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The British Columbia Federationist Nov 14, 1913

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERA
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH.
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 136.
QFFJCIAL PAPBR: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B, & FEDERATION OP LABOR.
POLITICAL
V.ANOOUVER, B. G.fIW|)AY. NOVEMBER 1.4,1913.
TEN PAGES-'
(In Vancouver V 41 an
«ty; HM   JI; V-i-OU
eers show
Me
Local Branch bf Interna
tlonal Union Proving Fittest to Survive
Old B. 0. Association Members Rapidly Joining
Forces.
;' On or about Oct, 1 the secretary ot
Vancouver Trades and Labor Covin-
cU addressed the Vsncouver lodge of
the B. C. Assoclstlon of Stationary
Engineer! on the advantages ot
trades unlonlim,'and thla address resulted ln a special meeting being held
by the Vancouver lodge on Ootobor
11. to consider the. advisability of
affiliating with the International
Union of Steam and Operating Bn-
gtneere at Vanoouver, ■        '   .    ,
The meeting was attended by about
forty members of the association, and
resulted In the .unanimous adoption
' of ths following resolution:
'-That thla meeting appoint a oommlttee ot five, with power to add to
thslr number, whose duty tt shall be
to Snd out the finanoial standing: of
the B. C. A. 8, B. and the International Union of Steam and Operating
Bnglnoers, and all other facte necessary to oome to an Intelligent understanding of the desirability or other-
wise of joining, the international
union, The facts so gathered to be
set forth In writing and a vote of all
the members of the association taken
at a date not less than two months
from now, each member tn good
standing to receive cony of the committee's report"        ')
IA committee was appointed at this
special meeting for the purpose of
carrying out the provisions contained
In the resolution, and on Oct. 29 lt
rendered a partial report of Us
finding, as follows:
Ths1 „u.)k8 and records of Vancouver lodge ehoSr:
Membership
Members paid to and after June
80/1M3  .'.........•-..   »6
' Members over three months and
less than six months In arrears    76
Total membership .........   281
Flnsnolai Statement
Cash  balance  la  treasury,
.-(:T©«:'l>'lfej-*«'tViM*..,.'..     l?W:7i
Expenses for half month...     138.80
Amount  due organiser for
hslf month       82.50
Balance Cash on hand      602.45
Members  In  good standing
March 31, 1912      426.60
Expanses for month.         277.80
.. The records of the International
unton show:
Membenhlp
Memben paid to and after June
30, 1013  ,.•......'...,.-.   171
Members over three and  leas
thsn 6 months In arrears....     82
Total membership.........   203
Flnanclal Statement
Expenses for month.. ;.   $180.00
Cssh on hsnd, Oct 17      186.15
Sixty shares Labor Temple
stock    .'       60.00
Expenses for hslf month...,      89.86
Total cash assets, Oct. 17...     186.60
Upon reading'.tbe findings of the
committee, a motion was made wherein it waa provided that this report of
progress "be accepted, that a copy
ot lt be posted In a conspicuous place
In the ledge rooms for two weeks,
and that It be considered at some
future time,"
Before voting upon the'motion, the
attention of the meeting was called
to the fact that If this motion psssed
It would operate as a discharge of
the committee, but the plover of the
motion and his associates held that
such was hot the fact; that there was
no Intention of Inclination, so tar as
they were concerned, to discharge
the committee and that they wanted
the committee to proceed with Its
work In accordance with the provisions of the resolution creating lt.
The meeting took this view of the
matter and decided that the motion,
If sustained, would not discharge the
committee, with the result that it
was passed.
The committee proceeded with Its
Investigation and reduced Its findings
concerning the flnanclal and general
condition of the two organisations to
writing, which, ln addition to the
partial report above, was clothed:
"The B. C. Association of Stationary Engineers Is afflliated with no
labor organlratlofi, but stands alone
and on Its merits, while hundreds of
engineers In British Columbia remain unorganised on account of tbe
existence of, two organizations,
whereas the International Union of
Steam and Operating' Engineers,
Local 397, realising the necessity for
unity on the part of the labor class,
are affiliated with the B. C. Federation of Labor, the Vancouver Trades
and Labor Counoll and the Vancouver
Building Trades Council. It Is also affiliated with the Miners' union, Insofar
that the union card of its members Is
recognised by said miners' unions
when they are working tn the mines.
"By reason of said affiliations the
International Union of Steam and
Operating Engineers, Local 397, has
been generally successful with the
public authorities and the attainment
of the object for whloh lt was created,
as Ib evidenced by the establishment
of the wage schedule now recognised
by the employers and municipal authorities.
"Ths records show tbat Local 397,
on Sept. 80, had 46 members, and that
Its membership has increased since
that time at the rate of 16 per month,
while that of the Vancouver Lodge of
the B. 'O. Association of Stationary
Engineers has decreased at the rate
of seven psr month,
"This, snd ths recognition afforded
It, shows a preference for organized
labor, and realiiing the demand for
FRANK MORRISON.
General Secretary of the American Federation . ot Labor,v the busiest man ln
Seattle this week.
unity among the engineers of British
Columbia, the amalgamation of the
two organizations Is proposed, thereby reducing the expense ot malnten-
an.ee to that required for one organisation, , and thereby facilitate the
more complete organization of the
engineers In their entirety.".
The committee, tn making this report, Intends that a copy of It shall
be sent to every member of the Vancouver Lodge In good standing,- as
directed uy the resolution oreating lt,
and presented the report to the lodge
at Its regular meeting on Nov. 6 for
approval, rejection or amendment.
As soon as ths reading of it was
completed, sn objection was moved
to the consideration of It, the mover;
giving as his reason the fact that the
oommlttee did not exist, having been'
discharged by the , sustaining of. a
motion at the next preceding meeting, wherein the partial report then
made Was aocepted, "etc., and the
mover of this objection was the same
Individual who made the motion ln
question at the preceding meeting.
Attention was then directed to the
discussion that took place and the-
understandlng arrived at by the
meeting before a ballot was had on
the motion, of -acceptance. The
mover of this objection and his confederates denied that a discussion
took place before the motion, was
put before tbe house, snd denied that
an understanding had been arrived at
as to the effect the motion would
have with reference to the committee.
It developed, upon examination of
the rules of order, that the committee
had been discharged by she acceptance ot this partial report, and the
handful ot members present, something likeHftsen, were not only successful In sustaining the objection
and in preventing the reconsideration
of the motion discharging the committee, but were successful In preventing the revival of the com-
mittee, and defeating the desire of
the Wdge, as eapresw-l by tbe resolu-
;M«^»*Mi|W*»'>-■ "Wls^'meeting,
of having' these facts pieced In the
hands bf all Its. members in good
standing.
As a result of theBe proceedings, a
dozen or more members of the association have already transferred their
membership to. the International
Union of Steam and Operating Engineers, and it Is to be hoped that the
rest of them will wake up to a realization of the conditions, as well ss
the necessity for unity among the
working class, and Join in with the
nation-wide rank and Sle. .
Pres. Nosohang and Secretary Fischer Guests of
Vancouver Union
The Union Label Movement
—Visit Labor Temple
—Met the Mayor
The local barbers were privileged
this'week to receive two gifted officers of the international union as
their honored guests. Frank X.
Nosohang, of Albany, N. Y„ president,
and Jacob Fischer, of Indianapolis,
ind., general secretary-treasurer of
the Journeymen Barbers International Union of America, arrived from
Seattle Tuesday morning, returning
'the same evening. They are delegates to Seattle convention of the
American Federation of Labor, also
to the label league of the A. F. ot L.
During their brief stay In Vancouver
they viBited Stanley Park and the Capilano canyon, in company with C.
F. Burkhart and Oeorge Isaacs, of
looal No. 120.
General Secretary Fischer expressed his appreciation of hts trip through
the city, and his surprise at its
greatness. He reported on the healthy condition of the A. F. of L, label
league and its great success ln regard to the patronage of union labels.
He lmpressd upon his hearers the
duty of* patronizing union label goods.
"If they expected their union11 oard to
be patronized by unionists as well as
others, they (the barbers) must ln
turn lend their patronage .to the
union label of other organizations,"
he said. The day had passed when
union men need fear to be ridiculed
for asking for union label goods.
The visitors were shown over the
Labor Temple and called upon The
Federatlonist, wh.en Editor Pettlplece
presented them with copies of the
paper. The recipients paid neat
compliments to the organ of labor.
A large delegation accompanied the
general president and secretary to
the boat, where they had the pleasure
of an Introduction to His Worship
Mayor Baxter, who waa on hli way
to Victoria.
Strike History^ as Reviei^ed
By tlifc  Miners' Solicitors
The Vancouver joland atrlke haa already been
dealt with from almost svsry angli by vsrlsus
writers, from msn digging at ths face, membere of
the union, union officers, newspsper writers to
clergymen, and Svsn a B. C. court Judge hss rushed
Into print
Ouring the process of such development! is hive
,takin plan on Vansouvsr Islsnd fsr pvir s yur, It
Is rsssonsbls to sssums thst ths situation might hi
viewed from a good many dlffsrsnt standpoints, hut
most piriom will agne that ths judicial mind of
the svsrsgs lawyer hash distinct advantage over ths
layman In summing up evidence snd arriving at
conclusions.   ,
For this 1-eaeon, than, a statement this week pre-
pared by Messrs. Bird, Lelghton-and Darling, counsel for the U. M. W. of A., should prove of eepeojal
Intel-wit st this time. Ths statement Is • brief,
oslm snd dlspssslonate review of events Which hsvs
trsniplnd from the beginning ef the trouble until
now, snd should csrry a good deal of weight with
svsry thinking psrssn, beeiuM of ths advantages
thsy hiva had. In being lii close touch with sll
sources of Information. At any rate, Thi Federations believes ths statement ihould be raid carefully by svsry worklngmsn In Canada, with a vlsw
to ascertaining ths sctusl facts In ths oass, ss
viewed by msh thoroughly competent to state them.
Ths statement raids:
"Miners of Vancouver Island have
had the advantage, or disadvantage,
of being represented In the local
legislature for some years paat by
two men who have'had some experience ln coal mining, and the members for Nsnalmo and Newcastle have
consistently pressed tha government
continually for better conditions ln
the mlnei for the appointment ot Independent mining Inspectors, for the
dismissal of mining inspectors who
were In the control of the mint operators: Thess two men have ior some
time psst constituted practically the
sole opposition to the local government . They were powerless  to do
anything more titan make protests
and ths government has turned a
deaf ear to all their demands.
No Damage for Wiled Breadwinners
"In 1909 an expteeion occurred at
Extension which caused; the death ot
thirty-live minera. An notion was
brought against the Wellington Colliery Company for damages for negligence. At the trial. It was shown
Conclusively and certified to by the
trial Judge, Mr. Justice Gregory, that
many of the mines, fogulattone, passed for the protection of life aad for
the betterment of the condition of
the men, had been?absolutely disregarded and broken,' These mines reg-.
ulstlons ara the result of hundreds of
yesrs of'experience In England and
elsewhere ln regard to the working
of ooal mines, and every word ot tits
rule hss for Its purpose the'saving of
life and the protection bf the miner.
Mr. Justice Gregory came to the
conclusion that' notwithstanding the
tact, that theie breaches of regulations had existed the plaintiff had
not been able to Show'ths accident
In question waa the direct result of
these breaches, and dismissed the
action, with costs, which costs were
upwards of 82600, The widow served
an appeal, and was Immediately met
(Continued on Page Two)
DISCUSS
FORMATION OF A
mm
Committee Will Confer
With Socialist Parties
of this City
Must Do Something—The
Delegates Who Attended
—Harmonious Meeting
On Tuesday night a meeting was
hold ln Labor Tomple for the purpose
ot forming a labor representation committee,        <
Chairman H. C. Benson explained at
length why the delegates had been
called together. This .gathering oould
decide upon a ochres, to pursue, when
a general call might be issued to all'
workingmen to' support the proposed
labor partyr-'-or whatever .name It happened to' be called, "It waa useless
to go on as we are and take no political action,", said the Speaker. The
workingmen of New Westminster, Nanaimo, Extension and the Interior ot
the province had done aomethlng towards naiqlng labor candidates which
must be dose here. For the present
the workingmen should confine then-
party organlutlon work to Vancouver.
Ac it Is, the labor vote wai practically
divided between the old parties. And
during the discussion lt was pointed
out thst were an independent labor
party formed hundreds ot msn would
leave the ranks of Liberalism and
Conservatlvelsm and Join a working-
man's party, - An attempt should be
made to Unite the two socialist parties
with the trades unions' tor political
action, which- will be considered at a
later meeting. The policies adopted by
the labor parties of Australia, the old
country and the United States were
discussed; also labor legislation was
touched on In this province, none of
which had been enforced by the government at Victoria. One delegate
said that he would vote for a wooden
■*-*— -ter-	
STREET RAILWAY
EMPLOVSM OI^EET .
PRES DENT  MAHON
Special mass meeting Sunday
nest 7.30 p.m., Imperial theatre.
Admission by yrorklng oard sf
Strsst Railwayman's Union, to
hear W. D. Mahon, president of
the A. A. S. E. B. E. of A. Ad-
mlttsneo only to members of
the three coast divisions, with
paid up working esrd.
man so long as his platform of principles was to his liking.
Altera somewhat protracted discussion, which was carried on In a most
harmonious spirit a resolution was
passed to the effect that "a oommlttee
of five shall be elected to interview
the Socialist pBrty of Canada and the
Social Democratic party of Canada."
The committee selected comprise: H,
C. BehSos, John DavldBon, John Sully, E. Prendergaat and J, B, Wilton.
The delegate! present were:
Dslegatu
U. B, of Carpenters—Jamea Campbell, Chaa, Scott:
Journeymen Bakers—A. McCurrach,
Mathew Mackte,
Builders Laborers—John Sully, O.
Harrison.     . . ;,..t.,,. ...       .
"* Comioerelal TelegmjMtfe"-*- Ten.
nant, H. W. Withers.   '
Steam and Operating Engineers—H.
Longley, B. Prendergaat.
A, S. of Carpenters—John Davidson,
James Bltcon.
Painters—W. J. Nagle, 3. Train.
Molders—A. C. Dunn, C. Cropley.
T. and U Council—W. tt. Trotter,
Photo Engravers—Swerlnger and
Bell. ,v  '
Tailors—A. Harvey, W. J. Psrker.
TypoB—J. B. Wilton, H. C. Benson.
Longshoremen—P. Payne, George
.Thomas,
Electrical Workers—), H. Robertson, John Reld, E. Salmon.
Lathers-V. B. Mldgley, Z. McMartz.
Waltere—Dave Bell, Walker.
Pattern-makers—Thos. Smith, Robt
Samson.
Bricklayers—James Hazlett, Jamea
Brown,
Bartenders—G. A. Curnock.
Bookbinders—Razey.
G. Harrison acted as secretary,
Conscience If its own counselor,
the sole master of Its secrets; and it
is the privilege of our Nature that
every man should keep the key ot
his own breast—South.
Paid the Local Fraternity a
Seiiii-Offlcial Visit-
Saw the Sights
Welcomed at the Eoyal City
by Mayor Gray—
Meeting To-night
. A party of "higher ups" of ths
International Typographical Union
paid this city a flying visit today.
They were Secretary-Treasurer John
W. Hays;' Second Vice-president
Hugo Miller; Hugh Stevenson, Toronto, Ont, Mu Hayes, Cleveland, Ohio,
Tht*. MeCulUnigh, Omaha, -Neb-,,"' delegates to the Seattle convention ot
the-American Federation of Labor;
President Barrett, of Chicago Typographical Union, They were met on
the arrival of the Seattle boat this
morning by Preildent A. B. Robb snd
Secretary H.. Neelands ot the Typographical Union, and R. A, Stoney,
New Westminster, I. T, U. Organizer for British Columbia,
IThe visitors registered at' the
Hotel Lotus and after breakfast made
a trip over the city, Marine Drive
and Stanley Park. In the afternoon
they motored to Now Westminster,
where they were tendered a civic
welcome by Mayor Gray.
They will address a meeting ot
printers this evening In Hall 301,
Labor Temple, at which lt Ib hoped
there will be a large turnout of the
local fraternity,
Lecture This Evening
(the Art, Historical and Scientific
Aiioclatlon will hold its opening public lecture In Aberdeen school, Burrard Strset this evening at 8.15.
Speaker: Hr. W, Porteous Jack.
Labor conditions w'" ne dealt with.
Mr, R, Maokay Prlpp will preside.
THE REAL MONSTER OF THE MINE
*-*ATKI*Fis)!-'mi
SAMUBL OOMPHM.
Preeldent of the American Federation ot
Labor, who Is very much In the eye - pt
the Labor world at the Seattle Convention now In union.   ■
BIG MASS MEETING
hi nit
Hi;
Resolutions Demanding the
Release bf Imprisoned ,
Miners Carried
HfifflWl
MEDMIfiS
Bowser's TaaMbsf VLfc
*tiimstis*__4moL
mertoiMhm'ftrtbl
InSight   ^;
1   ' '   '- :   ■ •'' ■'>' ..^Mfy
«d«MM fsr toe U. M. W. afjfM ','
seeded In scour** ka* MM,
, Chief JuMles Haattn la      ""
tor kali _»"———-4_ ma**—<W<!
aat ^^H^M, ^HPJQ|^|RQvi F,
tymaamsFm
Oollection Taken—Striking
Russians Present—     -
Speeches
Long before 8 p. tn. on Monday
night the Dominion Hall was crowded to the doors with men and women
Interested In demanding the release
of the Vancouver Islsnd Mlnen Incarcerated at Nanalmo and New Westminster, B. C. This msss meeting
was one of the largest ever held in
the province. It was addressed by
speakers representing the Federations
ot labor, tradea unloni, mine workeri,
industrial unions and socialist parties.
Thos. Greenall, M.P., representing the
miners of Great Britain, waa also
present.
There are now looked out In Vsncouver Island for ovsr a year soms
3,600 mine workers, snd 177 are now
In jail; 47 have been sentenced ta
terms ranging from three months to
two years, tke cauls of Jke-lsafc-
out waa that men serving In "gaa
committees" were black-listed. Tat
miners protested against this whsn
the lockout occurred. The ft C.
Miners' Liberation League demand
that tbe sentences bs suspended anl
the mlnere be released.
The following reiolutiom were unanimously carried at Monday nlght'i
man meeting:
"Resolved—That this msss meeting, held under the auspices of the
B, C. Miners1 Liberation League, In-
PLUNGES ID DEATH
DOWN HE
Thomas Cook, Carpenter on
Hudson's Ray Building,
Loses His Life
Accidentally Killed by the
Terrible Fall—Funeral
Largely Attended
Thomas Cook, aged about 26 years,
was hurled to his death Saturday
morning at 10 o'clock, while employed
on the Hudson's Bay Building. He was
leaning on the support near the elevator shaft, when it gave way, and
he plunged c*->wn the shaft to the
cellar—three . ireys. Dr. Perry
arrived on tbe scene shortly after the
accident occurred, bi't he could not
do nothing for the unfortunate man,
death having been Instantaneous.
Tbe poor fellow's skull was badly
crushed and his back broken.
The police were almost Immediately on the ground, the undertaken
were notified and the body was removed to the undertaking parlors of
Nunn and Thompson, Richards steet
Thomas Cook was a member of No.
6 branch of the Amalgamated Carpenters and Joiners, also ot the Ayrshire Club of this city. He was well
liked ° and popular with his fellows.
He was a single man and resided on
Georgia street, his bereaved parents
living in Ayrshire, Scotland.
At the inquest lt was found that his
death was accidental, a "rider"
stated that proper precautions were
not taken regarding the elevator
guards.
The funeral, which took place from
the undertakers' parlors on Wednesday afternoon, was very largely attended by 260 members of the union,
the Ayrshire Club and friends, to
Mountain View Cemetery, The pall
bearers were Messrs. R. McCormlck,
A. Campbell, R. Grieve, J. McCorken-
dale, D. Cromar, J. Drummond.
Bakers' Union
tn place ot holding the regular
meeting of the union last Saturday
night In Labor Temple, the members
held a very successful "smoker." A
good musical programme of events
WM carried out
only a few iaaW.itrlBin.tlas
Basitisaa ssniaiart iieao' atroaf-
evidence s«otost ska illllS,
was sail rsfmn, and la ska Sua.
a ilx of the im»riasMd uMaa
minora tta judge oouM ft* an;
evidence to wariaat thrir. Iota!
held, and ha illswid tkaw to t»
on thslr own
,...    ._,
Attorney-general Bowssr, wko Ms,
vtousiy mads application at Vsasois>
v«r for a change of vsaas. haa am
switched bis aaallcattoa ta Victoria.
Ths miners, on tke other hand, w*l
endeavor u> have tke natttatag
casss tried at either VaaeoaiW fr
nanalmo, feeling that, attar tba #
pertence at New Westminster, i
the judge was compelled to «
one farmer Juryman, they ca
hope to secure aa unpreiudtosd L
Nothing particularly new aas _
veloped in ths itrike iltuattoa dsxtafl
the put week, except tke appearance
oa ths ground of another fediral Of
partment of i,akor officer; a baa»>
down on ths part of Minister of Lsksr
Crothers. sad Increased dilimlai
tlon on ths part of tba asm taSm'"
the itruggle to tha vtototjr, now a aat-
talnty. There are many nana! to
supposs that in lees tkaa a atsatfc
some remarkable chutes '■'HaM BA»a
taken place, If, indeed, I
not back at work nadir' i
between the ooal oompenlcs and I
union. At aay .lata tha iltuatkm la
changing rapidly and every day
brings nsw avMaace to Hgbt. all at
which presages an early aattlarsaat
and an sgreement between the ooal
oompanlee aad  tha
owners for the, right to
PstternmsksrsP President Here
Sectretary T. Smith, of the Pittom-
makers' Local Union, advlMS The
Federations that their lutenatJooal
Preaident, Jamea Wilson, with headquarter! at Cincinnati, O; wtU ba aa
official visitor la Vancouver toaartow,
and in the evening will address a
special meeting ot tha Pattamaaksrs
at Labor Temple.
eluding representative! of the following: Britlah Columbia Pederstica
of Labor, Vancouver Tradea and Labor council, United Mine Workera of
Amerlcs, industrial Worksrs af tba
World, Socialist Party of Canada,
Social-Democratic party of Cauda,
and citlsens of Vancouver—protests
against the brutal severity of tho
sentence! passed upon tho mlnsrs sf
Vancouver Iilind, and demand! ot tho
mlnliter of Juitlce ot the Dominion
of .Canada that they bo at once re-
leased.
"Resolved—That the minister ot
Juitlce bo requeued to forward aa
early reply to the aeeretary of tho
Mlnen' Liberation League Indicating
ths action ha proposss to take. Secretary, 0. V. Cooks, 74 Hsstings strsst
west Vancouver! phone Seymour
1643.   -
"Resolved—That this meeting condemns the government of British Columbia for refusing to enforce tho
provisions of the Coal Mines Regulation act, which refusal on thslr part
is responsible for all the trouble
which has occured In connection with
the situation on Vancouver Island."
Before the meeting opened a gentleman ln the audience went forward
to the platform and spoke oa tho
Sprlnghlll, N.8., mine explosion that
occurred there about 15 yeara ago, In
which many lives were lost—and too
part tbat Premier Fielding played m
the settlement of that atrlke.
The Speechea
J. Kavanagh, vice-president of tho
B. C. Federation of Labor, in the absence of V. R. Mldgley (who arrived
later), opened the meeting, and stated that resolutions had been drafted
by the Minora' Liberation League
which would be submitted to the
audience for lis approval. The
speak i would represent tha B. C.
Feder.. a of Lsbor, the Trades and
Labor Council, United Mine Workers,
Socialist party ot Canada, the Social-
Democratic party of Canada, and tha
Industrial Workere of the World.
J. W. Wilkinson, sscretary of tho
Trades and Labor Counoll, waa tha
first speaker. He ssld that the nature
and slse ot the meeting should be
sufficient satisfaction to thoss who
got It together. In the city there had
been considerable difference of opinion regarding the strike situation.
The audience was confronted at tha
present moment with a miracle, Inasmuch on the platform every shads
of working-class opinion ta labor
politics In the city, province and
Canada were represented. (Applause.)
This is the miracle that the government at Victoria baa brought about
The good friends at Vlotoria wars
"tickled to death" when occasions
arose where working people did not
know their own minds. "I am here to
protest sgslnst the brutality of the
sentences Imposed upon the miners
by ths lsw courts, I represent tho
Trsdss shd Labor Council, whoso
membenhlp numbered 7,100 organ-
(Continued on Pago Bight) PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY..,..NOVEMBER it, ill!
VANCOUVER ISLAM)   1
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TERMS—Residence on the
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improvements to the extent
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For further information apply to
Depoty Minister of Lands, Victoria, B. C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
Dominion Hotel
victoria, a, c.
Bnlirsed ind Remelelled 800 ROOMS wo BATHB
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In addition to this you ere helping to
BUILD UP LOCAL INDUSTRY
which means that instead of sending your money out of the
country it stays here and returns to you. Fendray's Naptha
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VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
fhoae aorawai I
ro-r Arfama Studio
', yiurtagrattt-tt Arttiti
•m aoaisa snaa*
VANCOUVER, B. a
O. J. Rognon F. P. Stevens
Phone ley. 7171
Canadian Photo Co.
OOMMBRCIAL
PHOTOORAPHIRS
Photos Taken Anywhere, Anytime
118-818 CROWN BUOabma
•II Pender Itreet West
1
HEM PROTEST
Meeting Called to Consider
Entering Coming Municipal Campaign
Central Labor Body Seeking
Establishment of Free
Labor Bureau
VICTORIA, Not. 5.—The Tradei
and Labor Council held their regular
meeting last night, Preildent F. Per-
rott occupying the chair.
