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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 23, 1914

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Array INDUSTRIAL! UNITY;/    * JNGTH.
BRITISH
SIXTH TEAP  /• i. 146
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
DEATH OfjlllANOIR EXTENSION
CASE DECIDED
BY
J. Mairs Dies in JaiJ.—His
Relatives Were Not
Notified
Jury Scored Present System
of Medical Attention
to Prisoners
Bartolomeo Found Guilty of
Unlawful Assembly-
Jury Out AU Night
A New Panel Called-Will
Make Total of 132
Petit Jurors
Joseph Mairs, Jr., the 21-year-old
miner who was found guilty on charges
in connection with the troubles at
Ladysmlth last year and who was sentenced by Judge Howay to one year's
imprisonment with a further four
months ln default of payment ot a fine,
died Tuesday morning at the prison
farm, Burnaby. Deceased bad been 111
for some days, but did not receive medical attention until Sunday afternoon,
and tt waa not until Monday afternoon
that the medicines ordered by the prison surgeon were administered to him.
It also transpired that another prisoner—a barber—who'Is in charge of med-
- icineo at the institution, had given deceased hot mustard pills, salts and cod
liver oil ln addition to prescribing his
diet for him. Death, however, took
place at 8:20 the following morning.
At the inquest the Jury severely scored
the system prevailing at the prison
farm regarding laxity ln attending sick
prisoners and recommended that a resident doctor be provided. A sad feature ot the case wss the fact that the
relatives of the deceased were not Informed ot his condition until after his
death.
The inquest took place Wednesday
at Messrs. Center and Henna's parlors,
Georgia street, Coroner McQuarrle of
New Westminster conducting tbe examination. Mr. Lelghton watched the
enquiry on behalf of the United
Mine Workers. The flrst witness
called was w! 0. McMynn, the prison
warder, who stated that deceased wae
brought from Nanaimo Nov. 3rd and
remained at the prison farm till his
death. Up to Jan, 12th he had been
employed out of doors, chiefly clearing
land. As he wss. a clean lad' of exemplary behaviour and Bultable for the
purpose, he was, on the latter date,
taken into the kitchen as cookee.
There was no hospital in the prison,
but a room was set apart as a sick
ward, Into which deceased was moved.
He always considered deceased enjoyed robust health. In answer to Mr.
Lelghton and the foreman of the Jury,
the warden stated tbat the relatives
were not notified of his condition. Visitors are allowed to aee the prisoners |
on Sundays, although on the Sunday
previous deceased's aunt had been refused admittance on account ot the doctor's recommendation. There were 202
prisoners in the Institution, no hospital, and the prison doctor resident In
Vancouver.
At the conclusion of this witness'
evidence the foreman of tbe Jury requested that these answers should be
placed on record. This the coroner refused to do, and the enquiry was proceeded with.
W. 0. Stackhouse, who had been
looking after deceased, was the next
witness. He stated that he was a barber and was an inmate of the prison
farm. He is In charge of baths and
medicines and part of hts duty Is to
enquire into the health of prisoners
and giving out medicines. On the night
of either the 14th br 15th the guard
woke him up and told him deoeased.
had cramps. He gave him some hot.
mustard and ln the morning a dose of
salts. On Friday night deceased complained ot vomiting, stomach mixture
waa given him and he was moved out
of his cell Into the corridor, a bed being made up tor him near a steam pipe.
Special food was obtained for him from
the kitchen. On Saturday his cell companion said that medical old should be
summoned, and at night deceased was
given codliver oil. Deceased stated he
had no pain and had never asked to
see a doctor. The doctor came on Sunday afternoon. Stackhouse said that
although the doctor prescribed for
Mairs on Sunday the flrst dose of the
medicine was not administered until
midday on Monday. Deceased, however, could not keep It down. Between
6 and 6 on Monday Mr. Haslam removed the patient to the sick ward where
he stayed till his death the following
morning, witness remaining with him
all the time. •
Dr. W. T. Hoyes, medical practitioner In charge of prisoners at the prison
farm, said he made his usual trip on
(Continued on page 8)
On Wednesday morning Crescendo
Bartolomeo was found guilty on the
sixth count by the Jury at the special
assize court holden at New Westminster, Justice Morrison presiding. ThlB
was one of the Extension cases arising
out of the coal strike trouble of last
August. The count ln the indictment
was for "unlawful assembly" and was
the mildest of all, the heaviest count
being the first, that of riotous destruction of property. The Jury had
been in the care of the sheriff all
night, having tailed to reach an agreement at six o'clock on Tuesday evening. ,
This special assize, called at New
Westminster, the venue being changed
from Nanalmo, for the purpose of trying the'coal miners accused ln connection with the Vancouver island coal
strike troubles, Is In some respects
more than special, It is extraordinary.
By Monday next an additional panel
of forty petit Jurymen will have reported at the court house to serve on
these cases. In the first instance a
normal panel of 52 was called. Then
the crown became dissatisfied owing
to the great number of challenges the
defence could use as their right
when the accused were tried ln
groups as high in number as 14. As a
consequence an additional forty were
subpoenaed, Now, with the possibility of trying 37 men in one batch
ahead of them, the crown authorities
have decided that they need still more
petit Jurors and on Monday the total
will reach 132, which is decidedly extraordinary, one might say unprecedented. It is understood to be the intention of crown counsel to try some
half dosen more prisoners separately
In connection with the Vancouver
island coal strike riots, before placing
the large groups on trial.
VANCOUVER, B. C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
W. FOXCROFT
President-elect Vancouver Tradea uid
Labor Counoll for the January-June
term—Delegate from the United Brotherhood of Carpentera.
Wives and Mothers of the
Imprisoned Miners Ask
For Olemency
Premier Stilted That the
Responsibility Bests
With Ottawa
GRABBERS OF B.C.
I
How  2,000 Square Miles
Have Been Filched From
the People
Ground Hog District Averages 57,000,000 Tons Per
Square Mile
TWELVE IN A CELLAR
Lack sf Sanitation and Overcrowding
Rampant in Chinese Quarter
Or. Underlain, medical officer of
health for Vancouver, made some
startling statements to the health
oommlttee on Monday regarding sanl-
tatlon and housing in Chinatown. Hwj
brought up one case where a dozen
Chinamen had lived ln a cellar for
seven months without leaving it during that-period, and gave a grapblo
description of some of these dives. He
desired to cooperate with the building department and bring many of
these places under the rooming house
bylaw, thus preventing overcrowding and tending to improve the sanitary conditions. He also wished to
have dark rooms and cubicles abolished and during a house to house
Inspection had served notices for _
general clean-up. The committee promised its cordial support to the health
department In lta attempt to bring
about these reforms, Alderman Enrlght considering that the standard
of old Chinatown should be equal to
that of the new district, where the
rooms had plenty of light and air. "■
FREE FOR A TIME
Morris Out on Own Recognizances
In Attempted Murder Charge
On Tuesday afternoon at New
Westminster, Justice Morrison sentenced Ernie Morris, a young Extension miner who had been convicted
of unlawful assembly, to serve the
time he had already spent ln Jail as a
punishment. Morris will, therefore,
be allowed to go, On a charge of attempted murder Morris was allowed
to go on his own recognizances to
appear later tor trial. The accused is
only 17 years old.
Robert Hindmarsh, editor of the
Nanalmo Herald, has received fitting
official recognition for his treachery,
by Attorney-general Bowser. He
Ib now a government appointee on
the miners' examining board of three
ln the Black Diamond City.
R. Toung, president; O. Ericson,
vice-president, and A. ,F. Manchee,
secretary, have been elected by the
Port Arthur labor council for 1914.
CHARGING A JURY
Gentlemen ot the Jury: You are expected to find the prisoner guilty.
There has been a good deal of evidence Introduced on both sides ot this
case, but you will pay particular attention to that which favors the prosecution, and not allow your minds to be led astray by any evidence
which might possibly prove the accused to be Innocent
An attempt has been made to establish an alibi which I would not
endeavor to pick holes ln. This is absurd. I am unalterable In my
determination, gentlemen, to see that somebody gets punished, alibi or
no alibi. In connection with this evidence, I have discovered a period
ot about thirty seconds during which the actions of the accused have
not been accounted for. You will bear ln mind that ln this interval he
may have been doing the most horrible things. If anythlpg occurs to
hamper your imaginations as to what awful damage a man might commit
ln thirty seoonds, cast it aside. There is no limit to my imagination and
I do not expect there to be any to yours.
The most important point to be considered is that this man is a
union organizer from the United States, and he came up here to take
part in this strike. If any ot you should happen to think that there is
nothing exceptional about a union official attending to union business,
dismiss lt from your minds. You are not expected to think, but to bring
In a verdict according to such of the evidence as I shall instruct you to
approve.
Organizers are all right if they are not union organizers, and unions
would be all right If they had no officers. I am not opposed to trades
unionism ln principle. Trades unions would be perfectly in order If
conducted properly. .That is, if they would dissolve themselves and
cease to exist whenever requested to do so. It they would never make
any demands and would not retaliate whatever was done to them, but
would remain passive under attack until knocked into eternal oblivion,
I would have no fault to find with them.
A remark ot mine has been construed to mean that if the prisoner
had different counsel he would have more chance of being innocent. This
is a mistake. You must understand, gentlemen, that this prisoner, being
an organizer from the United States, could not possibly be Innocent, no
matter what counsel he had or what evidence they Introduced.
One of the most pathetic scenes
even enacted in the parliament buildings, Victoria, took place on Thursday of last week, when the wfves and
mothers of the Imprisoned miners
waited on Premier McBride to appeal
for clemency tor their breadwinners.
There were about sixty women present and as they pleaded for their
loved ones, one or two completely
broke down and many eyes were filled
with tears. The delegation was introduced by Mr. McEwen, secretary
of the Miners' Liberation league, who
presented a petition for the release
of the prisoners, which he said, wss
signed by every women In the strike
district who had a male relative in
jail. He laid the blame on the premier and complained that the miners
bad not received Justice.
Several of the women next made a
personal appeal fof the liberation of
Uie men, many of whom are the
breadwinners of the family.- In some
cases three from one family were In
Jail causing severe privation and
hardship to the women and children.
Mr. 'Watchman, ln supporting the delegation, warned the premier' that
unless the miners were released by
the 29th of this month there would
be a call for a general strike throughout the province, and that employees
whd are now working under agreements with their employers would
break those agreements.
. In reply Premier McBride stated
tbat an account of the meeting would
be forwarded to the minister of Justice at Ottawa and spoke in terms
of appreciation of the sacrifices many
of the delegates had undergone, saying that he would speak with the same
candor that the speakers had expressed in laying their case before
him. The responsibility, he said, did
not rest with him, aa the royal clemency was exercised by the governor-
general, acting under the advtoe of
the minister of Justice at Ottawa. In
his opinion, the workers of this province had the right to strike and that
the government should not Interfere
with that right, but tbat It was his
duty to keep law and order.
Touching upon the threat of a general strike the premier deprecated
the ides, saying It would be calamitous and might bring about Industrial
ruin ln the province, but that nothing
of the kind would prevent either him
or the minister of justice from executing the laws of the land. "If the power
of pardon," he concluded, "Is to be
influenced by threats of industrial
strikes, a precedent would be established tbat could only mean disaster
to the civil liberties of tbe people of
the province.
The collections on "tag-day" in Victoria, held on the Thursday, resulted
In a sum of 1681 for the imprisoned
miners' families,
Will Stay With Strikers
T, J. Shenton and W. K. Bent of
Nanalmo, representing the U. M. W.
of A. local and the engineers, respectively, were visitors in Vancouver
Wednesday, While here they held a
conference with the remnants of the
B. C. Association of engineers relative to supplying engineers to replace
the strikers on Vancouver Island who
came out with the miners and have
been sticking unitedly ever since. The
loesl officers of the association have
agreed to support the miners In every
way possible.
HOT MEALS FOR SCHOOLS.
South Vancouver Feeds the Bodies as
" Well as the Minds of Its Children.
The South Vancouver School board
has recently Inaugurated a system of
supplying hot mid-day meals ln the
Uarleton, Norquay, Champlaln and
Connaugbt schools. Five cente will be
charged for the meal, but where the
home exchequer Is tn bad shape, no
charge will be made. Tickets will be
used so that no child will know whether his neighbor or playmate has paid
for the ticket. This is an excellent
Idea as by this means the susceptibilities of the children cannot be hurt.
The scheme originated with Mrs. Morris, wife o. School Trustee Morris, and
haa been taken up by the Women's Institute and various religious bodies,
lt has proved up to date a pronounced
success snd before long Its scope will j
be greatly enlarged.
BY SE-SOM.
This article will State how 2,000
square miles of best anthracite coal
lands, averaging 67,000,000 tons per
square mile, ln the Ground Hog district of Northern British Columbia,
are being filched from the people by
spurious "powersrot-attorney":
The stupendous quantity and .incredible value of this immense property
can hardly bs realised, but es I am
simply recording the tacts, after geologically considering the carefully collected data and evidence, corroborated
by no less than Ave mining engineers
of high standing, you may rely upon
this description: The location Is south
of the 67th parallel about 128% dog.,
west longitude, 100 miles north-east of
Mackenzie & Mann's proposed port
named Stewart, at the head ot that
Sreat inland fiord known as the Port-
ind Canal.
Harriman's Combine (U. S. A.), the
B. & K. Syndicate, sre reported to have
corralled about 92,800 acres,
Mackenzie & Mann are reported to
have corralled about 90,000 acres.
The B. C, Anthracite Co. of Quebec
are reported to have corralled about
80,000 acres.
The Western Development Co. are
reported to have corralled about 70,000
acres
National Finance Co. are reported to
have corralled about 60,000 acres.
Many other syndicates have gobbled
up most Of the remaining area for
financial exploitation, but as' most ot
them are composed of the keenest
American speculators, who delight in
taking this advantage, since the U.S.A.
Government stopped thst wholesale
form of public plunder recently, and
they can thus gain more, I will briefly
explain particulars of the 92,800 acres
staked by the K. & B. Syndicate's exploitation.
We may readily estimate the developing danger to Canadian and British
interests on learning that the K. & B.
Syndicate Is controlled by the Harriman railway and Financial combine of
U. S: A., who, according to information I have been able to. gather, are
trying to jegotW?,.^K>rt;hrtal.. op*
tracts with the Russian, Chinese and
Japanese governments with the double
object of cutting off the supply of
Welsh anthracite for war ships and
other craft on the Pacific Ocean, where
the carrying trade Is going to develop
aa tbat of the Atlantic, and with the
still greater object of taking enormous
profits from British and Canadian
lands to abnormally enrich the most
dangerous wealth abusing magnates in
U. 8, A.
Some idea of the vast extent of their
contemplated "profits" may be gathered from the fact that there are from
11 to 16 highly profitable seams of
thick anthracite coal under every acre
of those 1,280,000 acres, in well proven,
undisturbed coal measures, free' from
volcanic intrusions. All consisting of
hard (smokeless) anthracite ot high
commercial grade.
By securing the passes through the
Coast Range mountains, these people
will hold the key to the vast coal-
bearing area beyond, unless restrained
as I submit they should be, in the
public interest, before Crown grants
are allowed to be Issued by the government of British Columbia. Otherwise they will perpetually establish
Indisputable advantages over all competitors, and so impose upon British
Columbians and the empire a highly
dangerous monopoly, as they plan to
corner the economlo outlet for that
vast area by securing prior railway
rights and extending railway spurs to
ail future working collelries, to reap
unprecedented dividends.
There are good railway grades down
to the Nass river, and easy grades for
coal workings above 1800 feet datum.
Ridges separating the valleys provide
banks of overhead tonnage by galleries
driven on drain level nearly horizontal,
so that railway wagons csn be run
direct into some of the workings, facilitating the quickest and most economical production. The sesms He
parallel, and are adapted for return
airways on tbe other seam by brattice
cloth connections; thus there Is scope
for many men to quickly increase the
output in abnormally short time, as
working, draining, ventilating and
hauling are very economical for profit
able working an enormous output.
Careful estimates of the cost of production, Including the present cost of
wages, shows a cost of 12.14 per ton,
plus 86c for railway operation, including the haulage of empty wagons, totalling 13.00 per ton, whilst we, In normal times, pay ahout 88,00 per ton for
both house and manufacturing coal ln
Prince Rupert, Vancouver and Victoria,
and much higher for anthracite.
The estimated dally output of 6,000
tons per dsy is calculated to yield a
proflt of not less than 810,300 per day,
which would pay 10 per cent Interest
upon a capital of 130,900,000, or 20 per
cent Interest upon a capital of f 16,460,-
000, or 31 per cent, upon the capital of
810,400,000 actually required to begin
efficient development of this 92,800
sore block as below:
Purchase from Governments 928,000
Cost of Railway 4,760,000
Cost of Terminals, Bunkers
etc.  ..._: 1,000,000
Cost of Collieries 1,200,000
Cost of Preliminaries r   622,000
Purchase of coal from owners  2,000,000
MISS POLLY BRISBANE
Statistician Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council—Delegate from the Waitresses'
Union.
