many thousands.
Fu.ll information and
explanatory pamphlet on
request
WE WILL SAVE FOR
YOU.
Tradea and Labor Council—Room 1101
J. W. Wilkinson.       *..,
Typographical—Rooma 112, 111, 114;
R. H. Neelands.        ;  .
Western Federation of Miners—Room
217: R. P. Pettlplece.
atzd wtiti -fats, xsusam a»d
laUBOB   OOHOBMS   OP  OAaTAOA.
A Mittir of Environment—end Logic
No scientific truth about people Is
more universally accepted, aa a principle, than the statement that a man
responds to his environment, Nobody
oan be found, among scientists or laymen, who seriously disputes tt Some
believe the response Is greater, aome
leu; ill will agree that It varlea with
Individual!; but the principle remains
unattaoked. Tet when a person
comei forward with a proposition for
bettering the environment—and there
Is a wide variety of such propositions,
from socialism to prlion reform—the
flrst argument he meets Is likely to
be: "Oh, you are trying to give people
too much of a good time." Odd, Isn't
Itf  Pathetically odd.—Frisco Bulletin.
Two Old Reliables.
Endoried by the Ontario Labor Educational Aaioclatlon and the Toronto
Trades and Labor Council, the Induitrlal Banner of Toronto, the pioneer
Canadian labor paper, haa entered on
Its twenty.-seeond year. In aeason and
out, It basNilways been a strictly labor organ. Aggressive and a somewhat advanced In lti policy It hai
stood on the firing line all these years
and bears a clean record. Joseph
Marks has retained the editorship
since the start, and may be clawed at
the Nestor of present-day active labor
Journalists, The Banner bas fairly
voiced the sentiments and aspirations
of organized labor In the Dominion,
particularly Western Ontario.
The Voice of Winnipeg, another old-
timer, haa been regularly Issued every
week during the past twenty yean. It
hai itood the critical teit of time ii i
friend to organized labor. There ll no
labor paper better and more favorably
Cranbrook Tradee and Labor Council—
F. McKenna, Watt Ave.
Fernle Trades and Labor Council.
Nelson Trades and Labor Council—O.
H. Hardy, Box 277. _   , ...
New Westminster Tradee and Labor
Council—B. D. Grant Box, 884, Secy.
Prince Rupert Tradea and Labor Council—D. MacLean, Box 111.    ......
Revelstoke Trade! and Labor Council
—Phil Parker, Box 481. ,*"...„
Vancouver Trades and Labor Council
—J. W. Wilkinson, Box 1188.
Victoria Trades and Lsbor Council—
T. H. Norrla, Labor halt       _
Calgary Trades and Labor Council—
J. E. Young, Box 1404 or Labor Temple.
Edmonton Trades and Labor Council
—A. Farmllo, Box 1481.. ,\.   '_
Lethbrldge Trades and Labor Council
—L. Moore, Box 444.
Medicine Hat Trades and Labor Council—T. J. Webb.. Box 1088.
Moose Jaw Trades and Labor Council
—Wm. McAllister, Box 80. president; W.
H. Stiles, care Times Ofllce.
Prince Albert Trades and Labor Council—John Dalaley, Box 141.
Reglns Trades and Labor Council—
Oeo. Peake, Box 864.   .
Saakatoon Trades and Labor Council
—WT Busby, Orchard Block. Rosaer Aye.
Winnipeg Tradee and Labor Counoll—
R. A. Rigg, Room 14, Labor Temple.
Berlin Tradea and Labor Council—Urban Strub, 11 Ellen Strait    '_'.*„
Brockvlile Trades and Labor Council
—Fred Clow, Xing Bt W.
Fort William Tradea and Labor Council—O. W. Howltt Box 114.
Oalt Trades and Labor Council—A. L.
Philip. M Centre Street
Ouelph Trades and Labor Council—F.
W. Felker, 114 Northumberland St
Hamilton Dlatrlct Tradee and Labor
Council—W. R. Rollo, Box 828.
Kingston Trades and Labor Council—
W. J. Drlscoll, 110 Lower Bagot St.
London Tradea and Labor Council—3.
Cha«. Mottashed, 888 William St.
Ottawa Allied Trades and Labor Association—W. Lodge, 81 Cretghton St, N.B.
Port Arthur Trades and Labor Council— E. Hoherg, 288 Wol-ely St.
Peterborough Trades and Labor Council—Chaa. Hammacoth, 418 Brthuns St.
St. Catherines Tradea and Lahor Council—Leo T. Coyle, 188 Church.
St. Thomas Tradea and Labor Coun
cil—Jas. D. Ballantync 	
South Waterloo Dlstriot Trade* Coun.
89 Flora St.
'a* Cc-
Preston,
ell—J. W. Burgess, Middle St.
Ontario,
Windsor Trades and Labor Council—
W. K. Collard, 102 Crawford Ave.
Welland Trades and Labor Council—
William Powrte, Box 28.
Toronto Dlstriot Labor Council—T. A.
Stevenaon, Labor Temple.
■Montreal Trades and Labor Council—
O. Francq, 808 St. Paul St.
Quebec and Levle Tradee Council—
Jules H. LaRocoue, 81H Soott St
Sherbrooke Trades and Labor Council
—Chas. Dunsmore, 108 King St
Three Rivers Trades and Labor Council— E. Gellnas, 18 Cooke St
St.  Johns,  Que..  Trade*  and Labor
Council—Robert Martin, Box 188.
St.  John,  N.B.,  Tradea  and   Labor
Council—J, L. Sugrue, 17 Peters St
Moncton Trades and Labor Council—
Nell Savage, 168 Dominion St
•Amherst Trades and Labor Council—
Thos, Carr, Box 88ti
Halifax Trade* and Labor Council, M.
D. Coolen, 8 Maltland St.
; Sydney Trades and Labor Council—H.
Gregory, 111 Falmouth St
•Newly organlatd.
Phone Seyaonr S7SS
DIXON & MURRAY
Offloe aid Mare -fitting.
Jobbing
Oflee aad Shopt
lOSS BURSMUU1 I1SIST
VANCOUVER REALTY t%
BUSINESS EXCHAN8E
Wa Sell ind Exchingi
Houses, Loll, Homnltei, Acre-
ige, Prult ind Chicken Farms,
Hotel!, Catea, Rooming Houses,
Retail Stores, Livery Stables,
Saw Mills, Shingle Milts, Grain
Elevitori,   Boats,  Automobile!,
Loini ind Inauranea.
401   HOLDEN   BUILDING
11 Hiitlngi St E.
Mldgle;
Piece, j.
trustees.
i"P"?•-«»-». ...a,   ...   r.   jrwi.a-
H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
tress-
V. B
Pettl-
ALLIBD PRINTING TRADES COUN-
o ?iLTM,Mt* Ana Monday ln month.
Preaident Geo. Mowat; aeerstary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
o PSSlS1*" -"d Joiners—Room ?9».
?«?' I'"' l"?1"!" 'Sent, J. A. Key;
ofllce hours, 8 to 6 a-m. and 4 to 6 p.m.
Secretary of management oommlttee.
Jae. Bltcon, 878 Hornby atreet. Branches
meet every Tuesday and Wedneaday In
Room 808. ,
BROTHERHOOD OP CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No, 117—Meeta
Monday or eaoh week, I p.m. Executive
committee meets every Friday, I p.m.
Preaident Ed. Meek; recording secretary, Thoe. Lindsay, 806 Labor Temple: flnanclal aeeretary. W, Leonard, IM
tabor Temple,	
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo
cal 218,1.A.T.S.B.—Meeta every sso
ond Sunday ot each month, Labor Tern,
pie, 8 p.m. Preaident J. H. Fletcher,
secretary-treasurer, A. O. Hansen; bust,
nesa agent, G. R. Hamilton. Offlce:
Room 100, Loo Bldg,    Tet Say. 1846.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 116, A. F. of M.—
Meeta aecond Sunday of eaoh month, 111
Robson street President J. Bowyer:
vice-president F. English: secretary, G*
P. Howett; treaeurer, Wt Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTER.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 88—
Meeta flrat and third Wedneaday, aBrlea
Hall, 8 p.m, President G. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal secreUry, D. Scott; treaaurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phone
Sey. 1614.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE 5S
, NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meata lat and 8rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer at., room 806. Robert C, Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joaeph tt,
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1711 Grant st; Tom
Smith, Rec, Sep., lis Broadway west
STONECUTTERS',       VANCOUVER
Branch—Meete second Tuesday, 8:01
p.m.   President J. Marshall; corresponding secrstary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
nnanclal secretary, K. MoKenale. ,
PAINTERS',    PAPERHANGERS'   AND 1
_ Decorators',  Local  188—Meet every
■Thursday, 7:80 p.m.    Preaident J, E.
Phillips; flnanolal aeoretary, 3. Fr.ok.l- I
ton, 811 Seymour Bt; recording seers- i
tary, George Powell, I860 Fourth' Ava
W.; business agent W. J. Nagle, Room
108, Labor Temple.
BAKERS' AND CONFEC-
tloners' Local No. 41—
Meets seoond and fourth
Saturdays, 7:80 p.m. Presided, X. M. MeeCurrah:
oprreapondlng secretary, W
ni   .   „       J5°*SM: Buslneas Agent 3.
Black, Room 620, Labor Temple.
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 180—MBBTS
eecond and fourth Thursdays. 1:10
p.m. President, Sam. T. Hamilton: recorder. Geo. w. Isaacs: secretary-business agent JS. F. Burkhart Room 108.
Labor Temple. Houra: 11 to 1; ( to 7
p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 671.—OF-
. .nSe 'J0*"11 !0' L,hor Temple, Meeta
flrat Sunday of eaoh month. President
Wm. Laurie: flnanclal sscretary. Geo. W.
Curnock. Room 808, Labor Temple,
STRUCTURAL   IRON
International    Union,
BRIDGE    AND
, W0.RK.5R?' International Union
faocal 87—Meets second end fourth Pr|.
lay. Labor Tomple. 6 p.m. President
,'iA Sooley! aeeretary, A. W. Oaklet
788 Semlln Drive, phone Sey. Ill
BRICKLAYERS' AND MAsAn*, N*. 1
... ~Jf'*ft *"■"? Tuesday, I p.m., Room
»07. President. James Haslett: corresponding secretary, w, a Dagnall, Box
83: financial secretary, F. fi. Brown:
business agent W. S. Dagrall, Room
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION NO.
'0J—Meets third Tuesday ln every
month, In Room 166 Lsbor Temola
President, F. J. Milne; vice-president H.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat 111
Dunlevy avenue.
BROTHERHOOD OF ROILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Hriners
nf America, Vancouver Lodge No. Ill-
Meets first snd third Mondave. 8 n.m.
President F. Barclay. SM Cordova Rant:
swrotsry, A. Fraser. 1161 Howe Street
FORBES A VAN HORNE LTD.
Importer! of
TOOLS
and Plni Cutlery
114 CORDOVA ST. WEST
City Auction and Commission Company
Caah paid for houses and aultea
of furniture or Auotlon arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
AB*ztm a. aazonar
Auctloneer. Sey. 2178
PATENTS
Trad* Marks, Dailgni, Copyrights.
PITHIR*TONHAUOH i  CO.
Tht Old establish.* Firm of
PATINT ATTORNEYS
1020 Rogsrs Bldg., Qranvllla Strsst
City. Phons Soymour 3796.
G«o. E. McCrosiMo
A.M.H*n»«r
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Office 32-36 !nptr.»J Block
SM fa-itr St., W.    Vaacto-m, B. C.
CICM RMAKRRR' LOCAE, NO. JtRT—
Mot»ta flwt Tiimi-Ikv auch month, $
n.m. ProsM-Mit Ooo. CMrrard; annrrtary,
Unhurt 3 Oral*. Kurts Cl«tr Factory:
trfflanrar. 8. w. ,Tnhn<wn.