Credential! were received from
eight delegate!. The United Brewery
Worken also applied tor member
ship.
Delegates Watchman, Martin, Permit and Simmondi ipoke against the
heavy sentences passed upon the
miners and the matter was tully discussed,
After quite a debate, a motion was
passed to hold a special meeting Friday evening, November 14, to consider tbe question ot entering candidates In the coming municipal elections and a lively meeting.' Is' expected.
Mr. Proebstle, International seoretary ot the Brewery Workers, ad-
dreaied the meeting and gave the
delegate! a surprise by telling them
at the conditions under which the
brewery workeri are working, but
that he hoped contracts would be
signed up with the, two breweries ot
the town In a tew daya, whereby the
men would get an Increase ln wages
and shorter hours.
The council Is making every effort
to get the olty council to open a free
employment offlee. aa several complaints have been received of men
paying for jobs which never existed
and having to ,pay railway fare besides.
A mass meeting will be held on
Sunday evening, Nov, 16, In the Empress to protest against the heavy
sentences paBied upon the minera ot
Vancouver Iiland.   .
It Ii to be regretted that a larger
aaeembly hall la not available as
every class will he represented. This
Is a question not only for the laborer,
hut for the business men who derive
their profits from the laborer.
The following are aome of the organisation! which will be represented: Trades and Labor Council, B. C.
Federation of Labor, United Mine
Workers of America, Socialist Party
of Canada and Industrial Workers
ot America. All the Victoria
organisations' have taken - up
arma to light thla to an Issue aa they
reallie (hat If they let the men suffer
now, they might aa well disband their
organiiationa and give up the only
weapon the working man haa to better hla iondttiona In life. Several
reiolutlon! will be put to the meeting
that will, without a doubt, be passed
unanimously.
STRIKE HISTORY AS RE-
CE1VED BY THE MIN-
ERS'SOLICITORS
(Continued from Page One)
hy an offer of aettlement of $1500
and a releaae ot all claims for costs.
Disgraceful Condition!
"The condition of the mines at tbls
time wai disgraceful, and this was
continually brought before the legislature and the minister of mines, but
without any amelioration of conditions resulting.
"If gas li, discovered ln the mine
that portion of tbe mine muat be put
upon Safety lampa exclusively and
no flrllig mult be done, except under
the protected conditions mentioned
In the regulations.
"The men appoint a oommlttee to
see that their interests are proteoted
and -the efficiency of this oommlttee
depends upon the protection afforded
these men by tbe mining operators.
Minera Seek Lsst Reiort
"On tbe list of September, 1912,
owing to a difference between the Canadian Collieries Company and their
employees, the latter deolded, by
way of protest, to take a holiday for
one day. The difference arose because members of the men's gas
committee, a committee authorised
by law for the purpose of inspecting
.the mines to ascertain the presence
or otherwise of dangerous gaa, were
discriminated agalnit by tha, company and were ultimately dismissed
without reasonable excuse, The miners believe, with apparently good
reason, that the men were dismissed
solely because they reported tha
presence of gai, whloh meant that a
certain portion of the mine had to be-
temporarily ahut off ind some trouble
and expenie lnourred In .clearing
thoie portion! ot the dangerous gal.
Wanted Law Enforced—Fired
"When the men returned to work
from the so-called holiday they found
themselves looked out, and thli lookout has continued down to the present time,
Nanalmo Mlnen Join In Lookout
"On the first day of May, 1913, the
miners of Nanalmo, with a view to
assisting their Cumberland brethren,
went out on strike, Most of the
miners of Cumberland and Ladysmlth, and a large number at Nanalmo and South Wellington, belonged
to the United Mine Workers of America, and when the itrike waa commenced almost to a man the strikers
became' members of the union and de-
nfanded Its recognition by the company. Other questions have been
raised In connection with the strike,
such as better wagei, eto.
Jingle Pot Slgni with Union
"On or about the first da/ of September the ownen of the Jingle Pot
mine, the Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal
Company, made an agreement with
the union, giving the United Mine
Workers of America offlolal recognition and all that was asked for the
men. This company haB been working at full pressure under the union
agreement since, that date.
"The remaining companiei, employing ln all about 8600 men, hare refused to make any settlement or to
discuss the matter with the men at
all, except as individuals.
Othen Import Scabe
"All the companies bave attempted,
more or less continuously, to work
the mines with non-union labor, and
for this purpose have Imported
negroes, Chinamen and Japanese in
large numbers, ' and have scoured
this continent and the BrltlBh Islea In.
their endeavor! to obtain sufficient
force to work the mines.
"The union members and officers
bave tried by every lawful means to
persuade Imported strike-breakers td
go back to their homes, and have
Bpent large sums in paying their
railway fare! back again.
Government Supplies "Special!"
"Large numbers of special police
bav.e been recruited from the unemployed of the larger cities. They are
men who, for the most part, have
had nd previous experience of police
work; many of them entirely fall to
realize that the merits of the strike
la a matter outside their province,
and they hare acted towards the
strikers aa though employed to break
the strike, rather than merely to preserve law and order,
"Many minor cases have arisen In
the police cdurta'that at an ordinary
time would be passed over, but
whloh, on account of the strike, have
been treated ae serious crimes - by
tbe local magistrates.
Many Raw Court Decisions
"In some Instances men have been
convicted, through the bias of. magistrates, and the conviction promptly
quashed on appeal to higher courts.
These circumstances, and (hany
others of a similar kind, have gradually driven the men to desperation,
which culminated ln thSTlots and.
disturbances-which took place during ■
tbe week commencing August llth.
"The trouble first became acute at
Nanalmo on the morning of the llth,
and, as naturally follows, when men
hare been living for a long time In a
state, of high tension, the excitement
and violence spread rapidly trom
camp to oamp, resulting in riots ln
Ladysmlth and South Wellington on.
tbe nights of the 12th of 13th of
August, andi at Extension oh the 13th
and 14th.
"All these camps are within a few
miles of one another and ln olose
touch.
Mine Ownen Winted Excuse to Jill
Striken
"No serious effort'was made by any
responsible officer anywhere In the
district to take any step to avert disorders whloh Inevitably followed.
One Incident and act of violence led
to another with such rapidity that
men who, at ordinary times, are most
peaceable and law-abiding eltlseni
were transformed Into an angry mob,
with full scone to vent their feelings
unchecked against the men whom
tbey regard as their Inveterate foes,
the strike-breakers.
Mllltla Then Rushed In
"The matter had drifted along In
this way from Monday, the llth of'
August, to the following Friday, when
troops were sent In and all disorders
immediately ceased and there has
been no disorder of any sort or kind
since that time.
Whoienle Arreiti
"As a result of these disturbances
no less than'258 were placed, under
arrest; bait was refused ln most
cases, except in a few Instances, of
serious Illness, The preliminary hear
lngs dragged on over a period of six
weeks; many of the men were re*
leased at the preliminary hearing,
there being absolutely .no evidence
against tbem. Some of these were
later re-arrested on other charges.
One hundred and sixty-six were committed for trial. Four were tried
summarily and conrlcted by the
magistrate,' two of whom are appealing. Ball has been obtained for,fifteen or sixteen of the One hundred
and sixty-six committed for trial on
the ground of illness ln the family,
but lt haB been refused In all other
oases, even though some ot the
charges are trifling and the accused
were eltlseni of long residence and
good standing ln the community.
Needless Delay In Trlala
''The first cases came on for trial
on tbe 9th of October, In the ordinary course of arents the assises
would hare been held at Nanalmo ln
the month of October, but this was
not done, and the representatives of
the crown refused to give any Indication of when trial by Jury was likely
to be obtained, The yen were naturally extremely restive at the long delay ln obtaining trial, and the uncertainty as to when a jury trial could
he had, and many men were thus coerced Into electing for a speedy trial
before the county court Judge. Judge
Howay was Bent from New Westminster to. try the cases In lieu of Judge
Barker, who Is the regular county
court judge for Nanalmo County, before whom nearly all had elected for
speedy, trlali. Thirty-two of the
Ladysmlth men, on tbe advice of
oounsel, pleaded guilty to a charge of
rioting; seven were tried before
Judge Howay, twq of whom-were
acquitted and the remaining five con-,
vloted, the defence evidence being
brushed aside and disregarded,
■   Astounding Sentencei
"The trial waa completed on Friday
the 17th and sentences postponed.
The extreme severity of the sentences which Judge Howay pronounced upon thl i prisoners made
the whole community gasp.
Unpncedintijd Interview
"By .Interview, ghjen the New Westminster News, Monday, Ootober 27th,
the judge appears to be seeking to
Justify himself in the public eye tor.
the extreme severity of the lentenoei
which he pronounced. It ll aft unprecedented thing for a Judge to
grant' an Interview with a newipaper representative upon a matter
whloh haa been before him In his
Judicial-capacity. ; In- fact, counsel
for the defenoe Refused to believe
tbat ahy such Interview had been
given until after it had been confirmed by Judge Howay himself. This
interview shows that the Judge' haa
listened to gossip ticked up in Ladysmlth as to.matter! which had never'
been sworn to or but* to' the test of
cross-examination..[ This. Interview
was published immediately before the
trial of some of the itriken at New
Westminster assises, and may he ac-.
countable tor sonfe miscarriage ot
trials at that aailze, Mr. Justice
Clement baring discharged one of
the Juries after oils Interrlew because of admitted blai -and prejudice
against the mlnen!
Ptaiillsid Because Union Officer!
"Judge Howay picked upon two of
the union leaders, Outhrle and Taylor, who. were not shown to hare personally done any violence, These
two men, though they pleaded guilty,
were glren the maximum sentencei
allowed by law; three othen, Uttle
more  than boys, j Morgan, Simpson
MAX HAVE8.
I, T. V. Delegate to A. F. of L. Convention at Seattle, who IS paying hie firat
visit to Vancouver, along with other
Typographical i International' Officers,
to-day, and will address the local
Typos at Labor Temple this evening,
and Deconick, 19, 18 and 22 yean old
respectively, were glren the same
sentence, namely two' year! In tha
penitentiary.
Judge Lied
"Tbe Judge, In hli Interrlew,
stated that Morgan and Simpson were
21 or 22 at the least. If he didn't believe the age stated ln court he might
bare challenged lt at that time. These
ages, eighteen and nineteen, are the
correct agea and can be rerlfied by
examining the registrar's books at
Nanalmo, as the judge could eailly
bare done hlmielf during the week
that elapsed between the trial and
sentence. Of the remaining thirty-
four, twenty-three were aentenoed to
one year In gaol and a flne of $100
eaoh, with ihe alternative of four
additional months' Imprisonment, and
eleven were aentenoed to throe
months In prison and a One of |50,
or ln the alternative two months additional imprisonment. Theie sentences are equal to fire and sixteen
months respectlrely for the great
majority of tbem, as they cannot possibly pay the line imposed.
. Unprecedented Severity
"A search of the history ot strikes
ln Oreat Britain and the United
States nowhere rereala severity approaching that whloh Judge Howay
saw fit to Impose.
"Larkin, the prime mover. and
avowed Instigator of the Dublin riots
and, all the trouble that has arisen
therefrom, waa sentenced to seven
month!'. Imprisonment. The majority
of the partlei concerned In the Dublin riots reoelted only fourteen days.
Many yean ago the Right Hdnonble
Jobh Burns, M.P., waa aentenoed to
six months' Imprisonment on a similar charge, but waa released after
serving two months. The Ladysmlth
men had served more than two
months before they even got a trial.
Only Union Man Prosecuted
"The legislature of Canada evidently regard neglect of duty on the part
of tbe authorities of any town or
municipality as just ai culpable as
the act of a rioter. The same sentence Is provided for thie neglect,
namely two yean' Imprisonment; yet
tbe attitude of the crown officers towards the striken Is such that they
are prosecuting these men to the
limit allowed by law and are leaving
unprosecuted and unpunished thoie
who are responsible for the extent to
whloh the trouble waa- allowed to
grow.
Part of International Struggle
"The. troubles In question are tbe
direct outcome ot strife between
Capital and Labor—the Union man
ranged on one aide, believing thit
they have been goaded to a point beyond endurance and that the riots
were the necessary expression ot the
collective discontent and Justifiable
as the meana of stirring up the
public to a realisation of their real
eondttlon; on tha other side the mine
ownen, the government and all the
rank! of shop-keepers, merchant!
and professional men arrayed In a
solid phalanx to defeat the union
men.
Rank Lineup With Goal Baroni
"Tbe attorney-gineral haa not hesitated to give an Interrlew stating
that the spirit of the miners Is being
.broken, and Mr. Shoebottom, an employee, of ihe attorney-general'a department, who appeared at the preliminary hearings, haa also unhesitatingly glren out to the press, In
gloating terms,'his opinion that the
spirit of the striken wtll be broken
by tbe lererity of the sentencei imposed."
Ladies' Hair,Dressing
and* Shampooing
Hair Work done In all lti
branohei. Theatrleal Wigs for
bin and for sale. Electrical Pace
and Scalp Treatment. Switches,
Pompadours, eto.
Mrs. L.M.Ross
<. Successor to
MADAM KOSCHB   ■
. Pbone 1178
110a DOUQLAI STRggT
Victoria, ao.
UNION DIRECTORY
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Counoll—MeeU Bnt and .third Wednesday, Labor Hen, 711 Johnson itreet,
at 8 P.O. -President, A. Watchman, secreUry, '.. H. Norrls, Labor Hall, Vic
torla, B.C.    -,-..,
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners—Meets every Tuesday.
8 p.m.i at Labor hall, 711 Johnston St
President, 3. E. Bryan; recording secreUry. Oeo. L. Pyketnan; buslneas agent
and flnanolal secreUry, W, A. Parkin-
son. Box 881,	
maaas' vmova.
KIHBEHLEY MINERS' UNION. NO, 101
w Western Federation tt Miners-
Meets Sunday evenings, In Union Hall,
President, Wi Fleming; secretary-treasurer, M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley £c.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No.  8888.  U,  M.  W.  of A.—MeeU
Wednesday, union Hall, 7 p.m. President, Sam Outhrle: aeoretary, Duncan
McKenale, Ladysmlth, B. O,
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.of A.
—Meets every Monday at 7:10 p.m. In
the Athletic Club, Chapel Street Arthur
Jordan, Box IIP, Nanlamo, B, c.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No.
i 8818, U. M. W. of A.—Meets every
Sunday 7 p.m., In U, M. W, of A. hall.
President Jos. Naylor; seoretary, James
Smith, Box 84, Cumberland, p, 0.
ILTE
TRAIL MILL 'AND SMELTERMBN'S
Union, No. IM, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday, at 7:88 p.m. President,,
F. w. Perrln; secretary, Frank Campbell, Box 81, Trail, B. 6.
Contest
Any Person May Enter        Work to Win
Contest Closes Positively
-•■»■'    New Year's Eve
Lilt of Votes as per
Purchases
JO'c purchase ,
S1.00 "
SS.00 >'     ..
♦8.00 " ';,
S8.00 "
S10.00 "
S80.00 "
....      SOvotes
—   sap -
,.,,., in **
.....8,000 "
  8,000 "
.....15,000 "
 80,000 *
5000 REGISTRATION
VOTES
Votes at either Store, but all
rotes,must be mailed in or deposited at our Store, corner
Eighth Avenue aiid Main Street
Contestant's number must be
plainly written on vote coupons,
Valuable Prize List
1st Prlzer-Set of Russian    .   ,',
Fitch Furs, ralucd at.S100.00
Ind Prise—Cash ......'.'.' J0.00
8rd  Prize—Set Marmott
Mink Furs, Valued at.. 40.00
4th Prize—Cut Glass
Pitcher, valued at  11.00
(th Prize—Cash ..,.,..'. 10.00
6th Prize—Order for
Goods, value 10.00
7th Prize—Lady's Umbrella 7.00
8th Prize—Cash ...  ....   (.SO
0th Prize—Pair Lady's
Boots    (.00
10th Prize—Cash    8.50
A Weekly Prize of SJ.oo In
GoodKi   to   the   ConteiUnt
Standing Highlit
Entries may be made at any
time during contest, but those
who,  enter   first   stand   best
chance.
Also ask for Free Coupons for
Slrerware, Cut Clan Premiums
Votes may be gathered from your friends
who are not contestants. Get busy, work.
Induce your friends to shop here. We sell
most everything. Best Values. Best Goods.
Prices .the lowest possible for Good Goods
Bingham's Voting Contest
Employees of the Store, or their Families, will not be allowed to compete
Main Store: Corner Main St. and 8th Ave.
Branch: Cor. Main Street and 18th Avenue
UNDERTAKERS
LIMITED
Past Members
'•*'■'
of Undertakers*
Union 9049
MAIN OFFICE-Phone
Fairmont 736, 225 ' llth
Ave. Wist
NORTH VANCOU-
VER—427 Lonsdale Ave;,
Phone 640.
SOUTH VANCOU-
VER-6263 Elgin Street
Fairmont 48R.
STEVESTON - Phone
L57.
_ We want the support of all the
unions when in need of our service,
and we pledge ourselves to give
them the very best service at one
half what it will cost them elsewhere.  ,
If The best references we can offer
is the people we have served in
the past.
United Undertakers, lid.
Main Parlors: >
/     225 12th AVENUE, WEST
Phona Fairmont 738
Patronize the Labor Temple Cigar Stand 2SI^7^-T»'KS5R^?W:--V, ^J'^SWsSfwi'r!
tf-mM
WM'Wh^-W^^^^S^W^'^K^-'
—wo^o*^f***m^g^aajm.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PEDERATIONIST
.    '■   '■"■-'        '-'*.      "'■' "■"■'   '   '   ■".?■-").   "   i . ■' .■   ■■-*■"—■-■"-■■■" ■     '.-   '       ." -- * i .»r rn, Jfc.-'Ba".-.""^-   -— .■;■.   ■     ■    "■*?','■" V''i I !   .1
SIXTH STSAfc  No. 136,
MccHjyiiB,^. o^ei^Yt^
Empress Royal
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE ASD GEORGIA
CO., M$ftfEED
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work ihoe, ud specialize in linei
for minen, railroad conibuction,
togging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C.
WE SOLICIT THE PATRONAGE OF UNION PEOPLE
CALL AND SEE OUR WORK
ERSTORRY&CO.
Ladies* and Gent's
TAILORS
510 GRANVILLE STREET (Room 9). UPSTAIRS
Phone. Seymour 2946      , Vancouver, B. C.
We keep the largest and moat
complete line ot MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
. prlcea whloh cannot be duplicated.
Everything ii to be tound here,
HENRY D.RAE
Canada'a Snap Specialist
104 Hid 106 CORDOVA ST. W.
THI MAMMOTH BAROAIN SHOE  STORE   IS  THE   SPOT  TOR
OOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THBBB STORBS IN VANCOUVBR
tt Hlltlngi at.     Phone Sey. MS 401 Qnrill. St
MS Oranvllle Sk    Phone ley. WU
PMns Hy. 8717
.VICTORIA STOBB, IM VIEW ST.
OBBUNHOUSES
'     list Avs, and Main St. Victoria, B.O. Hammond, a. C,
Phone Fairmont 188. Long Distance Phone M
Just likd the illustration.
There are more expensive
ranges than the Empress
Boyal, but we guarantee;
there's no better range to
be bought anywhere for
$42.80 and $48.50. Never
until thie. wagon have we
had as good rangeB to offer
at these prices and we ex-
. pect to put them into hundreds of homes before the
season is out. They are
ll?SnJS;^r*, high-grade k every re-
,*»•»• spect except in price.
THE BODY is made of polished Wellsville steel,
THE FIREBOX is roomy, all catsings are
extra heavy, and it's fitted with duplex Wood
and coal grates and extension box for when
burning wood.
THE RANGE TOP is made in sectional parts,
With six 8-inch holes.
THEOVEN is made of cold rolled steel of
heaVy gauge and is protected on top with
asbestos and reinforced with channel iron to
prevent buckling or warping.
ffLUES ARE EXTRA LABGE, made especially so to suit the Pacific Coast coal, and
heavily lined with asbestos board, which holds
the heat and protects the body.
PRIOES—Fitted complete with coil and, set
up in your home f or ^42.50 and $48.50, according to size.
r. T. U. PRESIDENT TO
wmm
Jas, M. Lynch Will Resign
To Be Succeeded By
James H. Duncan
Typo. Union Loses Competent Executive- Offlo-jr
By the Appointment
JamM M. Lyhoh, preaident ot the
International Typographical Union, a
reildent ot Syracuie, N.Y., haa-beea
named by Qor. Martin H. Olynn, aa
State Labor Commlaaloaar. The appointment waa unanimously eon-
armed by the State Senate. 'Tha ap-
Doliitiuent ot Jauiea M. Iayneh vai
made prior to the Impeachment ot
William Sulier, but not confirmed by
the Senate, no action baring been
taken, 'ihe Labor Department ot the
State of New York haa been broadened in acope and remodelled ln auoh a
manner aa to make It possible. for
the chief executive of that Department to be of Inestimable benefit to
the workera of.the State. Tbii waa
accomplished on the recommendation
pf the factory commission, ot which
President Uomperi waa a member,
and which reported to the lait session of the State Legislature which
enacted the recommendation! Into
law. The position la said to carry
with it |8000 per year and over S000
appointment!.
James M. Lynch waa elected preaident of-the International Typographical Union In 1800 and assumed that
ottlce on -November lot that year.
During tbe period of hli laoumbency
Important-changee hare oocurred In
the International Typographical Union, among whioh are the following:
An Increase In membenhlp trom
32,106 to 62,601; the adoption of an
arbitration agreement for lire-year
period! with the American Newipaper Publtehen' Association; the establishment of the unlvereal eight-
hour Workday in the book and Job
branch; the putting Into effect ot
old' *age and disability pensions
whereby member! after reaching
sixty yeara and baring been continuous memben for twenty yeara, are
entitled to a pension of J6 per week;
the lncreaae of the mortuary benefit,
baaed upon length of membership;
establishment of a achool for technical education, the principal feature
being Initruotlon by correspondence,
. Information baa not yet been lectured as to when the duties ot Preaident Lynch will oeaae with the International Typographical Unton and
the work ot the Labor Oommliiloner
commence. . —
Jamea M. Duncan, of New Tork
City, vice preeldent, will succeed
Preaident Lynch,      .    .
Civic Laborera' "Smoker"
A very enjoyable "amoker" waa
held -on Friday erenlng laat, Nor.
7th, In hall No. 301, Ubor Temple.
The affair waa under the auiplcei of
Local Union No. 65 (clrlo laborera),
Hod-carrlen, Building and Common
Laborera'-Union. There were over
200 preeent, and John Sully made a
capable chairman. The program, waa
a varied one, Interspersed with re-
treihmenti, the following taking
part: Remarks by the chairman;
long, A. Sutherland; speech on "organization," by Victor R. Midgley;
violin leleotlon, C. McGregor; solo, B,
T, Jones; speech on Nanalmo atrlke,
J. Kavanagh; long, Mr. Watklni, recitation, Hr. Blaokle; song, Mr;
Young; mandolin selection, Jamea
Douglas; long, Oeorge Harrison;
long, Oeorge Duftell; song, w.
Moody; song, Chaa, Bunco; Instrumental selection- (harmonica and
bonea), H. Harrison; long, Hr.
Swift Proceeding! terminated at
11 p.m.,;
iA subscription waa alio taken up
for the "kiddle!" and striking mlaera
at Nanalmo amounting-to |21.65.
Fed. leiue of Fib. 7 Wanted
The Federationlit deilrei four
ooplei ot No. 96, February 7th, 1»1S,
for lta Ilea. If there are any readen
who hare coplea of that date and
will forward ume to thla office, lt
will be very much appreciated aad
26 centi each will be paid for them,
Dlga.
He—Madam, you promlied to obey
me.  Do you do lt?
She—Sir, you promlied me your
worldly goodi.   Do I get them?
Teacher—Name the tones.
PREAMBLE OP THE B. a
FEDERATION OF LABOR
The Britlih Columbia Federation ot labor' ia organlied for the purpoie ot ruining the needi and aiplntioni ot
Labor,' leglilatlrely and otherwise; and to provide a place for.
worthy memben of lti adulated
unloni to participate In the dla-
cunion of thoie practical problem!, upon the solution of
whloh dependa their welfare aa
workeri, Individually and collectively.
' With the Introduction of tha
modern machinery ot production
and the harnessing of the loreea
of Nature, it la only fitting that
tha wealth producen ihould par-
itclpate ia the benefits derived.
Wi, therefore, pledge our-,
■elvei to unceailngly demand a'
universal work-day of eight
houn or leu; do long ai labor
power li uld aa a commodity.
We believe there Aa mora efficacy In electing worklng-clau
repreieatatlvea to write the law
than by supplicatory methods;
and oui elloru will be more In
tbat direction in future.
an
EBMONTON BT*EET RAILWAY
—,.   AaRtoMENT WITH-OITV
Sdnwntoa strut rallweynwn'i-
unlon oMeialf have reached an
agreement  with the elvle  eom-
mlealonen, whieh eoneedea full .
-  reeognltlen ef the union and pro-
video for the observance of thi .
eenlerlty prlaetple. The old wale..
of wages will be renewed and the
agreement will he effective until '
April Slstr IWl?
ELECTRICAL WORKERS
SCORE AWOTHEW VICTORY
Secure Beat Agreement Yet Negotiated oirPaolSo Cout
The Pacific District CouncU ot ffi-
eetrteal Worker!,, representing the
Reid-Murphy faction, whoee memben aire on itrike agalnat the Pacific
OSS end Eleotrio Company, - haa Juit
negotiated a working agreement with
the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph
Company.