CONVENE NEXT
Preparations Now Nearly
Complete for the Reception of Delegates
C%s____)jmp^Yiuw
MAYOR T. S. BAXTER
Plans for Public Work in
flood Shape—Prospects
Bright
City  Assessme:
Need ReadJ
The Um
Important Resolutions Will
Be Considered at the
Convention
The NeW Westminster Trades and
Labor council are busy people these
days making the final arrangements
for the reception of the delegates to
the annual convention of the B. C.
Federation of Labor, which opens Its
sessions on Monday. The reception
committee is oomposed of D. 8. Cem-
eron, chairman; H. Gibb, secretary:
and Messrs. Aid. Dodd, W. Taylor and
C. H. Lugrln members. They have
done everything possible for the
comfort and entertainment of the
visitors who will doubtless flnd their
stay In the Roysl City an enjoyable
one. The executive committee of ths
Federation Ib holding a meeting today and will have everything ln readiness for the opening. The headquarters wtll be at the Savoy hotel, Columbia street, and delegates are asked
to hand their credentials to the secretary in the committee room st that
hotel. Delegates travelling Over the
C. P. R. or the G. N. R. must purchase
first-class tickets, pairing th* full oneway fare to New Westminster, and
obtain certificates to thst effect from
the ticket agent in order to secure the
reduced fare returning home, these
certificates being turned over to the
secretary. Many Important resolutions will be dealt with and a successful and educational meeting Is
assured.
WESTERN   FEDERATION   MINERS
District No. S Holds Its  Fourteenth
Annual Session
NELSON, Jan. 22.—The fourteenth
annual convention of District No. 6,
Western Federation of Miners, has
been in session here since Tuesday
morning. According to reports submitted by Secretary-treasurer A.
Shilland, an Increase of twenty per
cent, has been recorded in tbe mem
bershlp during the past year, and
the convention itself is one of the
most largely attended in years, there
being representatives of unions present from all parts of the interior.
Yesterday resolutions were passed
urging upon the provincial government the adoption of an amended
Workmen's Compensation act, fashioned after that of Washington state.
Another resolution, unanimously
agreed to, condemned piece work and
the bonus contract system.
The convention also passed a resolution which will be forwarded to
the federal government, asking for
tbe abolition of tbe Lemleux act.
The delegates went on record as
condemning the provincial government for its attitude towards the
striking coal miners on Vancouver
Island, and alao voted financial support to the striking miners ln Michigan.
Mayor Baxter wss ssl
regarding the outlook for	
as public work was concerned. _
ply he stated that the two big _.
laws provided for an expenditure of
8260,000 on sewers, rocking roads,
paving streets, etc. Some 84,000,000
will be spent by the city, of this amount about 81.880,000 would go to interest and sinking fund. Work will be
carried out on the Georgia-Harris
streets viaduct park aad other Improvements. Besldss, sidewalks will
be built The olty hss 1st contracts
for ten miles of streets, costing
8660,000. Thus, three million dollars
will hs spent on looal and other Improvements. The partnership 18-lnoh
Water pipe will be laid through the
park. "Yes, things are In mighty good
shape, wltb good prospects for a busy
season," said his worship) assurlngly.
"And If the private citlsens do their
pert, Vancouver will have nothing to
complain of this year as the elty counoll will do a lion's share ot the proposed work." The school board will
spend about $1,000,000 on schools and
sites therefor. The olty Is bard
pressed for revenue, but these contingencies must bs provided for.
One thing his worship drew attention to, wss the low rate of the city's
assessment which Is . deplorably
small. The total rateable property
was set down at 8160,000,000, when It
could Just as easily be raised to
8600,000,000,, without at all Increasing
the rste of taxation. Were resl estate rated at 60 per cent of real values, taxes could be levied easily on
8800,000,000, which ts double ths present amount A fixed rate should be
taken on prices that Would cover the
debts of solvent debtors who could
realize voluntarily on conservative
valuations. For Instance, a piece ot
property which st present is assessed
at 820,000,' haa a real selling value ot
8176,000, should be put down at say
890,000. There sre.sny number of
glaring assessments on the rolls like
this which sre fsr too low. Again,
Instead of the tax rate being 80 mills
lt should he pieced st say 12 mills,
and by so doing more actual revenue
could honestly be raised than b sow
being collected, and principle of single
tax maintained. Vancouver, if proper
real estate valuations were sobered
to, could easily adopt a low rate and
yet have more revenue to carry on
its needed public works. Twelve instead of 20 mills would be a good advertisement for any city let alone
Vancouver,
Owing,to the large number of out-
of-works, the board of works employ
600 men for three days a week at 82
a day, the regular 83 a-day gangs
working the other three dsys.
NEED OF POtHlCAL
M AMONG
.■■■
Strike Trouble Exhibit an
Homogenity of
Phenomena
smustrate Clearly Deep
onism Between *
land Labor
Is Wing so widely
Michigan, Colon*),
where tbe worksrs-
_ wltb armed resistance to
thslr demands for decent conditions,
lt Is well that affairs closer boms
should not be forgotten. Vanoouver
Island ta still the scene of bitter Industrial conflict attended by circumstances ss aril, If not as boisterous, as
any taking place In other ports ot tbe
wqrld. Men whose lives show isujiSB
ss deal, If not cleaner, than thoee
who Judge them, and' whose strongest
Impulse has bsen toward the betterment of their fellows, an growing
prematurely gray behind prison walls.
Other men—not angels, lost avenge
men—have hsd tbe stigma ot crime
placed upon tbem, and ban bees castigated publicly solely because tbey
have been given honorable positions
In the union of tbelr craft and have
dlschsrged their duties honorably.
True, no snob conditions ss those
shown by the United States government to exist. In Michigan corner
country have been disclosed on Vancouver Island. Strike-breakers an
lured to the Michigan mlnss by promises of high wsges and assurances' of
the absence ot trouble, and an then
driven to work at revolver m
and herded  thereafter worse
peons   or  slaves.   Then Is  .	
reason td believe, however, tbat If tho
existence of such conditions at Cumberland, v. I., hu not been made tab- ■
Holy known, lt Is because Britlah 0*
lumbla has a government tbat would
not Investigate, much less disclose
any condition tbe public knowledge ot
which would be Inimical to the mine-
owners' interests. As for tbe federal
government, It Is content with sending out lsbor ministers who openly
announce that they believe only what
Is told by ths employen or their representatives, without deigning even
to consider the evidence ot the otter
side. This they call on "Inveetsg*
tlon." Taking tbem altogether, a*
strike troubles of Dublin, Virginia,
Michigan, Colorado, South Africa and
British Columbia, exhibit an "^
genelty of phenomena that .Ilia
dearly the deep antagotfsm b<	
capital and labor, and the need for effective political action on the part ot
the workers.
Changing the Sore Spots
That the provincial government baa
grown tired of the enormous expense
of maintaining a useless armed force,
in the interests of the coal miners on
Vancouver Island, is evidenced by a
news story which appeared a few
days ago ln the Victoria Times, which
says: "Orders have been given, It Is
understood, or are ht least In contemplation for tbe recall of the permanent force stationed at Nanalmo.
There are about thirty or forty members of the Work Point garrison
stationed in tbe strike zone, and if
they are 'recalled' it will probably
mean that ahout ten men from each
of the Victoria and Vancouver regiments will have to be ordered out to
replace them to keep up the strength
which Lieut-Col. Hall, commanding
officer of the forces in the field, recently stated was the minimum which
lt was safe to have on the ground."
810,400,000
The facilities  for plunder of the
public resources here is evidenced by
the   technical   "owners"   demanding
82,000,000  "plunder"    to    let    their
LABOR ON ATLANTIC C0A8T
New Brunswick Federation Holds
Convention In Moncton
The annual convention of the New
Brunswick Federation of Lahor, which
is being held this week In Moncton
promises to bs a most important one.
Among other matters of Interest
which will be taken up will be arrangements for procuring a charter
from the Trades and Labor congress
of Canada and proposed amendments
to the present labor laws of the province. In the call for the convention
the secretary ssys: "Realizing as we
do the need ot closer affiliation among the organized workers and believing this Federation will be one of
the best ways of bringing the organizations at present in existence In
closer touch with each other, and will
also be the means of Inducing the
unorganized crafts to organize, we
would request that all organizations
make an earnest endeavor to be represented at this meeting." A bumper
attendance is expected.
Last week about 1600 attended an
unemployed mass meeting at Hamilton, Ont. "Work, not charity," was
the tone of the speeches,
Ottawa Typographical union has
successfully negotiated new working
agreements In Job and news branches.
The news scale runs for four years
and the Job scale for three and a half.
The job men now get 819.60.
UNIONS MERGED
Charter Being Supplied to A. S. of C.
snd J. by the U. B. of C. and J.
The new charters of the Brother;
hood of Carpenters are being supplied
to the locals of the Amalgamated society ln eastern Canada, which have
been merged Into the big carpenten'
organization. The numbers of tbe
new unions In the United States will
start at 2600, while thoae In Canada
will begin at 2600. A full complement
of supplies accompanies each charter.
Under the constitution, where two or
more Brotherhood locale are operating in a district a district council is
required to be established, In Toronto
the Brotherhood and Amalgamated
each had a district council. These
will be merged on February 1st On
the same date a district council will
be Instituted In the Niagara peninsula.
The Hamilton district council will bs
comprised of loesl branches In Hamilton, Brentford and Burlington, and
will get Into working order early next
month.
■ The "yellow peril" may have Its
terrors but, as a comlo supplement
says, the worst Is yet to come. A
shipment of two million "fresh" eggs
arrived In Vancouver from China on
one of the Empresses during the paat
week,
add inquest
'staked coal lands" be used, in addition to the 8928,000 the government of
Birttsh Columbia are to receive for
letting that part of our heritage to give
their friends the cream of that 82,000,-
000 before allowing lt to be used.
Said J. Place, the socialist member
for Nanalmo, In the houee on Monday: "There wtll be no peace In the
mining districts until the men an
organised. No matter what the outcome of the present struggle may be
It will not be final. Take the history
of any country and you will observe
that there Is no Industrial peace until
the workers are In a position to fight
their case without actually going to
war. In the mining districts of this
province the men are satisfied that Individually they have no chance whatever and that collectively, while they
may not succeed, they will at all
events stand a better chance of having their demands listened to,"
SAFETY FIRST
To sll the gunmen, burglsre, bandits, ssnd-baggars, swindlere snd
petty thieves, greeting:
Have you ever stopped to consider the dangers that beeet you In
your various callings? No doubt most of you are aware that persons
who seek wealth ln the manner to which you have taken a fancy are
liable to severe punishment This is a grievous condition, the elimination of which you would all welcome.
You are hereby offered a chance to reform and become law-abiding
citizens, free from all possibility of danger in the form of punishment
for your past acts. Self-preservation is the strongest human instinct
and there can be no question that each one of you Is fairly fond of himself.   Therefore, you will welcome this opportunity to reform.
But if you should consider that lt is too late, that It Is Impossible
to reform, lt will be doubly welcome nows to you that lt ts now possible
to reform without ohanglng your occupation. If you could follow your
natural bents, drawing a steady Income therefrom, with tbe law protecting where it now pursues, would you turn lt down?
All you have to do is to join our strikebreaking detective agency.
The work la easy and safe and the pay Is good. Those of you who have
a natural leaning toward assassination will be allowed full swing tn
attacking strikers. Arms will be provided. While there Is no risk If
care is exercised, the agency assumes no responsibility for injury to
anyone wbo carelessly attacks a striker from In front.
Others, whose tendencies are more toward housebreaking, thieving,
etc., will be given ample scope for their activities In sacking and looting
strikers' homes. Here again, the only caution that must be exercised
ts to bo sure tbat you go ln sufficient numbers to guard against injury.
Remember that thore is no limit to what you can do, provided you
do It to union men. You need bave no respect for women or children
It Ib a life of perfect freedom in which, above all things, you will be safe
You can rest absolutely sure that if tbe law should t..». . ■ '
law .v  TS V ue saxe,
22WJ*1? **»****;*' ^Ym^m be bC>R V.?!****
teaets, but respectable citi»«L,.J, "■•?*•
community itfBSSp % W*
you will no longed be social outcasta, but re,DectaK.«for "'   *•*"»«.
of wealth and standing in the community*3KL*£._a__ *""•.
holders of law and order, '
>
?4B$WQ
THE
BRipSB C0I,UMBIA FEilERATiOKIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 23, 191
Westminster Trust, Limited
Capital, si,coa,ooo.oo. Sassrve mag, gaoo,ooo.oo
labsulbed, SSO1.00O.0O
We have MONEY TO LOAN on improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and city clients. Payments collected and forwarded or invested. We act as agents only for the
purchase and sale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Westminster, B. C,
1. J. Jones, Haaadnr Blrsctor
J. A. Bualt, Bswatarr-Tnaaunr. .
;1 V.v*'
Telephone B-7S1
vmov shop
Besldanoe B-10S0
J. P. GALVIN
High Class Ladies' and Gentlemen's Tailor
,». o.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
Snoeissors te Outer k Manna, ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
mon sss
is Columbia sxnssx new Westminster, b. c.
All Work Guaranteed
{land Sewn Shoes Made to Meaaure
The Progressive Shoe Repairers
McMillan a paterson   *
Onion nop.
SS BMBXB STSIII NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Opposite Westminster Trust Blook.
ESI
RECEIPT OF
On behalf of District No. 28, United
Mine Workers of America, I desire to
acknowledge the receipt of V2012.91,
ln addition to the 86,000 already received, in connection with The Federationist subscription for the Kiddies
Christmas fund,
The effort of The Federationist has
already been acknowledged by some
of the membership of tin-mine workers, but let me again, on behalf of the
entire membership, their wives and
children, thank the workers of Canada generally, and British Columbia
In particular, for the magnificent
manner ln which they responded to
the suggestion pf The Federatlonist
tbat the workers appreciate the heroic sacrifices made by the women and
children to assist their husbands and
fathers to plant the flag of unionism
on Vancouver island.
I desire also to acknowledge the
sum of 828.76 from the Victoria
Trades and Labor council which came
ln after the announcement of The
Federatlonist fund. . This amount
irom Victoria is ln addition to the
amount already acknowledged
through the columns of The "Fed." as
received from that city.
The money has been distributed as
follows:
Cumberland  ,  81207.30
Ladysmlth : y  1417.00
Nanaimo  2972.30
South Wellington   1004.70
Extension  267.90
Sointula  60.00
Cost of forwarding money fo
Cumberland and Sointula.. 2.16
Balance on hand   120.31
O. J. Rognon F. P. Stevens
Phone Soya 7S78
Canadian Photo Co.
COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Photos Taksn Anywhere, Anytime
Ill-Ill CROWN BUILDING
III Ponder Strset West
A WorM Bovlow et leclallpM   Br tto
btst wrltem In Surope and America
will bo Sound la THI NBW RBVIBW
whloh dtftto la aa authoritative war
wtth all phsui of Soolallsas—aot tor
•citation, but education. Published
monthly. Sl.00 per year: Canadian iub-
•crlptlono S1.S0. sendlOo tor maple
oopy.  msw   wtvrew.   iso  ~-—
■tract. Mow Tork City.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Panning, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Coluiribia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers    -
 FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of |5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial information, Victoria
DRUGS BY MAIL
If you will cut out this advertisement and
attach it to your order we will prepay the
charges on anything you wish in the drug
line.
Send enough money to be sure and cover
i   your purchase, and any balance will.be returned to you.   -   .      (
Terry's Mail Order Drug Store
VICTORIA,, B.C.
B. C. Electric Irons
THE
CHEAPEST
IRON OF
ITS
STANDARD
ON THE
MARKET
THE BEST
IRON
OFFERED
ON THE
MARKET
AT ANY
PRICE
Price - $3.50
Every Iron is guaranteed by the B. C. Electric for
10 Years
' Cattail
Hasting!
"•<■        Rf    FIFfTRIP    inea-*st
Stmt LleV/e   IjliljV 1 I\lV NeirDivie
PHONE, SBTMQUR 6000
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
UNION      o^^^>   ' LABEL
THB BS* Of THE IaABBI, ON YODR PRIMTINO-NO EXTRA COST TO VOU-
Wli.1V HttF PS DO OUR DUTV IM P10HTIWG TUBERCULOSIS
FlewSer. 7»S3 Dii or Nl|kt
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
S2SUckHaSt,        Vaacoanr, 1. C.
HARRON BROS.
""■^.afiBK*" ano
Vancouver—Offlce and Chanel,
MM Oranvlllo St, Phono So?, till
J""ih.. Vijioouver - Offloe and
chapel, lit Second St. E.    Phone
President Foster Thanks
The "Fed." for Handsome
Kiddies' Fund
Furnishes Detailed State'
ments of Distribution
by District Officers
Total   17041.66
The balance on band, (126.31, together with sundry small sums received by The Federationist since the
fund closed, will be banked to the
credit of the officers of District No. 28
and will be used to defray the expenses incurred through illness among
the wives and children of the imprisoned miners.