POflKS'. WATTTCRS' AND WATTRKSBR8'
TTntnn—Mnetn ftrwt Frtftav In anoh
month, K:M Tt.m.. Lahor T#rw>to, W. W.
Walkfr. hi-mlneas r*>nrn«entntlve, Offlce.
Room soj, Lahor Tt*>mnte. Hours: I s.m.
to 10:110: 1 p.m. tn 2:11ft and R p.m. to 6:16
nm. Cnmpi»ti»nt heln fiirnlnhofl on ahnrt
notlPA.   phont* Rfv. 8414,
COMMTCRHTAL TWiFftRAPWRRR',
RrtH«h roliimola P*vialon. C. P. Bva-
f««m. nivUlnn No. 1— M»Wb 11,M aim.
rtiM Riinrlftv In month. Room 104, Loral
fhalrman. T. O'Connor. P. O. Bo* 4M.
Vanroiivnr, Local aorty. and train.,
R W. Withers. P. O. Box 491, Vancou.
TCLKPTRTr-AL WORTTWRr. MVML NO
f18.—Mart* Rnnm 101, avtw Monrtav
« n.tn. pt*MM**nt. Tralf. Fii11*>r: v|r#-
nrr>a|t1*nt D, Fink: rafwoln* tmriretarv,
Rnv TCIa-ar, Lahor Tt»mplo: flnanclal a#c-
rs-rnrv. 15. C, TTnlirht: traaaurer. Gonrvr
Wa-swil: hHilnww oorant. W. F. Dunn,
Room tft?. Lahor Temple.
UTHKUTYPEnS' AND ELECTROTVP-
era' Union. No. 81, of Vanoouver
and Vlotoria—Meets aecond Wednesday
of eaoh month, 4 p.m., Labor Tempi*.
Preaident. Chas. Bayley: recording seoretary, Chris Homewood, S4I llth Ave.
Eaat
STREET   AND   ELECTRIC   RAIL WAT
Employees. Plonser Division No. 101
—Meeta Labor Tomple, second and
fourth Wednesdays at I p.m., and flrst
and third Wedneadaya, 8 p.m. Presldsnt
Adam Taylor: recording eecretary*
Albert V. Lofting, 1616 Trinity Street,
phone Highland 1678; financial aeoretary*
Fred. A. Hoover, 1408 Clark Drive.
STEAM   ENGINEERS,  INTERNATION-
al Looal 197—Moots every Wednesday, l p. m.; Room 104, Labor Temple.
Financial aeeretary, e. Prendergaat,
Room 116.
TAILOH8.   JOURNEYMAN   TAILORS'
UNIOk OF AMERICA, Local No.lTl
—Meetinga held flrat Tuesday ln eaoh
month, f. u.m.    President, J, T. Ella-
worth
retary
aeeretary,
recording and corresponding l__
C. McDonald, Box S01; flnanolal
L, Wakely, P.O. Box 608.
TILE LAYERS' AND HELPERS', LO-
___ cal No. 62—Meets flrat and third
Wednesdays eaoh month, I p.m. President, J. Kavanagh; secretary, A. Jamla.
aon. 64 Fifth Ave. East
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 124—
Meetp last Sunday eaoh month, t
p.m. President, A. E. Robb; vlce-prealdent A. H. England; secretary-treasurer,
R. H. Neelanda. P.O. Box 66.
 JX o.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADEB AND
Labor Council—Meeta every aecond
and fourth Wedneaday at 8 P.m., In
Labor Hall. President, D. 8. Cameron:
financial secretary, H. Olbb; general
secretary, B. D. Grant P. O. Box 184.
The public in Invited to attend.
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS masts svsry
second and fourth Thursday of saeh
month ln Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St., at 8 p.m. President J. L. Hogg, Hankoy Blk.. Sapperton; Secretary, A, McDonald, 811 Royal
Ave.. New Westminster.
PLUMBERS' and 8TEAMPITTERB' Local 4IB—Meeta every seoond and
fourth Friday of month in Labor HaU*
7:10 p.m. President D. Webstar: aeerstary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 616, New
Westminster, B, C
UNITED    BROTHERHOOD    OF  CAR-
6enters. Local Union No. 1688—
i ovary Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Tomple, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, Mr. C. Schmendt; seoretary. A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westmlnater, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Westmlnater, cor*
ner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every aecond Sunday of each month, at
1:10 p. m. Preaident, E. S. Hunt: aeeretary, F. W, Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
n.T.FfTRTr'AL WHftinCftir, I.CoCAhl^
6*1 annlfli* M*n1—M*»-»t« flrwt anil
♦MM MonrtevPi of *»*ch' month. Room 8*6.
« rt.m. P*mM«M IT. P MrPoy; rcoorfl.
1n«r secretary. Geo. Atbera: business
agent F. L. Estinghausen, Room 807.
LONOPWOppMirVfl' TVTFRiV*TTnVAL
AffffnPTATTO-W. No. »« t 61—MeH*
mvurv PrMfiv #v»*n|n*r. 146 A1creni'-»i- 9»
President P. Peel; secretary. Goo. Thomas,
MA^WTVIRTP* Wt 16Y—MART* SfcP.
ostfl end fourth Thurtdevs, 7:16 nm
Pr-M-Menr. Chum, Mattlnson: winrrllna-
w*t»T*r J Brookes: flnanclal seoratarv
T H. McVety.
COWAN ft BROrtKHOUSR
Printers nf B.C. Peileratlon.at
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer.  Phone Sey. 4490
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastingi Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operate, by the lateat, moat aeientific and painleu methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
Honest and Artlatlo
Dentiitry
Tbe moit lelentlfle and
up-to-date method!
DR. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
,    301 DOMINION TRUST BLDG.
Open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
RING UP SEYMOUR 2354 FOR APPOINTMENT
SYSTEMS
We carry everything
for the o^fee
The most successful busineu men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunsmuir Street
Phona Exchange Sejr. 38284827
TIOTOBJA, a. O.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—M.Pts flrst and third Wednesday, Lahor Hsll, 731 Johnson street,
at 8 p.m. President. A. Watchman, .ec-
rstary. K R Norrls, Labor Hail, Victoria. B.C.
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Jolnera—Meeta every Tuesday,
I p.m.. at Labor hall, T8I Johnston St
Preaident J. E. Bryan: recordlnt secretary, Geo. L. Dykeman; business aaent
and flnanclal secretary, W. A. Parkin-
«nn, Boa SSO.
"  ■!■■■■' WlWt
KTMm-TOT.WT MTWHinW T1NTOV. VO. 166
Wo^torn F*n>ratlnn of •fin*".""-'---
M#ot* RuniHv •vMifnrn, In TTnlon Hull.
PwMmt. W Wofnfnv. Mrrrtiirv.trMii-
iiror, M. P. VllUnwivo, Klmhurlov B.C,
LAPT«MTTH MWFTW TWTOW. LOf»AL
Wn,   3886.   TT.   M    W.   of   A.—WMli
WftflnMrtiiy. TTnfnn Hill. T D.m.    \*r**k
<1«nt,   Sum  Oiitlirlc,  NMNitsMW, Dunou
M>TC<»nrU.  T^rlvm'th.  B   "
NANATMO TirtPAt. fWftfc tT.MtV.nf A.
—Meat* avarv Mnnriflv nt I'M p.m, jn
*hc AthWIp ritih. PhunH Sfrp«t Arthur
Tor-Inn. Fn* 416. Nunlamo. ft (7,
-t*'M"t;'TU,AVT> T.OHAT, TTVTOV. Wo,
•MB. TT. M. W  of A.—Mot* (tv-rr
Siinitiiv 7 Tt.m„ In V. M. W  of A. -hull.
Prpfslri^nt. Ton. Nnvlnr; nwrAtarv. Jimai
Omith. Bn-T 64. PiimMrliinil. R f.
TRATT. MTT.Tj AWrT' fltfH!T,ffcftMtW-i
TTnlon, Wo. 166. W. V. nt W — MmIn
•vm-v Mnnilftv  dt   T?6fl  p.tn.    ProM-Vnt,
w   w  PoHn'!  rwrefiirv.  FrtnU Psrnn-
h*»11   Post «6. Trull. W   f\
tiOPAT,    VivrnTTvwp.    nw*    finpTAL
PHiMOPPATTP P A P T T — PitMIc
nnwtlniw In TWunlnlnn ThMtro. Ornnvllls
fttraot,  Pun-Inv wvninw.     R»pr#tary,  J.
AtllWUI.  PoftW   __    T.ahrtf-  TatfinV.
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
Thlt is a gift that will be appreciated in any part of the world.
Tastefully bound In three bindings.   Cloth, $1.60; Ooie Calf, $3.50;
Burnt Leather, $8.75.
THE ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
325 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
iTwowxe or goal Mijrara biov<
Co»l mlntnir rliihti of th. Dominion,
In Manitoba. Raflkatr.tmwan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, th. Worthwoat Ter-
rltorlffl and In a portion of th* Provlno.
of British Columbia, may be 1mb.i1 for
a term of tw.nty-on. year, at an annual
rental of tl an acre. Not mora than
2.680 acran will bs leaned to one applicant.
, Application for law. must be mad. by
the applicant In person to th. Aaent or
Bub-Aaent of the dlitrlet tn which th.
rights applied for ar. altuated.
In surveyed territory th. land mimt b.
described by sections, or least subdivisions of -sections, and In tinxurveyed territory the tract applied for shall b.
staked by th. applicant hlms.lf,
Each application must he accompanied
by a fee of 66. which will be refunded If
the riant* applied for are not available,
but not otherwise, A royalty shall b.
paid on the merchantable output of th.
mine st the rat. of flv. cents psr ton.
The person operating the mine •hull
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pnv the royalty thereon, Tf the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
should t» furnished at leant one. a year.
t The lease will Include th. coal mining
right* only, but the lessee may bf permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary fnr the working of the mine at th.
rate of 61ft an acre.
For full Information application
should be made to.the Secretary of th.
Department of the Interior. Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands.
W. H. PORT.
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
W. B.—TTnanthorlsed niit>1 lea tlon Of
thin ndvertlnemont will not he nald for.
«2Ssjsass^
 Of America  .^~-.,
COfmawT ___o_ __________ not I m
I FRIDAY. DECEMBER 6, UU.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE BTVB
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS
Thia ia one make of underwear in which you can iecure good
quality and a perfect fit The makers Studied theie two
requisites and have produced garments that clearly ahow
much thought along theae lines. Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally aasociate themielvei with underwear that fits the figure.
If you want real underwear comfort thia winter we would
recommend that you try Merode.  We know its merits.
Merino separate garments at
$1.00 and $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
$3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to M years, ind ill sizes
for women.
Merino Union Suite at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garment! in
light or medium weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
LIMITED
575 Granville Street      Vanoouver, B. C.
It will pay yon to set onr snowing for Fill.   Prices Aat cannot
be beaten or repeated in Aa City.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 ■ Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADYT. AND WE WILL
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
LEARN to be in expert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hate; make and curl
plumes, etc. A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for e few dollars a week, when you can learn
a profession with short hours ind easy work that
pays a high salary? We guarantee positions to our
graduates.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
. For Paraculan iee Madame Mills, Suite 319, 1100 Seymour St
or Phone Seymour 7450L
BOY'S
Would, you like to receive a remembrance every month.     Fill ln
blank below, mall to me and I will aend you one.
SAM M SCOTT
Boya' Clothing Specialist 72S Oranvllle Straet, Vanoouver, B. Ca
MAILING LIST ~~ "
Name	
Street Addreu 	
P.O.Box      City	
Age      Birthday	
"Best Three Dollar Hal on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Grssville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
J. A FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware snd
Sporting Goods
111 Hastings St., W.
Coal. Coke & Wood
PROMPT
DELIVERY
ROYAL WOOD YARD
PHONE FAIRMONT 1009
Corner Dufferin Street & Columbia Avenue
Phone Seymour 1390
Always Open
The T. EDWARDS Co.