The nsw agreement, saya f, W;
Ely, In tha *FrlSco "bulletin, whla
will hold good, until December 11,
1914, will affect Wore than 8000 Reid-
Murphy electrical workera throughout the Pacific Cout States, and ia
■aid to be the but agreement from
tbe viewpoint ot the workera that has
yet been negotiated with the Pacific
Telephone and Telegraph Company.
Aa a mult, the Reld-Murpby eleo-
trtcal workera, afflliated ., with the
Light -aad' Power Council, are prosecuting with renewed vigor and hope
the itrlke agalnit the Pacific Gaa and
Electric Company, which hu been on
•lace lut May.
'Preaident J. W. Morgenthaler ot
the Pacific Dlitrlet Council of Electrical Worken li of the opinion that
the men are In a better position to
win their fight with the Pacific OtA.
and Blectric Company than at any
time ilnce the Inception of the itrike,
JUDICIARY CRITICIZED
Open   Olaiatlefaction   Exprsesed  In
Brltlih Tradu Union Clrelu
* One result of -the recent oonvtction
of the engine driver, Caudle (who
wu afterward! pardoned), hu beea
a declaration by the general federation ot tradea unions that the time
haa arrived when lt ta neceasary to
conalder the aeoeaalty ot recruiting
Judges, ln bases where tbe Interest!
of capital and labor clash, from- a
different clasa than the preient one,
uya a London press dispatch.
The federation urges that auch
eases ahould be tried before Judges
who have been trained in tradea
union practice, and are* Qualified,
from experience of Induitrlal history,
to give cloeer attention to the elalma
of lahor.* The Incident Is typical of
the dissatisfaction with the Judiciary
u at preient constituted, which hu
been growing amongit the working
olauei ilnce the celebrated Taff
Vale declilon.
HAVE COURAGE!
Union men, stand close together,
You are fighting good and true;
Not the masters u you know It,
But Just working men like you.
Cloie your eyei and think a moment
Of thoae men you' onoe called
frlendi,
Now turned traitors, for wbat purpoie
Time alone will tell that end.
Men, you have not lost your  manhood—
- Dearer far than worldly gain-
Yon can hold your headi up proudly
tta- your name la without itain.
They have tried to break your splrlti,
Humble, you in every way;
To make you falter and consider,,
Ii lt right that we've, uld yea,
Cling together still more firmly,
For no discord can prevail
When there's unity and manhood,
Which no salute and cry all hail!
Prisons were built for law-breakers;
Not for men who uk tor rights,
Who demand a safe protection
... Against the dangers to their lives;
Three months now you've been ths
meats
Of Hla Majesty King Oeorge;
Aad the river atlll runs smoothly
Through the deep and. silent gorge.
Unreasonable they cannot call you
For demanding Just what's right;
The recognition of your union,
Which will end this bitter itrife.
-AGNES QUIGLEY.
Extension, B.C.
WHAT MAKES THEM
HUME?
Oompettmg lone is .the
Law oi Self Preeemtion
Asserting Itself    '
Human Life Bo Cheap end
Plentiful Mine Owners
Heed Not Worry
,, tie number ot frightful mtae disasters that have taken place during recent yeara include ao many vlattsas
that it is sickening to think of It,
It li becoming oston ai eammo* «*»
aerreaeo that accidents killing moral hundred minen take plaoe that
inch tragedies no longer excite ear-
.Stittii-y
_ Every few weeks a new horror ii
recorded and there, the matter is allowed to remain. .':-
'■■ Careleu mine ownen are allowed
to go on with -their life-deitroylng
redkleaiaesi. *
Often the accidents are due to failure to comply with laws that have
beea secured alter yean ot pleading
by the representatives ot tha miners
who generally get aome concessioas
only when the rotu ot the miners
begin to slip away tram the poliU-
ans in control
But the arm of the law li generally
eur on the law-breaker when that
law-breaker la a mine owner.
Thoie who are familiar with mining are agreed that a large percentage. If not moat ot the accidents, that
occur In mlnee today could ba avoided by taking precautions that oaa be
taken. That Is what all unlona are
demanding everywhere, Inetsdtng
Vanoouver Iiland. But thue pre-
cautions cost money, and ao long u
human life la oheaper than the aafe-
ty appliance! whloh would prevent
the big accidents now so. common tt
eeemi probable that this awful waate
ot life will continue,
The only object that mine ownen
have in letting an army of hired
working men operate mines la to
make profit!.
The welfare of their employeu ia
an entirely secondary consideration.
The fact that life la endangered
doea not leem to worry the modem
firoflt gatherer who, like a leech, la
utened to all our leading industries.
The only thing that doei worry
him U financial low that may malt
trom aooldenti.
At preient human life le ao cheap
that mine ownen can afford to have
hundreds of human being! killed
erery year and atlll be In a poiltlon
to continue doing business at a big
profit . :
Letter Carrlin' Danu
The first of a leriei of dances to he
given by the Letter Carriers of Vancouver wu held oa Wedneaday hut.
Over two hundred were preeent and
all agreed tbat they had apent a very
pleasant evening. - The proceedings
were opened by a whist drive, the
prixei for which were won by <Mn.
Kllbank aad Mr. Modlln, while the
consolation priaee went to Mlsi Anderson and Mr. Ecclestone. After
cards were out of the way supper
wm served, then dancing commenced
and wu kept.up till midnight. All
the lateot and but dance music wu
furnished by Mr. L. Holland'! orchestra, and to them Is undoubtedly due a
huge ahare ot credit for the aueceu
ot the evening. i
F. D. HICKMAN.
8414 Heather St, Nov. 6.
BIGHT PAGES
Men's Worfc
GLOVES     1
fat raAatja-iaabsm-TYtatkOiamm (two
k-wi-Uralifca SPENCER*   ~
Well
Gauntlet glore, in
split horsehide, at 66c
Piiet quality Oordo-
*M; gauntlet -dote
v&;. $1.00
HEAVY QMSf-M
GLOVES - Suitable
for the nun who
wants a glove to protect his hands white
working around ihe
garden or woodpile,
at3for2!S«{2£)i^e;
and, per pair,;. ,25c
WORK IflMJSjwtta
knitted wool wrists
In split chrome at 65c
In split horsehide,
at.............,85o
In genuine Cordovan,
at............$1.00
In chrome tanned
horsehide, at.. .$1.00
mm
wide gusset*
-jW/'B "i':a.pft> aaatf 4Xfi.f£KJI$k
Anottw jtioire that
■ will give good service
for ordinary wear is
a split horseskin, with
string fastener, ■*
at.,,........ „..«)e
A similar glove ntade -
of buckskin, at.. .6158
At 7§c we have an
excellent glove with
a genuine horsehide
pafia. split back and
double leather at
wrist,
Genuine   pigskin
glove with protected
seams, for only fLOO
All horsehide glove
at .....$LO0
David Spencer Limited
•3
DAVID SPENCER, LTD,
OAVID SMNOER, Ll*
m___mstmM—mm
FOWLER'S open f°'Ba/^ «"«•»«•"*
ORCHESTRA •s^^ •••»««««*.cyty
21M McDsbsU Stmt fieae layview IfTII
MUSICIANS   UNION ■
wish to announce that Mr.
Franklin and members of his
orchestra are not members of the
Musicians'Union. When engaging music for your next dance or
social, make sure that your
Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
Per full lafefmatiM n« llMMaaa ileiaa
t rsia   •     -
Scab-herdere' Apologlat
A militiaman wu arreeted on Saturday night on a charge ot creating
a disturbance In a looal restaurant
The cue same up In the police court
yeBterday morning.   ...   ...   At the
rery wont tt wu a oommon caae of
drunk and disorderly, and ao far u
the soldier wu concerned there may
hare been provocation.—Nanalmo
Herald.
27th Annual Clearance SALE
of Hentamaa & Co. Pianoi, Player Piaaoa, Grand Fiaaos.
Also our entire stock of Violins, Mandolim. Baajoi,
GuiUn, Autohupi, Accordeom, Concertinu aad all anuical
merchandiie.
25.000 Sheet! of Popular
.Sheet Muiie  at 2  copi
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street Wert.
c o. toitm
Mr. founr, who rscsnlly rlslted Vancou ver, Is the International organlKr of the
American SVIeratlon of Labor.   Ha U now at Spokane Wn., whore ha Is
doing successful organisation work and strengthening organlKd later,
having secured the aOllatlona o( • avaral unions with the Central Labor
Ooaaell. Hi wIU be kept buiy In tb at dty for iirenl
OVERALLS and GLOVES
We carry a good stock of Carhartt Overall*. Blue, Black
and Striped $1.50
Kentucky Jean   1.00
Buck Brand Overalls   f.OO
Carhartt Gauntlets, $1.50  2.00
H. B^X. Gauntleti. 75c to  2.50
CLUBB & STEWART
309-15 Hutjagt St W.        Tsl S»>. 702
-d £AGE FOtJB
THE BRITISH flOIffMBIA !EffDERATIONlST.
FRIDAY..,...NOVEMBER lj i»U
TH6
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 1.855
Capital and Reserve,
$8,700,000
•   85 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Buiineu
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches.  Interest Allowed at Highest Current Rate.
Eait Eifl Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A W. Jirvii, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPOflATED 1SM
I
Paid-up Capital - - - $ 11,800,00
Rieorve ...'--.- 12,500,000
Total Acute	
- WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINOS
DEPARTMENT
One   Dollar will   open   ■
the account, and your,
buelneae  will   be  welcome  be  It   large  or
email
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
DKOKPOUTID
1SS5
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reurve S11,178,578
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
la the BANK OF TORONTO
an proving to be a great convenience to many ot our
friends. With these accounts
either ot two person! of the
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest la paid
on all balances twice a year.
Ia event at death ot either
party the eurvivor may withdraw the. money.
Main Oltlee-
■ 488 HASTINGS ST. WEST
(Nur Rlcharde)
Branches— \
Cor. Haatinga and Carrall Sts.
New Wutmlniter
s   Victoria
Merritt    '
L
The Systematic
Saving
of small sums will help a great
deal in time of Illness or accident.
. Thla Company pays
A%
I Compounded Quarterly
'    (Subject to Cheque)
OPEN AN ACCOUNT NOW
And Deposit Regularly.    One
Dollar it lulficient to start.
National Finance Co.
Limited
(Corner Pender and Hamilton,) .
Paid-up Capital and Reserve,
ti,80o,oeo.
1B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Vanished every Ttlday auntac by the
a. o. Aaentiaiit, &tZ  *
R. Parm. Pettlplece •
•   Manager
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell, preaident;
Christian Siverts, vlce-prealdent; 3.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treaeurer, and R. P. Pettlplece,
OBcei Boom aw, Laser T.mple.
Tet axetange Bar. lent. -
Advertising Manager
M, C. Sbrader
Subscription: }1.80 per year; ln Vancouver
City. 12.00; to unlona subscribing
In a body, 11.00.
■maty of Labor; ue kepe ef Ihe world."
FRIDAY .v ..NOVEMBER 14, 1»13
THE CHECK-OFF
Having pointed out aome time ago,
that three thousand men ln Weit Virginia were able to pose u United
Mine Worken, to throw upward! ot
70,000 othen out of employment, ln
spite, ot having been In comfortable
circumstances and perfectly contented, and to defy all law the authority,
the Dally Province now turns lta attention to Nanalmo and explains
what lt thinks about the check-off,
one ot the U, M. W. A. demand!.
The "check-off" merely meana U)gt
union duea ihall be deducted from
the men's pay by the company and
turned over to the union official!. la
ihort, the unton would collect lti
duel in much the tame manner - u
the British Columbia government collected the poll-tax, a method familiar
to every employee of large corporations doing buiineu ln the provinoe.
Certainly the belt method, too. Aa
long u the obnoxious tax wu Imposed, the check-off eyitem saved
trouble and expenie In lti collection.
It must not be supposed that we are
drawing any analogy between that
miserable tax and union dues. The
almilarity llei only in the way the
government and the union desire to
collect..
The Province, however, seei lome-
tbing sinister In the check-off. It
may be u well to Quote:
It enable! tbe union to have
full control of the miners and
tbuB keep its organisation well-
together. From lta own Pdint ot ,
view, lt would naturally affirm
that thla1 la a good thing, aa It
makea the men keep to agree-,
ments they have ilgned, and
everything worka smoothly as
between masters and men. From
the point of view, of the mine
owner or manager, the ayatem
would, from the practical buiineu point ot view, deliver him
bound Into tbe\ hands of the
handi of tbe union official!,
whoie Interest! may be entirely
different to hla.
The check-off lyitem enablea
the organisation to collect lte
duea without trouble. It Is obvious that-the organisation oan
not be kept going without the'
support of .the men, and therefore there Is something to be said
for thla contention. But lt li alio
obvious that tbe check-off system Is g dangerous weapon in
the hands of an executive whose
headquarters are In a foreign
country, and whose whole Interests may be governed by entirely
different condition!. Without
any limitation itje in any case
dangerous. Unlimited- right to
do anything Is not the sort of
power and democracy or free
people carea to place ln the
bands of a few men.
The "unlimited right" sought by
the Mine Workers Is merely the right
is
481 RICHARDS STREET
Phones Sey. (684-5685
Loans Without
INTEREST
BT THB CONTRACT PLAN
1.1.00 per month
12.00 per omntb
8.00 per month
81,000 Loan
88,000 Loan
13,000  Loin
For   the   purpose   of   Building
Homes,  Paying oil M<	
Improving Reel Estate.
off Mortgages or
Repayments 118.80 per month on
eaoh 11,000, without Interest
MAIIa THIS At) POR PULL
INFORMATION '       >
to collect duea in the best and most
efficient manner possible. Without
the payment of dues there can be no
union. On the other hand, where
there is a good solid organisation, recognized by the employers, and able
to collect Its dues without the checkoff, lt would appear to have just as
much "dangerous" power as though
possessed of tbat means of collection.
The International Typographical ifn-
Ion may be cited as an instance and,
being handy, Is recommended to tbe
Province for study.
The only power possessed by a
union over an employer Ib that whicb
comes from the solidarity of the men
and tbe reasonableness of their demand!, neither of which can be'
affected by the mere character of the
machinery of dues collection. The.
check-off system affects the principle
of International Unionism neither
one way nor the.other. What the
mining companies object to, and.
what the provincial government object! to, Is not the, check-off lyitem,
the U. M. W. of A. or anything elee
but UNIONISM In the mining lnduitry on Vancouver Island. The strenuous attempt! of company and government organi to lead the men and
the public dway from the real Issue
maked It.all the more obvious that
untoniun ii the iBsue. The fierce op-
poiltlon aroused In the companies
and their friends to organisation haa
convinced the men that In organization Ilea their,only salvation.
Seven Per
Cent, on Your
Small
Savings
CANADIAN
FINANCIERS
LIMITED
4% Paid en Deposits Subject to Cheque
Slid Offlee, SSI Hasting! Strset Witt,
Vancouver, 8. C,
QSNSRAL TRUST BUSINBSS
Patrick Donnelly-General Manager.
Bring .your Savings Account up to not lets than
$200, and it will earn 7%
if you transfer the amount to
- a Fractional Mortgage.
Through the Fractional
Mortgage system of Canadian Financiers, Limited, the
small investor can acquire
exactly the same rights and
rate of interest through his ,
Trustee u the large capitalist
. with his many thousands..
Full information and
explanatory pamphlet on
request
WE WILL SAVE FOR
YOU
MORE EXCUSES
The News-Advertiser Ib at some
pains to justify the lending of the
militia to Nanaimo. Thla Is pleasing
to those of us who have contended
that tbat action wu totally unnecessary. Coupled with the fact that
several Conservative ward associations found it advisable to pass resolutions commending the government's course, It leads one to believe
that the responsible parties are not
serenely conscious of duty well performed.
'Referring to the fatal shooting alleged to have occurred ln the Colorado atrlke dlitrlet, the morning
paper observe!:
"Theie Unhappy event! repreient
what might poulbly have happened
tt the mllltla had not been called to
Nanalmo,   .   .   .   .
"What we know la that the riots
had reached a stage In whloh lite wai
in danger, and that the persons who
owe most to the mllltla are those who
might ln attack or defence have
taken human life."
These sentiment! would be eminently fair and would receive the endorsatlon ot union men were they
baaed on faot' The trouble le, that
although the "riots" on Vancouver,
Island may have reached the stage
where human life wu ln danger, .they
had long passed that stage before the
militia wai lent No One In' Nanaimo will deny thla, except the email
minority who, In their allegiance to
the coat company, would deny any
thing,      . ,g
Nor would there be any objection
to the preaence of the mllltla, (as
long u thb people who pay the bills
will stand tor lt), lt it did not have
such an influence upon the special
police.and other representatives of
the law, The former gentry, tt will
be remembered, took to thejdlla at
the first suggeitton of danger without -even ucettalnlng whether the
danger wu real or not It li Inter-
eating to note that the only time that
"■pedal!" and aoldlera might conceivably have been required, neither
were there, Shortly after the union
men had lucceeded tn restoring order, and peace once more reigned,
both arrived on the scene In large
numben. While the soldiers have
done nothing but endeavor to surround their movement! With an air
of myatery, under the Influence of
their presence the special police have
conducted themaelvei with the arrogance common to cowardice in command and weakneia In authority.
The worst of this Ib, that although
a special policeman may have been
sworn In hastily without examination
aa to hli character or capabilities,
the law glvei him the same recognition <tt accord,, a regularly trained
policeman. Preference Is given hli
testimony in the courts over that of
the ordinary citizen, uoniequently,
u ll emphatically the cue on, Vancouver Iiland, the special ii empowered to work great mischief among peaceful and Innocent people,
The long and the short of the
matter la that the aoldlera, ao far
from having brought order to the
community, have protected rank injuitlce and illegal outrage, That la,
their mere preience hu been the
occasion tor the suspension ot or-
Unary law and oommon decency.
However, • there Is alwayi a day ot
reckoning, and, certain offlclali, who
have been mora vindictive -than discreet, are likely to ahortly regret
that tbey ever had the power to per-
secute-better man than themielvei,
How would you like to be the hangman?
Unity doei not necessarily mean
fusion,:
ILlttle attempted. — little accomplished.
All the enemlei of organised labor
are not on the outside.
Increasing the police and mllltla
power will not lolve the, labor problem,
There la an interesting ten yean
ahead of tbe workeri ot Brltlih Columbia,
Blessed are the "ringleader!" for
they ahall pave the way to induitrlal
freedom.
Another week nearer the close of
the reign of Bowser. '
Modern day strikes are resolving
themselveB into Industrial war—literally speaking.:
.Police cluba are, greater than: everything except the ballots of the
united working class.
Talking la not always thinking
aloud, Words are oft-times uied to
conceal thought.
More than 200 names were added
to The Fed,'!/mailing llat laat week.
A few more auch record! and that
twelve-page paper will become a
reality. v
Knockers knock because they have
plenty of time to do bo. Thoie who
DO things have little time to waite
on backcapping.
When you flnd union official!
squawking about per capita tax eaten be careful that, they are not
merely jealoue.
The chief aim and object of aome
alleged meal ticket artlati ln tbe
trade union movement ie to flnd fault
with the men who do thingi.
Adversity leemi 'to have renewed
the life, and unity of organized labor
In Vancouver. At any rate every
union- in town li growing, and offlcen
and business agents report renewed
Interest ln every meeting.
What the cheerful Idiot who officiates u hired "e-d-t-t-o-r-l-a-1" writer
on the Dally Province, doesn't know
about coal miners and mining should
be written In book form. It wouldn't
make the Province,so ridloulous.
The flnt news of a atrlke these
daya la that the scab-herding mllltla
has been rushed to the scene.. Tet
there are working men dippy enough
to imagine that soldiers are maintained to "protect us from, a foreign
enemy,"
Wage-workers ln Vancouver are invited to spend their, spare time ln the
Labor Temple reading room. It Is
warm, well lighted and clean; all the
local dailies are on file antta variety
of labor papera and literature ia
available.
The next time a union man cornea
along and proceeds to knock all and
sundry just reach for his hat and see
tf tt bean the union label. Then
frisk him from head to foot. If he
stands the test listen to the rest ot
hi! itory.
Premier McBride haa returned
from his old country tour In dukedom
too late to rescue Bowser or undo
the things which he has done. The
tide hai turned, and a united working class in British Columbia will do
tbe rest on next election day.
It"Is said-that tt Bowier withdraws the mllltla on Vancouver
Island the "ineolali" will leave. And
If the meclali leave the mine.own-
era will be peeved. If both were
to leave induitrlal conditions would
he ae quiet ai before Bowser eent the
first batch of special! to Cumberland.
"Why don't you quit If you don't
like the nay you are?g(tftlngT" li the
answer of tM ilave-dHVer when the
labor market ts glutted as at preient.
In Reglna the wagei of laborers bave
been cut ta 80 centa per hour. Unless organised labor awakens ln
Vancouver tbe aame* cut will be attempted here.    <
Emnlovers are organised to control,
nnd Uiev do control. Thev control
tmHtlnlnns, government!, police.^ army
snd navy, courts. There le nothing
ton blah nnr too low for .tbem to
overt an Influence to direct tt In their
favor. They present a.s a matter ot
fact the most potent effect ever
could be witnessed .of the bower of
nrgantmtbm, And the worken could
ha similarly all nnwerful would thev
but organise u the bossei Jo—organize to control
"In those daya," will-write the historian, speaking of 1913-191-(the date
of Bowser's political death) "union
men were Jailed flrst, denied ajl privileges, treated like criminal!, venue
changed from Induitrlal to agricultural centres, farmer jurlei dlimtued
by the judge for openly expressed
prejudice of at leaBt one juryman,
but the prisoner convicted and aeht
up for nine montbs Just the same;
tn ahort, sentenced to terms of Imprisonment fint and- tried after
wards; thus making the government
act ai fint aid to ooal baroni."
Uhllke in Britlah Columbia the
California Railroad Commluion hu
decided to enforce lawa relative to
telephone companlea requiring deposits from patrons for Installing
phones and has instructed telephone
companies to cease demanding auch
deposits. While under the law the
companies have had no right what-
aoever to make sui* demand! upon
the public, they have continued to
do ao. It li eatlmated that the-com-
panlei are receiving from this aource
sufficient capital to carry on their
buitneu without recourse to the uie
of tbe Original capital Inverted In the
enterprise for thli particular purpoie,
It'i getting round to. the place
where lt la hard to convince aome
workmen that violence ihould not
be met with vlblenie. Bach lucceed-
ing strike and the'brutality of hired
government thugs and pluguglles on
the side of the big corporations Increases the. difficulty, It Innocent
workmen must be jailed and even
killed, argue the direct actlonlsts,
then why not go out and get eome-
thing; In return? A alight application, of the old Mosaic law. The
weakness ot thli position Is that the
real culprits, iuch as Coulson and
Bowser, are ln no way affected,
They are too cowardly to do any
fighting themielvei. and why ihould
they when they can, hire damphool
workmen to do it for/them at $1 per
day? The day that the Bowsen and
mine ownen will really get buiy li
election day. And that li THB day
tbe worken must emulate the houei'
example, If they are to lurvive, let
alone enjoy Induitrlal freedom.
Never before in the hlitory of the
Coait unions haB there been such a
call upon tbelr financial reiourcei In
an effort to provide sick and out-of-
work benefits. If there la actual
want among the unionists, who are
generally well employed, one can
only hazard a guess as to what'the
conditions must he among men and
families where there li no union to
provide for them In tlmei of stress.
During tbe past week a number of
cues of destitution have been cited
to The Federationist stories of hunger and privation that are enough to
make one Want to fight to destroy
the damnable social Bystem that begets auch inequalities. But despite
this government immigration official!,
both provincial and federal, are
working, overtime In an effort to
tranafer the problems of older lands
to Western Canada, With the Increased competition tor jobs, wages
being decreased, .and the cost ot living still going up, the future must
soon preient lome solution it open
rebellion ii to be prevented.
Another example of the alimy
method! of employen' association
courts was "associated" to the daily
preu during the put week. Ortie
MoManlgal, the detective, who awore
to the atorlei prepared fo( htm by
the. employen who sought to cruih
tbe Structural Iron Worken' Inter
national Union and thua lucceeded In
"convicting" the McNamara brother!,
and a self-confessed dynamiter for
revenue only, la to be treed "because
of the prisoner's bad health." He
will thui be able to join hia friend
and co-worker, Orchard, who rendered similar aervloe to the employ-
era when the lives of Messrs. Moyer,
Haywood and the late Pettlbone were
In Jeopardy, For a low-down raw-
deal thli hai few equals, even . in
Bowierdom.
The fint duty of. the new regime
ln B. C, will be to clean up the Jails
and so conduct them that they will
not function aa, criminal and Idiot
producers aa at' preient. Before the
change,, however, Bowier ahould be
given a sample of the preient treatment to unfortunate "vaga," guilty
only of being broke,
Moit Just lt li that hd-who breweth
mischief ihould have the " flnt
draught of It himself.—Jemmat
VANCOUVER REALTY A
BUSINESS EXCHANBE
We Sell and Exchange
Houses, ,Lote, Homeiltea, Acre-
•gi, Fruit and Chicken Farme,
Hotele, Cafea, Rooming Houaee,
Retell Storee, Llviry -Stables,
Saw Mllla, Shingle Mills, Grain
Elevatore,  Boats,  Automobiles,
Lome and  Insurance.
401   HOLDEN   BUILDING
1S Haatinga St E.
G.B.KERF0OT
Peabad/sOvaralls
Union-Made
SHIRTS
UNION LABEL HATS,
CLOVES, Els.
155   HA8TINGS   8TREET   E.
Opp. Pantagea Theatre
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTOR* AND
BMBALMBR8     -
. Vancouver-Oflloe   aad   Chanel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 8188.