The Federationist Will long be remembered by the rising generation of
3630 Children whose Christmas was
gladdened by the forethought of The
Federationist and the response of its
readers;
HOBT. FOSTER,
President District 28.
[The "Fed." has been furnished
with a copy of. the receipted rolls
from which the money was paid to the
individual families, and any subscriber to the fund Ib at liberty to examine
lt at this office at any time.—Ed.]
The McBrlde-Bowser regime sure
believes ln the slogan: "Back to the
land!"
VANCOUVER    COAL   OPERATORS'
TEN COMMANDMENTS
1. Thos shalt have none other
master except me,
2. Thou shalt not' make to thyself
any comforts nor the likeness of anything to thine own Interest; thou
shalt bow down to me, for I am thy
master and a jealous master, and I
will show you no mercy, aB there Is
no charity in business, but endeavor
to make you keep my commandments.
3. Thou shalt not speak disparagingly of thy master lest I sack thee
without notice. .,
t. Remember thou workest six
days with sll thy strength and to do
all I want thee, but the seventh day
thou shalt atop at home and do no
manner of work, but thou Shalt do all
that thou canst to recruit thine exhausted strength for my services on
Monday morning.
5. Honor thy master and his foremen that thy days may be short and
miserable for I shall not want thee
when thou gettest old asd art able
to spend thy days in the workhouse.
6. Thou Shalt ha*e no U. tt. W. of
A, to protect thy labor as that la
against my will
7. Thou shalt slways speak well
of me though 1 oppress thee thou shall
be content If I flnd thee work and pay
thee what I think well.
8. Thou shslt starve thyself and
thy children if It Is anything to my
Interest, thou must only think of me,
not of thyself,
9. Thou shslt have no meeting to
consider thine own Interest as I want
to keep thee tn Ignorance and poverty
all the days of thy life,
10. Thou shalt not covet thy master's money, nor his comforts, nor his
luxuries, nor anything that Is hts.
Thou shalt not covet his money even
though he gets two hundred dollars
per week snd thou hardly twenty.
Thou shalt not grumble at anything,
for I want to reign over thee and tyr-
ranise thee and keep thee ln bondage
all the days of thy life.
Oenersl President James Klrby and
Board Member Martel, of Montreal, of
the Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners of America, will begin a tour
of Ontario locals of hts craft ln February.
AU interested
in    organiza-
u ,'on are re~
quested to at
once call at Room 217, Labor
Temple, or communicate with
OEO.  HEATHERTON
A. F. of L, Oenersl Organiser
HUGH M. FRASER
The Newly-elected  Reeve   of   Burnaby,
who beat his opponent by nearly 400
majority.    D. C. McGregor, one of his
f opponents,   and   late  Reeve,   holds  a
■ commission  in a local  regiment,  and
waa .at   Nanalmo   during   the   strike
trouble,  whioh • accounts,   In   a   large
measure, for hla defeat.
RADICAL VIEWS ON  PUBLIC
QUESTIONS
By W. J. CURRY, D.D.S.,
801 Dominion Building
ECONOMIC   CAUSE   OF   DISEASE
"Nature Is red ln fang and olaw."
Life preys on life—the fish eats the
worm, tbe man eats the flsh, and the
worm eats the man—a continuous
round of one-sided pleasure. The
"bug" theory came and is now waning. Vaccines, anti-toxins and1 antiseptics still hate their place ln the
drug store, ana, with tbe conventional
doctor, mainly because they pay; but
we ara slowly learning that while
germs cannot be eliminated, they can
be made harmless. Nature has supplied us With forces which can protect us from their assault. Seed
scattered 1:. well prepared ground
grows; the same seed planted in a
desert fails to propogate. The coming system of healing will not be to
destroy the germ so much as to render the system immune from their attacks; physical and mental resistance
will be understood and developed.
MASTICATION PREVENT8 TEETH
DECAYING
Through the mechanical process
particles of fermenting food—the
home of the germ—are removed. But
mastication does something more than
this: it massages the gums and connective tissue around the teeth, Increases the circulation which carries
the lime salts to harden the teeth,
and increases their resistance against
the forces of disease. This Is the main
reason why the old Indians of British Columbia, as well as our ancient
ancestors, had good teeth. The germ
was there, hut the resistance to the
germ was there also. To-day our food
is mostly soft, requiring little mastication and so to compensate somewhat for disuse we use tooth brushes
and chew gum. Nature prompts children to do the latter.
THE WHITE PLAQUE
ThlB Is because the poor have poor
blood. They lack resistance; they eat
poor food; they breathe foul air, and
when not overworked they are out of
work, underfed, worried and exposed
to cold and damp. On the other hand
the middle and upper .classes are comparatively free from tuberculosis,
WHITE BLOOD CELLS
DEFENDERS
Modern phsyclology has shown us
that the chief function of she billions,
ot white blood cells contained ln the
normal man Is to defend the system
against the invasion of germs. The
modern microscope has enabled ub
to see the battle between health and
disease actually taking place. If the
blood Is In good condition these white
blood cells are numerous and active,
and they pounce upon the Invading
germs and devour them before they
can gain a foothold. On the other
hand, If the blood is poor, the system
reduced, the germs are liable to enter
and propagate. Today drugs and
antiseptics have been discarded, practically ln the treatment of tuberculosis, and every effort is made to build
up the resistance through nourishing
food, rest, sunshine, pure air and invigorating and enjoyable recreation.
It would be obvious to' sll, that slum
dwellers,, the Industrial classes, the
Inmates of asylums and gaols, sre particularly susceptible to tuberculosis
and other germ diseases, because
these classes offer a proline soil for
the propogatlon of germs. It Is slso
evident that the human race can never
enjoy sound health until poverty la
abolished—until there Is an abundance of food, clothing, homes and contentment for all, and, therefore, the
true physicians, while they are doing
all possible to relieve existing conditions, must never cease to teach the
public that diseases—such as tuberculosis and decayed teeth—are but
smyptoms of our social and economic
disorder Which has produced' widespread poverty ln a world overflowing with natural wealth. Today millions of hands are idle who are able
and willing to produce all the comforts and. luxuries of life. The flrst
step toward a healthy humanity is
the propogatlon of knowledge ot
these great problems of life which
are now before us. What is the remedy for the unemployed problem? The
reply will he given next week.
Letter Carriers' Dsnee
Although the letter carriers of Vancouver have had to do more than their
usual share of walking during the
week, they intend holding a whist
drive snd dance la O'Brien hall, corner Homer and Hastings streets, on
Monday, January 26th, at 8 p. m. Admission, gentleman 50 cents, lady 26
oents. Everybody welcome! Music
by Prof. L. Holland's orohasetra. Refreshments will be served.
MINARD'8 LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC.
'Frisco Plasterers' Strike
The atrlke of the Plasterers' union
to enforce a decision of the building
trades department of the American
Federation of Labor is still in progress, though negotiations are under
way which should lead to an early
ad1ustment-ef the difficulty. The plasterers and carnenters have arrived at
nn understanding concerning-some of
the features of the esse, so that now
there remains but the working out of
details In the arrangement, but lt is
hoped that no serious hitch will occur concerning them. The International union of Bricklayers has Instructed the San Francisco local to
stand unswervingly with the plasterers, and the union has voted to comply with the order. The executive
council of the American Federation of
Labor convened on Monday, January
19th, in Washington, when the cues-
tion was taken up. A decision will be
rendered ln a few days.
Hamilton, Ont., plumbers have elected James Cunningham, president, and
A. W. Harris, seoretary of their union.
MS IN SE:
2,000 DELEGATES
' IF
a -
United Mine Workers Hold
Annual Convention^
Indianapolis, Ind.
President Charles H. Moyer
Is Expected To Be in
Attendance
This week the biggest international
union on the American continent, the
United Mine Workers of America, are
In session at Indianapolis, Ind,, with
over 2,000 delegates present. More
than 300 resolutions have been sub
mltted by locals in all parts of the
country to the convention. A number
of changes in the constitution has
been suggested and the constitutional
committee, wblch met prior to the
convention, will report on these to
the delegates. It is also planned to
draft an agreement whereby the miners will continue work during the
time conferences are being held between the unemployed and the mine
owners, on many scales, which expire on March 31st.. The miners and
operators, have already agreed that a
suspension ot work during the negotiation of a new contract, is unnecessary and both sides are hopeful that
the plan of a new contract ln the mines
will be reached. In connection with
the miners' big: convention, president
John B. White has announced that
a meeting of the mine department of
the American Federation of Labor
will be beld some time during the
convention, and lt is notable that
Charles H. Moyer, president of the
Western Federation of Miners, is expected to be present.
Coast Sailors Need Organization
Editor B. C. FederationiBt: Much
has been said about the organization
of miners, loggers, mechanics, railroad men, etc. But there is one class
ot men on this Pacific coast whom
you very seldom see mentioned ln
any organ of the A. F. ot L., and
who need the services of an organiser
most urgently. I refer to the sailors,
or rather freight handlers, who work
on the small freight boats plying
along the coast, from as far south as
'Frisco to as far north as Prince
Rupert The conditions aboard these
floating workhouses are a shame and
a disgrace ln this age of industrial reform. Having worked myself on
several of them, on both sides of the
International boundary line, I feel that
I am qualified to speak on the subject. -To begin wltb, the hygienic conditions aboard most of these boats
are unmentionable, the sleeping
quarters of the men are the worst
that eould be found anywhere. The
average cell ln which criminals are
confined is cleaner, better lighted,
better ventilated, and, , generally
speaking, more sanitary In every
way than these conservatories for
the perpetuation of the prolific "grey-
back," misnamed fo'c's'les. They are
situated at the bow of the vessel below the water line and are absolutely
unventilated, with the exception of
what little air finds its way down
through the forward hatch from the
upper deok 16 or 20 feet above, which
Ib very, little. When several men
start smoking in this already stagnant atmosphere, it becomes something indescribable; added to this, it
is a veritable paradise for vermin of
all descriptions—bedbugs, lice and
fleas, merely wait nil the lights are
extinguished snd then flock to the
feeding ground (the bunks) snd proceed to make things interesting for
the unfortunate occupsnts thereof.
Bsd as this ts, lt is not all by any
mease: The men are hired at 140 or
$45 a month, 30.days to a month.
Asd whatever part oi the 24 hours Ib
required for the operation of loading and unloading freight constitutes
a day. If often requires all of It, and
very seldom less than 14 or IS hours,
thus if a man works 24 hours and
quits,.he receives a day's psy, 11.60.
Think lt over you freedom-loving
Americans and Canadians.
F. DAVIS.
Nanalmo, B.C., Jan. 22, 11114
Vote of Thanka
Editor B. 0. Federatlonist: We, the
Ladies' Auxiliary ot the U. M. W. of
A., local No. 2388, take this method
of sending a hearty vote ot thanks
to you all, and to those who bo kindly
donated towards the Kiddies' Christmas fund, for lt brightened many a
home and gladdened many a little
heart on Christmas morning. Thanking you again and wishing you all
a happy new year.
MRS. JAMES JONES,
President.   -
Ladysmlth, Jan. 21, 1914.
'When the law makes the worker
a man apart from the rest of society
and that worker comes to realise lt,
he becomes a real force In the organised working class. Every day that
goes by sees a distinct advance In the
militancy and determination of the
organised workers. Such things as
these conspiracy trials are bringing to
the organized workers allies that they
had long despaired of winning. Onoe
the workers are convinced that, the
machinery of the law is the exclusive
property of the mine owners and
other representatives of big business,
then will the people take the law out
of the hands of big business."
WHENORDERINGASUIT
See that this Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
It stands for all that Union
Labor Stands for.
t
ncrease
ifee fearniM fmtir
of Your Family
Is your son or daughter able to command a good salary? Are
tbey revenue producers, or revenue reducers? Arc they qualified to
hold an important position? Can they do any one thing so well that
their services are in good demand?
IF NOT, WHY NOT?
Write us now for full information, or call and aee us—
Success Business College
Horner Main Street and 10th Avenue
Phone Fairmont 2076
Vancouver, B. C.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, fo-
eluding SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STALEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STARRETT'S
FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN LOCKS
SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR 134
7 HASTINGS ST. WEST
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital 116,000,000       Best „ ....112,600,000
Main Office: Corner Hastings and Granville Streets, Vancouver.
CITY BRANCHES . LOCATION
HASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. HaBtings and Cambie Streets.
BAST END Cor. Pender and Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .. .. Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIEW  Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KITSILANO .Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET .........Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL ..........Cor., Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road.
Also North Vancouver Branch, cor.   Lonedale  Ave.  and   Eaplanade.
A Word to the Unionists of
British Columbia
With the beginning of the New Year The Federationist aims to increase its usefulness to the
organized labor movement of British Columbia.
During the latter part of 1913 The Federationist
was enlarged to a minimum of eight pages, and it
is now proposed to increase it to twelve pages as
soon as possible.
Your organization can co-operate in making
The Federationist a thoroughly provincial paper
in three ways:
(1) By inserting a card in the union directory
at the nominal price of $1.00 per month;
(2) By subscribing in a body for the entire
membership from the local treasury, the paper to
be mailed to each individual address at the rate
of $1.00 per year each;
(3) By sending your orders for job printing
to this office, upon which The Federationist will
receive .10 per cent, at no increased cost to the
patron.   Union printers; union-made paper.
Vancouver wige-worken ean miterlalljr asellt The Federitioniit by cilllnf or
writing ior a lew csrdi which hive juit been printed, Hiding:
I cime hen bcciuie I reid your
idvertliement In our piper.
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Owned and' publlihed by organised
labor, tn our own quarter-of-a-mlllion
dollar Labor Temple,, every Friday
morning, and I alwaya tive preference
lo goodi  bearing the   union  Label.
When out shopping go to Federatlonist advertisers, and before leaving leave a
card where it can be found by the clerki and probably reach the principal!. It ia
an eaiy way to help The Federationitt get resiitts—hence more advertising—and a
bigger and better paper to, champion the cauae of Labor.
Remember, too, when you are In need of printing of any kind that Tht Federationlit accept! orden.   Union paper—union printers.
PRINTING
THE FEDERATIONIST/has completed arrangements which
make it possible for us to accept the printing orders from unions, unionists and others, at a profit of 10 per cent., which will help THE
FEDERATIONIST aiid cost the customer no more than if sent to
the printer direct.
This LABEL is our GUARANTEE
And In addition we will give you Union-made Paper, and your
orders will receive careful and prompt attention. Mail orders a
specialty. Here Is an opportunity for the unions of British Columbia
to help THE FEDERATIONIST, help themselves, and at the same
time get the best clui of work possible at the hands of competent
union printers.
PHONE SEYMOUR 7495—Or send your Orders or Request for
Quotations to
Tlie R G FEDERATIONIST
ROOM 217 LABOR TEMPLE VANCOUVER, B. C. > „    OFFICIAL FAPER VANCOUVER
W   TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OPIKUL PAPA I
imu nDOunoN or urn i
SIXTH YEAE. No. 146
VANCOUVER, B. P., FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
CTRSBf) ILMPEBtlBAl
I
OUR
January Sale
ISNOWON
AND YOU OAN SAVE HONEY BY
TAXING ADVANTAGE OF THE
PRESENT PRICES
Past experience has taught you that our.
sales are GENUINE.
You know when we advertise a special you
are going to get it. We do not say special
unless our price is lower than you can get
the same goods for elsewhere. v
DURING THIS SALE
All our prices are special, except on wines
and spirits, groceries and contract lines.
We Are Selling Many Lines
Below Cost Prices
The goods we are selling are our regular
stocks—quality lines—every one of them.
Our sale prices cannot be matched anywhere.
SPECIAL SALE WINDOWS
EVERY DAY
Goods taken from the windows if you want
them.   .
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA
J. LECKIE CO.*. LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
for miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C.
We keep the largest and most
complete line of MEN'S and
LADIES', BOYS', GIRLS' and
CHILDREN'S FOOTWEAR at
prlcea which cannot be duplicated.
Everything Is to be found here.
HENRY D.RAE
Canada's Snap Specialist
104 and IM CORDOVA ST. W.
THE MAMMOTH BARGAIN SHOE STORE IS THE SPOT FOR
GOODS AND EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
SCOTCH CLOTHING HOUSE, Ltd.
(Kenneth Grant, Manailng Director.)
Two Stores—
M-M OOBDOTA ITBIST WW     77 XABTXKIIITUH JUST
Carpenters' Whits Duck Overalls,
with 12 poeksts, union lsbel 11.71
Msn's Heavy Tweed Psnts, union
 label  ...13.00 to S3.60
Ws ask for your pstronsge In our  Suit   and   overcoat   Departments, when we give value everytlme.