SUCCESSORS TO
ARMSTRONG & EDWARDS
«,     Sfatteral -Btmtora, Embalms
612 MAIN STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
WOrtAn SUFFDAGE-
Edited by MISS H. R. QUTTERIEH3E, Room 818, Labor Temple.
Woman Need the Vote
There was at one time a certain
logic ln giving the franchise to grown
men, when the existence and stability
of the nation depended upon their defence, and when the ultimate value'of
tbe elector could be reduced to hla
ability to perform  military service.
It wae fair that only those who were
liable to a sudden call to arms ahould
be aelected to decide the relatione of
the people to a rival.nation, and that
the vote for war ihould be eaat by
the same men who bore the brunt of
the battle and the burdon of protection.
We are told by historians that citizens were first called together Into
assemblages which were the beginning of popular government when
there wai to be war declared or for
purpoiei ot defence.
The modern city to-day Is no longer
a' feudal city of militarism; it la a
stronghold of Industrialism, and the
lighting ll not with the enemy outside. The . problems of to-day are
largely Internal and Industrial, One
of the most difficult of theae problem! Ii the insufficient regulation of
Industrial condition!. The women are
needed here as voten to regulate.
It la sometimes said that tbe franchise for women would be valuable
only aa far aa the educated woman
exercised lt This atatement totally
dliregarda the fact that matters ln
which woman'a judgment are moit
needed are too basic and primitive to
be largely Influenced by what we
call education.
The condition, sanitary and other
of the faotory and workshop in
which the Induitrlal procenei are
carried on to-day affects the health
and llvei of thousand! ot women.
Myrlada of women are out In theie
place! producing the commodities at
one time produced In the home.
Two centurlei ago they did all
the spinning, weaving, dyeing, sewing,
much of the brewing and baking, and
thouiandi of operation! which have
been puihed out of the domeitto eyi-
tem into the factory system.
During the domestic lyitem women could dictate concerning the houn
and the Immediate condition! ot their
work. But suddenly, since the application of steam to the process of
kneading bread or turning the iplndle,
which really meana only a differing
ot motive power and not ln the leaat
an essential change In her work. The
woman has been dented the privilege
of regulating the condltlona which
Immediately surround her.
In the sweat ihopi.ihe carries on
her old business ot making clothes,
yet all the legislation concerning the
regulation of these shops Is passed by
men, and very Inefficient It'll at that
Women directly controlled the surroundings of their work when their
arrangement! were domeitto, but they
cannot do It now unless they have tbe
franchise. The mechanism by whloh
a etate or provinoe select! lta representative!, and by which a number of
people are able to embody their collective will In leglilatlon.    —H. O.
A well-known Bishop, while, visiting
at a bride'i new home for the lint time
waa awakened quite early by the 10ft
tone! of a aoprano voice singing "Nearer, Hy Ood, to Thee." Ae the Bishop
lay ln bed he meditated upon the piety
which hie young hostess muit ponesi
to enable her to begin her day'a work
In auch a beautiful frame of mind.
At breakfast he spoke to her about
It, and told her how pleased he was,
"Oh," ahe replied, "that'i the hymn
I boll the egge by; three venei for
soft and five for hard."
"Never mind," laid the cheerful
Idiot to a friend who was down on his
luok, "remember there'! alwaya one
place where you can flnd money and
aympathy."
"Where!" aiked the friend, brightening up,
"In the dictionary," replied the C.I.,
aa he moved oil.—Boston Globe.
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goea
500 Gallery Seat, at 15c.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Viudivllle
Mean,
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, t.lS
Season's Prices—
Matinee 15c, Evenings lEc, 25c.
FOR EXPERT
Watch and Jewelery
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller ind Optician
143 Haatinga Street Weat.
WESTERN
STUDIO
Makers of Fine
Portraits
423 MAIN STREET
P. SELIGMAN, Prop.
Public Meetinga.
At the regular public meeting of
the B. C. Women'! Suffrage League
on Wednesday, December 10th, ln the
Labor Temple st 8 p.m., the apeaken
will be Mra. J. Douglas Fearn and
Mn. Campbell Johnson. Come and
aak queitlom.
Mt Plaaaant Suffrage League,
A public meeting li held every Monday evening under the auipicei of the
above league In the Lee hall, Main
itreet, near Broadway, at t p. m. A
hearty welcome to all enquirer. Into
suffrage.
The dance arranged by the B. C.
Women'a Suffrage League for December 3rd, haa been postponed to January 28, 1914. Ticket! taken for December 3rd will be available at tre
later date.
There will be a suffrage meeting at
Staple'! hall, Fraaer itreet South
Vancouver, on Friday, December 5th,
at 8 p. m. The public are Invited. Mrl.
Parr haa charge of thli meeting and
all enqutrlea ahould be directed to
her at 656 Fifth avenue eait The
ipeaken will be Mn. Parr, Mn. Dorothy Darlington, and othen.
A suffrage meeting and concert will
be given ln Ash hall, Fraser avenue,
on December 12th, at 8 p. m. Mr, Alh
hai very kindly let the auffraglata
have the use of the hall (or that evening, A very enjoyable evening la
looked for. Thoae who live In thai
neighborhood please make a note
of lt.
THE STATUS OF WOMEN
The following are excerpt! from a
pamphlet on the status of women In
B. 0. that la shortly to be lined by
the B. C. Suffrage League. The
author la Alta France! Chriitlan of
Seattle, formerly of thli city:
■ "The hand that rooks the cradle
rulei the world," eaya the gallant
chlvalroui, unthinking knight We
can almost iee him aa he utters the
words, bent low before the lady fair,
his hand to hia heart.
But does ltT Did not the knight
forget truth In gallantry, and omit'the
one word—ahould. The hand' that
rocks the world ihould rule the
world, hut how can lt If the cradle
Is empty? If the father of the child
chooses she may never see her baby
from the time lt Is born until lt attains Its majority. (Even with the
later amendment! to this act, the living father remains the aole guardian
of hla child.—(Editor Woman'! Department.) It la worthy of comment
that thla law, making the father sole
owner of the child was passed in
1216, being one of the clauses of
magna Charta.
Concerning the exclusion of women
trom the parliamentary franchise
much haa been said and still remains
to be said—and done.
The objections raised by that highly Intelligent animal—MAN—are auch
as to make one wonder if, after all,
Jealouiy Is not at the bottom of the
whole buitneu.
"Woman's iphere li the home. Let
her stay there and she will do more
good to the world* than by bothering
herself with politics."
How tired one geta of hearing that
superficial, inconsistent remark. If
man believed that woman's sphere
was the home, and her work lay
there, why haa he taken her work
away from the home? Why Is he employing her by the million ln his factorial and workshops all over the
country?
When man Invented the flnt sewing machine and put up the lint factory chimney he took one of the flnt
atepa toward! giving women the fran-
chlie.
When he said to her: "Tou ahall no
longer stay at home to do the work
you have been doing there for centuries, . Tou must leave your home
and come and do that work ln my
faotory and workshop, for lt Is done
more quickly and cheaper that way,"
he should have remembered that lt
la Inevitable sooner or later she
would demand to have a voice In the
assembly which controlled the work
she waa doing. That she haa no voice
in making the laws accounts for the
faot that where women are exclusively employed there prevail the most
insanitary conditions and the most
dangerous, the longer houn and the
smallest wages; and lt is significant
the strongest opponents to women
having the vote are the larger employer of female labor.
Another favorite objection Is that
the experience of ages Is proof that
a woman's only natural sphere la the
home. To this we reply "What experience has she had of anything
else?" The fact tbat women have
managed their homes and reared
their children, often ln the face of
great difficulties, in a way that commands the admiration of all, la no
proof that they are unfit to undertake any other work wltb equal success, but Is rather a proof to the
contrary.
The woman question, io called, Is
not entirely a woman question. It
Is a race question, the solution of
which vitally concerns all men, women and children. The equality of the
sexes Is not an opinion or a theory-
It Is a natural fact. But equality does
not mean similarity. The sexes are
essentially dissimilar, and must alwayi remain io. Each Is the complement of the other and neither can exlit without the other any more than
water oan exist without land, or
land without water. It la for the recognition of this natural fact that
women are striving today, for until lt
is recognized the whole race must
suffer, men equally with women.
I care not tor the truth or error of
the opinions held or uttered nor for
the wisdom of the words or time of
their attempted expression, when I
consider thli great question of fundamental ilgnlflcance, thli great flght
which muat flnt be iecure before free
society can be said to stand on any
foundation, but only on temporary or
capricious props.
Rich or poor, white or black, great
or small, wise or foolish, In teason or
out of season, In the right or In the
wrong, whosoever will speak, let him
speak, and whosoever will hear, let
him hear. And let no one pretend to
the prerogative of Judging another
n.an'8 liberty. In thli reipect there ll,
and there can be, no superiority of
penons or privileges, nor tbe slightest
pretext for any—J. A, Andrewi, Governor of Maasachuietti.
About 60 per cent, of the carpenten
of thla city were employed this week.
INDUSTRIAL LEGISLATION.
"Working women ln large numben
are beginning to reallie that though
the industrial woman ln Industry may
be transient, women In industry Sa
an Inititutlon are there to atay. To
be there uneducated aa to the Juat
value ot their labor, without regulation ot houn and unitary working
condltlona, women are a menaee to
the well being of society at large and
aa underbidden tend to lower the
statui of all workera."
In the statei where women vote
thla haa been very clearly aeon, and
leglilatlon to ralie the itatui and
protect the working woman haa heen
paaied. The enforcing of thia leglilatlon la placed in the charge of an
Induitrlal Welfare Committee, con-
■liting of three unsalaried members
appointed by the Governor. One member repreient! the employen, one
the employee!, and one must be an
Impartial penon representing the
public. The duty of thli committee
li to declare for any occupation standards of (a) houra ot labor for women
and. minora; (b) physical and moral
oondlttona of labor for women and
minora; (e) minimum wage for women workera; (d) minimum wage for
minora. Power li given In tome
itater. to regulate the hours of work
for women aad ohlldren, that order
may be adapted to condition! of work
In different tradei and a working
day established of inch length
that will not Injure the health
of the women employed. Compare
the above oondlttona with thoae.prevailing ln state, or placea where
women are not yet penoni ln the
eyei of the law. Miss Jane Addama,
speaking of the benefit! suffrage had
bestowed on women, Said: "There la
a decided improvement ln the general poaltion of women, and all organized industrial, social and philanthropic agencies flnd they oan obtain
better and quloker results through
the power of the ballot" The working women of Brltlih Columbia eould
get Juit aa good results If they would
come out and help themselves to he
cltlieni by becoming auffragliti, "who
would be free themielvei muit itrlke
the blow," and when the women work-
era reallie thla nochlng can be withheld that they deilre to obtain, for
In unity la atrength.
Aftir Porty-Flve Yun.
The suffragista in the States held
their forty-fifth annual convention at
Washington, D. C, from November
the 29th to December 5th. Nearly a
thousand delegatea were present, representatives of every state In the
union being present Among those
present were Miss Jane Addama,
Senator Helen King Mollnson of Col-
orada; Mra. C. Bradford, state superintendent of schools, Colorado. It
was evident that the spirit of the con-
ventlon waa the ipirlt that li at the
back of the whole of the woman'a
movement if It takea the form of an
International congreu at Budapeat
or a national convention at Washington, D, C, or an ordinary propaganda
meeting In a hall, or on an orange
box at a atreet corner the allpervad-
lng spirit la manifest, the ipirlt that
makea for freedom and progreu.
Mra, Pattle Pacobs, delegate to
the convention in Washington
from Birmingham, Alabama, said: "In
the suffragist ranks are many women
following the vision of their soul."