North    Vancouver — ofllce    and
chapel, 111 Second St E.    Phone
City Auction and Com-
*   mission Company
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHR R. BITCHLIY
Auctioneer. ley. »7l
PATENTS
Trade Mirks. Designs, Copyrights,
FSTHERSTONHAUOH  A  CO.
The Old Establish.* Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
1080 Rogera Bilg,, Oranvllle Street
City, Phone Seymour 8781.   .
"KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures land Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
421 GRANVILLE ST.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
., Directors: Fr|d A. Hoover, J. »
MoVety,; Jamea. Brown, Edward Lothian,
famesfcampbell, j. W. Wilkinson, B. K
PettiplecftlJohn McMillan, Murdock Mc-
Kenafe FTBlumberg. H. H. Free, Manas-
Ing director, J. H, MoVety, Room 8fl,
FORBES eV WAN HORNE LTD.
Importere of
TOOLS
and Fine Cutlery
114 CORDOVA ST. WEST
=^===c= ill"
Is Your Fanfare Sbwbf
Sign of Wssr ud Tsar?
High time to look; winter evening! to come. A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a book-
cue or rug, can make a lot of
difference* to one'a comfort
Don't go oh buying furniture
winter, after winter—buy here
where furniture la aelected to
wlthitand the round of seaion
after ieaion, aad many of
them, Oome In and io* the
new arrival!—they will bring
many houra' comfort to lome
lucky persons.
Hastings Fanfare Co.
Limited.
41 HASTINOS STREET WEST
FOR EXPERT
Watch and Jewekay
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
143 Hillings Street West
rteeeSay. 7SSI risyorMikt
Nunn & Thompson
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMEPJ
52SIiduidsSt.       Vaaconer, I. C.
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS
Offices 32-31 Imperial Slock
SNFsaeVSt, W.    Vaaeeam, I. C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL,
\ DEMOCRATIC PARTY — Publlo
meetings In Dominion Theatre, Oranvllle
Street, Sunday eevnlngs. Seoretary, J.
Adams, Room 301, Labor Tomple.
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING    ;
602 Hastings Street West .
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 AM. TO 6 P.M.
UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS WSt-RTED     11.00 A MONTH
B.    O.    FEDERATION    O*    LABOR—
Meeta ln annual convention In January. Executive o„.cers, 1913-14: President, Christian Slverti; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J.Morris, A. Watchman, G.
A. Burnes, J, W. Oray, Jaa. Cuthbertson,
J, J. Tawlor; oec.-trea», V. & Mldgley,
Boa int Vanoouver.
TJtaUlKS AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets 'flrst and. third-Thursdays.
Executive hoard: H. C. Benaon,rpreel-.
iSatLla' H- MoVety, vice-president: J.
VV. Wilkinson, general eecretary, Room
810, Labor Temple: Jas. Campbell, treasurer: Miss Brisbane, statistician: V. R.
Midgley, sergeant-at-arms: R, P. Pettipiece, J..H. Burroughs and H. McEwen,
ALLIED PRINTING TRADEB COUN-
„ OIL—Meets 2nd Monday In month,
Preaident Oeo. Mowat; secretary, *" a
Fleming,-P.O.'Boa II. '
*- sosiiaiiB,   r,v,   mil   on,
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR*-
„ . "SS!!™ -""a1 Joiners— Boom Ml.
Sey- 8808, Business agent. J. A. Key:
ofllce houra, I to 8 a-m, and 4 to I p,u.
?SJ™»f.r/.0f»,l?fnHa,,I,.,,t «»mmlttee,
Jas. Bitcon, 873 Hornby street Branches
m«et every Tuesday and Wedneaday ta
Room 808.
BROTHERHOOD OFCART ENTERS
and Joiners, Looal No. 117—MeeU
Monday ef eaoh week, 8 p.m. Executive
oommlttee meeta every Friday, 8 p,m.
Preaident. Ed, Sleek; recording aeeretary, Thos. Lindsay, 808 Labor Tem-
Ele; flnanolal aeeretary, w. Leonard, 101
abor Temple,
BAKERS' AND CONFEC1-
Honors' Local No, 48—'
Meeta. second and fourth
Saturdays, 7:80 p.m. President A. M. MaoCurrah;
corresponding secretary, W
,,, , „ Rogera; Bualneaa Agent J,
Black, Boom 220, Labor Temple
BAKISitMH' LOCAL, NO, 120—MEETS
aecond and fourth Thursdays, 8:80
£.'Si«.pB,llto& •T*"1' T- Hamilton: recorder, Oeo, W, Isaacs] aecretary-bual-
?•" Ment C. P. BurKnart -SeViBi
Labor Temple. Houra: ll to 1; i (o 7
p.m.
BARTENDEAg' LOCAL MO, 871.—OF-
doe Room 308 Labor Temple. Meeta
flrat Sunday or each month. Preaident
Wm. Laurie; Hnahdal secretary; Om.W.
Curnock. Room 808. Labor TemplaT
 -™   —a  m-w    a.ww* 	
UH1DUE AND 8TRUL1URAL IRON
WORKERS' "interSttomil tfSSS
Local »7—Meets second and fourth FrB
aay. Labor Temple, 8 p.nv Preaident
h.*z Beeleyi aeoreiary, A. W. Oakley.
138 Semlln Drive, phone Bly. Ill,      "
BWUKLAKEHS' AND MASONS', NO. i
... "TfeeVS,v""' Tuesday, I p.m., Room-
807. Preaident Jamea riaalettl oStSS-
pending .eecretary, W. 8, Dagnall Box
Mi, flnanclal secretary, F. fi. Brown:
buslnesa agent W. £ Dagrjdl, Room
8H&KBiNI.BI¥*i'. fS41* wioh no:
105—Meeta third Tueaday in evert
month, In Room 808 Labor TempK
President F. J. Milne; vlce-prealdent. a
ferry; aeeretary, Oeorge Mowat IW
Dunlevy avenue.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpera
ol America, Vancouver Lodge No. 181—
Meets flrat and third Mondays, 8 p.m.
Preaident F, Barclay, 888 Cordova- East:
secretary, A, Fraaer. 1181 Mows h".<
CIOARIlAKBmr    LOCAL,    NO. ~887=
Meeta flrst Tueaday 'each month, I
&3,'..Fr?"d,l"1f' °9''«n*ar* •«««Wry!
Robert J. Craig, Kurta cigar Factory;
treaeurer. a W, Johnson. '" *'
COOKS', WAJTEHB' AND WAITRESSES^
month, .8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. a
ff2j5.<"5«J>u,"Cl?'*" "Pr-f-enta-lve. once:
P°?!R.il,,i Labor Temple. Houra: 8 a-m.
to 10:30; i-p.m. to 2:30 and 8 p.ra. to 3:88
p.m. Competent help turnlabed on abort
notice.  Phone Sey. 8414,
C ° -SA.-W,1 •*ii TP^^BAPHEltS','
British Columbia Divlaton, C. P. system, Division No, 1—Meeta 11:80 a'm.
third Sunday ln month, Room 804. Local
chairman, T, O'Connor, P. 0. Box 482.
Vancouver, Local secty, and treas.
H. W. Wlthera, p. o. Box 438,, Vaneou"
•5iLK»(vEH1*iAI-. WORKER&, 1.0CAL Na
, 213,—Meeta Room 801, every Monday
5 P'S- PfJ-ldept Fred. Fuller; vice-
Preaident D. Fink j, recording seoretary,'
Roy tiger, Labor Temple; tluanclal aee-
"tar-ff, By C, Knight; treasurer, Oeorge
Hesaell; bualneaa agent W. F. Dunn,
Room 207. Labor Temtli. '
ELECTRICAL WORKERS', LOCAL NO.
,m ■!*& (InsWe Men)—Meeta lira? and
third Mondaya or eaoh month, Room 806,
8 p.m. Preaident U, P. McCoy; recording aeeretary, Oeo. Albera; treasurer and
buslneas agent F. L. Estinghausen.
Room 308,   Bay. 2348.        """"'■••""ne",
LONUSHOREMENS' INTERNATIONAL
AbSOClATlON^No, 88 x 13—MeeU
£K3*iSll9rt?vV"* '!• Alexander St
Preaident P. Peel; aeeretary, Oeo, Thorn-
MOVINO PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo^
Ml 238, I.A.T.aa-Meeu every second Sunday or eaoh month, Labor Tem-
pie, 8 p.m. -President J. H. Iletcner;
aecretary-treaaurer A. O. Hansen; bualneaa. agent O. R. Hamilton. Offlce:
Room Too.'Loo Bldg,   Tel, May, 8046,
aa a1. iui hi lumui     u,.- ,"<a.,      ■.,■',.«.    .^■."■..-?*
*AHSiN1''.T?'' «0. HS-MMETg BEt>
ond and fourth Thursdays. 7.-16 p.m.
President Chas. Matflnson; recording
secretary, j. Brookes; nnanclal secretary,
J. Si. McVety.      ■*
Honeat and Artistic
Dentistry    \
Tbe moit scientlflo and
■ up-to-date methods
DR. W.J.CURRY
DENTIST
301 DOMINION TRUSTyBLDG.
Open (rom 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
RING UP.SEYMOUR 2354 FOR APPOINTMENT
SYSTEMS
We carry everything
fir the office
The moat successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment     '
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS
PRINTING.   BINDING, ETC,
WESTERN SPECIALTY, LTD.
331 Dunsmuir Street
Pkeae Exchange Sey. 3526-3827
Interest the
Non-Union Man
Every loyal member of a labor organization
should try to induce fellow -workers who are not now
members to join. The dangers which seem to
threaten one union threaten all, and are not confined
to the organized, nor to thejinorganized. The members of the/union may look to the union for protection and feel somewhat safer than those who are not
members. Still, ii those who are not members have
their wages reduced, competition may bring wage
troubles upon those who are members. For this reason THE FEDERATIONIST believes it is to the
interest of-every member thathe shall induce'the
largest possible number, of non-union workers to
become members-of the union.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL. PROTECTIVE
Union, Local Ne, 111, A, P, of M.—
Meets second Sunday of eaoh month, IM
Hobson atreet President -J, Bowyer;
vlce-prealdent F, Dngilsh; aeoretary, C.
P. Howett; treasurer, W, Fowler.
OPtaBATlVH PLABTEKMhB' INTflB-
_ NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 88-
Meeta nrat and third Wedneaday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, O, Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter: flnanclal aecreury, O. Scott; tcsaaurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Joe Hampton. Phone
Bey, ltlt
PATTKRN MAKERS' LKAOUU OF
, , NORTH AMERICA—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branoh meeta 1st and 8rd Fridays at Labor Temple. Dunsmuir and
Homer at, room 806, Robert O. gamp-
son, Free., 147 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph.6.
Lyon, Fin. Sec., 1721 Grant at: Tom
Smith, Rec, Sec,, US Broadway west
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tueaday, 8:08
p.m. Preeldent J. Marshall; corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box lOITi
nnanclal secretary, K. McKensle.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANOERS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meet every
Thursday, 7:80 p.m. Preaident J. E.
Phillips; flnanclal eecretary, 3, Freckelton, ill Seymour St.; recording aeoretary, Oeorge Powell, 1881 Fourth Ave,
W.; buelnesa agent W. J. Nagle, Room
808, Labor Temple.
UiH./ll'l'hllS' AND BLECTROTYP-
ers' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver
and Vlotoria—Meeta second Wedneaday
of eaoh month, 4 p.m., Labor Tempi*.
President Chaa, Bayley; recording aeeretary, Chris Homewood, 84848th Ave.
Beat  , T
STREET AND  ELECTRIC  RAILWAI
Pioneer Division No. 101
_ft       -
Meeta   Labor   Temple,   aecond    	
fourth Wedneadaya at % p.m„ and flnt
and third Wedneadaya, 8 p.m. Praaldant
Adam Taylor: recording secretary,
Albert. V. Lofting. 3880 Trinity, Btreet
ebone Highland 1178; flnanclal aecreury,
Fred, A Hoover, 8408 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTEBNATION-
. al Local 887—Meets flrat and third
Wednesday, -I p.ib.; Room 204, Labor
Temple. Financial secretary, B. Prender-
aaat, Room 218.	
TAILORS.   JOURNEYMAN   TAILORS'
UNION OF AMERICA, Local No.l?8
—Meetinga held flrat Tuesday In each
month, I. u.m.    Preaident, J, T, Slit-
worth; recording and corresponding
retary, C. McDonald, Bo%808; Una:..
secretary, L. Wakely, P.O. Boa 808,
TILE LAYERS' AND HELPERS', LO-
cal No. 62—Meeta flrat and third
Wednesdaya each month, 8 p.m. President, J. kavanagh; seoretary, A Jamla-
son, 64 Fifth Ave. Beat  .
TYPOGRAPHICAL  UNION   NO.   828—
Meeta last Sunday each month,- 8
S.m. President A. E. Robb; vlce-presl-
ent A. H. England; aeoreury-treaaurer,
R- H. Neelanda. P.O. Boa 16.
^SMj»[,!lll**1>fc^g>
"Ale
AND
Porter
Of America &*:
I co-flltHT ITM-.I wammimaia ilea \ '.*•?$£
&?&&■'
.'•''"^■''^V'v*-''-'-''^ * *       *t
SWIMMING
Unionists Join WithJtaong
Municipal Committee
in the Demand
Will Seek Heceesary Change
X.  J*Municipal Act to   ,-
'   Ortate Powers
VICTORIA, Nov. 11—In September
a meeting of the' cltlieni of Victoria
waa called to dhouu the adviiability
Of buildtog sad operating municipal
awlmming bathe and a oommlttee was
appointed to sollelt the cooperation
of aU bodlu and societies ot the
Olty,    "'•■'
Oa November S thla oonwilttoo called a meeting and reported that torty
bodlea bad oonaented to giv* their
Support to the project and at thla
point the aaaembly constituteditself
into one committee to be known M
the Cltlieni' Committee, wltb Mr.
William Blakemore is chairman and
Mr. Mead aa aeoretary.
TMr site of the propoaed busting
wss dlscuaeed end, u the olty Bwne
property (• Dooglu street st thenar
Ot the Rmpeeil hotel, lt waa the un-
aolmdui opinio*ttat thtt waa a suitable alto, belnf central and within
eaay reach of all car llnee, One member thought the cltlieni of Vlotoria
might think the property too valuable
tor a iwlmmlng hatb, ai It la In the
-guilgeei lection of the olty,'In aniwer to which another member ex-
pressed the opinion that no property
wai too valuable for auch a project
Where tha ayetem ot llfeeavlng la
taught, aa well 'as ths, beaeflto
calved by the phyelcal training.
One difficulty, however, li that the
dty haa no power to build and operate awtmmtng bathe, owing to the
fact that the Municipal Act doei not
give cltlei In B. C. the power, and
to overcome thla a sub-committee
Waa appointed to uie all efforta with
the government to "amend the aot
accordingly.
The following aub eommltteea were
S(pointed: Legta'alive: Mr. Juitlce
artln, Dr. Donald, Capt D. Me-
Intoeh, Mr. Reginald Hayward and
Mr, Frank Perrott. Building and Information: Meun. L. P. Leo, P. R.
Pomfret W. T. Keir, 0. E. Hopper,
W. D, Hslf, ID. B. Paul, T. Si Clair,
Mn. Pringle, Mm. Hay and Mill
Bradihawe. To investigate possibility and expense of nit water aupply:
Mean, Thomai, Wataon, Napier,
Denlaon, Dm. 0. A. B. Hall, Mra. Hay
•nd Mill Bradehawe.
PRANK PBRROTT.
SOCIALIST HEWS AND VIEWS
. *'J,y*W". WATTS    .
BRITISH WORKMS
HAVl SHOWN THi WAY
Preea dieoatchie from London yesterday announce that
41m Larkin, preaident of -the
Tranaport ■ Workere1 Union at
Dublin, who waa recently aentenoed to levin monthi* lm-
prlaonment for : counaelllng
"riot" hss bun releaaed owing
to the splendid eupport given
him by the orginlitd workere
of Oreat Britain.
J. J. TAYLOH.
V. M. W. of A. omolal and yio.-Pre.i-
dent of B. 0, Dederatlen ot Leber, who
' waa aentenoed by Judge Howay to two
yeara' Imrlaonmint   on   a   charge of
■TloUag."
Two hundred merohanta of Indian-
apolli were iwora to aa deputlei to
handle the recent itreet car atrlke
there, i Thirty policemen handed ln
their badges 'rather than ride on can
wfih atrlka-breaken,
Charlee Edward Runell, socialist
candidate for mayor of New Tork,
pOlled 81,100 votea, aa agalnit 22,232
Wit year. For the flnt time In lte
history the elty of New Tork will "so
troubled with a socialist alderman.
Mayor Lunn of Sohenectady, N.T.,
waa defeated In the civic campaign
of a fuilon tloket. The Vote for
Lunn wai 6855, as against 5401 laat
year. Five socialist aldermen were
returned. H. M. Merrill waa re-elected to the New Tork legislature from
tbU district.
The Pateraon, N. J., socialists
made a gala of 700 per cent in the
municipal campaign. They itarted
out With an empty treasury.
The socialist mayor of Crookiton,
Minn,, waa defeated, although receiving an Increased vote.
Buffalo socialist! made a good
showing In the municipal campaign.
The vote for mayor wai 4975, aa
agalnit 4376 lait year.
Through the medium of 3. B.
OSbourne, in the Oakland World, the
socialist and labor papen in the
United States, have Juit discovered
that a itrlke exliti on Vancouver
Iiland, We are of the Opinion that
strikes on thla aldO of the line ahould
bo kept In tbe dark.
W. E. Trautmen, finding tho pick-
Inge in the Chicago I. W. W. very
poor, hu applied for membenhlp ln
the Detroit I. W. W. It la aald that
ho la anxious to form another I.W.W.
Dublin, Ireland, employen of labor
hsve formed an organisation, with a
fund ot $360,000, for the purpoie of
fighting organlied Worken of that
olty, thui proving the Identity of in-
tereiti between Capital and Labor.
After the mine explosion at Dawson, New Mexico, had killed about
800 mlnen a repreientatlve of the
TJ. M. W. of A. wu lent there to give
financial assistance -to the wlvu
aad children of the mlnen who had
lost their lives, but wu driven out of
town by mounted guard! and forced
to walk to the nearest town and leave
by the tint train. And then Is a
Democratic government tn the Statu.
H. M. Fitigerald, who hu been lecturing In Vincouver for the put few
monthi, hu left for Portland, Oregon,
where he will carry on organlutlon
work for the Socialist Party of America.
The aecond ballot In the Italian elec
tlons,give the revolutionary socialists
50 aeata and the reform socialists 30
seats. The revolutionary socialists are
the aecond largest party In the House.
The Finnish diet la composed ot 90
socialists out of 300 memben, Thirteen women have been elected on the
. socialist ticket and eight women on
other tickets.
Out of 14 Mill Introduced by the
aociallat women In the Finnish diet
dialing with leglatatlon for women
oily one wu paued. All the other
women legislators voted agalnit theie
measures.
W. W. Letaaux will deliver a lecture
ok "Prosperity" at the Empress theatre, Hutlngi itrost eut, next Sunday
evening, Doori open at 7.80. Questions and dlscuulon.   .
Vlnoent Frodibam, organiser for the
S. P. Ot 0,,-bu blown into town thia
WUk and will deliver a lecture at the
Btapmi theatre Sunday wuk. In
tii meantime he win visit tho scene
of tho "rtots,"
NtW WESTMINSTER
CIVIC IMPLOVMINT BUREAU
- HAS JUSTIFIED ITSELF
NEW WBSTrarJBTBR, Nov, 13. —
Tbe civic employment bureau has already more than Justified Its establishment and la doing splendid service, tar. Turnbull does hla but to
secure tbe right men for the Jobi iir
all cuei, ud to tar result! have
been moit utUfactory. ' Ton'' mea
were lent up the fiver on Monday,
uven on Tuesday to another Job, besides several singles, one at 190 per
month, another at 830 per week, bo
that- many of the unemployed are being provided for.
All employen desiring labor, will to
well to call at the olty hall and inter
view Mr. Turnbull.
Mayor John Allen of Hamilton, Ont,
hu asked tbe cltliena of that dty to
Join him ln a "milk etrlke," end uie
the condensed article. The baby food
wu railed to nine centa a quart "The
outrageously high coat of living muat
atop or the people will atarve," he
aald. ':.•■
Nenstfho Frees Committee-
Editor ,B. C. Federationlit: Wotdd
you allow me te clear tbe atmosphere
of a few thing! that aeem to be a hit
mttleadtos, and in aeoktag to leatore
all mes t* then- eoaai ud natural
rbjfrti we do not auk the beneM of
any clue, bat of all eluwi, tor. - we
both knew and aw by taeta that to-
Juitlc* can profit no oae, aad that
Justice nmet benefit all,   .'■;
I think men who control govern'
mutihuld uu thetr power tor the
general toot ue ton to grainy raws*
selves iter such an attitade teat* to
reetrtet liberty, Invent! orime, pro-
melee perlofy, fraud aid corruption,
aad thaw tblmge, carried to their to-
gteal cetlutu. Seem; etvOtasaon
aad ntoem mankind to savagery said
deterioration,   A» lenHtoem we
Tradu uateatim hu put forth the
Ww of mutuality of totereeta Md
ofton. *M**to to rats* cotrage, aad
further political education, while it
hu enabled limited bodies of working men to Improve somewhat their
condltlona and gain, u it wore,
breathing space. It haa alio gained
tor them a little.more freedom thu
they have hitherto had.':
Now the wonderful morning paper
we have In Nanaimo iayi: "We have
a perfect right to organiie a union
emongatf the workere In their trade
and are at perfect liberty io iuk
ton-end with all our atreugth sad
power." It Is our right and privilege
and no one haa denied it to them.
Now, gentlemen, thoae of you who
have taken patna to read carefully the
pages of thla paper from time to time
win have come, to the conclusion,
long before now, that If we had never
tried to organise a union there would
never have been any trouble, Tho
union wai the trouble at flnt and tt
ie still tie trouble.
Re the statement we have heard io
much about, that the plana for thu
rioting wore prearranged. Neither
Jodie Howay nor uy other living
person could mate me digest inch a
statement. The reuon we find fault
Or protett agalnat thli itatment of
Judge Howay, in connection with'thla
prearranged* plan, ta that we believe
It; to be Improper, u no point In the
whole clrcumatancu, ao far as we are
concerned, guarantee! that any auch
statement li JuitMably true. Wears
not speaking with a prejudiced mind
agatnit judge Howay or any other
penon, tnd don't think we are seeking to encourage violence because we
don't think any perfect solution win
ever be reached In that way In onr
time, as ln timet before. Then foreu
tbat are producing Inequality destroy
liberty.
On the horlion the cloud! begin to
lower. Liberty calls out to us again;
we muat follow her further, we muit
trait  her  fully.    Either  we muit
whOBKaei * ths* wtt'tsf
May. It » net. aoegh that MB
tomato vote, asd tt to not eaotgb that
they thesis Ve tMorettoalty eqtol before toe taw. M*t» met have liberty
to aval ttsiswUvw of tho opposUal
ttu and stosss OfUfa, Tbiey mut
stand on egual torau with raftnae*
to the bamty of aature. nth* this
or Irberty wNhdrawe her light BltSBr
thie or dertawwoemei es, ud toe
very foreu thai' progress hu evolved
tors to power tut worka deetructkm
This It IM ssHwtal law, this to a
tetooa of toe eutoriee. TJsleu tto
fouatetMoi be lata ta Jutto* tie
tho itrnotui* OSttoot itnd. 1 be-
lleve at toto pMSwt time a wit*,
deeper bOMMsat reraluttos is
brooding, aot over one country, hot'
all ovwr toe went. The truth «weto
it ud foreu mojhaor thu mu svsr
bad before are urgtog lt on. M'tow)'
more In tho powsr of vetted wrongi
to Btay It the* n Is In men'* power
to alay theomt   ,;
I believe our caul*, li too noWeit
oauie ta whioh eny humu being ou
poulbly engage. , What, after aU, la
there tii Ufa* ss". oompared with a
struggle like tbUT Is not too nobleot
ud but uie we cu aako of life to
do tomethlhg . to make better . and
happier tie condltlona of thou who
come after ue, by warning agatnit to-
Justice, by toe enlightenment ot publlo opinion, by doing an that we poo-
slhly ean to break up the aoounod
'lyitem thit. degrade!-ud embttten
the lot of w muy. We have a long
fight and a bard fight before at, tart
what of that It la a privilege to ho
engaged in iuch a itruggle, This we;
may know, that It ta but part of that
great world-wide; long oontlnuod
Itruggle In whieh. the Jut sal the
good of every ago have beu engaged,
and that In taking part In It we are
doing lomitbtng to our humble way
to make the condUloni of Ble tor
thou who oome afterward* bettor
thu they bave bun for ut. We ou-
not have tho mlHitonei of greed 'forever grinding the fau of the poor.
Qentlemen, lt Is not In order with the
tiemen, lt It not1 to order with the
unlveree. We have watched and;
waited for quite a Ume ud I tell you i
the "glow of dawn" la In the iky,
whether lt comes with the song ot
the birdi or the rott of the wardrumt.
It Is coming and it will oome.
Now, the standard I have tided to
raiae In my letter may be torn by
prejudice and blackened by calnmny.
It may nOW move forward and again
be forced back, but once looted lt can
never be furled. To teat down sad
oover up the truth that I nave tried
to make clear, selflihneu will call on
Ignoruu, but ft hu la It the germ-
of troth' ud the tlmu an fine tor
lt If tho fllht oppoee It tho flint
muit split or crumble. The nod ia
set and the good ttu will grow, had
it growing mora rapidly thu theu
people think it ihould. The whole of
the put hu bun agalnit the working mum, io much so that education hu wakened them and tney
havo rubbed their eyet.