SHOES FOR MEN
SHOES FOR SERVICE
SHOES FOR DRESS
UNION SHOES FOR COMFORT
FOR EVERY REQUIREMENT
We've picked winners in Men's Winter Shoes. We're at tbe service of every man who desires the best shoes his money can buy
VV. J. ORR (Opposite City Hall) >204 MAIN ST.
OF UFE AMONGST
Existence of Community a
Menace to People of
Province
Urgent Need for Organisation in the Upper
Country   •
J. W. Oray of District No. 18, United
Mine Workers of America, and member of the executive of the B. C. Federation of Labor, arrived in the city
Tuesday morning on hia way to attend
the convention ai New Westminster.
He has just completed an extensive
tour through the interior of the provinoe, and gives a most Interesting
account of his travels, reporting as
every other worker does, that in, most
places unemployment Is prevalent
and work dull. At Cranbrook, he
states that on account of the prevailing slackness, the local unions are
practically dead, with the exception
of the rallwaymen's unions which are
working full. time. Ail other industries are nearly at a standstill and
few men employed. That there is a
good field for an organiser'in the Interior Is evidenced by the fact that
ao many men In lumber camps are unorganised. '
Need Organization
At Klmberley, 60 miles from Cranbrook, one camp of 75 men could
most likely be brought Into the fold,
as could also the 175 men of the
Staple lumber company, a few miles
out of Cranbrook. Along Columbia
river, between Fernle and Revelstoke,
there are from twelve to fifteen hundred men employed in the various
camps—all unorganised. Propaganda
work would rouse them Up and make
them realize the value of unionism.
Mr. Oray addressed a meeting of
trainmen and firemen at Cranbrook,
and states that they sympathize with
the alms of th» Federation, but unfortunately owing to their- constitution
they are unable to affiliate. It Is,
however, only a question of time before these difficulties will be removed
and affiliations made possible. At
Revelstoke about 125 teamsters are
ready and willing to organize so be-
for long a charter will doubtless be
applied for. Mr. Oray reports that at
Nelson the United Brotherhood ot Carpenters and the Amalgamated Car-
S enters have Joined forces and are
olng business together.
\       - Elect Delegates
They have sent O. Hardy to the
convention where he will represent
the two bodies, comprising In all 76
men. Tbe organized workers of Nelson, however, wanted a bigger representation, so the remaining unions
In and around the city formed a
federation amongst themselves for the
purpose of sending another delegate.
It was eventually decided that one
should be sent with credentials from
the Machinists' union. The railway
carmen bave arranged to hold a concert in aid of the children of the
miners on Vancouver island, all members working energetically to make
lt a success. Mr. Oray arrived at
Revelstoke when the place was buzzing with excitement over the civic
elections, so little could be done ln
the shape of meetings. Like Nelson,
Revelstoke had its own troubles In
the way of being represented at the
Federation of Labor, and, like Nelson,
they
Squashed Aforssald  Troubles
The Blacksmith's union, being only
a handful, and the maintenanceof-
way men—about 160 strong—being unable1 to meet regdlarly on account of
stress of weather and long distances
separating them, It was decided to get
as many union workers together as
possible and send a delegate under
the auspices of one of the afflliated
unions. About 100 men were present at this meeting—which was one
of the best held for years—and a delegate was elected from the Machinist's
union. It Ib abundantly evident that
what Nelson and Revelstoke lack ln
numbers they make up ln enthusiasm
and action. At Kamloops Mr. Oray
heard the same story—slackness of
work, business dull. The only unions
there are the
Railroad Brotherhoods,
while the 1. W. W. also have a local.
As at Cranbrook the railroad men
would Uke to affiliate with the B. C,
Federation and hope tbat before long
the obstacles ln the way will be removed. While ln the district Mr.
Oray visited Brilliant and owing to a
mistake on the part of some of the
Doukhobor officials, he was able to
visit the community and talk to
many of the members, Although they
The   Central   Hotel
H. Freeman, Manager
European Plan Telephone 706
Rates SOo. per day and upwards,
Culelne unexcelled. A la carte
meals at all hours. Opp. B. C. B.
Railway Depot Columbia St.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C,
PATENTS
Trade Marka, Designs, Copyrights.
FETHERBTONHAUOH   A  CO.
Ths Old Eetabllehed Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
1020 Rogers Bldg,, Oranvllle atreet
City.  Phons Seymour S7B8.
»
KODAKS and PHOTO
SUPPLIES
Developing, Printing, Enlarging
Pictures and Picture Framing
BISHOP & CHRISTIE
42! GRANVILLE ST.
were too cowed and frightened to say
much the revelations are astounding
and lt is certain that the people of
British Columbia have no idea that
such a disgraceful state of affairs
exist ln the province. Laws are .flagrantly broken or Insolently Ignored,
the only law apparently being that of
Peter Veregin. No registers of births,
marriages or deaths are kept, in fact,
as far as regards marriages it would
be a difficult matter as the ceremony
of marriage appears to be non-existent.   There are
No Schools
In this community of 5,000 men, women and children, and bearing in mind
the tenets and practices of the members, lt can well he Imagined what a
crowd ot barbarians are being raised
there. As a rule, these people are
absolutely under the heel of Peter
Veregin, wbo reigns as a despot. So
well under subjection are they that
they obey his every order even to
their own personal adornment. Recently he directed the women to cut
the hair oil their heads, and theae
poor, deluded fanatics immediately
obeyed, and today, within the community, women are wearing their hair
cropped short. These people spend
nothing—they have little or no money
as all they can earn for their own personal use must be made on Saturday
afternoons when the dictator graciously allows them to earn a few cents
for themselves!   They
Live on. the Poorest of Food
and herd together—men, women and
children—in gangs of from 30 to 60,
in houses that would only comfortably
accommodate an ordinarily large Britisher's family. Peter sometimes takes
contracts to supply men tor railway
grading, etc. But who gets the money?
Peter., He rushes them out of the
community, rushes them back again
at the expiry ot the contract, pockets
their wages, and gives, them enough
food and clothing to eke out an existence. From the chats Mr. Oray was
able to obtain with a few of the
members it is dear that, although
they would ln some oases like to be
outside and bave the disposal of then-
own earnings, most of them are incapable of. thinking this possible.
Their belief in Peter Veregin Is so
strong that they cannot imagine,
much less attempt, such a proposition, without him. And these are the
people settled in our midst! A few
independents, however, some time
ago,
"Got Out Prom Under,"
repudiated the leadership of Peter
and settled at Thrums. But Peter
wouldn't pay up their share—he kept
back all the price. They appealed to
Attorney-general Bowser • to take
some action to compel the Doukhobor
society to pay their personal claims
and compensation. Mr. Bowser,
however, in reply to their petition
stated that the matter appeared to
be'one ln which private rights only
were Involved and that such rights
were for the courts to establish and
enforce. lAt the same time he congratulated them on obeying the laws
and giving their children the advantages attending the British schools,
The solution may ultimately be found
tn legal action when the flnanclal system of the community Will be fully
exposed. Veregin, it is stated,
brought ln 1600 Russians last year,
and. can> when it suits him, bring In
75,000  more!
Off to Michigan
Mr. Oray met J. Davison, president
of District 6, Western Federation of
Miners, at Nelson. Mr. Davison, who
Is now an international official, Is on
his way to Michigan. Although they
are having a hard struggle, he felt
sure they would win out In the end
and was delighted with the sympathy
and, help the United Mine Workers
had 'given the strikers.
Before the convention at New
Westminster, Mr. Oray will go over
to Victoria with a view to getting
Into touch with the B. 0. Fruitgrowers
association regarding affiliation with
the B. C. Federation of Labor. The
farmers' associations of Alberta have
affiliated with the Alberta Federation
and it is up to the fruitgrowers of
this province to do likewise ln B. C.
VANCOUVER lit
Beginners in Typography
Establish Precedent
in This City
Organize an Association and
Enact Constitution
and Rules
"NOT UNDERSTOOD"
Not understood, we move along asunder;
Our paths grow wider as the seasons creep
Along the years; we marvel and we
wonder
Why life is life, and then we fall
asleep—
Not understood!
Not understood, we gather false  impressions,
And hug them closer as the years
go by;.
Till virtues often seem to be transgressions;
And thus men rise and fall, and live
and die
Not understood!
Not   understood;    poor  souls   with
stunted vision
Oft measure giants with their narrow gauge;
The poisoned shafts of falsehood and
derision
Are oft Impelled 'gainst those who
I      mould the age-
Not understood!
Not understood! The secret springs of
action,
Which He beneath the surface and
the show
Are   disregarded;   with  self-satisfaction
We Judge our neighbors, and they
often go:
Not understood!
Not   understood!  How   trifles often
change us!
The thoughtless sentence and the
fancied slight
Destroy long years of friendship, and
estrange us,
And on our   souls   there   falls a
freezing blight:
Not understood!
Not understood!   How many breasts
are aching
For lack of sympathy; Ah, day by
day ,
How  many cheerless, lonely hearts
are breaking?
How many noble spirits pass away:
Not understood!
O God! that men would see a little
clearer,
Or Judge less harshly where  they
cannot see!
O God! that men would draw a little
nearer
To one  another—they'd be nearer
Thee!'
And understood!
—Thomas Bracken.
The examining committee of Vancouver Typographical union called a
meeting of printers / apprentices on
Friday night in the Labor Temple to
discuss the formation of a olub. Tbere
waa a good attendance and tba following, apprentices were enrolled In the
new organisation: C. Withers, W.
Boardman, A. E. Lalng, H, Bayley, C.
W. Pettlplece, C. D. Morris, G. H.
Jones, B. B, Kstabrook, L. L. Manning,
T..O. Millar, A. Price, O, Inglls, C.
Sandell, A. Haseldlne, W. Braus, jr.,
S. Henderson, C. H. R. Southcott, R.
Pettet, B. Humphrey, H. Scott, F.
Hobbs, H. Fletcher, 3. S, Hesson, G.
A. Roedde, L. V. Moody, A. Scott, D.
Duguld, W. Mattlx and J. Anderson.
Oeorge Bartley was in the chair
and. ln the course of his remarks
urged the apprentices to take every
means ln their power to become efficient membera of the craft He also
reminded them that their annual examination would take plaoe during the
flrst week In March, and that exams,
bad a tendency to become stiller each
year. P. McBwen also addressed them
on the Importance of keeping up to
date In their trade and pointed out
that the best way of so doing waa to
attend the lectures and courses of
study proposed. L, B. Denison spoke
of his recent visit to Seattle where he
attended a banquet of the printers
apprentices' club. He told them of
the success of that organization and
the amount of real work It wu doing,
and said that so highly did the employers think of it that ln addition to
personal and moral support they put
Into the treasury dollar for dollar
with the membera, Messrs, H. L.
Corey, H. A. Henry, R. H. Lockle and
B. Rorke alao spoke along similar
lines. The boys then proceeded to
elect a committee to draw up a constitution and rules with the following result: Advisory president, L. E.
Denison; Harry Bayley, chairman;
B. B. Estabrook, vice-chairman;
Clarke W. Pettipiece, secretary; A. B.
Lalng and R. Pettet, members. Of
the many trades unions ln Vancouver
the Typographical Is the flrst to form
an organization for the better training of its juniors. Association with
each other, together with the complete self-government they enjoy, and
attendance at lectures, etc., will undoubtedly help the boys to become
better qualified to take their position
as Journeymen and also further the
spirit of brotherhood. The meetings
will be held on the second and fourth
Thursdays ln each month. Adjourned
till January 22nd.
A SUGGESTION.
Do you know anyone whom you
think would become a subscriber to
The Federationist, tf he saw It?
If so, mall his name to this office
and The Federatlonist will he sent to
him for one month free of charge and
accompanied by a letter inviting him
to become a subscriber.
Send tn the name of tbat friend of
yours NOW.
MINARD'S LINIMENT RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
Berry Bros.
Agents for
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full  line   of  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
E. BURNS & COl
135 CORDOVA ST. E,
HARDWARE,   FURNITURE  AND
SECONO.HANO  DEALER
Ooods sold on Commission. Stoves
snd Tools our Specialty
Phone Sey, 15T».
Ii Your Furniture Showiif
Signs of Wear and Tear?
High time to look; winter evenings to come. A comfortable
rocker, an easy couch, a bookcase or rug, can make a lot of
difference to one's comfort
Don't go on buying furniture
winter after winter—buy here
where furniture Is selected to
withstand the round of season
after season, and many of
them. Come ln and see the
new arrivals—they will bring
many hours' comfort to some
lucky persons.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
»1 HASTING3 STREET WEST
Removal Announcement
CENTER&HANNA,Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service. Alter December
6, 1913, at 1049 Georgia Street,
one, block west of Court House.
Use of Modern Chapeland Funeral
Parlors free to all patrons
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
__ /
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Fill Bedding Requirements
at the Spencer Sale Prices
We believe these values are unequalled in all
Vancouver
00MP0BTKB8
COTTON FILLED with art muslin and cambric coverings:
60x72 Inches—age. each and np.
66x72 Inches—S1.2J each and up.
72x71 inc|ies-SI M, (2.2s, (3.28, SI.M each. -
DOWN FILLED, covered In sateen, with plain paneled bor
den, sbes 72x71 Inches .Bach ta.ro, 17.60 and «*60
DOWN FILLED, with Satin front and sateen back, In large
I    size.  $10.76, 112.(6, SUM, I14.(( and 11140
WHITE HONEYCOMB QUILTS-Size 72x90. Regular 01.76.
Each. $1.ZS
WHITE SATIN MARCELLA QUILTS-SIxe 74x26. Regular
12.25, for  SIM
WHITE COTTON SHEETING—48 Inches In width. Regular
30c., for 22c,
WHITE   COTTON   SHEETS—Hemmed   ready   for   use.—
Slse 2x2)4 yards, pair $1.40,11.76 and »1 J5
Size 2>4x2j4 yards, pair.  .$1.78,12.00, $2.10
PILLOW CASES—Hemstitched and plain, In all sixes at,
dozen $1.10, $2.26, $2.70
BUY BLANKETS AT THESE PBI0E8
^mamm~ma*-a-sisai^MaMMMM^aMarn^rn
White Wool Blankets, size 66*75.   Per pair $2.(0
White Wool Blankets, size 60x80.   Per pair  .$9.(0
White Wool Blankets, size (4x84.   Per pair $M(
White Wool Blankets, size 60x80.
Grey Wool Blankets, size 56x76.
Grey Wool Blankets, size (8x78.
Grey Wool Blankets, size 60x80.
Grey Wool Blankets, size 58x78.
Grey Wool Blankets, size (0x80.
Grey Wool Blankets, slse (4x84,
Per pair....... $4.(0
Per pair   $i.«g
!••'Pair $&U
Per pair   $2.(5
Per pair..: ;...»M6
Per Pair $4J(
Per Pair $6.45
T
David Spencer Limited
Heintzman&Co.
PIANOS and J
Player-Pianos
A Canadian Instrument built by
Canadian labor
SOLD ON REASONABLE TERMS
BY
WALTER F. EVANS & CO.
526 Hastings Street West
Stanfield's Underwear
Blue Label, Suit $3.00     Red Label, Suit $2.50
Red Label Combination, Suit $3.00
Headlight Ov etallt of all kit ji
DR. REED'S CUSHION
SOLE SHOES, $6.00
W. fi. Brummitt
18-20 Cordo« St., West
1.3S-CU5H10N
CCllPRESSFaSUHttl?
HttUDULSOrrEITMl
TOtl
_ cuimonawpoRnxRar-'
4-CUiHKU ruu HOW* KMU
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co.
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND
DRYGOODS
206 Cambie Street VANCOUVER, B. C.
Dressing Robes and House Coats
W. are showing a beautiful line of House Coals In Wool, Silk and Velvet;
also Dresslni Robes In Wool.   All slse. from 14 to 41.
PRICES Or HOUSE COATS RANGE FROM WM to U3.M
DRESSING ROBES FROM (7 to MS
Thess make handsome Christmas gifts for Husband, Sob or Friends.
Call and Inspect our stock.   By paylns a deposit w. will lay on. asld. for
you for a reasonable length of time.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
T.I. Sey«TO . SOS-SIS HASTINGS STREET W.
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN .
Mount Pleassnt headquarters for Carpenters' Tools and all
kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447. 2337 Main Stmt )
PAGE FOUR
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
■■■>
FRIDAY JANUARY 23, 1H4.
m
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Incorporated 1855
Capital and Reserve,
$8,700,000
65 Branches in Canada
A General Banking Business
Transacted
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
At All Branches.   Interest Allowed at Highest Current Rate,
East End Branch
150 HASTINGS ST. EAST
A W. Jarvis, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED ISM
Paid-up Capital - ■ ■ $ 11,500,00
Reserve     12,(00,000
Total Asset 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
buslneas will be welcome be It large or
small
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1855
BAM OF
TORONTO
Capital and Reserve 011,174,578
JOINT SAVINGS
'      ACCOUNTS
In the BANK OF TORONTO
are proving to be a great convenience to many of our
friends. With these accounts
either of two persons ot tha
household may deposit or withdraw money. Interest Is paid
on all balances twice a year.