From sweat-ahops and drawing-
roomi, from factory and office, from
■chool and home; women, with long
houn and scant pay, are yet unwilling to etand atlll and let thli great
world movement pan them by—for
they dealre to see their daughter!
have the lighting chance denied themielvei. Women of leisure, whose
souls burn to equalize some of the
hideous unfairness ot life; a vast
arm of women, awake to the spirit of
the age ln which we lire, an age with
•octal comclousness."
There are now one-fifth of the
women ln the United States exercls.
Ing the full franchise, It the hope of
•uffraglsts comei to pass an amendment to the constitution will ln a
comparatively short space ot time
give the ballot to women in all the
states ln the union at present unfranchised.   When will B. C. awaken?
$225.00
IN GOLD COIN
GIVEN AWAY
In order to eclipse all previous Christmas trade, we make
this liberal proposition.
The first twenty-five purchasers of new pianos from our regular stock at our regular net
prices will receive 8225 ln Gold,
divided Into three prizes.
The 1st Drawn Ticket
8100 In Gold
The 2nd Drawn Ticket
876 In Gold
The 3rd Drawn Ticket
860 In Gold
Purchasers will receive tickets, the duplicates of which we
retain until the twenty-five pianos are sold, when notification
will be sent out aB to date ot
drawing, The customers will
then meet and appoint the one
to draw the lucky tickets.
Ihe Oldest* Music House InHC
5SS Granville St
THE FAMOUS G0URLAY
Pianos can be purchased from ui
at 925 down and ten dollars per
month,    This  Is  the  house  that
firotects the purchaser, ln case of
oss of employment the payments
are postponed. Not one dissatisfied purchaser on our books, and
most of our business Is done by
recommendation.
AJELLO PIANO CO.
857 ORANVILLC 8T.
ED
JAMES STARK tSU
manataa msn wan      .    mm* Bun, ins a*, tt aim rm.
aetma, auott asm ostmsu      sesusay sos hie. tt sen »■,
THB STORE THAT SERVES TOU WILL
Re-organisation of Business Sale
CONTINUES	
Sensational Reductions Bring
Sensational Results
OUR DEPENDABLE MEEOHAND
OETHER WITH OUR CLEAN AND BUI
LIKE METHODS, HAVE MADE OUB
THE MOST IMPORTANT MEROF
EVENT OF THIS or ANY OTHER
OTTT.
Space forbids items; read evening papers.   We give yoa details aad
prices.  We atand st the bsck of ell our i
WEBSTERS' PAY FREIGHT ON ALL PROVISIONS
Economical Prices
Range All Through Our Store
Coffee, freih ground;
reg. 40o; I Ibs..|1M
Rolled Oati, freeh
milled, 8 Una.,   28c.
Balrd'a Chow Chow or
M. * C. Plcklea, per
bottle  20c
Wl WILL APPRECIATE
WILL CONVINCI YOU
Onr Beet now?, union
mad*, 4Mb Ik. (IM
Butter, flint Hasten
Creamery, S ihe (IM
Coooa, Kootenay,   per
tin, H lb  lie.
Tea, our Me. Ceylon
Blend, t lbi....(M0
A TRIAL ORDER WHIOH Wl FHL SURE
THAT WE ARE REASONABLE IN PRICE
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEV. 8301, 8302
1278 ORANVILLE (TREET
GOLD  WEATHER  IS  COMING
GET ONE OF OUR HOT WATER BOTTLES
Wa GasiaalM Th«a la List Twa Yaws
2-Qt.,re|. $2.00, Special $1.50      3-Qt., Rs|. $2.25, Special $1.75
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU
MARETT & REID
%maX_£i!aT pmcc'sts iB-g^Sfra;
The Burning Question
Ii yonr Cook Stove or Range
one that givea satisfaction, or
li lt the Und that waatea the
fuel, burni the eakea and plee
on tbe top aad leavee them
raw on the bottom.
IP SO, now ii the time to make
the change, and when you
make the change, there li no
bitter   range   you   eould get
than
"The Stay Satisfactory Range"
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
W. C. STEARMAN
Hardware Merchant
848 ORANVILLE (TREET
:: PAGE & COMPANY ::
HATTERS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS
898 GRANVILLE ST.
VANCOUVER, B. C,
WE UNHESITATINGLY RECOMMEND
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
As being the best soap on the
market for
General Household Purposes
POSITIVELY THE LARGEST
SALE   OF   ANY  SOAP   IN
WESTERN CANADA
There is a Reason—Try It and See
SHOES FOR MEN
(HOES FOR SERVICE
(HOES FOR DRESS
UNION (HOES FOR COMFORT
FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at the service of every man who desires the best shoes his money can buy
W. J. ORR (Opposite City Hsll) 204 MAIN ST., PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
HOTEL   DUNSMUIR
RICHARD AND DUNSMUIR STREETS
Half Block from Labor Temple
250 Bedrooms, 100 with Bath.   Long Distance Telephones,
Steam Heat. Hot and Cold Running Water in Every Room.
Our large new Electric Auto 'Bui is Free and meets all trains
and boats
MERCHANTS' LUNCH, 12:00 to 2:00 p.m.. 35 CENTS. .
DINNER A LA CARTE. 5:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Telephone Exchance, Sey. 8880.        A. J. LISTER, Mgr.
HOTEL STRATFORD
VANCOUVER'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTEL
tOO Bedrooms. 50 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Each Room
Equipped with Telephone, Hot and
Cold Water, Steam Heat, etc. Our
Beds are the Best ln any Hotel ln
America.
RATES
(Weakly) Single, 13,00, 14.00, SS.00
'•        Double, S4.50, $6.00, $7.50
Tranalent Ratal, $1.00 per day.   No
Mori.   No Lea,.
CORNER  GORE  AVENUE
AND  KEEFER STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
Hotel Stratford Co., Ltd.,
Propi.
Tohn B, Teeveni, Man. Director
BERGMAN'S CAFE
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity vlilt mi for a Flrat-Claei Mail it
Moderate Prlcea.    White Help Entirely
The best products obtained that the market affords. FIrst-claii
accommodation. Only modern system of cooking on the Pacific Coast,
second to none when compared with other American Cities on the
Coait Nicely furnished roomi In connection, juit perfected ln tbe
moot modern atyle and now ready for occupancy, at 50c, per night
and np. ,■
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3,25c
Short Orders Day and Night
GO WITH THE BUNCH To the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout Hot and Cold Water In Every Room
Wneet Oat. aad (Mil Boom ea tba recite Ooaat la Coiaeotfea
HOTEL ASTOR
C. 3. HARSH, Proprietor W. D. MARSH, Manager'
aa«wi $140 lis ap   (pedal Weekly Batoe.
avao-nua nu 147-14,
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL JKSSr'KSaffi,
Eaalsamely VualaheS        888 Sarmour at.
Centrally MoateS
c
CLARENCE HOTEL 88AB%^rR0Y
Cens, KNDHt aad SEYMOUR STREETS
VANCOUVER, S.C.
MULCAHY'S CAFETERIA   T_%'<
tar Cor*™, ten* Wan
Eixrytktni
* Cordova
» ::  HOTEL
C0NNAUGHT
■nropeaa Kaa, fl.00 Per Day Op.
" •• Up-to-Date Flrat-Claaa Dining
**      **        Room and Cafe ln Connection
120   ROOMS;   80   ROOMS   WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Htatad—Phone In Even
warn a raeraam mpe.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7087-7088.
^wawsi   ow    avvnanp
PRIVATE BATHS
ji Heated—Phone In Every
Room—Elevator  Services;    Bath
and Shower Bathe on all Floora.
ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS
NEW AND UP-TO-DATE
Lounging and Smoking Room,
Special   rates   to
nests.
Ratea;   (8.50 per week and up.   TIT Mctard, Si.
king Room, '< .mm SWA ojt,:        If    .    I
permanent   KjngStOIl   tlOtel
tteeettj. 12550
CLIFTON ROOMS   &^ Wafflf JS
tm__aaja^mga£aat^aaa» t&U-_V-mrZamtZ2
THE DAVID SHANTZ MEAT MARKET
412 Hastings Street, West
Our Meats are of beat quality, and we aell
from one to three cento a pound cheaper
than anyone else >
FISH MARKET AND BAKERY IN CONNECTION
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
UNION
LABEL
THS USB OF THR IAB8I, ON VOUR PRIHTINO-NO EXTRA COST TO VOD-
WIU, H8I.P UB DO OUR DUTY IN FIGHTING TUBKRCUI.OSIS
vWORKERS UNION
UNIOWTOTAMP
fjcrory
Nimsd Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass,
3. F. Tobln, Prea.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
Berry Bros.
Agenti for
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full  Una  ot  accessories
Repaln promptly exeouted
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 89S
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back,
Differs (rom all othir remedies.
Price (3.00, Pest Pild.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIGING   DRUGGISTS
1S2 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. O,
A  FEW  DEFINITIONS FROM
MARX'S     "CAPITAL."
A commodity la. In the tint place,
an object outside us, a thing that by
Its properties satisfies human waste
ot some sort or another. The nature
of such wants, whether, (or Instance,
they spring (roan the atomach or trom
fancy, makes no difference.
A use value, or useful article, haa
value only because human labor ln the
abstract haa been embodied or materialized In It How, then, la the magnitude of thla value to be measured?
Plainly, by the quantity o( the value-
creating substance, the labor, con.
talned In the article. The quantity
of labor however, la meaaured by lta
duration, and labor time In lti turn
(lndi lti standard In weeks, daya and
houra.
Some people might think that If
the value of a community li deter-
mined by the quantity of labor Spent
on it, the more idle end unskillful
the laborer, the more valuable would
hli commodity be, because more time
would be required In Its production.
The labor, however, tbat terms the
substance of value le homogenous labor, expenditure ot one uniform power.
The labor time socially necessary li
that required to produce an artlole
under the normal condition! of pro.
ductlon, ind with the average de-
gree of skill and lntenalty prevalent
at the time.
The value of one commodity li to
tbe value o( any other, aa the labor
time necessary (or the production o(
the one Is to the neceuary for the
production of the other.
The value of a commodity would,
therefore, remain constant, If the la-
bor time required for lta production
also remained constant. But the latter
changes with every variation In the
productiveness of labor. Thla productiveness Is determined by various
circumstances, among others by the
average amount of skill of the workmen, the state of science, and the
degree of lti practical application, tho
loclal organisation ot production, the
extent and capabilities ot the meana
of production, and by physical conditions.
The flrat chief function of money
ll to supply commodities with the material for the expression of their values, or to represent their valuei, ai
magnitudes of the same denomination,
qualitatively equal, and quantatlvely
eomparable. It this serves as a universal measure of value. And only by
virtue ot thla function doei gold, the
equivalent commodity par excellence
become money.
It la not money that renders com-
nudities commensurable. Juat the
contrary. It Is because all commodities, aa values, are realised human
labor, and therefore commensurable,
that their values can be measured by
one and the same apeclal commodity,
and the latter be converted Into the
common meaaure of their value, I. e„
Into money. Honey as a measure of
value la the phenomenal form that
must of necessity be assumed by tbat
meaaure of value which Is Imminent
in commodities, labor time.
Ai measures of value and aa atan-
dardi of price, money has two entirely distinct functions to perform.
It le the measure of value inasmuch
aa It li the socially recognised incar-
nation of human labor; tt Is the standard of price Inasmuch as lt la a
fixed weight of metal.
It la quite clear ln the first place
that a change tn the value of gold doee
not, in any way affect Its function as
a atandard price. No matter how thli
value varies, the proportions between
the values of different quantities of
the metal remain constant.
In the second place, a change In
the value of gold doea not Interfere
with Its functions at a meaaure of
value. The change affecte all com.
modules ilmultaneouily, and, therefore, ceteris paribus, leaves, their rel
atlre values, Inter se, unaltered, al.
though these prices are now expressed
In higher or lower gold prlcei.