Mao plainly sou that toe only-
power ho hu loft la tho power to
aasjei', a attwtt tatmam
a ssa wttooot wto«M
l^tost^or.;*^^"
witooot a' bono,
mu who lived
yeej*lgi>,v:*ha'
omsg>.' u«* nw
loon ud sgoho wtto 0
agabut ths developtog moaUrou In-
eQaallttoa. Th* oslssjs JAottttort
neered at hSm. toe armatma preach-
on deaoiaeod aim, bS w»» Hvlled u
a dreamer, as a dltturber, ss a oom-
munlit ud flaally orgaatood eodety
took alarm ud killed him. Bat what
he taught did not dl* with bJm; oo, it
is at work today ravolutaaatilag toe
aeauw of .*. totoosMfe Ala* ao it It
with thue mu oo Vancouver Ialud.
Thoy ar* only mirehtog ea- tt* road
of grass sulmi. What w**ld be tbe
ut* of tteee princlpiu tTttiiy wen
pallled and faltering, ta too face of
the moot moasutou prohtomi. ",
, Now tola groalnumber et "am have
toon kirt barred up to prtooa aU thla
tton for wtoto sosm psopto eafl riot-
lac, aad, ao. tor u moat pooal* who
Uvo to ISuatoM wa han, asFakout
3 or 3 panu ef glau tn oan bouae
were broken by aome Idle boys. We
ounot tor the life of ui we when
 WHinHllt toatapA
utoerwtw. Hu* to a eaw to Dotal:
Oae aua who came «rar from Vucouver with boxes to wttl* on the
Iihnd, ud tbe powers that be were
soaftotou of aoweonen, ud thoy
■adeit their baatoeu touuntoekk
bstosatogt. Ia one of t_ nam they
found a rifle, tor whieh be wu flaod
150 aad eooto,. became be oouM -'-aot
produoe a Hcenae. Thli *IU ha* a
utoa prtwlple. But hen I* a iWto-
oroaker touad coming out of oa* of
too wont dlitrloto to Naasttoo with
'Sa opea revolver to hit hast. Thli
muu Sued 310, and tmeef tteool-
Uery^odoiali ussrst tbo eoart ttat
too fine would be paid fer tUi mu.
Oentlemen, how long li toll thlni
goteg to-lutt    -,!  ■ ,-■■",-
Tour for Jostle*, "■'.:
pitase commcttw, ',.
U. S. Mtnirter of user Here
On hit way to Seattle to attend the
convention of the American Federation of Labor, Holt W. B. Wlbon,
TJ. S, Minister of Labor, arrived to
the elty the other day. Being later-
eited tn mining affairs, he alao bald
a brief vmit to the itrlke tone on
Vancouver Island, where no doubt he
gained : valuable information fint
baud, His department at Washington
hu been in existence but a abort
time, ud lt ta problematical as regards the fullllling of lta almS and
object!.
Stonotypen' Union
The Steraotypen' union held ill
regular monthly meeting on Wedneaday afternoon. Considerable dlacue-
ilon took place over tho proposed
new-wage schedule.
The preaident of the international
body, J. J. Freel, la expected to arrive
shortly from Seattle.
H, Rlckett of Beattle, paid- the
"boya" a rlalt thlt week.
.    TO A*to«T Tt« "FBWt
at' !>vi
ltr"ttM'l
verUum toto toK-<
.**•* s- _..__1._.__
there le  oo oeataBt for •*
mrloa label, aat gtoss that u
hie rassm tor tatkfw w Mr* R,'
' Juit mstot hba tool yo* wlB
withhold yur jsuss-m *am [
iuch ttat* u be oaawtten yetors'
u a dutu*. . E
A few inch Jottt wm sttr* Mat [
up. Tiktng amaatat »a» wai •
aevor prodsM~*fssSgto,
A. 4. CAft-TM.
geomarr-IMMunr ol WetHet * tT. I.
W. of A., of Mule, who aHWaf
tb* Cout during the put week,     i
yletoria-Shost ttoiai' Wihiiub -i
- -Victoria, Nov. fi^Voaat m, t
Sheet  Metiu Workers'  ntin, hil'
tlutr regular mwtlaa-laat night as,
of toe Important Itoatt dlacuwed bJ
tog to* Kldaw Chrletoiu hot
83840 wu votoS toswrds ttt* aat;
uparate mbacrtpUenHat atartoe, i"
SSv*M ouortden wsttad to hare •*
of «g>lng down la -thu
. .ir-ssMfaa oeouioa. . Tt
Sheet Metal Wttfur* fsettttt this (
a grand onportoalty of ehowlag
publlo what to* wort 0ato*
aat wo hope that doable tto i
uked for will be given, and that
heart* of to* mottson ud '
wttl be filled to
Chrlitmu.
R. Dickion, u old member of It'
wai killed In ■Friioo lut week, an"
hit body ihlpped to Suttte, where
few memben of thla looal attoatr
too funeral >
The Fair' Rent- Act hu become Ia\i
In New south Walee. A ilmllar la-t
It needed to B. C, particularly go tc
thla dty. '
al To You
MR.
BRICKLAYER
Do you remember when, you:
were working fourteen hours a day
at a salary of one-third your present pay? Yon had to do all kind i
of carpenter' work, shipbuilding,
iron work, etc, To-day your com
ditions arc better because of union labor. I insist that I should
fret your business, with the union
abel in every garment, as it means
that the union tailor gets the protection that you get in your work.
MR.
CARPENTER
Do you realize the best carpenter mechanics in the country are union carpenters, aiid
that the strength of your union
means the bettering of your union conditions, and means the
doubling of your pay in the past
eight years and the halving of
the hours? If you stop to realize, I should get your trade on
clothing, when in each garment
I place the union label.
MR.
MACHINIST
You know how difficult it was to get your
present wage, and how much organization
had to do with your wage? You must
know that your difficulties were nothing
compared to the poor tailor, and every
time you buy a suit of clothes from me
you help union labor in general, because I
am an advocate of the union label.
MR.
HAT MAKER
Do yoU realize how much trouble
you had to get the wage you now
get, and the conditions, sanitary
and otherwise, that you now enjoy? I insist that you should
recognize the union label, and buy
no clothing except that bearing the
label.
WEfeHAVE
$iq,ooo B
Worth of
Overcoatings,
Suiting! and
Trimmings that
Muit be Turned
Into Cash by
December'lit
PRICES CUT IN
HALF.
Any Gentleman's Suit or Overcoat in
the home, value from
$25.00 to $40.00. for
Ladies' Suits or Overcoats of latest
styles, values from $40.00 to $65.00,
for only
NO REASON WHY WE SHOULD NOT
GET YOUR TRADE
FIRST—Our goods are of the highest quality.
SECOND—Our Suiti are cut, fit and made by expert Union Help in our own shop in
Vancouver.
THIRD—-We srre the only Union Tailors in British Columbia who can make your Suits
for that.price;
FOURTH—Why buy a ready-made suit when you can order a tailor-made one for leu
money)
FLeTH—If you doubt our promises of perfect fit and making, keep this ad. as receipt and
we will cheerfully refund you the money if we fail to please you.
SIXTH—The reasons why we can make suits for $17.50 are: We buy the goods in large
quantities.    We employ a large number of workmen.
RAHY & CO.
6 2  HASTINGS
STREET EAST fttfs   BRITISH: COLUMBIA FEDEBATIONIST,
FRIDAY...-NOVEMBER H toll
WORSE
YTHE
TOY
•J--tng for
Tliirty
ri-fcaln.
Onward
ia.1   -and
Iaabor.
[dent of the
re       Mtoei-m*
with     ttae
sat   Britain,
al     delegate
Union   Con-
deration   of
.Seattle,   in
CTarrfnggton
red  in Van-
:,  to be pre-
t      meeting,
tne Miners'
ainion   hall,
er. Greenall
the labor
te -with The
1 aald:
ie Tlnplate
and myself
attend     the
the    two
i    unionists
much unaccorded
>few   Tork,
assistance
la or the
«r to help-
a   of    labor
■ old coun-
the new
> flnd con-
us, quite
near are ln
ed by ihe
n ou Van-
ant -which
re to the
than any-
I of Sn the
it
mfxtm     and
loan repre-
labor bas
1 country
•m In. con-
and we
this part
■anted    to
so   Ions-
o  hear of
uthoritles
lice.      The
in   to   the
cruablng
trades unlonUm ln the direction of
supplying them wltb special police
snd mllltla, under the condltlona
whloh they seem to have been sent,
vis., without the least provocation or
justification for snch a thing, to a
state of things wblch would not be
tolerated ln the Old Country without
very serious protest being made ln tbe
British House of Parliament, which
might lead to extreme action ' being
taken. We are astonished to hear of
the brutal and un-English method* adopted by the authoritte* towards
those who are taking part In this
trouble on behalf of the workmen.
It would seem to us that the authorities have adopted the methods more
common in Russia tban methods associated with the Old Country or any
country where any progress haa been
made .in the direction of social improvement.
"We can only come to the conclusion that the trade unionists of tbe
new country are passing through
such a period as was passed through
ln the Old Country some thirty years
auto, when trade unionism was- Juat
setting a foothold and doing a little
in the direction of Improving the
condition of workers, and the employers realising that, adopted tbe brutal,
barbarlous methods with a view to
attempting to stamp them out entirely. But we are of the opinion
that the same results will be
achieved here as were in the Old
Country: that lt will inspire tbe
tirade unionists to more vigorous
efforts; will unite tha different factions In connection with tbe industrial snd social movement In the
country and ultimately enable a
strong. ' perfect organization to be
created, whloh will Include the whole
of the workers In the different industries ta the country; and this should
hsve ai heart the social well-being of
the common people and will enable
the trade unionists to Improve the
condition of the workers in a much
less time than the trade unionists
and the political parties have been
able to do in the Old Country.
"So far as the workers of the, Old
Country are concerned at the present
time, they are in a fairly good position. Work Is very plentiful all over
the country, advances in wagea have
been obtained and, taken collectively,
they aire In a much better position today than they have ueen for the last
fifty years.
"Through their political action
they have beea able to force from
the government many acts of parliament during the paat few years,
which has very materially Improved
their condition. But having been
under the tuition, of the achoolmaater
In their younger days, and having
also been wakened to a aenae of the
conditions of things aa applied to
employers of labor and work persona
by the advance party, who haa gone
under the name of Socialist during
the last ten years, they now realise
the enormous increase in the facilities for producing wealth during the
last twenty or thirty years, and have
come to the conclusion' that those
-who produce the wealth of the country, by labor with band and brain,
are not receiving anything like a fair
proportion of results of their labor.
Hence the unrest which is displayed
so prominently among them, and
which must be heard of more or leas
In  this part of the world.
"The great problem appeara to
me, and to the whole of trade unionists ln the Old Country, to be, both
in  the old snd the new country, the
HOTEL   DUNSMUIR
RICHARD AND DUNSMUIR STREETS
Half Block from Labor Temple
250 Bedrooms, 100 with Bath.   Long Distance Telephone!,
Steam Heal, Hot and Cold Running Water in Every Room.
Our large new Electric Auto 'Bus is Free and meett all trains
and boats
MERCHANTS' LUNCH, 12:00 to 2:00 p.m., 35 CENTS.
DINNER A LA CARTE, 5:30 to 8:00 p.m.
Telephone Exchange, Sey. 6880.        A. J. LISTER, Mgr.
I
JOHN W. BRUCE.
Organiser for the Plumbers and Steam-
lattera, International Union,. Who Is In
Vanoouver thla week.
distribution of tbe wealth wblch Is
created by the hand and brain. That
problem la forcing Itself on the
trade unionists of Great Britain very
rapidly. The work of the trade unionist! of all the world, and alao ot
the governments, will be very muoh
directed to that end ln the future, and
with tho objeot of drawing the attention of the whole community to that
question, the trade unionist! and toe
Labor party have commenced an
agitation in the direction of nationalising the land, the mlnea and the
railways, believing that until that it
accomplished lt will be Impossible to
achieve the object! which trade unlonlim haa in view..
"Already the Labor party ln the
Houee of Commons, on behalf ot tho
Miners' Federation ot Oreat Britain,
hav* drafted a bill to nationalise the
mines, whloh haa been read the Srat
time la the Houie of Commons, and
attention will be centered on tbat
until this or some other government
Is compelled to make lt a governmental measure, with a view to It*
being carried Into law. The aame
will be done with regard to the land
and railways, and by these meana we
believe progress will be made In the
direction aimed at by trade unionist!
in the Old Country, and we hope that
America and Canada, who seem to be
following very closely to the foot-
atepa of trade unionists In Oreat
Britain, will soon iee that It will be
to their advantage: The new trade
unionists, the advanced thought ln
connection with socialism, and all
partlea who have for their objeot the
emancipation of the Induitrlal workers, wtll Join hands together and form
one industrial and political party,
when, we are of the opinion, they will
be able to make much more progreu
than haa been made, even In the Old
Country by tho Induitrlal and political partial."
. He U happy whoie circumstances
ault hla temper; bnt he Is more excellent who can suit his temper to
any circumstances.—Hume.
NEXT WEEK THE LAST WEEK
OF OUR GREAT REMOVAL TOY SALE
Sale positively close* Saturday, November 22nd—just Seven More Shopping Dayt
before we move into our New Toy Quartan.
Extraordinary Bargains in TOYS, DOLLS,
GAMES and WHEELGOODS.
Sweeping Reductions	
Thornton Stationery Co., Ltd.
325 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
PRINTING
THE FEDERATIONIST has completed arrangements which
make it possible for us to accept the printing orders from unions, union-
isto and others, at. a profit of 10 per cent, which will help THE
FEDERATIONIST and cost the customer no more than if sent to
the printer direct
This LABEL is our GUARANTEE
And in addition we will give you Union-made Paper, and your
orders will receive careful and prompt attention. Mail orders a
specialty. Here it an opportunity {or the unions of British Columbia
to help THE FEDERATIONIST, help themielvei, and at the aame
tone get the but class of work possible at the hands of competent
union printers.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7495—Or send your Orders or Request for
Quotations to
The EC FEDERATIONIST
ROOM 217 LABOR TEMPLE VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patronize the Labor Temple Cigar Stand
MPLOYMENT
GOOD WAGES
THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
, Domestic Servants
E    OF
ADVISED  BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
TO   SKILLED   WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
ILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
rHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPI-
IN   ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES.
O   KNOW  MORE ABOUT THIS, WRITE  FOR  ILLUSTRATED
•intendent of Immigration OTTAWA ••--"frTT"^^' ■
<p.^'WV
FRIDAY...,.NOVEMBER 14, MU .
THE BRtftSH COlitJMBiA FEDBRA*EIONIST.
■-Vw
Merode Underwear
'       FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS -
-This ii one mike of underwear in which you can mure good
quality and a perfect fit The maken studied these two
requisites ind have produced, garments that clearly show
much thought along theie lines. Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode Quality and incidentally associate themselves with underwear that fits ihe figure.v
'If you want real underwear comfort this winter we would
recommend that you try Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino separate garment! at
$1.00 and $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
$3.00 and $3.50 forgirliof
10 to M yean, and all liiei
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50, -
Silk and wool garments in
light or medium wdghb at
$1.50 ind $1.75.
575 GranctlleStreet      Vancouver, R'C.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEE OUR SHOWING
FOR FALL PRICES THAT CANNOT Tit
BEATEN OR REPEATED IN THE CITY
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
MEM ROBSON  -
>   FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 '.; Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADVT. AND WE WILL
give you
CREDIT FOR
LEARN to be an eipert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hall; make and curl
plumes, etc A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for a few dollars a week, when you can leam
a profession with short hours and easy work that
payi a high salary? We guarantee positions to our
graduate!.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For Particulars see Madame Milk, Suite 319, 1100 Seymour St
or Phono Seymour 7450L .«
$5
ON COURSE
FHONI
Hi|hlan<l
1301
Nw OiaaMaw, Hurls, PawsU apl HssUaai SUmI Csis '
ALCAZAR
THEATRE
Cor. Harris sat fna^swhl Drira
3. Vaa tbitlassa. Lsisss sal Maaassr
FHOHE
Highland
1301
THE ALCAZAR STOCK COMPANY
IN
niie Raricho"
tl—n Us. Ut, SB*. 11.00.
MaliaM Ewr Sstardaj, 2.50
"Sal Three Dollar Hat on Earth"     _
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
toM|>-SS&BB Tool Specialist
K. Ml  m -at \  \___        Hardware and
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Sporting Goodi
Jll Htutingt St., W.
Stoves and Ranges
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarter! for Carpenters! Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 441. -       2337 Main Street
Phone Seymour 1300
Alwayi Open
The T. EDWARDS Co.
SUCCESSORS TO
ARMSTRONG 4 EDWARDS
lunmtl Strwtora, -Emfrolmwa
612 MAIN STREET VANCOUVER B.C.
|g*M^3J TOrtAtt SUFFBAGfr
Edited by MISS H. R.aUTTHaRTDOB, Room IH.Iabor Temple.
yores for women
At a meeting held ln Now West-
miniter, under, tho auspices at tha
Provincial Political Equality League,
wa were told that the Provincial President had-deolded upon her plan of
campaign, and that, after all, lt
would not Include militancy, but
would be only educational.
We ourselves decided long ago
that an educational campaign waa all
that waa neceuary hare. Well, that
would, not have been necessary lt
thla subject had not been ao shamefully misrepresented by tho preu.
It waa, therefore, with groat relief
that we heard that the provincial
preildent had come to the same con-
elusion as wo had none.
She waa reported to have spoken
quite often on the subject ot militancy In B. O., and we all know there,
was no militancy hero and never had
been, ao we were forced to conclude
that she waa speaking tor herself and
■her league.. We began to fear that
she and her .league were going to
■tart something quite deplorably un-
neoeiiary and which the B. O. Woman'! Suffrage League could not poi-
slbly endorse or defend.
There are no iuch condition! here
aa there are In England. The men
here have treated ua with respect to-
stead of brutality, and It la, alter all,
the men who decide for peace or militancy by. their treatment of thla
subject A good many women here
do not reallie that, and take great
credit to themielvei tor not being
militant
There waa a dying man whose advice to hli son was thli: "Oet
money, honestly tt possible, but anyway get money."
The woman's cue' Is very similar.
They are out to get votes, peaceably
If possible, but any way, to get,votes.
A deputation of English gentlewomen waited upon Mr. Aequlthi-
tbey were struck down by police and
kicked as they lay on the ground.
When our deputation went to Victoria, Sir Richard MoBrlde received
them with compliments, muoh more
pleating compliments than our former deputation received. We were
told that they were contemptuously
referred to as "theie old hens."
Deputations of men are never referred to ai "these old roosters;"
they are called "Intelligent voters,"
and asked what they want In exchange
for their support of the party. One
deputation returned to us empty-
handed, for compliments are not legal
tender, as the poor man pointed out
to the gentleman who thanked htm
for holding his horse. He said:
"Where mun I spend It?"
Tbe women were In exactly  tbe
same position as the Tankee skipper
that I read about In a monthly magaiine years ago.   Hhe said that he
'"Sailed north, and south, and east,
and west,
And never saw a whale,
He came home, clean as he went
. out,
But he had a d—d line sail."
I believe the sailing Ii atlll Sue, ai
some gentlemen have offered to go
on a deputation for us, If we will
drop suffrage and concentrate on the
laws,
A short time ago they advised us
to drop all the other laws and concentrate on tbe equal guardianship
and we would get that, i What we did
get was an Insult to our intelligence.
The Impudent bluff that was 'given
to ui, with a flourish ot trumpets, as
an amendment to the guardianship
act, was enough to make the statue
of Justice, which Bowser deposed,
rise from the ruins of the court house
and go to Victoria herself to demand
VOTES POR WOMEN. /
J. DOUGLAS FEARN.
AVENUE THEATRE
Commencing Monday, Nov. 10th
George Kleine presents
"Qud VacJis"
Evening! 25c, 35c, 50c, 7Sc * SI
Matinee: 26c and 50c
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seat* at 15c.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville.
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.45, 7.20, 9.15
Season's Prices—
Matinee 15c, Evenings 15c, 25c.
WESTERN
STUDIO
Makers of Fine
Portraits
423 MAIN STREET
P. SELICMAN, Prep.
TIMES HAVE CHANGED
It waa but a low years ago that ail
women wore built-Uke churna In the
nether portion, and only men folks
possessed what might on occasion be
delicately referred to as "limbs." As
tor taking a bath, it was such an Indecent exposure, we will do aa they
did and not mention It Even the expurgated llluitratloni In the physiology were hastily passed over with
a blush by both teacher and pupil.
And the nudity Of classic art waa
either banished from view or moit
pruriently .draped In modern cotton.
Tbe aame obscurity prevailed regarding the pastimes of young men,
and tbere came Into existence a widely popular avocation known aa "lowing wild oats." ' Properly regulated
wives, mother! and listen quite Ignored all thla aa' something outside
their Interest and' understanding, and
the alluring mysteries were paued
On, unrebuked, from older' men to
younger.
It wu vaguely supposed that a
man laid aalde all theae hablta of
mind and body when he donned hla
Wedding raiment,
.But alas! It hai been written In a
higher knowledge, that sins ihall bo
visited even unto' the third and
fourth generation.'. Instead of being
lightly -laid aalde like a lolled gar
ment, thla light UVIng le&vea lta can-
ceroui roots ln mind and body wherever lt touches, and a while generation, the Innocent, and guilty alike,
now paya the terrible penalty exacted by the Ignorance and folly of the
paat'
Happily, a ohatfge Is coming over
onr Ideal. We begin to remember
that "Ood . . .In hla own Image
. created he them," and we begin to feel that. Instead of an Impediment ot which to be ashamed,
our bodlei are part of the beautiful
Divine plan—approved of Ood—and
In till own'Image. We begin to acknowledge our physical persons, to
honor and protect them:
To be Ignorant and to Ignore, la
no longer counted, the sum of Innocence, To underttand and then to
cherish, Is better and more aafe. It
is full time, indeed, that a halt be
called to the progress of those most
virulent of the communicable diseases that so 'heavily afflict our
womanhood.
The medical profession stands ao
appalled by the' extent and seriousness of thla black plague that almost
to a unit they would rend the
ancient leaden fabric of "professional
ethics" to give broadcast to the
World the knowledge and the warning tbat alone might oheck lt
Not that the medical world hai
been io heavily to blame ln the paat
as might at flrat appear. Time and
ages of medication have effected a
change ln the symptoms of the worst
of diseases, just as it hai In many
other ailments. Formerly the manifestations were such as to.suggest
the nature, of the disease. The untrained could guess almost'aa surely
as the physician, who was or waa not
afflicted. And, In. Its last analysts,
the verdict waa only a guess, for
there was no dependable test on
which to base an lnconteitable diog-
ngsis.
But even as time* and nature have
eliminated the grosser symptons, and
developed far more .varied and subtle
one, so modern science has come to
the rescue and given us, only four or
Ave years ago, the flrst and only sure
test for the presence of one of these
ancient diseases. Almost as recent
Is the establishing of the connection
between tbe other disease—once
thought to be a lesser menace—and
the general Ill-health, operations and'
blind or sickly children, that afflict
the women of today.
Knowledge is power and secrecy ia
vicious. Shall we not use what
knowledge we can ln salt defence
and ln the defence of those Who come
after! Shall we not cast aside the
allurement of mystery and reveal the
sordid ugliness of the facts? Shall
not the power of the press, the schooi
aad free speech be open to a frank
and earnest effort to oast off this
curse? The greatest men and women
of the world today think so—may we
ordinary ones soon follow their lead.
B. P.
HOW I BECAME  A 80CIALI8T.
Blind, deaf, and dumb—scholar, poet,
socialist! la there any more wonder
ful personality on the face of the earth
today than He,en Keller? asks the
Christian Commonwealth. Her eager
spirit has forced lta way through the
body in which It waa Imprisoned, and
at thirty-three she la a highly cultured
woman, widely read, a linguist keenly
Interested In'all human problems, and
contributing to their solution.
In her latest book, "Out ot the
Dark" (Hodder A Stoughton, 6s.), she
tells how she became a socialist Tbe
flrst socialist book she read waa Well's
"New Worlds for Old," and this led to
others. "My reading had been limited
and slow. I take a German bi-monthly
Socialist periodical printed ln Braille
for the blind. (Our German comradee
are ahead of ui in fumy reipecti.) I
have alao ln German Braille Kautsky's
discussion of the Erfurt programme.
The other socialist literature that I
have read haa been spelled Into my
band by a friend who cornea three
times a week to read to me." Manual
spelling takes time. "It Is no easy and
rapid thing to absorb through one's
fingers a book of 50,000 worda on economics. But lt Is a pleasure, and one
which I shall enjoy repeatedy until I
have made myself acquainted with all
the classic socialist authors." Miss Keller declares that she
Loves tbl Rid Flag,
and wbat lt symbolizes; ihe hai one
hanging In her atudy. Incidentally ahe
confesses that she likes newapaper
men; two or three edltora have been
among her most Intimate friends, and
newspapers have been of great assistance ln work for the blind. "But so-
cialism—ah, that ia a different matter!