In event of death of either
party the survivor may with-
draw the money.
Main Office—
«( HA8TINGS ST. WEST
(Near Richards)
Branches—
Cor.. Hastings and Carrall Sts.
New Westminster
Victoria
Merritt
Credit Foncier
FRANCO-CANADIAN
MONEY   TO   LOAN   ON   IMPROVED    CITY    PROPERTY.
NO BROKERAGE.
Apply at Company's Office
887 HASTINGS 8T. WEST,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ttt RICHARDS STREET
Phones Sey. 5SM-5685
Loans Without
INTEREST
BY THB CONTRACT PLAN
i.6.00 psr month   ■   (1,000 Leon
13.00 per month     -   $2,000  Loan
1S.00 psr month   •   S3,ooo Loan
For   the   purpose   of   Building
Homes,  Paying oil Mortgages or
Improving Real Estate.
Repayments $12.60 per month on
eaoh $1,000, without Interest
MAIL THIS AD FOR FULL
INFORMATION
none Seymour S76S
DIXON & MURRAY
oamraama, lie.
Mm and Store Fitting.   General
Jobbing ,
OflBos aad Bhopt
loss svjramm stbbis
D.rANIihlC.lU
Phoo.B.j.943
Parlor* A Chapel
2398 Granville St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published event FrUay morning ty tht
a. O. rederstloalst, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece ■
•   Manager
DIRECTORS: Jas. Campbell preaident;
Christian Siverts, vice-president; J.
Kavanagh; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer, and B. P. Pettlplece.
Offlce: Boom 817, Labor Vemple.
Tel. EiohMge ley. MS.
Advertising Manager
H. C. Shrader
Subscription: $1.60 per year: In Vancouver
City, $2.00: to unions subscribing
ln a body, $1.00.
'Unity of Labor; the hope of tbe world."
FRIDAY JANUARY 23, 1914.
B. C. F. OF L. CONVENTION
The fourth annual convention of
the B. C. Federation of Labor will
open at New Westminster on Monday
morning next. It promises to be one
of the most largely attended conferences of organized labor ever held ln
this province. Already, lt is stated,
there are more than 100 credentials
in the bands of tbe secretary-treasurer, As might be expected the miners'
strike on Vancouver island will come
in for a great deal of attention. The
executive committee of the federation
will convene at the Royal City today,
for the preparation of their annual report for submission to tbe convention
on Monday morning covering tbe activities of the federation for the year.
The convention of representatives of
organised labor at this time is most
opportune. With the provincial legislature in session; with a most serious
unemployed problem confronting us;
with youthful victims of Attorney-general Bowser and Judge Howay dying
in prison; with other union men
locked up without trial; with the severe penalties handed out to men for
no other reason than that tbey are
union men, and with tbe responsibilities placed upon the membership of
organized labor, lt is fitting tbat the
members of organized labor should
hold counsel among themselves and
endeavor, If possible, to forward tbe
solution of sucb problems now pressing upon them. The Federatlonist
trusts that the deliberations of the
convention may prove an Inspiration
to the delegates and redound to the
oredlt and benefit of the membership
which bas made the convention possible. The B. O. Federation of Labor
is destined to play an Important part
ln tbe development of the organized
labor movement ln this province and
upon Its officers must rest tbe task
of Industrially uniting the wage-
workers ot British Columbia, That
tbe result of the convention will
assist the workers ln this herculean
effort Is the fervent wish of The Federationist.
is there such a thing, 'as practical
idealism and logical sentimentality?
Haven't politics, business and diplomacy been singularly lacking ln idealism and, if you will, sentimentality?
The fetich of practical people is Immediate expediency, and that shuts
out Idealism, shuts out sentimentality,
shuts out everything except the direct
personal profit of some small group
of persons, ln some small space of
time. Do we not have to choose between the surrender of some degree
of this tangible, testable practicality,
and the surrender of a certain quality of Idealism, which Is in fact what
leads the world along? And if tbe
personality of women puts the stress
upon idealism, is It any more than
prudent to admit this personality as
an element of our political and economic life? Isn't Impractical idealism,
finally, extremely practical?
Let's Have Better Human Beings
The population of the civilized
world has Increased very rapidly since
the introduction of machinery made lt
possible to make a better utilization
of the fruits of tbe earth. Probably it
has It least doubled. Now, according
to statistics produced at the Nation
al Conference on Race Betterment at
Battle (Jreek, Michigan, we are slowing up, and the death rate Is gaining
on the birth rate. Yet tbere need be
no cause for dismay, even If the
world's population actually should
stand still. There is little object in
crowding more people upon the face
of the globe. The goal of mankind's
ambition should be to create, not a
larger population, but a better, healthier and happier one. Probably, if
we can eliminate hurtful sooial and
industrial conditions, do away wltb
war, and drive out certain diseases,
we shall have a more numerous race,
as well as a better one. but that Is not
what we should principally be concerned about—'Frisco Bulletin.
DI8TRICT 18 ll. M. W. OF A.
TO MEET AT LETHBRIDGE
MIDDLE OF NEXT MONTH
Official notices have been sent
out by President J. E. Smith and
Secretary-treasurer A. J. Carter,
of Dlstriot 18, U. M, W. of A.,
Fernle, calling for ths eleventh
annual convention of District 18,
which Is to be held at Lethbrldge
oh Monday, February 16th.
Death of Mrs. A. Shilland
'A. telegram reacbed headquarters last
week announcing the death of Mrs. A.
Shilland, the wife of the seoretary of
Sandon Miners' union, and likewise
secretary-treasurer of district union
No. 6, W. F. M. ot British Columbia.
Mrs. A. Shilland died in the hospital
at Nelson, fi. C, as the result of an
operation on January 2nd, and was*
buried at Nelson on January 6th under the auspices of the W. F. M. and
K. P. The telegram states that the
hearts of the whole community go
out ln sympathy to the bereaved relatives. The husband, A. Shilland, has
been identified with the Western Federation of Miners since Its birth and
has been tireless tn his efforts in behalf of tbe labor movement. The blow
that has fallen on the secretary of
Sandon miners' union will be felt by
all who know him, who will deeply
deplore the gloom that now shadows
the home of a man whose splendid
work has done so much towards
building up tbe labor movement of
British Columbia. — Miners'- Magazine.
BUSINESS AGENT  DIRECTOR^
Ask for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7491 (unleae otherwise stated).
Amalgamated Society Carpenten—Room
2M; Wm. Currle.
Bartenders—Room 208; 3eo. W. CtirnMk.
B.  C.  Federatlonist—Room $17; B. P.
Pettlplece.
B. C. Federation  of Labor—Room  101;
Victor R. Mldgley.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L, Yule, Room 208.
Brotherhood   of Carpenters—Room  804
and 80S; W. Leonard.
" i 2ll.;
Bricklayers—Room 2lfc; Wm. S. Dagnall.
Bakers—Room 220.
Barbers—Room 208; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1778.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Room 220: John Sully.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 208;
W. E. Walker; TeL Seymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207: W. P. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 107;
F. L. Estinghaueen.
Engineers (Steam)—Room 218; Ed.
Prendergaat
Labor Temple Co.—Room 211; J. H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Offloe,
146 Alexander street; Oeorge Thomas;
Tel. Seymour 6868.
Moving Picture Operators—G. R. Hamilton, Room 100, Loo Bldg,   Tel, Sey.
Musicians—H.   J. Brasfleld, 640   Robson
Btreet; Seymour 7816.
Plasterers—Joe    Hampton;    Tel.    Seymour 1614.
Plumbers—Room 218; Melvln    Engolf;
Tel. Seymour 8611.
Street    Railway    Employees—Fred.    A.
Hoover.
Trades and Labor Council—Boom 210;
J. w. Wilkinson.
Typographical—Rooms  212,    218,    214;
R, H. Neelands.
Western   Federation  of Miners—Room
217.
B.C. UNION DIRECTORY
CARDS INSERTED
$1.00 A MONTH
a C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets In annual convention ln January. Executive oaaacers, 1118-14: President, Christian Siverts; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, Q.
A. Burnes, J. W. Oray, Jaa. Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; sec-trea "" ~
Box 1044, Vancouver.
TRAPES AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrat and third Thursdays.
Exeoutlvs board: HI C. Benson, president; Jas. H. McVety, vlce-prealdent; J.-
VV. Wilkinson, general secretary. Room
210 Labor Temple; Jaa. Campbell, treasurer; Miss Brisbane, statistician; V. R.
Midgley,. sergeant-at-arms; R. P. Pettlplece, J. H, Burroughs and H. MoEwen,
trustees.	
LABOR TBMPLB COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W- Wilkinson, R. Pa
Pettlplece. John MoMltlan, Murdock McKensle, F, Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manag-
Ing director, J, H. McVety, Room 211.
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUN-
CIL—Meets 2nd Monday in month.
Preaident Oeo. Mowat; secretary, F. R.
Fleming, P.O. Box 88.
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners—Room 204.
Sev. 2008. Business agent J. A. Key:
ofllce hours, 8 to $ a.m. and 4 to 5 p.m.
Seoretary of management committee.
.Tas. Bltcon.,878 Hornby street Branches
meet every Tueeday and Wednesday In
Room 802.
"Defeat Is only for those who accept
Desire To Be Men; Not Slaves
"We have done everything for the
men," protest the puzzled employers.
"We have built them libraries, gymnasiums, schools and even churches.
We have put up comfortable homes
for them at reasonable prices. We
have kept the town clean and attractive, so that it would be a healthful
place for their children to grow up ln.
And now they turn on us with as much
bitterness as if we were their natural enemies. They don't seem to know
what the word 'gratitude' means. Why
is it?"
Obviously the reason is that the
workingmen in such a town have received everything they need except
liberty, and tbey need liberty more
than anything else. They do not want
things done for them. No healthy
man does. They want to do' them
themselves. If they earn money
enough to enable tbeir employers to
build them a model town, they want
tbat money to go Into tbeir pay envelopes, so that they can build their
own model towns. It is better that
they should take the money and tbrow
lt away, if they do so of their own
volition, than that they should remain
spineless beneficiaries of some one
above tbem. And this, Incidentally,
is true of all charities, public or private. In some parts of this country,
we hardly need to be reminded, the
industrial feudalisms are anything but
benevolent, and the bread' of their
meager charity Is bitter bread Indeed
But the evil they are able to do is inherent ln the power tbey hold rather
than ln the use, good or bad, wblch
given individuals are disposed to make
of it—"Frisco Bulletin.
it."
"There Is only one thing In the
world worse than being talked about,
and that Is not being talked about."
"A bishop keeps on saying at the
age of eighty what he was told to say
when a boy of eighteen."
The relation of stomach to morals
is an established scientific fact. Many
criminals are such because they bave
been underfed or ill-fed. Bad food
makes bad blood morally as well as
physically. Penologists will watch
with interest the experiment of a
scientific diet for prisoners In the
Oakland, Cal., Jail, which is expected
to show that proper feeding of delinquents will make better men and
women of them.—Daily Province editorial. But why should society wait
until men become prison inmates before making the experiment?
Some Idea of the class of thugs engaged bv Attorney-general Bowser for
the strike on Vancouver Island may
be gleaned from the number of barroom brawls which take place from
time to time at j points where
"specials" are stationed. A few weeks
ago Tbe Federatlonist recorded one
of these events. This week, P. Crow-
thier, a strike "special" is under arrest, charged with shooting and
wounding John Lewis on Friday last.
The victim of the shooting Is ln the
hospital and grave hopes are entertained for hts recovery. As might
he expected, the victim was shot ln
the back while fleeing from the
"special." Lewis and four other young
men got Into some sort of mlx-un In
Chinatown over the payment of a
meal with the result that tbe police
were telephoned for. The boys, naturally enough, fled from the premises and the "special" seeing them
run away ordered them to stop and
took pot shot at Lewis.
"The man who is looking for
trouble can always flnd It, and he who
is "touchy" will flnd numerous points
of contact between hla oversensitive
enltheltum and an unfeeling world.
Most of us are entirely too buBy to go
out of our way for the purpose of offering deliberate Insult. But there
are always persons who scent an affront to their honor and their motives
and Imagine that others have stopped
work to Mure them in the world's
esteem. Their vulnerable vanity wtll
not let them rest till they have resented the affront. Their microscopic
gaze enlarges the minnow of criticism to a huge catacean. Frequently
those who have Invited suggestions
are the very ones who are offended
when a candid hint Is offered. They
want to he told that they are doing
entirely right, and you cannot point
out a better way and he a friend. The
worst of supersensitlveness Is that
none can say when the man with his
skin inside ont will feel hurt. When
any work Is undertaken in which he
has a part his exotic sensibilities obtrude themselves and must he considered. He stands in his own light
and obstructs the labors of other
men."
Practicality of Impractical Idealism
A magazine writer expresses the
fear that woman suffrage "may mean
an effemlnatton of public life, an accentuation, tn maters of commerce,
finance and foreign policy, of Impractical Idealism and illogical sentimentality," says the 'Frisco Bulletin. But
Unemployed In Canada
Reports come from practically every
oentre of population in Canada of
large numbers ot unemployed who are
feeling the pinch of poverty. In the
cities of the west there haB been industrial distress for several montbs.
The number of unemployed has been
greatly in excess of the number to be
expected by reason of tbe end of the
demand for seasonal labor ln the
prairie provinces, and the consequent
unemployment of the men so engaged.
In British Columbia tbe same conditions have existed. In Regina, Sask.,
the situation is sucb that the police
flnd lt difficult to maintain order, lt
being feared for a time tbat martial
law might bave to. be declared. That
ominous institution, the soup kltohen,
haB made its appearance ln this young
and prosperous country. In Montreal
hundreds of men have stood in line at
midnight to receive coffee and bread.
In Toronto lt is estimated that there
are at present 15,000 men out of work,
with the number on the increase
Such conditions should never be allowed to exist ln a country like Canada, and would not, lt there was a
little more national sense. Thefe Is
no country where the opportunity and
the reward of labor are greater than
here. There is work for untold thousands of men, in developing the resources of Canada. Even ln winter
the labor .of these unemployed men
could be used to excellent advantage.
They have to be supported anyway;
then why not use their energy In profitable service and production? It can
only be construed that tbe grip of
special privilege and land monopoly
has become such that access to the
natural resources Is denied to the men
whose labor applied to lt would produce ample wealth for themselves and
their country. The fundamental task
Is to break this power, and to make
possible in every individual case the
profitable union of labor and of land.
Charity, employment bureaus, emergency grants, are all makeshifts, and
lead nowhere but to tbe old problem.
Freedom of access to the land and its
opportunities is the only sufflclent
remedy.—Ottawa Citizen.
No Answer
Harry Slbble, the well-known purveyor of literature wrote to the minister of justice at Ottawa asking for a
straight "yes" or "no" to the following
question: "Will you release the miners who are now in Jail In connection
with tbe Vancouver Island strike?"
The reply stated that an answer could
not be given as the minister of jus-,
tlce had no authority to release prisoners under sentence, the power to
grant clemency being exercised solely by the governor general, and that,
in any event, the question was under
consideration. Harry now is going a
step further—to the governor general.
Pres. Watters Before Commission
J. C. Watters, preaident of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada, has been asked by the Federal
Prison Reform commission to testify
before them at Kingston, Ont., along
with Secretary-treasurer P. M. Draper, but as Mr, Draper was unable to
attend, the congress will be represented by President Watters. The
competition of prison-made goods
with those produced in workshops
throughout Canada has long been a
delicate question and organized labor
can rest assured that their case will
be carefully presented by President
Watters,
WILL AFFILIATE
District, No. 6, Will Send Delegates
to T. and L. Congress of Canada
Some two years ago, it will be remembered by western unionists
through the offices of Organizer J. W.
Wilkinson, District No. 6, of the Western Federation of Miners, voted to
affiliate with the Trades-and Labor
congress of Canada. However, not
until the convention, which is ln session at Nelson this week, was the
question of providing ways and means
of sending delegates taken up, and
the following resolution was submitted for its consideration:
"Whereas, District Association, No.
6, W. F. M., by referendum vote of its
membership, bas, during the past two
years, been affiliated with the Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada, paying ner canlta tax on the full membership, and
"Whereas, no provision has been
made for delegates to represent District No. 6 at the annual convention
of the congress, thereby excluding the
metalliferous miners from presenting
any demands to the dominion government for the betterment of the condition of these underground workerB,
through legislative committee of the
congress, therefore he it
"Resolved—That District No. 6 elect
a delegate or delegates to the next
convention of the labor congress, said
delegate or delegates to be elected,at
the same time and in the same manner as the officers of the district, and
be lt further
"Resolved—Tbat lt no funds are
available to defray the expenses of
such delegate or delegates, the executive board be empowered to levy
an assessment of not to exceed ten
cents per member for that purpose."