Juit as when we estimate the value
ot any commodity by a definite quantity of the use value of aome other
commodity, so In 'estimating the value
of the former ln gold we assume nothing more than that the production
of a given quantity of gold coats, at
the given period, a given amonnt of
labor. As regards the fluctuations of
prices generally, they are subject to
the laws of elementary relative value.
Evlla of Child Labor.
The Injurious effects of labor on
ohlldren may be aummed up ae follows:
Injury to the weaker organism.
Interference with growth and phyelcal development
Production of aplnal and bone deformities.
Production of pathological condltlona predisposing to certain diseases
In early and late life.
Physical, mental end moral degeneration.
Shortening of life.
The effects of Industrial dust,
poisons, etc., Is comparatively greater
on children than on adults, and the
relative number of all Industrial ae.
oldenti te greater among children
workera than adults.
Mlnin' Preu Committee.
Editor B. C. Federationist: Allow
me a little space ln your columns for
the purpose of commenting on Sam
Price's report on the Vancouver
Island strike, appearing In the dearly
beloved Bowser-controlled rag, the
Nanalmo Dally Herald. It la beaded:
'■commissioner who Investigated the
strike oondemna the U. M. W. of A.
or lta officials for bringing on strike
at Nanalmo." Of course tbat was
fully expected aa he Is owned by the
capitalist class and must do bis
maater'a bidding.
Allow me to quote pasaagea ln his
report and criticise them as I go on.
"The companies and their managers
and superintendents on their part
deny any unfair treatment o( the men
and any man who had a grievance
waa permitted and encouraged to
eome to the management with his
grievance." Now, when T. W. Crothen was here he was shown a stack
ot documnetary evidence of grlev-
anoea and wouldn't believe the evidence put before him. Of coune, he,
tbe same as his partner, Sam Price,
only had to believe what hla masters
told him. uet me quote one instance
ot a man going to Mr. Stockett with
a grievance and the method of hla
elimination. This man was employ
ed as an engineer on a boiler under
steam for ten hours a uay. Of course
the Chinamen who were using the
power the boiler generated had their
dinner hour but the engineer was ln
charge of the boiler during tbat time
and could generally flnd plenty to do.
He waa paid for a nine-hour day at
the rate ot $3.00 He appeared before
Mr. Stockett and claimed pay for ten
hours, but Mr. Stockett, with his Inherent diplomacy, beat him down to
i'/i hours, and told the Chinamen's
boss to watch the' engineer and see
that he did DM hours' work. When
the Job was finished, upon the engineer asking the master mechanic for
another job, he was told there was
no more work. No fault was found
with his work, but as tbe master mechanic didn't like him there was no
more work for bim, and this Ib one
ot the cases tbat was laid out for
Mr. Crothers, and tbat is what happened. So a man who went to the
fountalnhead with his grievances was
treated ln this way in nearly every
Instance.
IWhen Mr. Price talks about unexpired agreements and agreement committees, he strikes a very humorous
chord, for their agreements were a
Joky and the committees were known
as the "dirty 13." When the agree-
menta were drawn up the company
had nearly all the say; the "dirty 13"
would have lost their Jobs If they
bad said too much and It the rank
and file weren't satisfied, they eould
get out The Weitern Fuel Company
had. a well organlted system of espionage and woe betide the victim of
that system.
It Is very nice to hear tbe'traitor
Tully Boyce talk about the homes
owned by workmen In Nanalmo, but
how about the homes of the victims
tbat have been broken up by the
greedy conscienceless machine, where
the head of the house has been forced
off the Island. Isn't lt necessary to
have a powerful organisation to back
the worken up In their Just demands
and curtail the powers of the machine,
and how oould we form such an organisation In Canada when there are
only about 160,000 union men and
133,000 are already In International
unions? The company's objections
to the U. M. W. of A. are that it la
controlled by foreign socialists who
care nothing for the Interests of this
country; they cannot be relied upon
to keep their agreements and their
leaden have | to be bribed Jn order
to get alongj with the union at all.
Now let ua take a dig at those objections and right here let me aay that
whoever made these statements requires an expert- to examine him as
to hts sanity:
In the lint place, there Is no suoh
tiling aa a foreign socialist, as we
socialists know no suoh things as
geographical boundary lines and I
don't think the capitalist does either
aa evidenced by the number ot so-
called foreign capitalists that are
grabbing the resources of Canada.
What love have the Western Fuel
Co.'a officials for their country when
they aoheme out of paying tbat help
to run the country? All this talk
about country and foreigners Is mere
piffle. Look at the natives of other
countries the coal barons are em-'
ploying ln their attempt to force the
worken baok Into tbe mines.
Ae for the U, M. W. of A. breaking
agreements, the companies know that
they wilt bave to keep their end of
the agreement or the powerful U. M,
W. of A. will Jump on them like a
shot, and that Ir what la worrying
them, The companies would limply
have the respective local unlona to
deal with Juit the same aa they did
with their petty little two-by-four
Ralph Smith unions, with this great
difference, that In the event ot the
loeal unions being unable to procure
an equitable agreement, they would
have 400,000 fellow worken behind
them, and the companies would have
a tough proposition to crush them
aa they have crushed the little unions
ln the past.
I see the great S. Price haa to do
hla little bit of mudallnglng about
the union leadersbavlng to be brlded
Let bim prove tne aocusatlon and
state the names of the guilty parties
and he will iee how quickly the recall
ll put Into effect and tha guilty parties eliminated. I wonder If he Is
getting a bribe for doing tbe dirty
work of the olasa he represent!, I'll
bet he Is getting a bigger salary from
the capitalist government than any
official ln the U. M. W. of A. is for
doing useful work.
Let us now go on under the section
headed: "Views of others." Ot coune
the Joint committee and a few old
shellbacks will back up the disss that
has been feeding them sop and quote
the time-worn arguments about the
State of Washington profiting by the
strike, and the men not having a
chance to vote on the strike, but
there is no need to dwell on those
arguments; the Dally Herald murdered them months ago. Can he wonder
at the Marseillaise being flayed and
fault being found with constituted
authority? I oall lt prostituted author"4
ity when I see around me evidences
of the way that authority has been
used. Up till quite recently tt cost
the taxpayers of British Columbia between four and Ave hundred dollars
a month to keep one man at work, a
man who, by the way, would not do
an honest day's trork If he eould
scheme out ot lt. Bright constituted
authority when two of the specials
get mixed up and one of them gets
hit behind the ear with a coffee pot,
dying shortly after,
Doem't lt seem feasible that the
provincial and dominion governments
SOCIALLY PRODUCED, WHY
NOT (OCIALLY OWNED?
Everything that Is sold on the
world's market today la socially produced by the working class, but lt Is
owned by the capitalist class. We will
take a piece of coal and ahow'you
the many different kinds ot labor that
Is embodied ln the production ot tbat
coal before it enters your stove.
A certain piece Of land haa Indications of coal and the land la either
purchased or handed over by the government (thla Is the usual method) to
a bunch of capitalists, The coal ll
probably one hundred feet below the
surface so the capitalists start ln to
dig down for the coal, but having
nothing to dig with,they look around
for some picks and shovels to carry
on the work. In order to make picks
and shovels Iron haa to be taken out
of the ground and shaped Into picks,
so the. capitalists decide to let some
one else make the picks and as by thla
time a bunch of men have asked the
capitalists to allow them to do the
digging, they give ln to the men, To
make the picks and sbove.ls minera
have to dig the Iron, lumbermen out
trees for the handles, and moulders
for shaping the Iron. We will now
say that the plcka are on the Job and
also the men, but the men are not
naked; they are dressed In overalls
and shirts and they have recently had
a meal, ao before thoie men were,
ready for work, cotton had to be grown
and made Into cloth, grain, beef, potatoes, etc., had to be grown and transported to the men, shacks have to
be built (or the men to sleep ln, ao the
lumberman and the carpenter take a
hand and so we find that before and
during the production of coal almost
every kind of labor has to be applied,
After the coal Is out of the mine lt
has to be transported and ao the rail'
way workera take a hand and the
teamsters and the trains and wagona
have to be built before It can reach Its
final destination. Now then, what
part have tbe owners of that mine
taken ln the, production? None whatever. They hire a boss and he hires
the men and he telle them what to do
and after the nay's work Is done the
worker goes to a place called home
and fills himself with pork and beans
and rests up for a tew hours ready (or
another day. The capitalist, what o(
him? Automobiles, splenld houses, delicious (ood, (ast women, balls, banquets, pleasure trips and a leisured
Ume generally and he never raised a
pick to obtain those things. It the
workera want to enjoy what they pro-
luce, tbey must own the machinery
o( production.
Now tor the'promlied test, by which,
when applied to a man, lt may be seen
whether the government he meana to
give his support to Is of the one sort
or of the other. Put him to this question: Will you, sir, or will you not,
concur In putting matters on such a
footing, ln respect to the liberty of the
press, and the liberty of publlo discussion, that, at the handa ot the persons exercising the powers of government, a man shall have no more fear
from speaking and writing against
them, than from speaking and writing
for them? It hla answer be yea, the
government he. declares ln favor ot, la
an undespotlo one; If bis anawer be
no, the government he declares in favor of, Is a despotic one.—Jeremy Ben-
tham. i
should be criticised considering that
the Financial Times ot Londan, England, making a trip for tbe purpose.
But according to the article ln the
Times he hasn't Inspired much confidence in hts special pets, the Canadian Northern, Canadian Collieries,
Mackensle & Mann outfit that our
friend, Sam Price, so ably champions.
He said he thought there were
some grievances that needed remedying. How condescending! Well, tell
us, Sam, don't'you ihlnk we stood
a good chance of remedying them
by Joining a powerful organization
like the U. M. W. of A., even If there
are a bunch of those awful socialists
attached to lt Don't you think we
can do better that way than by trusting to the Joint committee, the dirty
13, as trey are called? I don't wonder tbat they are afraid of the socialists because they'll get your goat yet.
Mr, Price dilates at great length on
the Lemon aot and If he had his way
he would make It a crime for a union
man to breathe the same atmosphere
as a acab. We don't expect any fair
dealing from a man of tbat calibre;
he simply hears hla maater'a voice
and obeys his mandates. Will the
workers get wise to their Interests
after the education they have been
getting during the last few months,
Snd throw such parasites as Crothen,
Price, Bowser, et al, overboard tor
keeps, or will they wait for a dose of
the same medicine we bave been getting? Let them sink their petty differences and get together, throwing
aside all thoughts of creed, nationality
or color, forgetting that such things
as geographical boundary lines exist,
remembering that the world contains
only two classes, capital and labor,
the one exploiting and the other exploited. Get together once and for
all and change the present system un.
der which we are groaning. They
can accomplish this very easily If they
only show the same spirit displayed
by the B, C, Miners' Liberation League
and carry the good work onto the
political as well as Industrial
Held,    Tours for the earth,
WALTER HEAD,
On behalf of the Press Committee,
Local 872, South Wellington.
South Wellington, Nov. 26th.
IpHlaltteai
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Birthday Cakea,
We Uaa onion now.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY   '
Rot Drinks and Lunches
All Ooods Freeh Dally.
ns OBurmu st.
Tsl. Say. 7104.
WHENORDERJNGASDIT
See that this Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
It stands for all that Union
Lsbor Stands for.
FRIDAY........DECEMBER 5, 181
HOTEL   CANADA
C. G. MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room, European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1S71
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Ritea to Permanent
Guests .
C0TTINGHAM k BEATTY
Proprietors
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
" ■■■■-■■■■■ ■ -—  ■ -       ■ i.'   ,m   ., ,,    j-       ,     _,
CAUER A DUUARESQ, Pr.rri.tor,
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Leading Hotel :: Auto Parties catered to.