That goes to the root ot all poverty
and all charity. The money power of
the newspapers Is against loctallam,
and the editors, obedient to the hand
that feeds them, #111 go to any length
to put down socialism and undermine
the Influence of socialists." Of a New
York dally she remarks, "Socially blind
and deaf, lt defende an Intolerable system—a system that la the cause of
much of the phyelcal bllndneaa and
deafness which we are trying to prevent," adding that lt ever ahe contrt-
hutei to the loclailit movement the
PUW.IC MEETINGS
A, regular weekly meeting to held In
the Labor Temple on Wedneaday evening at I p.m. under tha auaptOe* of the
ad Woman'!.Suffrage Leaa*ue. The
queitlon of votei for women ii discus-
■ed, opportunity Is given for thoae op-
poOOd to' itate why.   '
The regular weekly meeting of tbe
Mount Plaaaant Branch li held every
Monday In the Lee Hall, Main Bt, at
8 pjn.   s-"l *'*
A debate haa been-arranged to take
place in the Labor Temple on Wedneaday, November the 16th. Mr. W. 3.
Conley will itate tho eaao agalnit Wo-
men'i enfranchliement baaed on tho
atatementa made by pollttclana and
leading churchmen aa reasons why
women should not vote.
A dance and card party haa boon arranged for December tho 3rd, S:S0
p.m„ In the large hall. Labor; Temple.
Tickets an now on aale at Ht Labor
Temple, or of member* ot the League.
Ticket!, 60 centi, Including refreshment*.     .
book that she somiUme* dreami of,
etji will name tt: ,
"lnduitrlil Blindnew and Social Dentin dealing with social and Induitrlal
queitlon* Mil* Keller raveala accurate
knowledge and ken lnalgbt In a
very moving chapter on "The Hand of
the World"—the band that lupplle*
our material needa nnd doea th* dally
work of the world—aba prayi that
aome heart* may heed her words,
"that they may believe in the oomlng
Of that commonwealth In which th*
gyve* shall be struck from the wrtit
of Labor, and the pulse of production
shall he timing with Joy." She toll*
how once when ahe heard ot new Invention* the* thought all nun would
be the gainer*. "When I heard that
locomotive! had doubled In sire and
apeed, I thought: The food of the
wheatflelda will come cheaper to the
poor of the cities now,' and I wa* glad.
But floor costs more today than when
I pad of thoie great new enginei,"
Her Inveitlgatlon ot blindness led her.
Into the Induitrlal world. "My dark-
noil had been rilled with the light ot.
Intelligence, and behold the outer day-
lit world waa Humbling and groping In
social blindness." What a rebuke to na
who Imagine that we see! '.'Why la
It" ihe crlei, "that io many workeri
live ln unspeakable misery? Why Is lt
that willing hands are denied the prerogative of Labor?" She plcturea the
day when the Hand of the world will
he disciplined and organlied. "The
llmbi of the world muit flnt be re-
stored. In order that no limb may suffer, and that none may keep the othen
In bondage, the will of the many muat
become ielf-couiclous and Intelligently
.united. Then the band—the living,
power of man, the hewer of the world
—will be laid with undisputed away
upon the machine with which lt ha* ao
long been confounded. Then will ba
abundance for all, and no hand will
cry out any more agalnit the arm of
the mighty:"
In subsequent chapter! Miss Keller
expreeies warm sympathy with women
worken. "Their cauae Is my cauae.
If they are denied a living wage, 1 alao j
am defrauded. While they are induitrlal alavei I cannot be free." A*
might be expected, ahe li a keen- suffragist, but she feels that the aochl
revolution muit precede the full emancipation of women—aa of men. "I am
Indignant" she exclaims, "at the treatment Of the bnve, patient women ot
England. I am Indignant when the
women cloak-makers of Chicago are
abuaed by the police. I am filled with
anguish when I think of the degradation, the enslavement and the Industrial tyranny which crush millions and
dng down women and helpless children."
A brave, reproachful, yet Inspiring,
voice!
JAMES STARK
•uMnree
TM tTOIW THAT IPJ8BVMS TOO WELL , *■   • Jg
Special Announcement
Thu store hu been elwed Wtihwdiy, ThmmUy amtfrijaj,
, November 5th, 6th, and 7th, in order to namag* etsr.oM
ind mark down prices for our
REORGANIZATION OF BUSINESS SALE
■ ■'■ Cup*** Linoleums, Gnu' FwwAia^.'^rWhtynw
PUbmrsi to be clond out wtiqfe „. „       -
OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF 41 W,00Qj0Q i "
ia involTid inJhii ligaatto iA. 'Watch >8W**8^w J^vStpl-; _
liooil prim Ev^ artlde m th* ^ K
SALE OPENS SATURDAY, NOV, 8, Ma*
__»-  ' i'
■mWt;,, ■■■■■ii*,*
WBBSTERy PAY BUBCHT ON ALL PROVISIONS
Economical Prices
Range All Through Our Store
Coffee, fraeh ground:   ■<
r*g. tool • Ota. .#1^0  J
Rolled Oat*, tttaa
rnUIOd, t lb*..  Sfe.
Balrd'a Chow Chow or '
M. * V. PUkln, per
bottle ..........too.
Our port How, tataa -
■ ***^ 4» lfc^U§
Bnttor, -taut laMM*
' Creamery, t lb* flati
Cooo*. KooUoay,   aat
ttn, fi D> .......SS*.
T**, our Me. Ceylon
Bl«d, I lb*....ft*
NOVEMBER LIST OF
New Edison
BLUE AMBEROL
Records
NOW ON SALE
This hit comprises 54 new
numbers, including latest New
York song hits, Talking Records
—Old Standard Favorites. You
ihould read over the list ai
there will be aome record you
want in your collection.
Tho Old** Music House InBC
Wl WILL APPRECIATE A TRIAL ORDER WHICH Wl RHbV MMf
WILL CONVINCE VOU THAT Wl ARI RIASONAILI IN FRICI
The Webster Bros*
LIMITED >■
phonic uv. moi, not itre oranvilli •triit
COLD  WEATHER  IS COMING
GET ONE OF OUR HOT WATER BOTTLES    ;
Wa Psnaali i fesl la tasl 1— Yaaia
2.Q*,, m. $2.00, SfNhl SI.S0     3-Qt, If*. $-9, Special $1.1*
BRING THIS AD WITH YOU
MARETT&REID
157 Hastings St Wut     nBlirtttTf.       InoVpendwt Drugstore
Phone Seymour I5S3     I PKUCClm 74 and Main   Fair. 560
Recommended by Every
Woman Who Uses It
I
■t(m
m
R
T HAT is the best thing we can say about the O-Oodar Hop.
1 It take* but a few minute* to dust your entire home, and
when finished you have the dust in your mop and not again
spread around the house.
tavraa ™fe^nfiitrt, H«tfl*M,>>t tnd Henr-teohe
SOLD BY
W.CSTEARMAN
The People'* Hardware Merchant       546 Granville Street
:: PAGEJ& COMPANY ::
HATTERS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS
898 GRANVILLE ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Stoves Ranges and Heaters |
■aa  ai   baton  aaytag,      Wa  aaa  save  you  awaer.
we amy evssyaiag tar tk* httskaa at very lowaat ulna
SLOAN   BROS.
Wets tha Mlmsi-OOluma tut AT& aa* nam ■*■.
Successors to
M. W. WAITT & CO.
5S8 Granville St
THE FAMOUS G0URLAY
Pianos*can be purchased (rom
us at $25 down and ten dollars
per month. This is the house
that protects the purchaser, in
case of loss of employment the
payments are postponed. Not
one diiutiified purchaier on our
books, and moit of our business
is done by recommendation.
AJELLO PIANO CO.
957 Granville Street
'
WE UNHESITATINGLY RECOMMEND
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
As being the best soap on the
\    market for
General Household Purposes
POSITIVELY THE LARGEST
SALE OF  ANY  SOAP  IN
WESTERN CANADA
There is a Reason—Try It and See PAGE SIX
THE BRHISH MhVMBIk FBDERAlJI^NIST.
FRIDAY.....NOVEMBER 14, ttl|
BERGMAN'S CAFE
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity vlalt me for a Plnt-Claae Moil it
Modlrat* Price*.   Union Whit* Help Entirely
The beit product* obtained that the market aSorda. Firatolaaa
accommodation. Only modem system et oooklng on the Pacific Coast,
second to none when compared with other American Cltlea on the
Cout Nicely furnished room* in connection, juit perfected In the
moit modern style and now ready for-occupancy, at 1106. net night
and op. -
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3,25c
Short Orders Day and Night
HOTEL STRATFORD
TANCOUVBR'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTBL
MO Bedrooms, 60 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Bach Room
Equipped wltb Telephone, Hot and
Oold Water, Steam Heat, etc Our
B*d* aro th* Bait In any Hotel ln
. America. ,
RATI*
Tramlent RMn, |f>M nor day.
Mor*.  NOLwi.
NO
CORNER  O.ORI AVENUI
AND KEEPER (TREET'
Vancouver, I. C.
Hotel Stratford Oo., Ltd.,    -,
~ Prop*,
lohn B. Teevena, Man. Director
HOTEL ANSONIA
The most
r modem hotel 1
in
. Vanoouver,
RATES MOST REASONABLE
Large airy rooms with steam
heat, private phones, hot and
cold running water.
i    i;, \   i  ii
HOWE aad DUNSMUIR STREETS
•THB strike is atill on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, & ©.
All working men urged to itay
away until th* atrlke ii aettltd
Ord»TairlSairi'U*ka
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding and Blrthdajr Cakes.
WeVaa Valeanoar.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OP
ounce. PAantY and
.   COMFECnONEItY
Hot Orlnlu and launchei
AU Oooda Preih Dally.
•lLaey. no*.
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
UNION
LABEL
! via op tm una, on -room rammo-No grata cost to vod-
wiu nniaP o* do ooa doty in fighting tqbmcwibii
Nested Sam an freqseatly taait ia Moa-
Uaioa.Faet«iN-Do Not Bay Aa7 Shoe
ao matt* what lt* nunc, unleai It bean a
plain aad n*d»bl» Imprenloa o* this stamp.
AU ah*M without tk* Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
SOOT * SHQS WORKERS' UNION
ttt Suunor Street, Beaton, Mia*.
J. F. Tobln, Pro*.   0. L. Blaine, Sec^Treaa.
Richly *raniiahed Throughout Hot ant-Cold Water In Every Boom
Ham flal* aa* 8h8U leaa *■ *ke rtttta Osart ta OwaisWsn
HOTEL ASTOR
C J. HAMH, Proprietor' W. D. MARSH, Manager.
■ami auta earn n-*a*—* weekly aaHa
m—aaawaaaamU mm** atannraa a
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL  ww amd oMt>*ATi
CLARENCE HOTEL "A,0^.1Bl0,tv
i-iirmounmirTi
MULCAHY'S CAFETERIA
Thetamet
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m      a*      aaw a mm     «      aa        Boom and Cafa In Conoaotlon
COMIUO-CHT SStoaP
- "" ~irS»t
 „. ._ Every
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tha on all Floors.
ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS
NEW AND UP-TO-DATE
Lounging and Smoking Room.
Special   rati*   to   permanent
Rat**:   »M ptr week tad up.   »7 ticks* K.
Kingston Hotel
tame toy. lint
CLIFTON ROOMS   __'"■»"• pp»«<* -J**
I1M — —     -- It __a___a ____%    a_\\\\\    *■€•   t*  #■   N*  *>•?.      MwtB
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Q.Q-WITH THE BUNCHT0 THE
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I,
Berry Bros*   V-**mof Mei>
W- ' 111 XSIa\   laema   m    wnlttun    m*amm*mAmm
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CLEVELAND
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' Tk* Bicycle with the Reputation
Full line ot aecenorto*
Repair* promptly executed
•12 HASTINGS ST. EAST
nonn Seymour 7MI   -
We luue a written guarantee
that SIT will euro or your money
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Differs (rom all other reme-
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Price II Joy Port P«ld.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB   OBLIOINO   DRUGGISTS
ltt Cordova it W.
Vucouver, B. 0.
PAST, PRESENT AND PUTURI
By. Max Thelmer *
Someone aald, 'Don't brood over yea-
terday—don't dream ot tomorrow, but
aot today." Or ahould we aay, "The
paat la beyond repair—the future will
eetabllsh Itself, but the preient ii ln
our care." '   -
At flnt glance thli theory appeara
to lie aound logic, But thon who believe In evolution, or the gradual development of thingi, material and otherwise, can not In offhand fashion accept aa gospel any inch theory, whloh
tries to chop oft a period, even though
It ihould be the preunt, from the rest
of time.
Time Is * peculiar phantom, anyway, and the best we mortals may do
at our preient state of mental development I* to say, "Hands off." It begins
with eternity aad ends with eternity
and between the! two ends whioh are
at a haiy distance beyond our Intellectual vision, we try to Intercept inch
meana of identification aa milleniUmi,
centuries, decades, yean, month*, and
•o on down to the twentieth part ot a
leoond, ihown by a modern atop
watch.
We muat never forget thit at no
time we are Independent from either
the put nor the future. Thli li true
of the Individual a* w«U a* of humanity ln general. Our pad, oven unto
lay* beyond* our birth, conditions our
present, Just a* our preunt shape!
our future.
Naturally there ar* Influence* from
without which enter Into the miking
of our histories. Some of them are Uke
stumbling blocks to our progress, other* are more or less convenient ateps,
which lead upward to aucceu. But It
la the stumbling block of yutardiy
'' whloh will Warn ua agalnat failing, and
tt 1* tho dream of a golden bright tomorrow which ahould determine the
choice of today. .
Let ua consider once more. The put
I* for; guidance; the preient for action
and the future contains the purpoae.
All three are equally Important In Intelligent life, but wo are all too apt
to over-estimate either the one or the
other. The conservative la all guidance—the put;.the Idealist li all pur
pose—the future; the opportunist la all
action—the preient But the iuc-
ceasful require! them all.   .
When applied to the accepted forms
of culture tbl* theory shows up aome
pitiful contrail*.
Hor instance, tn religion we find that
the Individual* ar* overburdened with
awe and reverence tor th* ceremonies
and tradition* Of a put, and that they
are plpualy. dinging to the theory Of
a Judgment day of the future, but that
they fall to recognlie the algnlflcance
Of the preient, which ihould be tbe
time of action, baaed upon the guld-
aneeof the goapel and purposed by a
hop* of a future kingdom.
In history w* flnd patriot* ot all
oreedi and nations praising the heroes
of the put and proclaiming tba Important and glorious part whloh their
country fill play In tbe history of lie
future, bat, oh, the preunt, how Uttle
do they iter* up (Or the guidance of
othen! What a universal lack of
action, now, today.
. tn education W* flnd the child devouring the accumulated wisdom of a
put equipping Itself for the confronting task of a future and utterly neglecting the dire demands of youth,
whloh ur tb* preunt
-In government we find In republic!,
Where the supreme power I* vMted In
the people themielvei by an active
generation of the put, that the orlg-
lnators of the constitution are honored:
by the people and that their work
whioh wu adequate to the conditions
of a time gone by, I* glorified. But the
people of the preunt do scarcely avail
themielvw of the privileges {secured
for (hem In the put and much lew
follow the footatepi of their honored
forefather!, to make ample provliloni
for a generation of the future. •
And In our civic life we are ardent
coniumer* of a wealth of actual material, of luxuriei and of valuable Information, prepared by diligent
matron and Indtiitrioui activity, pre-
urved by prudent economy and then
bequeathed to the present by the past.
BUT MIT US RECOGNIZE OUR
DUTY THAT WE OP TODAY MUST
DO LIKEWISE FOR THOSE OF TOMORROW. THAT ALL OP U8
SHOULD OIVE TO THE PBTURB
IN THE SAME MEASURE A8 WE
AOCWPT FROM THB PAST. IMV US
CONSUME AND CREATE. LET U8
LEARN AND TEACH. LET US
PLAN, LET US ACT, LET US REMEMBER,      ,
Edmonton I. W. W. Will Help
Editor B. C. Federationlit: Fellow-
walker—At a special meeting of thla
Load, called to consider a communication from Local 811, Vancouver, I
wu Instructed to notify you that We,
the memben of this local, pledge you
Our full eupport In any and aU action
tho B. C. Federation of Labor may
decide to take In order to- seoure the
release ot the Imprisoned miners
from Vancouver Island and prevent
the railroading of those hold awaiting
trial—Youn for direct action,
JAMBS  ROWAN,
47 Fraaer Ave,, Edmonton, Alta,
Nov. t, 1113.
Evoy
20
Yon
OH
H
U
D
S
0
N
S
BAY
THE »OLDlkR'8 CREED.
;;'■  By* Smekt Crosby.
"Captain, what do you think," I aiked,
"Ot tho part jout aoldlera playt"
But tbe captatt auiwered, "I do not
think; "'  .
I do not tjSljik, I obey!"
"Do you think you ihould ihoot a patriot down,
Or kelp a tyrant alay?"
But.the captain answered, "I do not
think;  ..
I do not think, lobey!"
"Do you taluk your -conscience wu
made to die,
And your brain to rot away!"
But the captain anawered, "I do not
think; .
I do not think, I obey!"
"Then If thla la your soldier's creed,'
I pried, -
"You're a moan unmanly crew j
And for all your feathers and gUt and
"'-bratd,.. ■■
I am more of a man than youl
"For whatever'.my plan la life may
'bo;
And whether I swim or sink,
I can ny with pride, 'I do pot obey;
I do not obey, I think!'"   .
"WHAT ARE THE SUOLE8
BLOWlN' FORI"
(With Apologies to Rudyard Kipling.)
"What are the bugles blowln' for!"
said 91e*-on-patade. ,
"It g*t my goat; it get* my goat," the
- color lergeant raid.
"I've been to-camp thli rammer once,"
laid fllei-on-paradej
"You'll be campln' out ail winter," the
color eertpeant aald;
"You'll be campln' Out all winter," the
color urgeant uld;
"You'll be campln'(Out all winter, Oil
the coal la mined one* more,
The atrike haa laster long enough; It
makea the o.woers lore.
So draw your ammunition and the 'ar-
-   tides of War,"
And I guesa we'll' bike there In the
morning."
"Wliy are we flghtin', Rltt" uld fllea-
on-parade,
"You'd better uk BUI Bowser," the
color aergeant aald.
'What makes tbe  people  atare  so
hard?*' aald fllei-on-parade.
"They're gettln' what they voted for,"
hard!" aald lllei-on-parade.'
the-color sergeant aald.'
and a little more beside;
Juit watch Attorney Bowier, of the
people'! solid five,
And uk no foolish question; he a good
Conservative,
And I guess we'll hike there ln the
morning,"' :\._   ■
"Taln't my Idea of soldiering," uid
flles-on-parade-
"You've got to go, and round 'em up,"
. the color sergeant said.
"And what .la In thl! glorious stunt!"
uld fllei-on-parade.
"Oh, Just your beer and skilly," the
color urgeant said,
"For we're called up for duty, 'celer
et fortes'to the fore;
The solid five are calling; don't worry
any mora. „.
We're aiioh jkffOt of numbskulls that
we never aak 'what for,' "*'
-So we wtU have to hike It In the
morning,*'
f r- MARK THYME.
THI PILL ROLLER
...J«d you ever dept the fellow-that
never opens hut mouth' during a meeting, No matter < _w Important the
subject under dluuwlon may be, he
sits usually ln tbe back of th* hall enjoying* the fragrane*, of hi* favorite
acab cigar and looki on u though
amuied, at'the memben who have Interut enough In the welfare of local
union to help solve the questions confronting it by stating tbelr Ideas on
them.
This silent wiseacre is u a rule a
man' Of the average Intelligence who
oan form aound opinion* on general
queitlons. He likes to boast'of how
long he hu carried a card, but lacks
the courage, and n*i*e tb go on record
one way or the other on any quution,
tearing he may hurt ume one's feel-
Inn- '
He feera that the. local might take
an action hla boss would not like ond
It might leak out that he wu on the
■Id* of the afflitwttv*. 'He never
vote* on any queitlon, no matter how
important If he thinks ther* It a
chance to put-htm' on record he will
duck out of tbe meeting on aome pre-
tense or another, and after the vote
I* over, if lt doe* hot nit him, he
pretends to be very ur* and dams
everybody that had anything to do
wltb getting favorable action of the
local union on tha quution.
It seems strange" Indeed how many
member* fall for'this character of
man. One would think their following
would be few and far between but
inch li not the oa*t, They seem to
bar* a faculty of making friends,
eipeclally among th* new memben of
their loul union, who (tick to them
no matter what the luue may be.
They are slick politician* -or what 1*
known In labor circles U pill rollers.
They aro past muten at railing
pills which they band to their dupes
(0 admlnster. They, are alwayi ln th*
background and ae'they grow older In
thl* game their pills get rawer and
once they.are kn&wn lt Is easy to
recognlie that thoyare the men behind.
All member* that deilre to am tbelr
looal union-progreu ihould Una up to
a. man -agilnit this illent "Wlsen-
heltner," th* piu roller and repudiate
htm at every opportunity for he la not
on the level. HI* union Is a ucondiry
consideration with him. If hs could
advance hla own personal interut* by
so doing, he would sacrifice lt and aU
of lta memben. Aye, lie would nil It
out, Including the soil, for muoh lu*
tban tho,amount of sUver paid Judu
for betraying the toeatest of all men.
The quicker the memben ot a local
union let thli character know that
they ore on to htm" ind do not intend
to tolerate bim In Uwlr midst, tho better lt will bo for their looal onion and
themielvei.
Don't ho afraid dftbem If you have
them ln your ranks, go after them
good and strong, and bear in mind you
muit keep after them contlnuoualy
for you cannot InsAlt th*m by *ny lotion you. may. tak* that. will reflect
on them, You can* repudiate them at
our next meeting and yon will flnd
them at the meeting following wltb a
amlllng face and .the glad hand for
everyone.
A member that I* not manly enough
to get up at a meeting and light,open
and above, board tor what he believes
Is right, will bear watching, for In our
opinion he la not repreientlng an
honeit cause or purpou and the dupei
wbo tall for iuch men and who try to
administer the pilli they roll to th*
members of their local union, are M
bad and u much of a menace to th*
progreu and sneeeu of their lout
union u la the silent pUl roUor.—■*».
,trtcal Worker.      ft- . ;
A PEW LABOR DATES.
By J. SaBiieay.
Every agitator ahould kup a notebook la which data and uaeful tutor*
matten to the movement (hould bt
recorded. Fact* tho* gained (hould
be publlihed In our papen from time
to time to giv* other* a chance to
proflt from the Information of thoie
who have the faculty to dig after Information. I ahould Uke any fellow
worker* to help me flll out the-gap*
in the following date* with othtr or.
ganlutkma:
1724—Caulker* orgulud.
17»2—Sboomaken organlied.   ■
1803—Journeymen Shipwright* m-
corporated.
18SS—Flnt tradu council In New
York City.
I860—Prlnten organlied on large
loale.
18(4—Hat Sntahen organised on
large seal*.
1858—Iron workeri organised on
large aula.
1868-HeeUalit* organlied on large
acalfc
1868—R. R. englneen organlud.
1886—Brlcklayen and Muon* International formed.
1888—National Labor Union organlied.    , ■ ■ ■
1867-Cigar miken orginiud.
1868—R. R, couducton organlied.
1869—KnlghU of Labor organlied.
1868-Knighte of i% VrlamX^
186»—u. 8, wool hkt flnlahen togas—ei.
1871—Furniture makari orginlitd.
" 187S-R. R. fireman organlud.
1876—Horseshoen National formed.
1876—Oranlt* cuttora organlied.
1876-Amalgamated Aiao. Iron *
Stool Worker* formed. ■
1880—Journeymen Bricklayer* Aiioclatlon formed.
188l-P*d. of Org. Tradu* * Lah.
U. of U. S. A. and Can.Jormed (A. F.
1882—Bro. Carpenter* ind Jolnera
formed.
1888—National Hatmakw* organ-
"laod."
1888—Bro. R. R. Trainmen, Including yardmen, organlied,
1884—H. R. Brakemen organlud,
r, 1886-Nat Fad. Coal Miners
188*—Journeymen Baken Union organised.
1886—Name of A. F. of L. token by
the T. ft L. U. of U. S. A, ud Can.
1881—& R. Telegraphers organlud.
1888—Bro, R. R. Car Repairer! or
ganlsed.
1890—R. R. Carmen organised.
1880-U. M. W. of A. organised.
1891—a R, Trackmen organised.
1897-AmaL Mut Cutten * Butcher Workmen organised.:
1897—Int Longahereman'a Auo.
formed,
1906—L W. W. orgulsed in Chicago.
Prior to 1814 It- wu a felony to
unite into a union to raise wagu.
In 1821 Judge Gibson decided that 'It
wm an Indictable offenie to organiie
to get better wagei.
GuUdi In Germany aa early u the
Eth century had trade mark* itmllar
to the present union label.
■ Flrat trade union label In V.fi. wu
luued by the Clgarmaker* Inter
national in 1880.
In 1890 the Granite Cuttora decided
to refuse to work mora than 8 hour* a
flay. They made lt stick and got the
8-hour day In abort order on the Job
after spending about 30 yura In vain
ehort to get the ume remit through
poUUci.
At the close of 1869 member* of th*
Iron Moulden Int Union owned and
operated 14 co-operative toudderlu In
N. Y. andPenn.   '■'■'.-: -
The Letup for Mlnsra I* Plain
Memben of the profeaalona iuch aa
Jaw, medlolne, englnoen, mrveyon or
architects are duly- authorised by
-statute tO prevent nomnemben, ln
other word!, non-nnloal*ti, from prac-
tlslng tbe philanthropic puraulta of
extracting feet, appendlie* or teeth
from a grateful pubUc, uy* Wedneaday morning*! Sim,' editorially. The
aulatanoe Of the police oan be called
upon by than organlutlon* ahould
any enterprising Individual* of "Hoi
Pollol" ahow a too persistent tnd.
burglarious deilre to ezerolu their
uncultivated tutu and unruurrected
tatont* U theu attraotlvo but forbidden Sold*.        .