Adopted by Klmberley miners union,
No. 10Q, W. F. M„ at their regular
meeting on December 31, 1°1S.
M. P. VILLBNEUVB,
Secretary.
TRAbE UNION  DIRECTORY
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Jolnera, Local No. $17—Meeta
Monday of each week, $ p.m. Executive
committee meeta every Friday, 1 p.m.
President, Ed. Meek; recording secre-
tnry, Thos. Lindsay, 806 Labor Temple; flnanolal secretary, W. Leonard, $or
Labor Temple.
^atrFPg- <Np CONFECTIONERS LOCAL No. 46—Meeta sec
ond and fourth Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President,
A. M, McCurrach; corresponding secretary, W.
Rogers; business agent, J.
Black, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
BAKERS' LOCAL NO. 46
Ask Unionists to Purchase Union-
Made Bread—Officers Elected
The union bakers of this city are
beginning to think that the unionists
have forgotten that "union" bread
can still be obtained In Vancouver. All
they have to do Is to ask for bread
bearing the unton label. If a grocer
or baker Bays he has not got it, don't
be content with that and take some
other, but "insist" on getting the
"label bread," and it will surprise you
how soon lt will be forthcoming. Do
you know, mister union man, that 40
per cent, of your brothers in the baking Industry are unemployed? Those
employed are being assessed to help
financially the ones out of work. Don't
you see that you are making the
working bakers hear your burdens by
your own negligence in not demanding that the bread you eat sball bear
tbe union label. It is your moral
duty to do so. You are enabled to
procure the necessaries of life by
others patronizing your particular
product. Just think for a minute
what would happen to you if that
support were withdrawn. You might
flnd yourself very soon where the 40
per cent, of your brother bakers are
now, deprived of the means of providing yourself with the everyday
necessaries of existence? You owe lt
to yourself to rally to the support of
the bakers. If all the unionists in
Vanoouver ate union-made bread, the
40 per cent, of unemployed would
disappear and It would be reported ln
these columns that the "bakers are all
busy making union bread for union
men." It costs no more than any
other, only a little determination to
do the square thing. Union-made
bread is better than the non-union
product. It is made under the most
hygienic conditions. The men work
reasonable hours and receive very
nearly reasonable remuneration for
their labor. There is only one union
label and It Is not to be found on
Shelly's XXXX nor on the product of
the Woman's Bakery. There are
other instances where it is not to be
found, but if you want to know what
the label is like call at room No. 230,
Labor Temple, and you will be shown.
If you cannot call write and one will
be mailed you. At the last meeting
of the Bakers' Local No. 46 two new
members were admitted. President
Leeworthy was re-elected by acclamation; business agent, J. Black; corresponding secretary, R. J. Adams. What
a fine thing it would be for the bakers
if all the union men of Vancouver
would resolve "that henceforth they
would eat none other than bread
bearing the union label."—Cor.
It Is as fortunate as it is true that
a newspaper, like an individual, Is
often judged by the foes it makes.
The California assembly has passed
a bill creating an immigration commission for the purpose of studying
and regulating the expected influx
following the completion of the Panama canal.
In respect to the dispute tn the
Norwegian printing Industry, the gov
ernment announced that it would not
stand by and do nothing during
Btrike for the reduction of working
hours in the printing trades, but would
rather make the eight-hour day compulsory for the whole trade through
the law.
Allied  Printing Trades Counoll—F. R.
Fleming, P. 0. Box 66.
Amalgamated      Carpenters—Jaa.  Bltcon
Room 209, Labor Temple.
Bakers—W.   Rogers,   Room  220,  Labor
Temple.
Barbers—0. F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Geo.   W.   Curnoch,    Room
208, Labor Temile.
B.  C.  Federation  uf Labor—Room 206;
V. R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
£aacksmlths — Malcolm    Toiler,     View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat 616 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1161 Howe St
Bricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood   of   Carpenters—A.   Paine,
Rooms 804-306, Labor Temple.
Hod Carriers. Builders and Common Laborers—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, .care Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooks,   Walters,   Waitresses — W,   E.
Walker, Room 203. Labor Temple.
Elevator Constructors—
Electrical   Workers    (outside)—W.   F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical   Workers   (Inside)—Room 107;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E.  Prendergaat,  Room   218,
Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment  Workers—Miss  McRae,   I*bor
Temple.
GliwBworkers—Charles   Roberts,   Labor
Temple.
Oroundmen's Union (I, B. E. W.)—
Horseshoers — A.   C.   MacArthur,   City
Heights. B.C.
Lettercarrlers—Robt. Wight, Dlatrlct 22.
Lathers—Victor B. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco.   Firemen   and   Engineers—James
Patrick, 1183 Homer street.
Loco.  Engineers—A. E.  Solloway, 1088
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo.   Thomas, 148  Alexander Street.
Machinists—J. H. McVety,    Room   211.
Labor Temple.
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217. Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld. Room 5, 640
Robson Street.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
Molders—D. Brown, 042 Broadway Weet
Moving Picture Operators—A. O.' Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Engravers—A. Kraft, Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Block.
Pslnters—w. .T. Nagle, Room 808, Latar
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John James Cornish; 1808
Eleventh Ave. East
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 648 Broadway west.
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. McCorvlIle.
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Stage Employees—C. Martin, care Or-
nheiim thentre.
Structural Iron Workers—W. L,'Yule,
Room 208, Labor Temple,
stonecutters-James Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
5, Fifteenth Ave. West.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting. 2636 Trinity Street
Sterpotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln. Box 482.
Trades and Lahor Council—J. W. Wilkinson. Room 210. Labor Temple.
Tvnne-ranhlpnl—Tf. Neelands. Box 66.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 603.
Theatrical Stage Employees—^Gordon
Martin, 667 Prior street.
Tllelayers and Helpers—
ITph'olsterers—A. Duthle, 1068 Homer St.
WANTED—A few reliable trade unionists, not otherwise engaged, to solicit
subscriptions for The "Fed." Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple.
PATRONIZE    B     O.     FBDERATIONIST
4DVERTISER9—AND TELL THEM WHY
BARBERS' LOCAL. NO. 180—MEETS
second and fourth Thursdays. 6:80
p.m. President, Sam. T. Hamilton: recorder. Geo. W. Isaacs: secretary-business ag«nt C. F. Burkhart Room 208.
Labor Temple.   Hours:   11 to 1; I to 7
BARTENDERS' LOOAL NO. 17$.—OF-
floe Room 208 Labor Temple. Meets
first Sunday of each month. Preaident
wm. Laurie: flnanclal secretsrv. Oeo. W.
Curnock. Room 206. Labor Temple.
<fflITNTO AND STRIimnRAL IRON
WORKERS' International TTnlon,
'.oeal 97—MPPts second and fourth Friday. Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President
' A. SppIov: secretary. A, W. Oakley.
788 gpnilln Drive, phone flsv. Sll.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', Nn. 1
„„ —Meets every Tuesday, 8 p.m.. Room
807. President. .Tamps Haslett: corresponding secretary. W. 8. Dagnall. Ron
63: flnanolal secretary. V. R. Brown:
business agent. W. H. Dam-ell. Room
»1B.
nniwrnvnicRS' r.nrAi, union no.
. 105—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, ln Room 205, Labor Temple.
President, F. J. Milne; vice-president, II.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat, 616
Dunlevy avenue.
BROTHERHOOD OF ROILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. Ill-
Meets flrst and third Mondays, 8 p. m.
President, F. Barclay, 868 Cordova East
seoretary, A.,Fraser, 1161 Howe street.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No, 141, A. F. of Ma-
Meets second Sunday of each month, 14$
Robson street Praaldant, J. Bowy.r;
vice-president F. English; aeerstary, O.
P. Howstt; treasurer, W. Fowlar.
OPERATIVE, PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 81—
Meets flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 6 p.m. President, G. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal secretary, D. Scott; treasurer, I. Tyson; business agent, Jo* Hampton. Phone
Sey. 1614.	
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver aad
vicinity. Branoh meeta 1st and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st, room 205. Robert C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph tt.
Lyon, Fin. See,, i 1721 Orant st; Tom
Smith, Rec, Sec,, 141 Broadway west
STONECUTTERS',    i VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, 6:01
fi.m. President J, Marshall; correspond-
ng secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
flnanclal secretary, K. MoKonale.
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meet every
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President Skene
Thomson; flnanclal seoretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour street; recording seoretary, George Powell, 1660 Fourth ava.
west.
STKKJTI'PfcltH' AND ELECTROTVP-
ers' Union, No. 81, of Vancouver
and Victoria-Meets second Wednesday
of eaeh month, 4 p.m., Labor Tempts,
President Chas. Bayley; recording seoretary, Chris Homewood, 34$ llth Ave.
Bast
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAT
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meeta Labor Temple, ■ aecond and
fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and first
and third Wednesdays Ere, President
Adam Taylor; wore:-.,; secretary,
Albert V. Lofting, 88.15 Trinity Strsst
Phone Highland 1672; nnanolal secretary,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2408 Clark Drive.
i_t wn,  m   nvm»i)  atvm  y,i»in  Ajrivw.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTBRNATION-
al Local 817—Meets' every Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204,-Labor Temple.
Financial secretary, E. Prendergaat
Room 216.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
u ,Jt^inat!Snal)v Local No. 178—Meetings
held flrst Tuesday In eaoh month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording secretary; C. McDonald, Box 60S; flnanolal
seceretary, L. Wakely, P. O. Box 608.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 228—
Meets last Sunday each month, I
p.m. President. A. E. Robb; vice-president, A. H. England; aecretary-treaaurer,
R. H. Neelande, P.O. Box 68.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
, Labor Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 J>.m„ In
Labor Hall. President D. S. dimeroaj
flnanolal secretary, H. Olbb; general
aeeretary. B. p. Grant P. O. Box 184.
The public Is Invited to attend,
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
PENTERS AND JOINERS meets every
second and fourth Thursday of aeon
month in Lahor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St, at 8 p.m. President J. L. Hogg, Hankey Blk.. Sapperton,- Secretary, A. McDonald, 881 Royal
Ave,. New ..Westminster.
PLUMBERS' and 8TEAMFITTERS' LC-
. 5?1 «jff—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:80 p.m. President D. Webster; secretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 181, New
Westminster, a O.
CIGARMA105R8' LOCAL No. 857—Meets
flrst Tuesday eaeh month,. 8 .p,m.
Preaident. Walter Hosklns; vice-president, F. J. Brandt: secretary, Robert J.
Craig, Kurts Cigar Factory; treasurer, S.
W. Johnson.
COOK'S. WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets flrst Friday In each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, bustnes representative. Office:
Room 203, Labor Temnle. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10.80: 1 p.m. to 2.80 and 5 p.m. to 6.00
p.m. Competent heln furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414. .
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784--MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Westminster, cor-
ner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of each month, at
J'■*> o.m. Preeldent, E. S. Hunt; secre-
1   Ii a'       ™nM0B'   Visiting brothers
COMMERCIAL TELEGRAPHERS
British Columbia Division, C. P, System. Division No. 1—Meets 11:80 a.m.
third Bundav in month. Room 204. Local
chairman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 482.
Vancouver; Local secretary and treasurer, H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 482, Vancouver.
 VICTORIA, tt. O.
VICTORIA     TRADES     AND LABOR
Council-Meets first and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 731 Johnston street,
at 8 p. m. President, A. Watchman; sec-
retary,  w. A, Parkinson, Box 302,  Vlc-
BLECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
213—Meets Room 301 every Monday
8 p. m. Preaident, Dave Fink: vice-president, M. Sander; recording secretary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temnle; flnanclal secretary and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 207, Labor Temple. .
ELECTRICAL WORKERS,  LOCAL NO.
621 (Inside Men)—Meeta flrst and
third Mondays of each month. Room 206,
8 p.m. Preaident. H. P. McCoy; recording secretary, Geo. Albers: business
agent. F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207.
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
Monday ot each week, 8 p. m. Executive
committee meets every Friday, 8 p.m.
President, Ed. Meek, recording aeoretary,
J. Schurman, 305 Labor Temple; financial secretary, J, Q. Porter, 805 Labor
Temple.
LONGRHOREMRNS'   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    38x62—Meets
every   Friday   evening,   146   Alexander
street.    President,   P.   Peel;   secretary,
Oeo. Thomas.  _^_
MACHINISTS. NO. 182—MEETS SEC*-
ond and fourth Thursdays, 7,15 p. m.
president, A. R. Towler: recording secretary, J, Brookes: financial secretary, J, H.
McVety.
KIMBERLEI MINERS' UNION, No. 100,
Western Federation of Miners-Meets
Sunday even ngs In Union Hall. Presl-
«B 5X'„ F,er"l"ti. secretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
MOVTNO PICTURE OPERATORS. Loesl 238. I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every see-
ind Sunday of eaeh month'. Labor Temple. 8 p.m. President J. H. Fletcher-
secretary-treasurer. A. O. Hansen: business agent. O. R. Hamilton. Ofllce-
Room 100. Loo Bldg.   Tel. Rev. 8048.
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Printers of B. C. Federationist
Labor Temple, cor. Dunsmuir
and Homer. Phone Sey. 4490
GET   ACQUAINTED  WITH   HIM
WHOf
THE WESTERN COMRADE
The Socialist Monthly Magazine,
breathing; the spirit of our Oreat
West. Emanuel Julius and Cheater M. Wright, Editor* 11.00 a
Sear; single copies, 10 oents. 203
Tew High St., Los Angeles, Cal.
A BOOK TO MAIL ABROAD
The Legends of Vancouver
E. Pauline Johnson
This is a gilt that will be appreciated in any part of th* world.
Tastefully bound in three bindings.   Cloth, $1.10; Ooze Calf, 12.50;
Burnt Leather, $11.71.
THB ONLY EDITION WITH EIGHT LOCAL ILLUSTRATIONS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
32B HASTINGS STREET, WEST
SYSTEMS
We carry everything
for the office
The most successful business men are the
largest users of office equipment
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS.        FILING SYSTEMS,
PRINTING.. BINDING, ETC.
WESTERN
331 Dunsmuir Street
SPECIALTY, LTD.
Phone Exchange Sejr. 3S26-3S27
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, moit scientific and painless method*
Specialist in Crown, Bridge, Plate and Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 9 A. M. TO 6 P. M.
TRAIL   Mllai,   AND   SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105. W. P. of- m!—Meeta
TZ -bI™,*1/ " 7'.SD p'm'    PresSent;
______&__■• Fra"k <W
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. 81,
Western Federat on of Miners—Meets
<"•<•>'•' Saturday ln the Miners' Union
SalLaAd,JrS?8 *" communications to the
Becretary, Drawer "K„" Sandon, B.C,
UNITED    BROTHERHOOD    OF  tjAft-
penters,   Local   Union   No.   1188-
Meete every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Tem-
_____&&L,b" "**• N-w
____» moms.
^■iySEH,M.INERS  UNION, LOOAL
No. 2388, U. M. W. of A.-MeetsWed"
nesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m.     President,
«___]__"_#?' Dunca° M°K<""
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. ot
. .A'"**M!!f,il ^"ry Monday at 7.30 p. m.
in "is Athletlo Club, Chapil atreet. Ar-
thur Jordan, Box no, Nanalmo, B. c.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No!
2299, U. M. W. of A—Meets every
Sunday 7 p.m. in U. M. w. of A. hall.
President, Jos. Naylor; secretary, James
Smith, Box st, Cumberland. B. n.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OP SOCIAL.'
.„ J>fMOCRAHC PARTY-Publl? meet:
Ings In Dominion Theatre, Oranvllle St..
Sunday evenings. Secretary. J. Adami
Room 304. Ubor Temple. "'
nsoraii °*__$t*~~o> mattv-
in'-v'ili!"!!'.'"! Wl <" ,h« Dominion,
In Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberta,
iteJikS"7frrltor>'' P* Northwest TeJ.
ff^naSiff-n1" * Ef"™ of »l Province
iJSXff it l.™tM>ne years at an annual
rental of 11 an acre. Not more thaa
U<0 acres will be leased to one appll-
Appllcatlon for leaae must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
&&&!!&& ih8 '"■"'!8t m which thi
rights applied for are eltuatsd.
**.!SJffinfV 1".rltor'' th» 'an* must be
described by eecttons, or legal subdivisions of sections, and ln unsurveyed ter-
■jtory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant hlmaelf.
Each application must be accompanied
5X ,Jeoaof ".which ""I be refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
""IS? «t the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine ahall
furnish the Agent with eworn returns
accounting for the full Quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such rsturne
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at tbe
rate of (10 an acre.
For full Information application
should be made to the Seoretary ot the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands,
W. H  CORT
Deputy Minister of th'e interior.
...a*   B—Unauthorized   publication   of
this advertisement will not be nald for.