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 135
Comer Fourth Street ud River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St., West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
m**na_____mm^maaaaamamaamaaaa——aaaaa—
first-class Grill in Connection
P.  L.  WALLINGFORD,   ManBger
PENDER HOTEL ».-»Hs3w
a.,. —_„— .a- .. R^^~p*!?S5*,nd%p.
SIS ISSSSSI
tWHT
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
" " rimlirn. fri ' an~¥3t ThrOUthoilt        C.U Wn.r i, «t.
33-35 HASTING* (TREET WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
RAINIFR  HOTFI   Cata open ,rom su °'°'o<*
IXrMllllirV    rH/lC*U   a.m. till MldnMjht,   The Beat
Meali ln the City, at Popular Prlcea;   White Cooke only employed.
Rooma Rented by the Day or Week.   First-class Llquori ind Clgan,
JOHN SNIDAR, Prop. Cornir Cordova and Carrall (ta.
Get Your Money's Worth
Pkw, S.j. 7S53 DwarMikl
Niran & Thompson
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Richards Si.       Vuceem, S. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNIRAL   OIRICTORS AND
■MBALMIftsF
Veneouvar-Offloe   and   Chap,!,
1MI Oranvllle Bt, Phone Sey. 8188.
North    Vancouver — Ofllce   and
chapel. III Second St. E.    Phone #
mm
w
m
JRIDAY DECEMBER 6, UU.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SEVEN
HOW CAN YOU
WE SO EASILY?
PenoWs NapAa
IS MANUFACTURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE KNOWLEDGE GAINED FROM
1st   Thirty-seven years experience in soap-making.
2nd. The services of our research chemist
3rd. The watchful eye of our factory superintendent
In addition to this you are helping to
BUILD UP LOCAL INDUSTRY
I which means that instead of sending your money out of the
country it stsys here snd returns to you, Pendrsy'S Naptha
Soap gives you a handsome profit and a satisfied customer.
««M-
W. J. PENDRAY & SONS, LTD.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
Dominion Hotel
VICTORIA, B. C.
■nlarged •»* RemaMled 100 ROOMS 100 BATHS
-iBilort    without    Extrava	
Comfort    without
11.00 u
STBPHI
Extravagance
American Plan   ■  11.00 Up European Plan   •  11.00 Up
 '■HBN JQNSI, Preprleter.
FUND DRAWING
TO CLOSE
Certified Check for $3000
Will Be Turned Over
on Dec. 18th
Donors Urged to Make Re
' nilttancai m Soon
as Possible
The time tor receiving donation!
tor The Fed.'i Christmas box fund tor
the wlvel and little tots of Vancouver
Island ltrlklng miners Is rapidly
drawing to a clou.. On December 15th
The Fed. will forward a certified
check to Robert Footer, president of
Dlatrlct 28, Nanalmo, to be distributed among the mothera or atrlkera'
children pro rata. The balance of the
fund will be turned over to Mr. Potter oh or about Deo. to. For thla
reaaon donors are urged te hustle In
their contribution,, to that there may
be no delay In reaching the kiddle,
for Christmaa Eve. Following Is the
Hit to dates
U. M. W. of A. No. MM, lilehel,
R O. _ , ... 118.18
Greenwood.    B. C,    collected    by
Wm. Lakeland . ... ...... 87.00
Typo Union No. 887, Nanalmo  88.00
Vancouver Local V. P. R. System
No. 1 C. T. U. of A.- *..,.,,,.  11.00
Bro, of Painter,  Decorators and
PaperhanSera, Reaina -.. 10,00
Railway Carmen Lodge 88, by P.
Hl|got .„.-„....—.. .'—   10.00
Cooke and waiters' Union No. Ill
Vanoouver   ', T.fS
W.' Churohlll, Canal, B. c. 8.00
Pievtoaaly AetaowleSgeS.
Jingle Pot Local No. 8884, Nanalmo 880.90
New Westminster Tradea and
Labor Counoll  .....„...._._ 67.75
Wm. Sloan, Nanalmo   60.00
Employeea, Sullivan Mine, Klmberley, B.C.  ...... 48,70
Street * Eleo.  By.  Employeea,
„filv. »M, New Weltmineftr.— 86.60
Boilermakers' Union No. 184, Vanoouver  ..... _,„ ;„..„ 86.88
Federated Aaa. of Letter Camera
No. .11. VaneoUver _-_—.— 88.00
Vancouver Builders' Laboren1
Union      . rliiii; 81.88
Amalgainaltd  Sheet  lleuu   Union
rm. 880, Vancouver — „  ia.W
Portland banal Mlnen' Union No.
161 111,  Stewart   ...............   10.80
Muslolana' Mutual Protective Union, Reaina   . w ,.„._ ._.„.   8,09
Miss Kllpatrlck, Vancouver .....~...    1.00
Ralph Johnson, Nanalmo ..... .....    1.00
Texada Mlnen' Union No. 118, Van
AndS  .! 110.00
C. P. R. Shop Men, Revelstoke.    51.60
Management    Committee,    Amal,
Sou.   Carpenten   and   Jolnera,
Vancouver , . .... 60.00
Sliver   Standard   Mine,   Haaelton
B.  Q...™;.;...» ,~. ... «™  16.00
Mlnen' Committee per 8. Olbaon,       ,
MerHtt  .„ !  12.00
W.  K. Baling, Rossland      1.00
John W. Bruoe, Toronto..       6.00
Wm. Boyd, Haloyon     5.00
Machinists'  Union.' Vancouver........   60.00
Local Union No. 411 V. M. W. of
A, Bellevue. Alta. „-_...™.„ 1100.00
let Bro. of Bookblndera No. 101,
Vancouver ,. ——„..—-.   16,00
Q. W. I. U. of N. A. No, 170, Haddington Iiland _..._.._.„..__   11.00
B. B, MoMaater, Vancouver™...™   11.00
Smith Curtis, Savona, B. &_.........   10.00
H. N. Frseeaaa. Manager Jlagle
Pot Mlae, Nanalmo ., ,, , u ,
Klaral Labor Jal« N» a, Naleoa
rae. Union No. 881. Venea	
'. a Trailer, Vaneouvrt ___ ™!
C. O, Johnson, Canal, R ft™	
O. A. KilMtriek. Vanoeuvi
Collected%y Smith Curlla,
Reglna Tradea, and Lahor i
Plaaterere* Union No. 10 -,—
Mlaera' Committee, per SV Olbaon,
Merritt . iZ ;	
S, Tambula. Merritt ..___._.
team Enalneers' Int. Loral No.
. 887. Vancouver ..■■■.„■■■■ .■■■■	
«uatav Praacq, Montreal...- 
, C. Clinton aad W. Murray
(raffle among T. Railway em-
ployeea) '.,,,„,...;.;	
Pattern Makers' Association™...
Bro. of Loco. Firemen * Baglne-
men No. 'Olf.ii.I...... i, man mi
uuouver   Journeymen   Barber's
wSSA 'r-U&sin o, MUW
No. I, Sanson _™—____
i
s!oo
1.10
in
81.10
10.00
10.00
lll.il
1.00
11.00
1.80
41.10
40.01
16.00
11.00
11.61
16.01
*">P?l*nt OieiCHO.-
larton, Vanaouverw—.
VlcSrtl'-™—
C. Cummins rertoeOnTa. «._
irmakara' Union Wo. 460, New
.'tatnilnatei' „....„.™£.	
Tradea and Labor Conine,	
Stnet Railway Employees, Van..
Vanoouver Typo. Union
Int Lopnhoremena Ann., 88-41,
Prince Rupert ...„.__.-..__._...
Tile Layera' A Helpen' Union No.
•8, Vancouver.... . 	
Building Tradea Council, Van..™
M. McBeath, Vancouver..................
U. B. of Carpenten No. UT, Van..
J. H. MoVety, Vanoouver _.„_.„„_.
J. W. wllklnaon, Vancouver .......
a P. PetUnlece, Vancouver .U...4.
O. 8. P.. Vancouver .................
Carl Jorganaen, Vanoouver ......
A Lady Friend, Vancouver ........
William Smith. Vancouver .
W. Foxcroft, Vancouver..............
Carl Jorgenaen -............_—.._..-.
A Lady Friend, Vancouver.'..,..™.™
William Smith, Vancouver ..........
W. Foxcroft,  Vancouver	
Ven. Cliermakere1 Union No. 887
Hosmer, a C, Local Union, No,
a D; iteardon, Ottawa, Ont™™™
Mlee H. a Outterldge, Vancouver.
Journeymen  Stonecutters' Awn,
Vlotoria _..„.....„...„._.........._.....
S:SS
10.00
..w.oo
MS
110.00
100.00
81.00
10.00
11.00
IMS
ss.es
80.00
10.00
10.00
10,00
10.00
10.00
6.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
6.00
6.00
SMS
10,00
1.00
4.00
1.00
 18,865.81
BUILDING TRADES FEDERATION.
Revleed Scheme To Be Voted On Net
. Liter Than January 14,11(4.
It ta prbpoied to eiUbllih a "National building tradei federation" aa
fint suggested by the amalgamated
society of carpenten and Jolnera. Thla
new organlutlon waa the outcome of
representations ot the different societies intereited held recently In Lob-
don. The objects are "to coniolldate
theae tradee for mutual protection aad
the adluatment of any dliputei that
may ame; alio fer support In tlmu
of strikes or lockout!." The governing authority ahall he a legislative
council elected from the general counoll, and the voting sower In proportion
to the amount guaranteed. The whole
of the tradei In any locality to be
regarded as branche, ot the federation,
which will be controlled by a dlatrlct
oommlttee. .A per capita ot $1 muat
be paid Into a general benefit fund. A
•oolety cannot receive benefit! under
one year'a membenhlp. The amount
of benefit not to exceed f5 a week for
a mjmber. Detail, ot the revtaed
■chime have seen forwarded to the
A. 8. of O. and J of thla elty, with a
request that a vote of lta memben
be taken set' later than --anuary 14,
1(14.
WRY FINDS
i
0FSTHIS
After Deliberating 86 Mb
utes on Charge of Intimidation Md limit
Messrs O. Ooodwia, Hall
Taylor and Connor,
NotCtallty
On Thuraday, November If th, a tor-
diet of aooutttal waa found by the
Jury st New Weetmlnater, after de-
llbenting for It mlnutea on thi In-
tlmjdatlon ease et Ooodwln et al, tke
Cumberland atrlke ean. Judge Morrison bad addreiaed tbe Jury tor half
an hour before lta retirement Be
pointed out thst ths deolelon muat
mainly binge on the aueetlon of the
credltablllty of the wltneeaea on either
•Ide, J, Hall, 3. Taylor and John Con-
non walked out ot the eourt room
free men, and were congratulated by
thslr hosts of frlendi awaiting to receive them 'oh the outside, ft. Ooodwln, who la also popular with his fellow mlnen, went downs™ the colli
to M returned to the provincial Jail,
where he Is serving the nine months'
sentence Inflicted on him by Judge
Howay at a previoui trial
Death of Vlotoria Pioneer
On Thuraday, November 17th, at
Vlotoria, Mn. Bmily BanflelS, beloved
wife of David Banfield, paaaed away
at the family realdence, Oak Bay ave.
The late lire. Banfield'waa a reildent
of the Capital City for upward! of
forty yean, having come to that elty
via the Iitbmui of Panama, from the
Baitern States ln the early aeventtee.
Besides the huioand, five children are
left to mourn her Ion—two nme,
Charlei F. and Ralph, both ot Vlotoria, and three daughters, Mn. A. J.
Bemon, ot Vermilion, Alta., Hn. R.
H. Neelanda of South Vancouver, and
Un. W. A. Thompaon ot Victoria,
And thli freedom wlU be the freedom ef alL It will looien both muter
and alave trom the onaln. For, by s
divine pandox, wherever tbere la one
aave tbere ara two. So In the wonderful reclproeltlea of being, we qui
never reach the higher leveli untll,sll
our fellows aioend with us. There Is
no true liberty tor the individual except ae he flnde it lo tbe liberty of sll.