Statutory powen enforced by police
protection eitended to the** privUlgad
profeulou apparently remit* In better service to the public. In fact lt
may be conceded that they are generally approved by society.
Apparently th*.exact opposite applies to the "profession" of ooal mining at Nanalmo "all the ruourou of
clvUlntlon" are being brought Into
play to oruih the organlutlon, apt allow the outsiders to practtoe. Thl*
certainly conitltutu an anomelou
condition of affaire anili wall worthy
of the attention of thinking men.  .
Surely tt I* Ju*t u meritorious to
extract coal from the bowels of
mother earth arfu*. Coal mining Is
a dangerous occupation for the minor
hlatulf. Th* othv occupation! are
daagerou* itoo, for th*j otk*r f*ajw.
It la aa undoahted faot that tf th*
coal mlnen W*r» organlud by rtat-
ute, u th* lawyen, doeton or den-
Uate are, the polhto aiid mUltl* would
at the preient moment be extending
them protection In thilr effort* to Ilx
the Mhedule of ttu, working hour*
and oondltioM nndisy which thtlr pro-
feailonal servlcu would b* giv*n to
tho public.
Stingk Weavers, S»w«fl
Workers id Wwtaai
MeNotk*
.'All interest-,
ed in organization are
requested to
■     ..- at once.:call
at Boom 217, Labor "temple,
or oommunicate with .
(Jit). HIATHBBTOH
A. 1, of Ii. General Organiier
See that this Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
It stands for aU that .Union,
Labor Stand* for*.
HOTEL  CANADA
Phone
Watar
C G. MULLER, Prep.
in ovary room. Hot and Cold
Room.     k     European Plan
Traniient Rate*, $1.00 par day up.   Special Weekly Rate*
Merchant-* Luaeh, 11.30 to 2i30 pjta* 35c
Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 pjn.
Free Bu*
518RkhanUSt
Eachatsi* PIwhw Sey. 1871
Latest Addition to V«ncowr,s Up-«o-D*ite Hbtds
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.  Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Etery
'..:•""'* i-i Roonir,r;     v-c..„. .....
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in OMutaction
RATES 11.00 PER DAY UP
AttmtJvtlatNbTPtniant COTTWCHAM A BEATTT
Csojt* > ■ . ,    Pr*iri*ters    .
GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL
CAUU ft StnUUUN, hofiWwi
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Laadint Hotel a Auto Parne* catered to.
European and aad American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 138
CcnerFoertli Street aad Rhrer Road      Eknu Statiia, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
VancouTer, B.C.
921 Ponder St, West Phone Seymour 8860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
Krst-claa. drill in Connection
' F.  L.  WALL INQFORD,  Manager
PENDER HOTEL ^S&_,x
JMteTMvaTStTtl
Pakce Hotel Bar and Cafe
Rkw $1 psr «Mkl   ..    M■»■._,,■•-.■'.'. '. | TsMaaa, Hat aid
»..•*•       1 GsedSenieetbeatieit  I eaMVuaraai*
B\ t. faaiilm, fee. I *'    " i rr^      ' '     ■ ■ -Mata,
8146 HASTINOS STRUT \yeST VANCOUVSR, B. C
I.. ———^"' .  >—^————.
—a—*—aatmmsfms^^me\,-l.   , '     '., |'   ,        , ... _
D A1MICD    Ur*Tri     0*(e °»n *<"* Six o'Oloek
m*»HlICi|\   il,\J I Cam.   ».m. UU Midnight   The B**t
Mtat* In tha Oltr, tt Popular Price*; White Cook* only employed.
Room* Ranted by the Day or Week.  Plrit-class Uquors and Cigars.
JOHN SNIDAR, Prop.        Oormr Cord*va and Carrall Sta.
HOTELS FURNISHING CO.   "%£&£?"
.-     *]***"*.^flo9mtm^^f ****P
Sll Peate St, W**l
Get Your Money's Worth
HE ST   IN ||[' {  \C, ^'llH
:^-'•-■"■?. '    »'     7.'    ', '  J.WJ.
FRIDAY.....tlOVEiiBER H WW
Vm^-.'»■    'W/'!" '   * ' »l-V'fJ l J": _»'! .'P. \ \ .'.' i.H. i ,ti-;.HJ..   ii.-^ip^^^p
^    *   '   '':" ■      '"*'?""'   ' *■" * . '*'■• ■ ■;;'■■■*'    "< f U ,,'^'      '
:-'    ■''* i -. ,-'.■•'   v-':        ■ ■■".', 3aJ.'-'    -■■.••■:'.-.'•••.    i-iftv'"- .' :     ■.. ' "  "   ' .   /
? -THE BTOSH COLUMBIA l^BaA*IIOSIgag.; "   '
nw^mmmmn
Low Fares to the Old Country
i- ™ v.-'   ;, ■■ -*•-.. ./:■ «::■:■'' gT- ™   .   ;!;-^'' .■',/'■.■.
Are You Going to Spend
ith the Old Folks** Home?
The Northern Pacific Railway
V eChe't%>ule6fthe Famous Great _lg [faked Potato
On DIG. 7, will ran a PB^SONjvLLT CWWGTED Pullman Tourist Slewing Car, 16 Sections, Electric-lighted, from
Vancouver, B.C., direot to PORTLAND, Maine, thd nearest
winter port for Canadians; connecting with the White Star
lane Steamship* "TaWTOMlO,'' sailing December 13, landing
the passengers at'the Steamer Dock, thus saving Hotel and
other incidental expenses.
CstaoctJoat tb* mat* with tk WUte Star Steeajals> 'HHy^c'' ttrn
'..   H*wT«k,DK«W13di     .
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLT AMD GET FIRST CHOICE
GENERAI,
AGENT   .
C L LANG
CITY PASSENGER
'  . AGENT .
H.SW1MF0RD 	
CMP'
Vaynusar, B.C.     ,
207 Hastings St W, Corner Cambie and Hastings
WHITE STAR ^^^'.^SERVICE-lARGIiST".,*^°'CANADA
'■ ,. -Sailing Every Saturday trtm'j:.X,>'§J:l
Montreal  - Quebec   -   Liverpool
H1W gftJATOWTlO, 1»,000 TOMB^ WWM.MWAMT10
; SS; TEUTONIC, £. TWIN S6BEW    t'SS. CANADA
'■'   682 11 long-X \'     STEAMERS       f : »14 ft. long
oa&T osra oua* oaaoi (it) ncoo a*a
■     tiSkattt asi.ai **« ip earn**.    .
SS. LAURENTIC, Nov. 22
SS. MEOANTIC, Dec.  6
SS. CANADA -    Dec. 2
SS, TEUTONIC - Dec. 13*
'
*-+• •*>••"■ *i saws xir-Jsp.!™.*-* *t-» ****->
Atlantic Steamship Agency
0. P. R, City Tickrt Offlca, 134 HartingiBt. W.       ' ...
yANCOUVBR, B. C. .$
CANADIAN PA01H0
iujmiaim
WHITE STAR   ■
DONALDSON LINE
CUNARD LINE
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD
HAMBDRG-AMERIOAN
AND AU, OTHER LINES '
3. MOE, v
OEO. R. OOOMBE,
Agent City TtakotAigant
Phone, Seymour 1710    ,
H   ■        $,}■   PROMPT
•   >' --1 DELIVERY    '.    >.x-{ ■
ROYAL WOOp YARD
v.--.',-.    % PHONE FAIRMONT 1009
Corner Dofferin Street & Columbia Avenue
'          I   i   li'   UU ' eeeasas»aai8p5aaa!B==^ggg=s
LANG SALES COMPANY
826 MAIN STREET
"The Workingmeii's Store"
SPECIAL-"TIGER BRAND" _(_,.- J*>1  AA
UNDERWEAR, A GARMENT W« «nQ if 1 .W
PEABODY OVERALLS
Suadud lb. Woild Owr
■.;   Cent's Furnishings, Mats, Clothing
-BOOTS AND SHOES
THE MAN AND HIS HAT
last
reason
etoroe 	
and Quality.
Thare la no hat on the market equal to the
„... —.. --■-,a,li*inaisJO.
Other (uaranteed makea, I
f. B. CUTHBERTSON CO.
•no
LTD.
SHOES FOR MEN
•Hou pop. aiRVicE
•HOE* POR DRESS
UNION SHOES POR COMFORT
POR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at the service of every man who desires, the best shoes his money can buy
W. J. ORR(0PPoiiteCity Hall) 204 MAIN ST.
SCOTCH CLOTHING HQUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Orant, Manailnf Director.)
Mr* AS— OTSBOO A* TAIVM
New Addreer,        ,.	
etween Abbott and Carrall, alio
orner Columbia Avenue,
SITJO
m -Mawmranav otsbaix xa moni onnm ausac
EVERY   UNION   MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR   TEMPLE   CIGAR   AND   NEWSTAND
CMC Ml M
Wimm
mrnm
Four Ii a b o r Aldermanlc
Candidates and Commit-
•;-   tee* Hard at Work.
Expect to Oaln Enough
Seats to Stenre Needed
* ■,,,  Legislation;
NEW WHSTMINSTBR, No. II. —
While diacasslone are bains carried
on' la varioui municipal oentm over
<the advisability of folng Into, politics,
the workers ol tho poyal City, havtni
years i«o settled that question, havo
eiitend Into tha campaign thli rear
with' greater ylfOr (ban over.
The aldirmanlo candidates ar* do-
ins all the Individual work thar oan
Had time tor, while th* committal*
are planning a thorough organisation
of th» oltX and are working ont tho
details la Mob a way aa to leave no
room tor doubt that four working
men win bold seat* at th* oonaoll
board during .1914. Tto reglltntloq
of household voten haa been very
successful, and the workers vote will
be the determining factor In the per-
aonel of our publlo bodlea during tne
coming yesr..
The first thing necessary Is for the
wage^arnera ot Ntw Weitmlniter to
reallie that they have It In: their
power to name the succeaaful cmdK
dates In the coming eleotloni. Then
all that li necessary to to give aun-
anlhioui support to the candidates
they have chosen to represent them.
All personal feeling ihould' be put
to one, side; that you dislike a man
personally Is n* reason why he Will
not make a good councillor' and do
his best to further the Interests of the
working claii,
, Sentiment and personality play tar
too important * part In our elecOan*
and personal feeling very'frequently
Influences a man to lend his support
to a candidate whose material Interests are dlreotly opposed to his own.
And lt li a tact worth remembering
that In any contingency where the
Interests of the workers and those of
the public official clash, the decision
to always against the workers. A loan
always Supports those things which
redound to his own material benefit,
whether he'll actually In a public or
a private capaolty, ln aplte of all the
protestations and promises he' may
have made from public platforms or
elsewhere.	
Then why should the wage-earner
waste, his franchise by Voting (or any
but a member of his own class? A
wage-earner acting In a publlo capacity will endeavor to further his ova
material Interest and at the same
time. the. InteTeat of all other wage-
earners In the community.
There to, then, no question that the
I, workers of this city In the present
campaign ihould mass their forces
and.give an unquallfled, unanimous
support to the candidates they have
chosen, Snd they can then rest assured that their demands will be attended to,
There are many thing* that the
workers Want, even In thla well-administered olty of New Westminster.
Among other things might be mentioned cheaper light, oheaper water,
a co-operative market, municipal ooal-
yards, day work on alt oily contract*
and Improvements, the. abolition of
private employment agencies, publlo
admission to all session of the olty.
. oo-gncll and school board; and the lm-
pavement of condltlona 'and wages
for all olty' employee!.
Thli to a large order ln Itself and
la only a small part of the programme
tbat haa been and* is being mapped
out by the workers, not only for their
own benefit but alao In the beat Interests of the community as a whole.
Harbor Improvements, civic expansion* and the locating of new Induitrlal are of vital lntereat to the olty,
but far mere Important to the workers la the iteady Improvement of
their condition!, both during their
working, houra and tbelr leisure time.
■ ,   ' ■ ';
Change In 8.8. "Canada" Sailing
Tha White Star-Dominion liner,
SS; "Canada," which.waa to sail from
Portland, Maine, Nov. 29, and from'
Halifax, N.B., Nov. JO, will now sail
Dec. 2 from Portland and Dec. 3 from
Halifax. The SB. "Canada" carries
ope olaii cabin and third-class passengers. Tbe new S.S, "fyegantlo"
will sail from Portland, Me., Dec. S,
and from Halifax N.S., Deo. 7, Carry
ing all classes of passenger!, and will
be followed by the SS. "Teutonlo"
from Portland, Me., Dec. IS, and from
Halifax, Dec. 14, carrying one dais
cabin passengers and third class:
' A^Mcnutt-tN*
i'M'H
-morn* or coai, mania aaoo-
. -uarosra.
Coal mining rights ot the Dominion,
ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Tar.
rltorlM and In a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may ba leased for
a term or twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of It an acre. Not more thin
8,880 acres will ba leased to one applicant,
Application for lease muat ba made by
tbe applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent pf tbe district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land muat be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory, the tract applied for shall be
staked" by the applicant himself.
' Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of 88. which will bs refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise,' A royalty ahall b.
paid on tha merchantable output of the
mine at tbe rate of Ave cents per ton.
The pareon operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghu
are not being operated, auch returns
ahould be furnished at leaat once a year,
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights, only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
aurface rights may be considered necessary for the Working of the mine at th.
rate of 110 an aore.,
For, full Information application
should b. made to the Secretary of th.
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of .Dominion
Lands.  > '
_      . /. W. H, CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised' publication of
tble advertisement will not be paid for.
By aus AtpNaow.
The social aad dance of the Social
Democratic Patty we* a great meets*.
W* were igreaabty lurprlied by th*
large audience which aaaembled In
the Labor Temple lait Tmdap evening. Everybody thoroughly enjoyed
themselves Th* attitude of the party
la to win people rather than to repd
them. That we ar* doing thli to very
evident The *opM* comrade* ara to
be congratulated woo the luceiss of
thelretort ' ," ' •" .'■   "
Tbe lubject of.,*** lecture Ja the
Dominion Vstatnc Oranvill* St, n
Sunday evening Mat, November l«tb,
will be, "A MunWp^ Program." 8am
Atklnaon will be tk* speaker, There
will baa abort muk*l program.
Next Thursday evinlng Local Vancouver Na il; iflll bold the weekly
meeting In the' Labor Temple. Dtoeiu.
•Ion open to aU. -*, "
Our Moral Eixlivement
I do not believe la going out of my
way to attack tb* church, bat when
the church gets fn. my way I ooaildw
It my duty to mak* an attaok,
i F»ther O'Boyle ot Vancouver hi*
recently preached a sermon agalnit
aodallim. He made th* uaual attack
upon aoolallam. It I* alway* mirprl*.
Ing to me that a single man,.who ha*
token a vow of chastity, who never
In all hli lit* ba* really known a woman, ahould be iuch i decided authority upon women. By luggeetlng thit
the Idea of th* aqotallat U to have
wlvei in common hi Iniulti the manhood and womanhood of every Canadian cltlten.       .'•■' '
Tbli prtiet. dauua among other
thingi, that we lay too muoh emphaaie
Spon industrial life, conilderiag pro-
uctlon a* the be-all and end-all of existence. He falls to recognlie' that
the way a people get their living determine* bow they live.
He saya the ayetem la impractlble
and will not- work, ilnce lt suppllee no
motive for lnduitry; He cannot know
this becauee It bu never been tried,
but joy fool ought to be able to realise that when we work for the plea-
sure of working Instead of merely pro- <
duclng profit tor the Other fellow, we
•ball have an incentive that will' result In greater effort to produce the
beet tor the benefit of all.
Tbe argument he, lava tbe greateat
stress upon, however, I* th* moral argument. He doea not recognlie Uie
fact that religion and ethics hav* been
Intimately bound, together aa a weapon
of rule. Kautaky asyi: "Certainly the
moral law la a product of th* aoclal
nature of man; certainly the moral
code of tho time Is the product of
particular social needs; certainly have
neither the. one nor the other anything
to do with religion.''
-The good Father tells his congregation they muat ba' honeit 1* lt honeet
tor the capitalist! to All their storehouses and then close their factories,'
and aay to the worker*: "We oannot
employ you until we hsve sold theee
gooda"? Ii It honeit to employ working men as salesmen, and teach them
to lie about the gooda they aellt Thla
Is the pdllcy ol eVery huainesi institution without exception In Canada. Is
It honeit to call a man a thief who
steal! * loaf of bread for hi) Starving
family, while'the man who dabble* In
watered stock la considered a pillar Of
the church! Under the (relent lyi-
tem wholesale robbery la respectable;
taking food when hungry la a orlme.
The church li compelled to defend
the preient system for the same reason that the working man ha* to become a socialist. That la, plainly evident when the accept* the gift.of a
cathedral from the blggeit thief on the
American continent. Ie lt honeit for
. the priest! ln Montreal to prevent the
' French-Canadian .brewery workere
who' are working for eight and nine
dollars a week, Joining the Union? IT
IS NOT HONEST, BUT INDUSTRIAL
CONDITIONS ARE RESPONSIBLE
FOR IT. THE CHURCH IS INTER-
--'     PINANCIAUiY    IN    THB
mm	
ill
QlMj-ay Despair of Beildng
a Master Day Afts^r Day ■■
■*'■.;'1tadiM0ffl»Mir;'V'' ■;.,
Awful Indkrtient of Oapi-
ttillam, In That litmi- to
Provide for All
The unemployed nan. • There are
away of them In Vancouver.. Aas
th*i* *r* many more In every olty
along the Pacific eoaat Speaking of
thla prevalent typ* Of Job«**k«r th*
Eureka. Labor N*w* aay*;."
Her* I* a man. It* to vrOU-propor-
turned—lound la. body and limb. He
to houM, earaful, thrifty, tnduatrloa*.
H* to fond of hla home, fond of hi*
wlf*, fond ot hli children. ;;•       '
Y»t h* to walking about the atre*t*
—hungry, gloomy, ^deipairlng. Ba
doee not know what to do with hlm-
teu.
H* I* unemployed.
Ha wai compelled to leave hli lait
Job beoauie work fell ilaok. WO*
fall* slack sometimes la all'trada*.
Vainly he haa walked froOk ibop to
ihop—from faotogy to factory. Meekly, gnd with a quaking st the knee*,1
hai hi goni ln and aiked the tot*.
man If they want any workman. Th*
reply haa alwaya been; "No hands
wmted."
tta to willing to work—only too
glad to be able to work—but work la
dented bim;
Hla heart la heavy, his feet sre
weary, hie stomach cravea for food.
So he wanders aimlessly about the
itreet* until darkness oomee down
ind he knows his ohlldren are abed.
He looks In at the library, but too
troubled Jn spirit to remain' there he
comes out and gazes moodily ln the
shop windows. ,        \
And then hli lagging footitepi
drag wearily home.
In the early grey of the morning
he will be up and out again. Once
more the old round of ihopi and
tectorial—one* more the discouraging replies that link Uke lead into
hia heart—once more the gnawing
despair, that terrible hopeleisless—
once more the weary drag hdme In.
the dark.
So lt goes on.
The saintly priest goes on to state
that "good working men are Industrious." This sh9wdfc*ere the church
standi. Priests are parasites. Probably tbey are the leaat neceiaary ot ill
, parasites. They want working men
to be lnduitrloui beoauie the more Industrious the workera are and tbe
more wealth Is produced for the parasite! to get, under the preient lytem.
Ii It really worth while being lnduitrloui., A friend of mine keepi bees.
I saw him collecting honey.- I called
hla attention to the fact tbat he had
not got all the honey from the Uvea
He said, "Don't you ne, you fool, that
I Have to leave juit enough honey In
the hives to keep the. beei alive until
next summer, ao that they can make
more honey for me tnen!" Precisely
the reason wages are paid. The worker geta Just enough to keep himself
alive and reproduce hla kind, ao that
there will alwaya be. more workers In
Industrial hives to produce wealth for
the parasites to enjoy.
The kindly Father admonishes workingmen to be sober. Consistent Incon-
ststency. Capitalists need sober workmen. Catholic priest* own stock In
breweries. Take the prollt out of the
liquor traffic. Manufacture for uae
only. Olve workingmen the chance
to have aomethlng elae take the place
of the aoclablllty of tbe saloon. Then
you will have a aober people. The
capitalist class spend more at a single
banquet than the writing men apend
In an evening In a whole city.
Another admonition ll "to be obedient to authority.'^ Wbat authority?
Are working men never to atrlke for
more wages, shorter houn and better
working conditions? - WHEN THE
CHURCH SATS, BE OBEDIENT TO
AUTHORITY, SHE TAKES THB
PART OF THE SCAB.
The ohurch tells working men to be
patriotic. Thlili very convenient for
the church, but very Ineoniiitent. She
sings "Ood Save the King" In Canada,
but she thanks Ood for a republic In
the United States. Her politics are
always tinged by the dominant factor
In the country ln which ahe happens
to be, The flags of ill countrle* represent the domination of capitalism.
Capitalism is International. 'There to
only one flag for, the working class.
The flag tbat will eventually bind tbe
workera of the world together, THE
RKD FLAO OF HUMAN BROTHERHOOD.
When the priest telle tbe flock that
we socialists are arousing discontent,
he tells the truth., When he tells theta
that we oreate the claas struggle, he
to wrong. Karl Mars analysed society.
He saw where social production would
lead ua. He did not make the clan
itruggle. We socialists want no class
struggle. We want'Just one clan, a
contented working elan.   Thli can
CONGRESS FRATERNAL
S DELEGATE IN VANCOUVER
EN ROUTE TO SEATTLE.
Mr, Ouatav Francq, fraternal dele-
gut* from the Tradea and Labor Congreaa of Canada, to the American
Federation of Labor, acoompanied by
Mr, 3. t. Foster, president of the
Montreal Federated Tradea and Lahor
Counoll, aUo a delegate to tbe Federation at Seattle, waa a vtoltor In Vancouver on Saturday lut, en route to
SeetUe,-.
■ 'Ton certainly havo a magnificent
labor temple bore," uld Mr. Francq
to The Federationlit, "and, but of
all, lt seems to be kept spotlessly
clean and'to thoroughly looked after.
I trust the. unionists of Montreal will
■ome day take similar steps to bring
the. workera of that olty together, .for
It la a aplendld thing to have union-
tots all mut under tbe ume root."
" Mr. Francq to very much taken up'
with the spirit of the wut and It la
not Improbable tbat he may come u
far wut a* Edmonton at no dtotant
date, there jo embark -in the newipaper and printing business. While
Mr. Francq would make no definite
statement of his Intentions, he would
not deny thit auch a nlove wu within tbe range of possibilities.
only be realised when the producer
hai what he produce!. ,.
The Knelt Illustration of economic
.determinism la furnllhed us by the
attitude of the Roman Catholic priesthood. The centralised ownerahlp within the Catholic church has made the
church the greatest property holding
Institution ln the world; the money of
the church hu been Invested, not only
ln property for religious worship; but
In all klnda of Industries as well as
productive lindi. Her Investments tn
America In Industrial atocks and bonds
to much greater than the holdlnga of
the Rockefeller group of capitalists.
This ihowi where her Interests He.
Her prlelti know which aide their
bread to buttered pn.
Father O'Boyle, flghta loclallim for
the ume reaaon th* working man
flghta for lt. He muat do tt to protect
hli own Interut*.
UNION DIRECTORY
NBVV WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 P.m., in
Labor Hal|. President, D. 8. Cameron:
flnanclal secretary, H. Olbb; icnersl
seoretary, B. D. orant, P. O. Boa' IK.
The publlo Is invited to attend. .	
AMALGAMATED BOCIETY OP CARPENTERS AND JOINERS meets .vary
aecond and fourth Thursday of eaen
■month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh Bt, at 8 p.m. Pruldent, J. L. Hogg, Hank.y Blk., Sapperton; SecreUry, A. McDonald, 881 Royal
A ye.. New Westminster.. A
PLUMBERS' and STEAMPITTERS* Local 188—Mceu .very second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:80 p.m. President, D. Webster: secretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 888, New
Weatmlnater. B. O.	
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
penters. Local Union No. IMS-
Meets every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Tem-
pie, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, M, c. Schmendt; secretary, A, Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westminster, B. C,
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 781—MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster, corner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every aecond Sunday of each month, at
1:80 p. m. Preaident, E. 8. Hunt; aeeretary, F. W. Jameson, Visiting brothers
Invited.
TRAINING FOR BUSINESS
IS  OUR
BUSINESS
SUCCESS IS PREPARED
NESS FOR
THE OCCA-
SION.
ARE YOU
PREPARED)
Investigate   the
merits  of the
Modern Business School
tISCshaaMaSt.
Hew Weital88.il
Westminster Trust,
W» sav* nowrt TO U-Jt aa twtwsad •*ira»*ij».t"  ' M
btttu attaacad for eatoCttwa aafl *ttr etlsais. taamaaA d
itotS^SSrmSa « ££«* aTSaTSmaa mSTi i
parch*** ud **)• of r**l **uu. <    fW     Y
DepodU aoeaptad aad latarwt tt «% aaa—U as ttOr
urarv dbvomt soxsata*■fWf'
'■■■■ ■■ ' fhy ";**.».'    " "'""*'■'• ■*'*-v"*""■'"-"   """"* "
J,'aV*
f;:
^V^
ROYAL BANK
0F CAfMAil
«**%*3
IM;
. Tha^ W**tmta-k*r.*^ *MM*rtoa
m rww wunaiaaur aat uaotrtoa Bmaebu a <*• loyal Baak
ot caaida sag sa**8*l sttsfettsa to fi.**f Aaaaaaaa Ostorils s(
Oak Dollar aid apwardi reeelvad aad lataw* alknrtd at k*jh**t
current rata. An asoooat m^ U opsaed with OW iMUAlb
A Ojanaral ■anking timlniu truuiilt«t ill* Itassh,  "' '■■
ta
VANCdtJWR LABOR
Pool ^Billiard Room-^Chib
now open  ;
Kemodelled and fitted upby the I*bor Teinple Club
Co., Ui., tot the express use of niiiodita aijd Wejsds.
s~W UUDDI» BOOK IV (WWWWWI
v Warm, weU-lighted and cheerful.  Join the Irtmeh
and drop in today.   Will b* open, on Sundav*.   '
■■ S «„ A. ALBXANOtlt IN CHARM  ■      '
€et theHabit
W«Gif.y«a
;"'i aSqimnOiali
HsveY« Ever Tri**1 Us?   No?   WeH,tk
rjiNwilimMMt-
TM-lwIk*
Crockery, China, Qlassware, Toys and Dolls, Stationery,
Oraphophones and Records, Fancy Ooods.