Union
MADE
5e«\
Of America  rQxt* j
I .COW8I8HT ____ ___ MCiirsaeirrii.. [
WANTED-A few reliable trade unionists, not otherwise engaged, to soliolt
subscriptions for The 'Ted.'1 Liberal
commission. Apply Room 217 Labor
Temple. » v
^^ FRIDAY JANUARY 38, 1914.
THE! BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATION!
PAOE1TW
Merode Underwear
FOR PARTICULAR PATRONS   ,
This is one make of underwear in which you can secure good
quality and a perfect lit The makers studied these two
requisites and have produced garments that clearly show
much thought along these lines. Women here and elsewhere
appreciate Merode .Quality and incidentally associate themselves with underwear that fits the figure. '
If you want real underwear comfort this winter we would
recommend that you hy Merode.   We know its merits.
Merino separate garments at
$1.00 ud $1.25 a garment
Silk and wool Union Suits at
$3.00 and $3.50 for girls of
10 to 14 years, and all sizes
for women.
Merino Union Suits at $2.00
and $2.50.
Silk and wool garments in
light or medium weights at
$1.50 and $1.75.
LIMITED
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
It will pay yon to tee onr showing for winter wear.  Prices that
cannot be beaten or repeated in tbe city.
Family Shoe
Store
823 GRANVILLE ST.
NEAR ROBSON
FRANK NEWTON
Store No. 2 - Cedar Cottage
BRING THIS ADVT. AND WE WILL
LEARN to be an expert milliner and trimmer.
Learn to trim your own hats; make and curl
plumes, etc. A six-week course in our wonderful
new system fits you for the highest position. Why
slave for a few dollars a week, when you can learn
a profession with short hours and easy work that
pays a high salary? We guarantee positions to our
graduates.
RATES REASONABLE
AMERICAN  MILLINERY  SCHOOL
For particulars see Madame Mills, 112 Hastings St W.
or Phone Seymour 7450L  Hours daily from I to 5 p.m.
GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR
$5
ON COURSE
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THBEB STORES IN VANCOUVER
St Hsstings at.     Phone Sey. est 401 Grenvill. St      Phone ley. ITT
Tit Oranvllle St.    Phene Sey. Mlt
VICTORIA STORB, Ut VIEW ST.
OREENHOU8B8
Jilt Avs. snd Main St. Victoria, B. C. Hammond, B. C.
Phone Fairmont 788, Lor.» Distance Phone 17
"Best' Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 GranTille St., Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Hardware and
Sporting Goodt
111 Hastings St., W.
THE  MUSICIANS   UNION  s
m p a, wish to announce that Mr.  Franklin and
¥>• ..yia. * j members of his orchestra arc not members
of the Musicians' Union. When engaging
music for your next dance or social, make
sure that your Orchestra is composed of
UNION MUSICIANS
v.Ncnuv..
For Full  Information Phone Musicians' Union
Sey. 7818,   Rooms 29-30, Williams Building
. 413 Oranvllle Street
A. M. McNeill
J.N.
The Coast Transfer Co.
LIMITED
Office: 1020 Pender St., West
We special-',.e in
Moving Furniture (Padded Vans), Pianos, Trunks, Baggage and Storage
Trucks and Wagons for all description of work
Estimates cheerfully given
Telephones: Seymour 620, 5520 and 1705
Night Calls, Fairmont 2514-R
W)mt\ 8UFFDAG&
Edited by MISS H. R. OUTTERIDGE, Room Ut, Ubor Temple.
FOR THOUGHT
In MoLeucfc Magazine tor January
the heroine ot a very pretty little
story says:'"I don't like weddings, I
think marriage is an awful responsibility. I don't see how anyone oan
undertake It I've been with Alice
Henderson, her baby died yesterday
morning. I never want to love anyone or anything if I have to feel like
that"
This girl could realise and sympathize with the mother's grief tor her
dead baby. She looked at lt from the
woman's point of view, whioh above
all holdB life sacred. A paragraph
from The World makes a good companion picture of the man's point of
view, and shows very clearly why
women want to vote.
Two Uttle children were taken ill
after drinking some milk. After
suffering great agony one poor little
child died. It was only three years
old, There Is nothing so awful as to
watch the suffering of a baby that
cannot tell where its pain Is, or what
lt wants; unless lt is to watoh the
agony of the mother who is powerless
to relieve lt.
The doctor who made the post
mortem examination, Bald the whole
intestinal canal was Inflamed, and
that some patches of congestion were
so acute that bleeding had resulted.
Too much boric acid or formaldehyde
in something that the boy had eaten
might have produced this effect stated the doctor. It is men who sell
poisoned milk for babies, or artificial
milk on which the Vancouver baby
was starved to death. It is men who
let them off with a small One. It is
man-made laws that hangs two men
for the murder of one pollcement, and
lets cold-blooded, wholesale poisoners
go free.
In olden times there were people
who poisoned their enemies, and
when discovered were horribly punished, not only put to death but often
tortured first
111 our enlightened 20th century
man's law allows purveyors of milk
and other foods to carry on a systematic massacre of the innocents that
makes Herod's performance look
fatherly by comparison—and they do
lt for a gain of a few cents for eaoh
victim.
That is the value men put on the
child that has cost the mother so
much anguish and so much care.
And clergymen in their sermons denounce childless women, and as yet
no Jenny Qeddes haB arisen to throw
a stool at their heads.
Some people are bo Ignorant about
conditions such as these that they
wonder at the militancy In England.
What I wonder at Ib the patience and
long Buffering of women. Lloyd-
Oeorge says he deplores their gentleness, and he reminds the militants
that Maohiavelli said "Spare not the
foe." IDA DOUGLAS FEARN.
T
CHILD LABOR AND WOMAN
SUFFRAGE.
The National Child Labor committee has announced that although it
will have onjy twelve campaigns on
hand thie winter (because the legislatures of most of the States are not
In session this year) lt will have
enough Work to keep it from feeling
dull. The Child Labor Bulletin says
"that eight hours a day for children
is the crucial question nowadays. In
Massachusetts the textile interests
are threatening to repeal this 'obnoxious clause' In .the new ohild labor
law." Last year, California passed a
Child Labor law and provided for an
Industrial Welfare commission to
make mandatory regulations concerning wages, hours and conditions of
labor for women and minors. Colorado, Oregon and Washington established similar commissions. All of
these States have equal suffrage, It
would be interesting to see what would
happen in any one of these States If
an attempt were made to repeal any
laws for the benefit of ohlldren. It
is however, practically certain that no
suoh attempt would be successful
since women, once they are granted
the franchise, are thoroughly alive to
their responsibilities and their powers.
VOTES FOR WOMEN* IN ITALY.
The congress for women's suffrage,
recently held in Rome, was attended
by several members of parliament and
representatives of the following political parties: radical, republican, constitutional democratic, refor msoclal-
lst, and official socialist. A resolution was adopted, ln spite ot opposition from the Milan women's socialist
group, "to appoint delegates ln the
various parties which represent constitutional democratic, reform soclal-
them, in order to form a parliamentary, group, without distinction of
party, ready to fight for the women's
movement lh parliament"
MEETINGS
There is a meeting ot the B. C.
Woman's Suffrage league every Wednesday evening ln the Labor Temple
at 8 p.m., room 206. Enquirers invited to attend these meetings.
A regular weekly meeting is .held
ln room 206 on Tuesday afternoon at
2.45 p.m. A very cordial invitation
is extendeo to women to attend these
meetings.
THE SUFFRAGE DANCE
The dance and card party arranged
by the B. C. Woman's Suffrage league
will take place ln the large hall of the
Labor Temple on January 28th, at 8.30
p.m. Tickets 50 cents. Tickets can
be obtained from headquarters, room
206, Labor Temple, or at the door on
the evening of the dance.
MOUNT PLEASANT
There Is a regular meeting of the
Mount Pleasant branch held ln the
Lee hall, Main street, near Broadway,
every Monday evening at 8 p.m.
Phone Seymour 98S
VENETIAN HAIR PARLOR
767 GRANVILLE STREET
Orpheum Theatre Building
Mrs. Genevieve Contl
Mrs. Prances Lohrman
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville
Means
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOW8 DAILY
2.45, 7.20, 9.15
Season's Prices—
Matinee 15c, Evenings 15c, 25o,
THE NEW
ORPHEUM
Vhe Vhealn Beautiful
Sullivan * Coiuldlne Vewkmllle
Granville Street
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c.
PAINE LABOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM*
THE FAMOUS G0URLAY
Pianos can be purchased from us
at ?26 down and ten dollars per
month. This Is the house tnat
protects the purchaser, In case of
loss of employment the payments
are postponed. Not one dissatisfied purchaser on our books, and
most of our business Is done by
recommendation.
AJELLO PIANO CO.
887 ORANVILLE ST.
PROGRESS
EFFECT OF THE WOMEN'S VOTE
IN AUSTRALIA
1. For Home and Children.—In
every state the enfranchisement of
Women has led to improved legislation affecting the welfare of home and
children. Laws dealing with drink,
vice, crime and gambling have been
tightened up, and the greatest vigil
anoe Is shown ln the protection of
Infant life by providing trained Inspectors for boardedout children,
pure milk and food supplies, education
for mothers, and the establishment
of free kindergartens for the training
of character; children's play grounds
for healthy recreation; and the substitution of children's courts, and the
probation system for the old, thoughtless, oruel methods of dealing with
juvenile delinquents,
**2. Marriage and Divorce.—The
marriage and divorce laws of Austral-
la are ln principle the same as the
English law. It was considered wise
to leave the question of equal marriage and divorce laws until all the
states gave the franchise to women.
When that end was achieved ln 1908;
Instead of endeavoring to secure six
acts of parliament ln the six different
states, an agitation was begun tor a
commonwealth equal marriage and
divorce law, applicable to the whole
of Australia, and the commonwealth
government has promised to deal with
the question.
3. Women's Economic Position.—
The improvement of the economic
position of women since they got the
vote has been most marked ln the
commonwealth, and ln New South
Wales and Victoria, the states where
Women are best organized politically.
In 1903, the first year after women
won the commonwealth franchise,
equal pay for equal work was established in the federal public services
act. The principle has also been recognized in certain departments of
the state public in New South Wales,
and ln Victoria and ln several trades
under wages board. /
4. Women's Property.— Woman
who have property of their own have
practically full control over It, subject
to some minor restraints, which were
devised mistakenly for their protection before women were enfranchised.
Women voters have not yet made any
organized effort to alter these laws,
as they feel that the unpropertied
women must be safeguarded first.
Naturalization. — The Australian
naturalization act, passed in 1903,
after women were enfranchised, does
not differentiate between men and
women; the imperial naturalization
act and the new draft naturalization
bill do. A married woman, under the
Imperial act, takes the nationality ot
ber husband. If a British woman
marries a foreigner ahe becomes a
foreigner ln her own country. If a
foreign woman marries a Britisher,
she becomes a British subject. A British woman who has married an alien
does not, on hts death, cease to be an
alien, and the status of a divorced
woman Is the same as that of a widow. A married woman has no nationality of her own; she merely reflects
the nationality of her husband. It Is
proposed to have a general system of
uniformity ln regard to naturalization,
but lt Is also proposed tbat the new
act shall not affect "any naturalization
law ln any British possession operating only within the limits of that
possession." The loss of the political
status of Australian and New Zealand
women who come to reside In British
Columbia demands immediate consideration. We are on equal political
terms with the men of our respective
countries. An .Australian or New
Zealand man comes to reside in B.C.;
he may become a voter there; he retains his political status. An Austral-
Ian or New Zealand woman may not,
under any circumstances, become a
Canadian citizen; she loses her political status, Indeed, she becomes the
political Inferior of a criminal, a lunatic, and a male Infant. The criminal
may regain his liberty and vote; the
lunatic may vote if he can prove thnt
he is sufficiently compos mentis to
discriminate between candidates; the
male infant may grow into a voter;
but an Australian woman can never
have political liberty; she can never
prove herself sufficiently compos
mentis to discriminate between candidates; she can never grow in civic
stature. This stigma cast by English
and Canadian law on Australasian
women must be removed, and the best
way to remove lt Is to enfranchise
English nnd Canadian women. Then
Australian women possessing the
same qualifications as qualify an Australian man, will vote. S. G.
There tre two lives necessary for
every human being to live. The Individual life that ot the home with lte
immediate surroundings, and tlie Communal lite, that of the. community
wltb lta many and varied Centres of
attraction, and the one life is Juat as
Important from the standpoint of
human development aa the other. No
human being has a right to live Us
individual lite to the exclusion of the
communal lite, because every human
being is a debtor to the community,
owing to that community a duty no
other human being can discharge for
bim, for this consciousness ot a universal duty draws forth from each
human being something different from
all other human beings, and lt is that
something, that contribution of character which is necessary for the building up and progress of the community.
Where one individual fails, the structure is Incomplete, Thla debt la paid
In part through taxation, but |t la the
bounden duty of each Individual to see
that his money Is used ln a wise and
proper way for the betterment of the
community. The proper fulfillment ot
the distinctive duties of these two
lives Is just as Important for a woman
as for a man. She must express herself equally in the one as in the other,
but she Is unable to do thla for ahe Is
debarred from living the communal ln
its fullest capacity, and she is also restricted In her individual life. The
power which is granted to man is
withheld from her. The parliamentary vote admits to citizenship, and
this admission would not only place
ln woman's hands a weapon with
which to protect herself, but by altering her whole, position she Is raised
in her own estimation and in the estimation of men. The vote establishes the fact that she Is equal in dignity
and ln human value with men.' Before
mien and women are men and women
they are human beings, and who gave
man authority to draw a dividing line
and say to the woman, "thus far shalt
thou go and no farther." The debt
that woman owes to the community
she must pay ln full, lt Is necessary
for her development to satisfy that
desire for self-expression whieh is her
right as a human being, but this she
cannot do while the power of the vote
is denied her, therefore she suffers
and the community suffers wtth her—
the structure is incomplete.. But
when she has gained that right by
reason of her humanity she will then
go forth not mailed ln scorn but in
the armor of a pure Intent. Great
duties will be before her and great
songs. Duties and songs are with
her now, have always been with her.
We hear their echoes from out the
past, if we will but bend our ears to
listen, though In the songs we catch
at times the notes of plaintive pleading, for woman Is not free. Her
greatest songs have yet to be sung,
when her unconquerable spirit shall
have broken down all barriers and
justice reigns supreme.
MRS. ERNEST LLOYD.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DANDRUFF.
tpwtaltlMi
Whole Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wedding ud Birthday Cakes.
We Vet Onion mow.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
, ALL KINDS OP
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks and Lunches
' All Ooods Fresh Dally.
8M OBAimuU ST.
TeL Say. TIM.
FOR EXPERT
REPAIRING
GOTO
GEO. G. BIGGER
Jeweller and Optician
143 Hastings Street West
THE BELGRAVIA
FLORISTS
1016 ROBSON STREET
Phone, Sey. 5476
FLORAL DESIGNS, WED
DING ORDERS AND
HOME DECORATIONS
OUR SPECIALTY
MISS M. BARRETT
Mr. Edison and His
Diamond Disc
haa aet a new standard In the reproduction of sound. You oan not
conceive how great this advance
haa been until you hear It. The
writer haa tried a dozen tlmea to
put Into worda a description of
what thla new Instrument Is like,
but falls every time he tries It. If
he coutd convey for Ave minutes
the exclamations and expression
of wonder that came from visitors at our atore during the paat
few weeks we wouldn't have supply enough to last the week out.
A comparison of the tone of the
Edison with other makea of machines reveals the fact Instantly
that something haa bean missing
and we are hearing It now for
the flrst time. Tou owe It to yourself to hear the new Diamond Edison before deciding on any make
of Instrument.
■The OMnt Music Houst .nB.C
558 Granville St
JAMES STARK {«
aat am. te sas am.
ama — '** $mo u
THB STORB THAT SERVES TOU WBLL
January Clearance and White Sale
We tire making substantial price reductions all
through our store. The prices that maintained in
our Great Reorganization Sale made us famous.
Our values are to-day identical and prices in many
cases lower. We are closing out Rugs entirely.
WE OFFER
$80.00 Brussels Bugs, 9x12, For  $18.60
$40.00 Axminster Bugs, 9x12, For........... 25.00
Tou will save money, get value and good service at
"THE STORE THAT SERVES TOU WELL"
Webster's Grocery List
COMPARE PRICES
Our Beat Flour. 49-lb.
sacks $1.45
Rolled Oatt. fresh milled
811*..      .25
Butter, Finest Creamery,
3 lbs.     1.00
Com Starch, Johnson's,
3 packets.. ......     .25
Lard,  Carnation,   3-lb.
pails, each........     .35
Hams, by the whole htm
perlb.  .. JJ
Bacon, machine sliced, '
perlb. 25
Ens.   absolutely   local
new laid, per doz... .55
Applts. Winesaps. 5 lbs. .25
Castile Soap, 35c bars. .20
Ham-mo   Hand Cleanser, per tin ....... .05
YOUR ORDER WILL BE APPRECIATED.