—Edwin Markham.
It la the greatest ef sll inconilit-
enclei to wlih to be other thin we are.
The more a man haa lh hlmielf, the
leu he will want trom other people—
the leu, Indeed, other people can be to
bim. Thli li why a high degree of Intellect tend, to make a msn unaoclal.
A man ean be hlmielf only ao long
aa he la alone; and, It he doea not love
aolltnde, he will not love freedom; tor
It Ii only when he le alone that he la
really free.—Schopenhauer.
VANCOUVER ISLAND  1
DRINK
■ll'tth, Water'
9 Sod A
Water
MADE IN VICTORIA
SOLD ALL OVER THE PROVINCE
Kirki'&Co.
Victoria, EC
aanm
aamm
I      n   ■
THE POPULAB PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
Qtt. I»t>V«rj0*, Mgt.
Rstss 75c, $I.N, $1.25, $!.», $1M
FREE AUTO BUS
Fort Street at Doaf Its * VICTORIA, B.C
Select -four Cigars from Braes bearing this
BRITISH C0LUMBIALAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Fanning, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TEBMS-Residence on the
land for at least three yean;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.	
For further information apply to
DeprtyliUtoofLadi,Vidtii,aC
Secretary, Bvcu of Prwical Mntfiti, Vtai
STEADY EMPLOYMENT
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED PY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic Servants
THESE ARE THE ONLY CLASSES ADVISED BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
COME TO CANADA. ALL OTHERS ARE ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
AFTER THEMSELVES IN CASE OF FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
FARMING IN CANADA OFFERS TO SKILLED WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET AWAY FROM THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
AND ALSO TO ESCAPE IN A LARGE MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
IN CITIES.
IN THE VAST WHEAT FIELDS OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
OFFERED TO EVERY MAN, WHILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
BE ACQUIRED AT PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPITAL AND PREFERS FARMING IN ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES.
IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS, WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED
LITERATURE TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT
THE BEITI8H COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY........DECEMBER 5, 19
OUR OVERCOATS
Our Overcoats are made better than the most exclusive
tailor could make them.
The same conscientious hand-work, the same exclusive-
ness of design, and the same note of individuality. Not
stuffed and padded into shape, but tailored honestly and
laboriously—by hand.
Now's the time and here's the best place of all to select
your new Winter Overcoat.
: THE SHOP OF :
"FASHION CRAFT"
Thos. Foster & Co. Ltd.
512-514 Granville Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
M CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE
Capital 816,000,000       Rest 612,500,000
Main Office: Corner Heating, md Oranvllle Street!, Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
HASTINGS and CAMBIE .....Cor, Hastings and Cambie Streets.
BAST END -Cor. Pender and Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE -Cor. Flrat Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIEW Cor, sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street.
MOUNT PLEASANT .Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KIT8ILANO «.» Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Street.
POWELL STREET .Cor. Vlotoria Drive and Powell Street.
SOUTH HILL ~ Cor. Forty-tourth Avenue and Fraser Road.
Alio North Vancouvir Branoh, eer.  Lonsdale Ave.  and  Eeplanade.
Last Night's Meeting, By 42
to 17, Refuse to Part
With Control
Coulson Retiree
At leaat one new development baa
transpired In the Vancouver Iilind
itrlke cone during the paat week.
Manager Coulson, of the Canadian
Collieries Co. at Cumberland haa "retired" on account ol "ill health." No
Sowers.
The granite cuttera' union met on
Sunday, when Jaa. Duncan, International aecretary-treaaurer, waa preient
and addreaied the gathering at length.
Hr. Duncan la alio first vice-president
ol the A. F.oIL.
Show your appreciation of the valiant itruggle for the right to organiie
being waged by Vancouver Island
minera, by attending the big proteit
meeting on Monday evening next, ln
the Hone Show building.
. ANNOUNCEMENT
Starke Limited, In liquidation, muat
not oe confuted with Jamoa Stark ft
Sons, Limited, 29 Heating! itreet
weat From the legal notice recently
publlihed regarding the winding up of
Starts Limited, many penona have
been milled ind have eent their regret! and lympathy to Jamea Stark
ft Sone, Ltd.,' but thli latter concern
aa hai been pointed out several times
in these columns, haa no connection
whatever with SUrka Limited. James
Stark ft Soni take pleaaure In itatlng
that they are ln a perfectly aound
flnanclal condition, and dealre lt to be
fully undentood that tbey are not ln
any way concerned with Starke Ltd,
PATRONIZE    B     O.     FBOBRATIOSIBT
ADVURTISima-AND TILL THBM  WHT.
Speakers' Class ForminS
Count, In Elocution, Oratory. Dramatic
Art asd Social Science
ft»T,ms.inilr
SAM ATKINSON
SS4 Lsksr Tsawle, Vaaceaver. S. C,
Hma.air.ttt
•^■*S»5!
ineGnavSIs
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBAIMERS
Vancouver Britlah Columbia
TO
BE RETAINED BY
T.ANDL.C.
Critics Forced Into the Open
and a Clean-cut Decision
Made by Delegates
L. R. C. DELEGATES
TO HOLD MEETING
All delegatea who have been
appointed by their organizations
to attend the meeting! of the
committee to form a "labor representation committee" are reminded that a meeting will be
held on Sunday afternoon,
Dec, 6, at 2 p.m., In Labor Hall.
All delegatea are requeited to
be preient
Scullln Braaki Out In New Place
Weatern unionists have been somewhat nonplussed of late ae to what
had become of Scullln, the "Peace"
Association artist who operated In
B. C. until the pay streak pinched out.
It now develops that he haa shifted
hts activities to Ontario, where the
Sledding la at least new. His unsavory
record, however, haa preceded him,
and the unionists there already know
what to do—and are doing IL
Mass meeting, Hone Show building,
Monday, Dec. 8.  Be there.
Preaident Benson presided at laat
night's meeting of the T. and L. Council, and Secretary Wilkinson waa ln
hia place. There was a good attendance.
Credentials were presented by
Frank Steel, ot the Walters' union;
Messrs. Pitman and Holllnger, of the
Theatrical Stage Employees. Ac.
cepted.
Communications.
Secretary bf police commissioners
wrote that instructions have been
given to strictly enforce the law regarding autos falling to stop when approaching stationary itreet cars. Filed.
S. Kernighan wrote acknowledging
letter of condolence re the demise ot
his wife.   Filed. ,
Oeo. Harrison, aeeretary of labor
representation committee, wrote that
(1) the Socialist party of Canada refuses to co-operate ln any way with
the committee; (2) the Social Democratic party are heartily in sympathy
with the committee and wlal co-operate wltb it.  Filed.
Organizer Sam Atkinson wrote itatlng that a convention of thoae Interested in the forthcoming municipal
campaign will be held on Wednesday
evening, Dev. 17th, ln Labor Temple.
Admission will be union card, or a
membenhlp card In the S. D. P.
C. V. Cook, aecretary-treaaurer of
B. C. Mlnen Liberation League, wrote
enclosing copy of resolutions to be
sent to minister of justice.   Filed.
P. M. Draper, secretary-treasurer of
the T. and L. Congreu of Canada,
wrote at length re lmprlioned minera
of Nanalmo, stating that the executive
council hai been very active ln connection with this matter. Referred to
Executive Committee.,
The usual accounts were ordered
paid.
Speculations re the erection of a
proposed new manual training school
at the General Cordon school were received from F. J. Giles, conatructlon
superintendent
J. E. Young, secretary of Calgary
T, and L. Council, wrote for full pap
tlculare re Imprisoned miners.
H. E. MelWSN
New Secretary-Treasurer of the Miners'
Liberation League, with Headquarters
at Room 308, Labor Temple.
L
BY
Third Case Nanaimo Miners
Tried at New Westminster Assises
Judge's Summing Up in
Favor of Seven Prisoners on Trial
ORGANIZER BRUCE
GOES EAST
WUl Revisit the Northwest
Towns Enroute Home
to Toronto
Organised  New  Local In
Vancouver Embracing
C. P. R. Workmen
We do not mean merely freedom
from reatralnt or compulsion. We do
not mean merely freedom to do aa we
like, Irreapectlvely of whit it li that
we like. We do not mean a freedom
that can be enjoyed by one man or one
■et ot men at the coat of a loss of freedom to othen. When we speak of
freedom aa something to be highly
prised, we mean a positive power or
capacity ot doing or enjoying eome-
thlng worth doing or enjoying, and
that, too, something that we do or enjoy In common with othen. We mean
by it a power which each man exer-
cliei through the help or iicurlty given him by hli fellow-men, and. which
he In turn help, to secure for them.
When we meaaure tbe progreu ot a
loolety by the growth in freedom, we
measure It by the increasing development ind exerclie on the whole of
those powen of contributing to social
good with which we believe the memben of the society to be endowed; in
short, by the greater power on the
part of the cltlieni as a body to make
the moet and belt ot themielvei.—
Prof. T. H. Green.
MRS. BAZIL
PsUstry sal Csrd Resdist;
50c
Room 4, 411 Hutlngi St W.
Over Johnston's Shoe Store
They are alavea who fear to speak
For the fallen and the weak;
They are slaves who will not chooie
Hatred, scoffing, and abuse
Rather than In silence shrink
From the truth tbey needs must think;
They are slaves who dare not be
In the light with two or three.
—Lowell.
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
AT REGULAR PRICES
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
5408-
-PHONES SEYMOUR-
-5409
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
MARKET
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
AT ANY
PRICE
Price - $3.S0
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
10 Years
Canall ud
HulinpSlrMt
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
1138 (Will, St.
Nm Dsvit
The Federations Dlioumd
The Executive Committee recommended to the council that the president and lecretary be initructed to
repreient the Vancouver Tradei and
Labor Council at the meeting of the
B. C. Federatlonist Limited to be held
on December 15th, and to vote to
elect Jamea Campbell, R. P. Pettlplece and Jamee H. McVety as dlrec-
tora of the before-mentioned company
representing this council.
The adoption of the report was made
a motion, when
Delegate Mldgley moved aa an
amendment thit the whole executive
committee vote the whole stock. He
declared that the management of the
pa^er waa neglected, and the lnterelta
of labor thereby effected. The editor
failed to report meeting! of importance
When they took plate. Very little
had been said about the minen' atrlke
on Vancouver Island till Farrington
undertook to ipend }50 a week for
papen containing the desired reports.
They had absolute proof of mismanagement, and the only conclusion to be
arrived at if they were to so continue
waa to allow matten to remain aa they
were. He went Into the hlitory of the
whole flnanclal arrangement, and said
that the whole echeme waa cleverly
arranged, as tbe balance of power voting at the directorate waa held by
three Individuals who dominated labor
affairs. The proof of mismanagement
was absolute. He therefore held that
the council ihould appoint the whole
executive to vote. The plan to-night
waa to place the paper and editor beyond the rank and file. Why Waa It
necessary that the original truiteei
take one share. The whole matter had
been gone Into by 80 or 90 delegates
at the convention of the B. 0. Federation. This council should have the
confidence of the executive.
Delegate McVety said that Delegate
Mldgley bad passed by quickly on mat-
ten that needed some elaboration.
The epeaker traced the growth of The
Federation from the very atart, end
said that lt had been over live years
since the council decided to have a
press of Its own, which It hai) procured without costing the Tradei and
Labor Council one cent. In 1911 the
editor waa changed, as well as the
paper from a magaiine form to tbat
of a newspaper, The company waa
formed In order to keep the council
out of litigation following libel aults
and other matters, and make lt a separate inititutlon from the council.
Reference had been made of a director
holding one ahare. Five shares were
held thui, coating only (1 each, thui
fulfilling the requirements ot the law.