THEPAHl
646 COLUMBIA STREET
NBW WBSTaHNBTIB
J. R GAtfflN
High CIkm Ladies' and G«ntl«nai'i Tailor
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
fi^eraiTdirectors
NEW WBSTMINSTBR. B. C.
LIBERAL CASH DISCOUNT PHOKBU.
^-'HEATING STOVES
nww  * .    '
M J. KNIGHT  COMPANY, LIMITED
SI SIXTH STllSET WtW WtSTMMSTSa. 8.C
All Work Ouaranteed
Hand Bewn ShoM Hade to Stauare
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
McMillan a paterson
NBW WE8TMIN8TBR, B. a
Use Electric Irons
Comfort
Convenience
Economy
The cost for continuous operation is only a few cents per
hour.
The iron is operated from an ordinary household socket.
The irons sold by this Company are constructed on the best
principles, this means an appliance which is hot at the point
and cool at the handle. The iron bears the manufacturer's
guarantee.
Ctrr.ll aad
Huliap Street
RC ELECTRIC
PHONE, SEYMOUR 5000
^PRESIDENT
#
SUSPENDERS
"Work with the President asd
the freakrtwwb with yon"
1
j PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1»U
=t=
12S-M1 Haitian St.,W.
VAKCOUVEI, I. C.
46 Stk it., McLsW Mack
NEW WESTMINSTM
OUR COATS FOR THIS FALL
beat every record for smartneBB and style.   Our prices are
$14.50      $16.00      $17.50      $18.50      $20.00
for theae high-grade, high-class, high-style coats; guaranteed to the last
stitch.   See, too, our
SPORT COATS, $12.75
OUR FALL SUITS
are Just what they should be and what those who know us would expect to
find at Ladyware.   They are elegant beyond word, and lead for style.
 "- --- -■ ' " - IJ~ --* --«—- -"** "very _\\&
We confine ourself to classle, well-considered, prices suit every
pocket, being ,
$17.00 $18.50 $22.50 and $26.00
MISSES' FITWELL SUITS
are our feature for this season; a creation of our own for (rowing girls of
16 to 18, or small misses. The design Is very smart and Is ours exclusively.
Sises, 32, SI and 36.   Our price Includes                          • Slfi 75
alterations    . ——--.■•.— - -••  •••—-- ▼»«»■•»
X^IES^lsklRTS AT $3.50
Man-tailored to the figure, made of short remnants of our latest
suitings.   Values to 810.00, for  	
$3.50
"Ttae Store la the Air Witt rtUm ea tt* Level"
ANOTHER GOVERNMENT
OFFICIAL FROM OTTAWA
NOW ON THE COAST
Mr. P. A. Ackland, Deputy Mlnliter
ot Labor, Ottawa, wu a visitor to
the cout thli week. While at the
Labor Temple on Monday, In consultation with officers ot the United
Mine Workers and local union officiate, Mr. Ackland stated to The Fed.
that lt wu hla Intention to visit the
atrlke sone on Vancouver Island, and
from the trend ot his conversation lt
would appear that he is here tor the
purpoie' ot endeavoring to devise
aome meana and waya ot brlnilng
both partlea to the atrlke together,
probably with governmental lnstruc-
tlona, but Inasmuch as no statement
wu given out to the press, It must
be presumed that Mr. Ackland la
making a quiet departmental Investigation tor reasons whloh will probable become apparent at a later date.
4.   N.   HARVEY,   LTD,   TO   CELEBRATE THEIR THIRD ANNIVERSARY WITH A BIO
CLOTHING SALE
"It Is just three year* thl* - week
since we took over the Johnston, Ker-
foot * Co. clothing buiineu, 127
Hutlngi Wut," uld 3. N. Harvey to
The Federatlonist yesterday. "The
volume et buslneas done during these
three yeara hu tar surpassed our
tondut expectations at that time."
''Back year we have celebrated the
occasion with a big Anniversary Sale,
and tke people naturally look tor thla
event and wait tor It u lt meana a
genuine saving In the very highest
class ot men's and boy'a wear obtainable and at the very beginning ot
th*. oold weather season when the
people need the goodi,
"The flnt yur we had a one day
uie. Last year we bad a two daya'
sal*. Thla yur we propose to give
the people * full seven days' bargain
festival, opening on Saturday, the
16th, and closing poeltlvely On Saturday, Nov/ Stnd. The price* thla yur
will be cut deeper than ever. All
prlou are marked ln plain' figures;
£u can see Just what you uve at the
id Arrow atore.
Big Mass Meeting Voices
Strong Protest
(Continued from Page One)
lied workera who were unanimous In
holding thli view," he uld, amldit
grut applause. The wiseacres, no
doubt will uy that the "boys" pleaded guilty. Outhrle and Taylor were
never guilty of the riotous acts u
charged, and were' never sentenced
u auoh, but were aentenoed u officials ol the union, which Attorney-
General Bowser and hla bunch tried
so hard to break up, (Applause,)
Theae men were not eent to jail because they threatened lite or damaged property. The gathering tonight will be an historical one, like
many similar gathering) in the Old
Country, held to proton and demand
the Inalienable right ot tree cltlsen-
ihlp. 'It wai not Owing to a faot that
theie men were convicted for ttt*
yean, It wu owing to the jurlipn-
denoe and loclal ethics as obtained
In thli province, that Is, extraction
agalnat it in its crudest forms. Newspapen and preachers took great
advantage of the British flag and
British rule to shelter themselves^,
which had been procured with the
■wut and lacrince. of the worken.
Things wire not what they seemed
on the. surface. "I want to uy that
If ever the workers of thli province
become io spineless and supine aa
to accept without protest the stuff
which haa been handed to theip of
late, then heaven help thla province,"
said Mr. Wilkinson amidst applause.
On behalf of the members he represented, he Bald that they would
do what they could to have'these outrageous sentences removed, and that
80,000 organised workmen throughout Canada would alao aot. (Applause.) .'•■       -
Frank Farrington, executive of the
United Mine Workers ot America,
next apoke, After referring to the
situation of the miners, he said tbat
because of the strike on Vancouver
Island, a brief explanation wu necessary. The government statistics
showed that during the put 27 yeara
there had been Ave gaa explosions ln
the mines, and 803 men killed. In
addition to thla grut loss by death
A FIVE-ACRE FARM
With no harder work than you sre now doing, 5 acres of rich
land close to Vincouver will mike you independent. •
OuP there the fertile loam soil produces the finest crops of tree
fruits, berries, hardy vegetables and garden truck, and the situation'
makes for the highest success in chicken raising.   You can make
big money because of the continual shortage of local produce on
the Vancouver market and the wonderful prices paid all the yur
round.
HERE 1$ THE OFFER:  5 acres of rich, deep soil, about one hour's
ride from town, with 6 to 8 daily steam or electric trains. .
'   5. tares with schools, stores, churches, post office, social hall, telephone and electric light right at hand.
5 acres on which you can start tomorrow and make a little money
even from the very start   The prices make these blocks the but
land value in the Fraser Valley—$ 100 to $200 per acre on 3-year
terms, with only 1/10 cash.
Let us give you fuller information, then come out and in the
land.
••—•- ' ; ~~~Tfflft^ffii'__'
Send me mips ind full information about the 5 acre
farms advertised in the B. C.
Federalioniit. <
Name	
Address	
t
Clothes Specialists
We're Clothes Specialists and therefore out Clothes
satisfy! You never hear one of our customer! complain about his Clothes. *J The Fit is Right; the
Cut and Tailoring are Right; the Fabrics are Right.
q Our $18.00 or $25.00 Suits; our $18.00 or $22
Overcoats will satisfy any mortal man, no mstter how
critical, <| Don't 1st advertised "bargain prices"
influence you. "It's the Clothes at the price that'
satisfy."      .
"FASHION CRAFT"
Thoi. Foster & Co. Ltd.
512-814 Granville Street VANCOUVER, B. C
the provincial statistician chronicled
15 men as being filled in the mines
every year.    These  figures  do  not
embrace the" total   number   of accidents—the 15 annually killed not Included ln the total of 303. The great
loss of life does not tall so heavily on
those taken away.   The awful blow
falls upon the dependents.   While the
coal was being mined and brought to
the surface many citizens could  alt
beside the fireside and enjoy comfort,
who did not realize the hardships and
the great Iosb of life sacrificed   ln
mining coal.   "livery legal means had
been devised, tor tbe protection   of
mine workers that were possible for
the human agency ot a union to devise.   There was no occupation more
dangerous for men to follow   then
mining.  There wu hidden away deep
beneath  its    surface  factors    that
caused accidents to take place, thereby   iuhfflng out   hundreds of   lives
without a moment's notice.   To avoid
this protective measures were sdngbt
through legislation.  The mlnen have
succeeded in procuring a reasonable
code of mining laws for this province.
And If they were properly enforced
the number of accidents  would  be
materially reduced.    The men  have
repeatedly asked for enforcement of
the acta; uut, strange to say, those
responsible for carrying out the provisions of the statutes, for reasons
best known to themselves, heed not.
The miners realised that If they were
to be In a poiltlon Jo have the lawa
administered,   their   only hope   for
any protection was through organlutlon. Imbued with this consciousness,
and u  a result  the United Mine
Workera of America were Invited to
extend their power   to   Vancouver
Island.   The minera bad worked all
these yeara without a militant organisation.   The subsidised press made
It   appear to tbe   public that   the
United Mine  Workers  Invaded  tne
Island without any solicitation.  That
widely-spread story was an absolute
falsehood.   The U. M.'W. of A. did
not   extend   their   organlutlon  to
Vancouver Iiland unsolicited.    "We
did so, because It was our duty to
extend a helping hand to the men
working on the Island under such circumstances,  and so  we came  two
yeara ago lut June/' said the speaker
amidst applause.   As Individuals the
miners could hope tor Uttle help from
the government to enforce the mining
acts. ' individuals pay petition for
redress till doomsday without results.
They may point out all the sympathetic, and deserving cues they like,
without any avail.   They would only
get about as much sympathy aB those
who, were brutally   sentenced   the
other day,   The men addressed Sir
Richard McBride to compel the mine
owners to enforce the mining lawa.
He in turn sent the request to the Inspectors  at the  mine, who  replied
that there were no regulations being
violated ln thla province.  And so the
laok ot enforcement of the mining
laws went on and on and will go on
without any protection being afforded to workers ln the mines,    The
men took kindly to the organlutlon.
As lt grew In power, the mine officials picked out the active men. They
were singled' out because they did
their duty and were discharged.  Because of the frequency of this thing
some of the minera decided to take
an Idle day to devise ways and muns
to remedy affairs.    Next day  they
were confronted.with notices to take
their toola out with them and stay
out.   The Canadian Collieries, Limited, locked'out 1,100 men. ' Then the
union decided to combat solidarity
with solidarity.   This haa been  the
order since tbe flrst of May.    Things
went along orderly.   The men were
ordered to pay strict obedience to the
law.  "I am glad to uy they obeyed."
(Applause,)' The mine owners  unt
to the Old Country and scoured Canada and the United States to get men,
with such - little  success  that  they
could not operate the mines.     The
employen being' thus exhausted, decided by some "hook or' crook!' tb
bring the military powers to  their
reieue,  They alwaya do at all points
where a atrlke exists.   The military
force arrived on the Island at Cumberland.   HOre a man named Cave,
an Infamous strike-breaker, had lent
word that he and hli outfit were, coming down to Cumberland to dean but
the union gang.  They came all right,
but went back to the camp ln Inglorious defeat.   (Applause,)   The union
men committed no offence, but had
.protected themselves against blacklegs who were now working,    Yet
four unlonlit! were thrown  In Jail.
The mayor and council ot Cumber
land were agalnat the strlke-breakera.
But the local  magistrate  dismissed
the cases.  The company waa getting
more and more desperate, and so the
scene of aotivlty was shifted to Ladysmlth, where one night two young
men on. their way home were attacked by four strike-breakers, and  one
unionist was stabbed.   The chief of
police was asked to arrest them.   He
replied, "No, I'll not arrest these men.
I'm not ln sympathy with you; We've
got you  beat."   (Cries  of "Shame.)
"Our men were charged with trivial
offencei, and the whole thing culminated ln riot,  Having appealed to the
authorities without results, they did
the only thing they couid do—they
defended themselves, and 256 were
placed under arrest"   These men—
every one ot them—were held In Jail
from eight days to six weeks before
being granted a preliminary hearing,
after which 92 were released because
the government could not manufacture evidence agalnat them.  Sixteen
were lying tn jail, having been denied
ball.   If these offences had been committed during tlmea of peace the offenders would have been allowed to
go upon payment of a small tine; but
because they were common miners
they were held ln Jail.   Thirty-nine
of the mlnen, after being confined
for three months, wanted to get released, and when they were brought
before the authorities pleaded guilty
because they had been advised to do
bo by counsel,    They were led   to
believe by doing this that the court
would Show them some leniency or
clemency; but Instead they were given the ievereit penalty as anywhere
might be given in the United States,
Canada or Oreat Britain,    five men
were sentenced to two years; 14 to
one year and a flne of (100 or four
months extra; IS. to three months and
a flne of (50, or two months longer.
Altogether there are 177 men now tn
Jail; 47 have, been sentenced to terms
ranging from three, months to two
years; with fines also attached.   An
amailng feature of the whole outrage
wai  the  way  Judge  Howay—(loud
hlases)—acted.     He   wai   not   yet
satisfied with matter! when he went
baok to the city of New Westminster
—a city where Jurors must bs chosen
for the remaining cases to be heard
there.     He   told   that  community,
through the columns of the press,
that women ranked with the men ln
disregard   for   property—and   even
life.   This publlo Interview Is unprecedented.   (Applauie.)
(Here the speaker was Interrupted
by sothe noisy individual, who  was
promptly ejected from the hall).
Mr. Farrington, continuing, aald
that Judge Howay's actions Insofar aa
Imposing leniences, as weU as giving
out a public Interview, were unprecedented during the life of the judl-
olary in the. Dominion. The punishment he Berred these men wai' rank
Injustice, whloh should mark htm for
Impeachment in any community not
dead to all' lease of. Justice. . The
crown proieoutor, . Shoebotham—
(hliiei)—states that these sentences
hare had salutary effect ln crushing
the spirit out of the miners. The
speaker then told of the calibre of
the men Involved In the itrlke. - No
place where ooal was mined can there
be found a class of minera with more
lofty characters than those ot Vancouver Island. Their characters wlU
compare favorably with thoae of
Judge Howay, Sir Richard McBride,
or any other citlsen ln thla province.
(Applauie.) A condition existed
which allowed the mllltla to be Bent
to the Island; It alio allowed a mining board, to place hundreds o( Japanese and Chinese In the mines ot
this province., I again raise my voice
to Bay that these men did; not deserve the heavy, penalties given them
by Judge Howay. Hla lordihip
should be condemned before the
bar of juitlce , In Canada. Joe
Taylor and Sam Guthrie are guiltless
and are aa human as any man ln the
audience.   (Oreat applause.)
Chairman Mldgley aald that the
Miners' Liberation League, aa represented, would stay In existence Ull
these' men were released. (Applause.)
Organiser Cassldy, ot the Socialist
party of Canada, stated that It could
not be gainsaid that mankind loves
a flght—that fact waa manifest In this
hall tonight (Laughter.) You muat
have a wholesome respect for; the
law. Capital controlled lt, the mill,
the factory and the press of thla olty
and province. He condemned the
press In scathing terms. Like vultures lt wanted to make capital out
ot the conditions, on Vancouver Island. Hla remarks ot a militant nature were frequently applauded, and
received continuous applause when
he reached hla seat.
Mill H. R. Gutterid.e waa well received. During her remarks ahe aald
she belonged to'an organisation who
believed In "deeds, not words." She
held that the atory ot the facta In connection with the cases of the miners
should be "paiied along" by every
one In the audience. Judge Howay
ihould not Insult the ilitere, wlvei,
mother! and daughter! of the aentenoed miners as he did. Next election Bowser and McBride should be
turned out of power. (Applauie;)
Robert Ooeden, of the Induitrlal
Workera ot the World, made a fighting apeech. He laid that the capitalists
were "putting you to the test" If
they can railroad men on the street
and sentence them to jail, they (the
men) are not guilty; they are far too
peaceful The Russians, who were on
strike on the Pacific Oreat Baitern,
bad promlied that tt this verbal pro-
teat failed, they could be called upon
to help. "Toil must have the might
The workeri oan do no wrong. Thl
capitalist* have called your bluff;
make good or He down." (Applauie.)
J. Kavanagh, vlce-prealdent of the
B, *C. Federation ot Labor, waa well
received. He held that riots never
came from the working clan; but
alwaya were oauied by the capitalist!.
Bowier had threatened that "before
to-morrow'i sunrlie you (mlnen) will
be surrounded by 1000 men." There
are aoldlera today walking the atreeta
of Nanalmo for fear that someone
will destroy property—"not on your
tintype," said the speaker. "You can't
trust a soldier ln any part of the
globe." He Instanced a caae ot partiality where Magistrate Simpson
handed over a militiaman arreeted ln
a restaurant to Lieut-Col. Hall, who
found him "not guilty." The minera
were peaceful—too blamed peaceful.
(Applauae.)
Thol. Oreenall, M.P., delegate of the
Britlah Trades Unions to the Seattle,
Wiv, convention of the American
Federation of Labor, waa the next
speaker. He aald that lt waa a great
privilege for him to bring fraternal
greetings from the workingmen of
the old country. He represented over
8,000,000 tradei unionist!. (Applauie.)
He had not been' aware that auch a
state of things existed oh British
soU aa there waa at Nanalmo. He had
been specially senf to the A. F. of L.
Convention at Seattfc, and should
have been tl.-o at the opening,
which took place that day, but postponed his departure ao that he could
be present at this great meeting, seeing that those who were being oppressed on Vancouver Island belonged to the aamr Industry aa himself. "My duty waa to be here," he
aald, amidst applauae. He bad belonged to the mining lnduitry ilnce hli
cradle. "I moat emphatically enter a
vlgoroui protest against the brutal,
un-English, Russlanlslng treatment
of my fellows at Nanalmo, and on behalf of the three million trades unionists of Oreat Britain I herewith voice
their sentiments." A roar of applauie
greeted this sentence.. He pictured
hi! friends as being taken back more
than 40 years In the battle of tradeB
unionism In Great Britain, . To-day
organisation work was more systematized. Although Oreat. Britain was
supposed to be played out, had similar treatment there been meted ont
to hla fellow-workers aa was being
done on the Island the Mlnen' Federation of Great Britain would
promptly have taken the matter In
hand and done more than holding
protest meetings to rebel such Infamous work of mlne-ownen. "We've
learned that lesson of organization,"
And every organised miner would
not have been trtubled about police
and mllltla; they! would have decided that 800,000 minera would1 on a
particular day take a holiday, and
continued to atrlke, till the whole
number of the brothers had been released trom Jail. (Applause.) "I want
to aay to the authorities and. leaden
In Canada and the United States that
what Tom Oreena|l hai said that lt
Is true." (Applause,) Mr. Greenall
spoke briefly on organization. Hli
advice wae organise, organize, organize—Industrially and politically. He
had had over 30 yean official position
and had aeen the time when the
minora were but partially organlied;
when Lancashire lads were fighting
against the reduction of wages, they
had to contend against their brother
workers across the,border; organisation had done awi»y with all that.
Experience haB shown that what Improvement was to be made was by
adopting political methods. And so
the government brought down acta
of parliament The' time has eome
when the workera ought to produce
tbe wealth of the country for uie—
not for profit tor a few, Individual!.
In order to. prove that the mlnen
were convinced of thli fact, it may
be mentioned that the minera of
Oreat Britain, through their political
platform, drafted the lint resolution
In the world calling upon the govern
ment to take over the coal mines. He
then took up the question of wages
and shorter hours, and laid that "all
tain ln wages Is wrung out of the
workeri," because the ' owners
charged that, much mora for the
mined coal The coal owners alio
made more money. If the object! of
tradei unloni are to be achieved, the
mlnei muit belong to the community,
and worked by It tor the benefit ot
tne conaumera. Theee object! cannot
be achieved by attending meetinga of
thli kind. When thingi grew worse
they must aot He had stood before
iO,000 men When they clapped their
hands ana cheered to the echo. A
little later they became "cats' paws"
tor the capitalist!. Coming back to
hie first advice he told hla bearers to
organise, organiie, organize.' He
wanted the different societies to be
drawn together to achieve the objects
of trade-unionism. "Your father!,
my fathera, and their sons were
'hewers of wood and drawers of
water,' Likewise It la with your
brothers and sisters. Organize so
that your chUdren will enjoy the profits of your hand and brain." Mr.
Greenall resumed his seat amid loud
applause,
Mrs. Porter, wife of one ot the convicted mlnen, wae called to the
platform. She aald that ahe waa glad
to be a union miner's wife, and, to
■hare his* trouble! and trial!, rather
than to be the wife of a scab who
waa protected by the police. She had
lost a ion In a mine disaster. She
had been put out of her houee and
home twice through strikes during
the paat 25 yean. On the lOth of laat
month, when ahe waa forced to give
up her house In florth Wellington
because she refused to take ln scabs,
she asked the mine boss to buy her
out, and could reallie only $60 for
all her atuff.   (Applause.)
Oeo. Pettigrew, organizer of the
miners, who had lerved.hls, eentence
In Nanalmo, received a fine reception.
Hla apeech waa listened to throughout with a great deal of interest.
After giving details of events that led
up to the atrlke, he said thoee men In
Nanaimo prison had Sent him thli
memge; "Raise your pen and your
voice to educate- the workera ot
B; C." Bowier had done, all he
could to break the iplrits of the men
In Jail; he had them put on prlion
diet On the 16th September while
at dinner the men sang songs, Including the Marseillaise, alio lome I.
W., W. parodlea, .for whloh the warden locked them up ln their colli. The
concert waa kept going juit the
■ame. Ninety per cent of the miners
on the Iiland Were socialists. He paid
high oompllmentl to Jack Place,
M.P.P., who waa aervlng time as a
striker, and Parker Williams, M.P.P.
The game waa to have the former
lose hla seat so that a conservative
mlght.be elected ln his stead. This
wai not only an Induitrlal fight, but
was a political one aa well (Applause.)
The collection taken up In the
meeting amounted to $139.45. In addition the overflow gathering down
stain had contributed $7.80.
The above .resolutions were  then
ftojmlar (ttljrtatmaa (Stfta
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JEWELLERS AND SILVERSMITHS,
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put and carried by a deafening roar
of "ayea." .'■' "
Mr. Olaf, a Russian, ipoke. He
repreiented 2000 striking Ruiilani ot
the P. Ot E., of whloh number about
800 were preient They came to Canada ln the expectation of bettering
their Condltlona. Heretofore they
knew nothing ot the strike on tho
Island. They now understood all, and
his people were willing to help ln.the
cause. He then at aome length addressed the meeting In the Russian
language. Counter applauae between the English and Russians and
the singing of the Marseillaise terminated this historical protest man
meeting.
DMANlakiaH.
PImm —t. MS
rntstsackMl
ISMCtsnllhSi;
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver        i British Columbia
Phone Sey. 4SM -    Mme, Bourgst
CHIC PARISIEN
High Clsss MILLINERY
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.■,* • 118 DUNSMUIR' STREET.
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MISS M. BA&RETT
Phone Mymoiir tM
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
\        787 ORANVUa*-..*! STREET
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Mrs. Franoea Lohrman
MRS. BAZIL
PsUsJit ud Csrd Rudiag
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Over Johnston's Shoe Store
ENQUIRIES POURING IN TO J. J, MILLER
From almost every part of the country enquiries are
coming in tor Maps and Information
about the
AT THE  DOMINION  HALL
VANCOUVER, B. C, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19th, 1913
Calgaiy, Wed., Nbv. 26th Edmonton, Taes., Dec. 2nd
'• ,.'',"     • "■■'    .      / '  . ';■   :\   '      /
The public seem* to be fully alive to the important strategic
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Columbia's greatest agricultural district.
After all, there is nothing that gives a city such continuous
strength of backbone and prosperity as rich, agricultural lands.
* With time, the value of the forest and mines "peter out,'' but
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Fort Fraser has an abundance of water power, arrangements <
-for the harnessing of which have already been made, tRus insuring Its future as the industrial center of the interior of British Columbia. «
•     ' v ■ ■.   .      '■■ '■.'■■'*    ■X'
Remember the dates of the Auction Sales and take advantage of jdie opportunity to secure property in this live town at
your own price.
for Maps and information entire of
J. J. MILLER, 418 Abbott St., VANCOUVER, B. C.
OR
THE DOMINION STOCK & BOND CORP., LTD.
Phone SEYMOUR 7640
Dominion and Winch Buildings
Vancouver, B. C

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