New Westminster or Victoria had not
opportunities for a labor paper. It
waa thought by enlisting the support
of the B. C. Federation by giving It
5,000 sharps for (200, that the paper
would become a provincial organ for
labor. Delegate Midgley at tbe time
called Ufe. proposition a gold brick.
Now he calls lt a gold mine, and wanta
to control It. Director McMillan resigned, and Mr. Siverts of Victoria
elected ln his place. From the very
moment the officers ot the B. C. Federation received shares, trouble began.
Several of the statements made by
Delegate Midgley the speaker characterized as being false. He read several letters that had passed between
himself and officers of the B. C. Feder
atlon In substantiation that fair dealing ln labor matten had been the
policy alwaya prompted by The Federatlonist. The paper had grown, In spite
of mlerepresentatlon, from one of four
Paget to an eight and ten page weekly.
The council fathered the proposition
from the very start, and had lent Tbe
Federationlit Limited $600, which
amount will be paid back when lt becomes due. Heretofore It had been
printed by B. T, Klngaley, who had
At New Westminster on Tuesday lt
took the jury less than one hour to
decide upon a verdict of "not guilty"
In the caae of seven Nanalmo minera,
who were charged with having assaulted Harry Taylor, a provincial
police officer, at the C. P. R. wharf,
Nanalmo, on August 13th, This caae
was conaldered the strongest the
crown had of all the cases arising
from the strike trouble on Vancouver
Island. Thomas Cowler, Tony Cetr-
olio, Richard Griffiths, William Hoy,
Alphonie Monadi, James Balrd and
John Jackson. Thomas Cowler and
James Balrd were taken back to their
cells to await trial on other charges.
They were granted ball, however, The
summing up of Judge Morrison was ln
favor of the accused, with the possible
exception of Thos, Cowler. The verdict forma the third successive failure
of the crown to secure a conviction,
fourteen men have so far been acquitted and no conviction haa yet occurred at this special assises.
John W. Bruce, general organizer ef the United Auoclitlon
of Plumbire and Steam fitter*,
who hu bun en thi coiit for
the put two weeki, left Vanoouver on Tueeday evening on hli
return to Toronto. En route he
will again vlilt local unlone at
Calgary, Medicine Hit, Llth-
bridge, Reglna, Brandon and
Winnipeg.
While ln Vancouver Org. Bruce haa
succeeded ln strengthening the local
movement by the addition of another
local to their already Increasing list,
this time by the chartering of the
railroad pipe-Utters and helper! employed In the local C. P. R. shops,
with a live membership, which completes the ohaln of locals In ' the
Western Canadian railway system. At
the flrat meeting of the new local provisional officers were Installed and
much enthusiasm displayed over future prospects. Mr. Bruce speaks
highly of the accomplishments of tbe
railroad locals ln Canada as to-day
their memben on the C. N. R. are en.
joying the best working conditions
on the American continent, and his
organisation Ib seeking to establish
the Bame conditions on all roads ln
Canada. The new union will be known
as Local No. 632, and will have jurisdiction over railroad pipe fitters between here and Calgary, and with
the Vancouver addition they have
practically a 95. per cent, organisation on their rolls.
Mr, Bruce Is convinced that, taking
Into consideration the overstocked
condition of the labor market and
general Industrial depression, the
members of hli organisation are holding together and maintaining their
schedules as well aa could be expected.
He.Is hoping to reach home ln time
to spend Christmaa with Mrs. Bruce
and family, and Incidentally In time
to give a lift in securing the election
of Jimmy Simpson, who la a candidate on the Board of Control,.
Wm. Klrkwlll, late ot Toronto, and
an old-time member of the shoemakers' unton, has taken up residence in
this city. He Is contemplating starting a cobbler's jihop.
made It a lecondary conilderatlon.
The mall. Had frequently been neglected, so that lubicrlbera did not
receive their papen till Monday or
Tuesday. Thla hid all been changed
ilnce the prlnten bad been changed.
He spoke of the untiring zeal and
efforts of the editor In his work.
Delegate McVety challenged anyone to
show mismanagement
Delegate Kavanagh was surprised at
the self-sacrifice of.the management
of The' Federationlit' He knew ot instances where photos and letters had
been sent to the paper, but the editor
had not deemed them ot sufflclent Importance to publlah. He held that the
expenses connected with the publishing of the paper had been extravagant,
the wages bill terrific, and the Institution wu not earning the money. It
wee Immaterial to htm what the policy
of the paper waa, but It was up to him
to see that the paper was not run on
the rocks. Wee the council going to
let these men conserve their Jobs?
Secretary Wilkinson desired to see
The Federatlonist made a provincial
organ and put into a limited liability
company atmllar to the Labor Temple.
The editor must be given an opportunity to develop the paper as well as Its
policy. Whilst!The Federatlonist was
struggling for an exietence, no one
wanted lt. Now, it wai In demand.
After speaking; at some length he
closed by saying that It the members
wanted the control of the paper to be
taken from the .council, to vote for the
amendment
Delegate England waa satisfied wltb
the policy of (the paper, If It continued on Its present course, It would
become a powerful organ tor good tn
a couple of yean.
Delegate Pettlplece Mid that the
paper properly'belonged to the council, which body ahould control It,
The previous queitlon waa then
called for, and Delegate Foxcroft
challenged the chair on the question.
The chair was sustained by a vote of
41! votes for 17 votei agalnat.
The main question waa. carried by
a vote of 37 for and 23 agalmt.
The amendment that the whole executive vote at the extraordinary
meeting of the Federatlonist Limited
was defeated by a vote ot IS for and
42 against tbe proposition.
The motion wae then put and carried.     -.      .'    ,
Bualneaa Agent'! Report,
Business Agent Wilkinson reported
that a large number of International
trade union offlcen had visited Vancouver during the past two weeks. He
had also spent some time with Deputy
Minister of Labor F. A. Ackland, Ottawa, but nothing definite had materialized covering the Vancouver
Island strike. Had addressed a mass
protest meeting at New Westminster.
Considerable organization had been
attempted.
The Grand and Panama theatres
were reported "unfair" by the Stage
Employees' delegates..
The Brewery Workeri will hold a
smoker tomorrow evening In Labor
Temple.
A resolution was carried protesting
agalnat the proproiltlon of the city
council to pay only 12 a day for relief
work.
FARRINQTON AND WALKER
Addraaa an  Enthualaitle Melting it
thl Black Diamond City
NANAIMO, B. C, Dec. 1.—An enthusiastic meeting was held on Monday night at the Athletic club room,
wblch was packed to the uttermost.
The speakers were Frank Farrington
of the U. M. W. of A., ln charge of the
atrlke, and John Walker, ex-presldent
of the TJ. M. W. of A., ot Illinois, now
.preildent of the State Federation of
Labor for Illinois, r'arrlngton gave a
brief and vlgoroua addreii, dealing
with the attitude of the press to-
wards the United Mine Worken, alio
with the relations entered' Into wtth
Mr. Acland, deputy minister of labor.
Mr. Farrington said he had made lt
clear to the deputy mlnliter that the
offleen of U. M. of A. Had no personal
equation to gratify, They were willing to stanu by any agreement which
might be arrived at. That such an
agreement would be endorsed by the
organisation was the understanding
when negotiations were opened, Mr.
Acland came to the Island. "Then,"
continued Mr, Farrington, "I heard
only to-day that negotiation! bad
failed because the operators would
only agree to meet men actually In
their employ. For my part, as I told
Mr. Acland, there could not be any
conference upon such a baili. What
I said was, 'Throw the company's
and the men's representatives together.' That was as far as any self-
respecting man could go." He explained tbat the International president, J. P. White, had been prevented
from being present owing to a lawsuit
ln progress between the coal ownen
of West Virginia and the TJ. M. W. of
A. Dealing with the general situation on the Island the speaker ln concluding said: "Because I have shown
myself extremely anxious to close
this struggle on a satisfactory basis,
and have gone further than they expected ln the way of conciliation, the
operaton have chosen to Interpret
any concession as evidence ot weakening on the part of the organization,
but as far as the U. M, W. bf A. are
conoerned, this conflict will go on
until a working agreement has been
arrived at that shall be fair and equitable to the men now on strike,"
John Walker then addressed the
meeting, dealing with the Inception of
organization among the miners. Their
fighting had been done under most
advene condition!, yet they had accomplished more In the direction of.
educational and social advancement
than almost any other. In reviewing
what had happened In the past, the
present flght seemed like child's play.
After getting the women out of the
mines, the next step was to set the
age limit for boys. After this was
accomplished they strove for better
working conditions and more pay.
Human protection came fint In historical order and was still their primary concern, In the mines where the
speaker had worked the miners lived
ln the company's houses, dealt at the
company's store, went to the company's church and voted the company's ticket, and those who came
from the old country, who revolted
against such conditions and tried to
organize a union were hounded out.
In some of the bitter flghta which took
place In 1897, some lasted four
months and othen eight years, but
such was the determined spirit of the
miners that In the end they prevailed
and got recognition. (Applause.)
The civic employees' union meets
this (Friday) evening at Labor
Temple. A large meeting is anticipated as matten of importance will
be discussed regarding municipal poll-
tics; also there will be a number of
initiations.
JEWELLERY
In the BIRKS STOEE you come face to face
with the whole jewellery world, its fashions and its
fancies, its dainties and its luxuries. There is a com
pleteness about this department of our store which
will be readily noticed by every customer who enters
our doors.
HERE MAY BE FOUND SUITABLE GIFTS FOR BOTH
MEN AND WOMEN;'
Bracelets—In all the latest
fashions, cither jewelled or
plain.
Signet Rlnga—In every known
style, plain or engraved to
suit .the wearer.
Cuff Link,—In such an assortment of styles that all may
purchase that which- will
please.
Scarf Pine—A scarf pin is a gift
which a man always appreciates. We have a stock of
scarf pins showing every
degree of quality.
Necklacea—Finely jewelled and
handsomely designed.
Brooches—In every'quality and
fashion, set with the finest
gems or with semi-precious
stones,
Cimeoi—In brooches and ring,.
Beautifully tinted Corals and
Shell, from the shadow of
Mount Vesuvius.
Pini—Ranging from the elaborately jewelled bar pin to
the simple, dainty blouse and
lace pin,
HENRY BIRKS & SONS, LTD.
JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS,
Geo. E. Trorev, Man. Dir.       . Vancouver, B.C.
Gnaflfl* asd Gsatsta Stmts    A
E.BURNS&CO.
AUCTIONEERS AND
FURNITURE DEALERS
13S Cordova Street, East
Midway between Columbia snd Main
GOODS  SOLD   BV  AUCTION
OR COMMISSION.
A large auortmont of Cook
Stovaa and Heatera In atock.
Weekly Salu every Saturday
evening at 8 p.m.
Phone 8ey, 1579.
'Hie Kodak House"
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Picture, and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIF
421 GRANVILLE ST.
What Better for Xmas?
THAN AN
EDISON
Phonograph
We are offering all of the new styles of Edison Hornless Phonographs at popular prices as follows:
$39.00, $58.60, $78.00 and $100.00. These marvellous
instruments play the famous Blue Amberol Unbreakable Four-minute Becords, which only cost
66 cents each. You can get a world of enjoyment
out of one of these talking machines at a moderate
cost ON EASY PAYMENTS.
For the Holiday Season we are giving the
BEST PIANO BUY IN VANCOUVER
-EVERSON PIANOS, worth $375 to $400.
at $290.00 On Easy Terms
AallaMcNslll
AN.
0.3.
EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
THE BOWES MUSIC HOUSE
10 HASTINGS STREET EAST
(Holden Building)
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
We specialize In
Moving Furniture (Padded Van,), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons lor all description ol work
Estimate, cheerlully given
Telephones: Seymour 620, 5520 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 25I4-R
—

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