PROMPT DELIVERY.
The Webster Bros.
LIMITED
PHONES: SEY. 8301. 8302 1275 ORANVILLE STREET
The Burning Question
Ie your Cook Stove or Bui*
one that gives satisfaction, or
to It the Und that waatea th*
fuel, burni the cakes ud pie*
on tho top ud leaves them
raw on th* bottom.
IF SO, now li th* time to mak*
th* change, ud whu you
mak* th* chant*, then I* so
better rug* you oould get
-thu
"The Stay Satisfactory Range"
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY
W.CSTEARMAN
Hardware Merchant
MS ORANVILLE STREET
J
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
80 PENDER STREET, EAST
ALL GRADES COAL
AT REGULAR PRICES
AGENTS JINGLE POT MINE
5408-—PHONES SEYMOUR 5409
LET IT RAIN!
LET IT HAIL!
Let it Snow if it will,
Boyal Crown is Supreme!
And is easily still
The best Soap in the West
for the Laundry, and
ROYAL CROWN
WASHING
POWDER
CLEANSES-PURIFIES-BEAUTIFIES
Save the Coupons for Presents
EVERY   UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM 1'
PAGE SIX
TftE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JANUARY S3, 1914.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPE.AN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
Dominion Hotel
' Enlarged and Remodelled
Comfort     without
Amtrlean Plan   ■   88.00 Up
 HEN
VICTORIA, B. C.
SOS ROOMS 100 BATHS
Extravagance
  European Plan   •   OlJtO Up
STEPHEN JONES, Proprietor^
HOTEL STRATFORD
VANCOUVER'S NEWEST FIREPROOF AND MOST LUXURIOUSLY
FURNISHED EUROPEAN PLAN HOTEL
104 Bedrooms. 60 with Private Bath,
Single and En Suite; Each Room
Equipped with Telephone, Hot ud
Cold Water, Steam Heat, eto. Our
Beds are the Beat ln any Hotel ln
America.
RATES
(Weekly) Single, 13.00, S4.00, 15.00
"        Double, S4.S0, M-00, S7.S0
Translsnt Rates, 11.00 per day.   No
More.  No Less.
CORNER  GORE  AVENUE
AND KEEFER STREET
Vancouver, B, C.
Hotel Stratford CO., Ltd.,
Props.
John B. Teevens, Man. Director
BERGMAN'S MODE KITCHEN
76 Hastings St, West
When In my vicinity vleit me fer a First-Class Meal at
Moderate Prlcea.    White Help Entirely
The best products obtained that tlie market affords. First-class
accommodation, Only modern system of cooking on the Paclfio Coaat,
aecond to none when compared with other American Cltlea on th*
Coait Nicely furnished rooms In connection, Just perfected In the
moet modern style and now ready for occupancy, at 60c. per night
ud up.
Merchants' Lunch, 11 to 3,25c.
Short Orden Day and Night
PHONE SEY. 3175.
Hotel Alcazar
(opposite Labor Temple)
Two hundred modern rooms, hot and cold water and
telephones in every room.   Up-to-date dining room
a la carte.
Best 35c. lunch in the city.
G O W,TH THE B U N CH T°THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
Richly Furnished Throughout
Hot and Cold Water In gtrery 1
Haas* Oafa aad Oiill Boon ea tke TteUSt Ooaat la Oouaeettom
HOTEL ASTOR
C. jr. MARSH, Proprietor             W. D. MARSH, Manager.
aatset SUlO aas np   Spiolil weekly nates.
147-14* I	
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL ,™«*«3Sffi.
CLARENCE HOTEL
Cenar PENDER aad SEYMOUR STREETS
SSABOID & MCELOROY
Proprietors
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS
NEW AND UP-TO-DATE
Lounging ud Smoking Room.
Special   rates    to    permanent
guests.
Ratea:   (8.50 per week and up.
Kingston Hotel
7S7 Iktadi St.
fern Sey. 125SS
CLIFTON ROOMS   SL«fi"»'•»»«.«*£?•
11M Ctunille Street      Phoo. Svmtm 402*4 __ ___ _   *? ***' _****
—   —       ■-   ■ - koalas, lot ft eeM water hevsiynoei
Tke HoaM o( Canal art"
RAINIER HOTEL
European—Rates tl per day.
^___^_^^__^_^^^_ lst-olass Cafe ln connection.
Rooms rented by Day or Week. Special rates to permanent guests.
First-class Liquors and  Cigars.    Every comfort and   convenience.
JOHN SINDAR, Prop. Corner Cordova and Carrall Streets.
::  ::   HOTEL ::
C0NNAUGHT
SANDS
Funeral Furnishing Co.
LIMITED
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
LADY ATTENDANT
TELEPHONE 380*
IBIS QUADRA STREET
Near Pandora Avenue
/ VICTORIA, B. C.
■sropeaa Plan, Sl.00 S*er Say Op.
Up-to-Date    Flrat-Claas    Dining
Room and Cafe in Connection
180   ROOMS:   BO   ROOMS   WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
Steam Heated—Phone in Every
Room—Elevator  Service;     Bath
and Shower Baths on all Floors.
Diseases of Men
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back. '
Differs from all other remedies.
Price ___ Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THB    OBLIGING    DRUGGISTS
132 Cordova St W.
Vancouver, B. C.
Named Shoes arc frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless lt bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
AU ahoea without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union,
BOOT 4 SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
3. F. Tobln, Pres.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treaa.
W.F.OFM.
Agitation for Higher Wages
—Work of Organisation
—Per Capita Tax
Compensation Acts — Some
Needed   Legislation—
The Federationist
NELSON, B. C, January 22.—
Following is the very able report of
President James Cuthbertson, of Dlatrlct Association, No. 6, Western Federation of Minera, which convened in
this city on Monday:
"To the Officers and Delegates in Attendance at tbe Sixteenth Annual
Convention of District Association, No. 8, Western Federation ot
Minersy
"My own lack ot experience and
education has, I am afraid, during the
past year, Imposed upon the shoulders of your secretary-treasurer more
than his fair ahare of the work of
directing the energies of this association, and, although I am not ashamed
of the general result, I do regret that
lt was beyond my powers to attain
to brilliancy. To the consideration of
the following resume ot the work attempted and accomplished by your
organisation, for the year 1913,1 hope
that you will bring the spirit of toleration, and, taking Into consideration
the opportunities your executive board
had for achieving anything notable,
deal leniently with our shortcomings.
As a result of a demand by several
locals ln this district for an Increase
ln wages, there was sitting In Nelson,
at the close of our fifteenth annual
convention, a board of conciliation
and investigation. A majority of this
board, on the strength of the evidence
submitted it, denied the justice of our
demands. Their reasons for so doing
did not convince me of the soundness.]
of their conclusions, and their aotion
should furnish the thoughtful worker
with food for much reflection. A .majority ot the board read, as ode of
the causes producing this
Agitation for Higher Wagea
a growing Inclination on the part of
the workers of thlB province to demand the best quality only ln food and
clothing. Their reasoning must bave
assumed tbat the workers should be
satisfied with less than the best, and
based on this premise their judgment
that our present wage was sufficient.
Personally, I would like to know who
should, ln justice, enjoy the best of
food and clothing if not those whose
labor produce them.. Again, in comparing the earnings of one of the witnesses, David D. Murphy, with the
earnings of one of the mining companies, tbe majority report maintains
that what Murphy earned, and put
back into the ground, was money
saved or profit; but that wbat tbe
Standard mine earned and paid in
dividends (160,000 a month) waa not
to be eonsldered profit, because tbe
capital Invested had not yet been paid
back. Although this company had
been using their earnings for the development ot other properties, you will
still notice that.wbat was put back
into the ground by the company was,
in the opinion of the majority of the
board, not to be considered proflt
However, tbe .fault of our want of success ln this agitation is not, to my
mind, to be charged to the findings
of this board, nor to the reports ot
Inconsistency and injustice,
but directly snd solely to our own
failure to make a united, co-ordinated
demand. Had all tbe local unlona In
the district acted unitedly, both before the demand was made and after
the board had reported, the result,
I am assured, would have been differ
ent Your executive board, in view
of the educational value of this report,
and for the benefit of our foreign-
speaking brethren, had it translated
Into Italian and Finnish and widely
distributed. In conformity with the
wishes of our fifteenth annual convention, your executive board secured and
placed ln the field as district organiser, Bro. Mike V. Grlbich; and I believe that the work accomplished by
him throughout the district baa more
thsn justified the expense. When
employed strictly within your Jurisdiction, district association, No. 6, paid
the cost' When Bro. Oriblcb was engaged beyond your Jurisdiction, the
Western Federation of Miners assumed the responsibility. Owing to the
weakness of the average miner for
lightly and' frequently changing bis
address, the task of keeping the district organized Is s continuous problem and an expensive one, Tbe fact
that the workerB of this district come
Prom All Points
of the compass, speak many languages
and vary greatly as to modes and customs further complicates the situation, To teach eaeh to- call the other
brother, to atand together for the good
of all, to bring them to membership
in a labor organization, many of them
for the first time ln their lives, ia the
problem that confronts us. It Is not
an easy one, but I believe that you
will, aB I.feel that you must, continually, press forward towards its solution, and, having found the man of
character and ability fitted for the
task, keep bim ln the field as long as
lt Is possible for you to do bo. I would
recommend this policy to the incoming district board, and, should  your
Pkoas Seymour S7S7
®ip Artotta fctofcto
ftiotosratililr Artists
SSS SOaSOST STBIBT
VANCOUVER, E C.
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
awsy until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Misers' Union
finances make It Impossible to carry
lt out I would suggest that the matter be taken up with tbe federation as
soon aa the parent organization has
brougbt to a conclusion the struggle
in whloh lt Is at present engaged ln
the Michigan copper fields. The district must be kept .organized, it we
are to make successful progress and
take united action on the needs that
from time to time arlBe. At. the close
of the fifteenth annual convention,
your executive board met and instructed the district president to visit
Rossland, and endeavor to persuade
local. No. 38, to resume their good
standing in the association.
Elected. Repreaentative ■
As I was elected to represent district, No. 6, at the convention in Victoria of the B. C. Federation of Labor,
the month of January was almost gone
oefore I reached; home, where serious
illness ln my family throughout the
month of February further detained
me. Through the Greenwood local I
waa advised that a special meeting of
No. 38 was called for Sunday, March
2nd, to oonalder, the representations
ot the district lh the matter of the
payment of per capita tax. Being
atlll unable to leave my home, in consultation with your secretary-treasurer, we got Brother Phillips, of Nelson;
Bros. Campbell and Castell, of Trail,
and Brother Mike Grlbich to attend.
The membership of Roseland union
took to my mind the very proper
course of paying their per capita tax,
and submitting to the referendum vote
the question of dissolving the district
In oonectlon wltb this matter I visited Phoenix.I6ca) on April 5th. As I
had not advised them of my coming,
and because there waa but a small attendance at their regular meeting, I
offered to come again before the vote
on the question was taken. This I
did, attending the regular meeting of
the local on April 28th. To the best
of my ability I pointed out to them
the work the district was doing. That
tbe best method of saving the lives
and limbs of those who work in the
mines was the rigid enforcement ot
the
Compensation Acta.
The mining company that has to pay
fifteen hundred dollars for the death
of an employee will take fewer
chances than the company .that Is not
compelled to' render compensation.
That the district organization could
enforce this act much more effectively
and with far less danger of Buffering
by discrimination for its activities
than the local union, I felt that the
dissolution of the district would mean
the non-enforcement of this act and
ot many otbirs enacted for our benefit The result of this referendum vote
afforded me great satisfaction, and
demonstrated that ln the opinion of a
large majority ot our membership the
'district organization was a necessity,
and lta functions necessary. I have no
hesitation in Baying that ln the part of
the district with which I am best acquainted, tbe enforcement of the compensation act has resulted ln the saving of a good many lives. Tbe arbitrary stand taken by tbe Britannia
Mining company, on Howe Sound, in
refusing to allow the secretary of
local, No, 218, to visit the men residing on the company's property, even
after a properly constituted board of
conciliation and .Investigation had recommended that the men were entitled to be so visited if tbey chose,
resulted ln a strike, which, after dragging along for some months, waa
called off. I believe that an effort
should be made to reorganize this
local. I believe that such an effort
would meet with far less opposition
than formerly, and that it could be
successfully consummated. .
Re-Organization
I would suggest for your consideration the situation at Goose Bay Snd
urge that an effort be made to organize this place also. A meeting ot
your district executive board was held'!
at Nelson ln August last to consider
several matters of importances This
meeting Instructed me to go to Hed-
ley and endeavor to organize Voight's
camp, and; if possible, affiliate lt with
Hedley local. I submitted the matter
to Hedley wbo advised me that, owing
to the distance separating the two
oamps, they did not tblnk it feasible
to organize both under the same charter. After consultation with the officers of Greenwood local, lt was arranged that Brother Lakeland, the secretary of Greenwood local should go
to Voight's camp, organize It and
make lt a part of Greenwood local until such time as it was self-supporting.
This was done in September, Brother
Lakeland calling at Hedley and advising the brothers there of the action
taken. Other matters considered at
this board meeting were the McShane
and McCormlck cases. In tne farther,
the relatives of Brother Manus McShane, who lost bis life at the Bluebell mine, have since recovered compensation. The principle at stake in
the latter waa so Important that your
executive board deemed lt advisable
to retain counsel to assist Mr. McNeil.
No Conviction
Although the evidence was such
that the provincial authorities under
took tbe prosecution' of the' case, we
were unable to secure a conviction.
It looks as if It depended on your identity as to whether the law of the province of British Columbia was violated or not, and, from the sentences
Imposed upon our striking brothers
In Vancouver island, and the failure
to Impose any sentence at all on Brother McCormlcH's assailants, lt would
appear that these laws are so fearfully and wonderfully made that only the
working olass are oapable of breaking
them. Here, as on every other occasion like it, lt is fit and proper to
again point out that the remedy for
conditions like this, lies In our own
hands. Send men from our own ranks
to do the' law-making and adjust its
administration. Enforce the laws
placed on the statute books for our
benefit and When election day comes
round, reward with our suffrage the
socialist members who were largely
responsible for putting them there. I
would recommend tbat the question
of united political action be taken up
ln our local unions, for I believe that
we have arrived at that stage ln the
labor movement where, if we do not
keep step with the march of progress
we will be run over. When the labor
commission sat at Greenwood, we
urged upon It, amongst other things,
the necessity for the following legislation:
Nsedsd Legislation
An Act to compel employers to provide bath and dry rooms for the use
of their employees, At present ln
many of the camps, the only place
where men can change and dry their
clothes is ln their common sleeping
rooms. With the dirt thus continuously carried In, and the steam arising from wet garments, It Is impossible to keep the room clean or wholesome, An act covering several
amendments to the Elections act,
and a Workmen's Compensation set,
similar to the one now In force In the
state of Washington. A copy 6t this
latter the commission was good
enough to lend us, and I believe the
act to be a very beneficial one. It
Is administered by the state insurance
commissioner. It ia not necessary to
employ a lawyer to enforce lta giro-
visions, and every dollar of compensation goea direct to the dependents.
In accordance with the resolution
adopted at our last district convention
we also urged upon the commission
the necessity for amending the Eight-
hour law so as to make lt apply to all
smelter employees. I would recommend tbat legislation be demanded
covering a universal eight-hour law.
Several instances have been brought
to my attention during the past year
where men, working on piece work,
or
Under the Bonus System
have not lived up to the provisions of
the eight-hour law for underground
workers. I would point out to the
delegates the danger that lies in this
practice, and I would urge that <tt be
taken up and discussed in this convention. To my mind, there is pace-
making and speeding-up schemes
enough without working overtime. In
Michigan our union Ib waging a bitter
war for tbe very thing that in some
instances, at least ln this jurisdiction,
we regard so lightly. Practices like
these should be condemned ln no uncertain terms. It Is on account of
the dangerous elements they contain
that Greenwood local, unlike some of
the other locals has abolished the
contract system within its Jurisdiction
only one short contract being sanctioned by the local last summer.
Owing to the need of our members actively supporting tbe Michigan copper miners, your district executive
secured the services of J. W. Bennett
of Fernle, and had him tour the Jurisdiction, explaining the situation at
the seat of the trouble and urging
tbat morally and financially we should
whole-heartedly, support our International officers and our brothers on
strike. Mr. Bennett proved a capable
and energetle exponent, and I am
confident that a large amount of good
Is resulting from his visits. In connection with thia matter, I have only
one regret, and that is-that largely
through my own fault Mr. Bennett
was unable to visit Hedley local.
Independent Newe Service
Owing to the unfairness with which
the Associated Press has reported
labor disputes, I recommend that the
delerates go on record' as favoring
the establishment of an Independent
news service. This, I believe, eould
be carried out if all labor organizations acted ln unity. A better news
service could be given by the labor
papers at present In existence, and
the necessity for the workers reading
the papera controlled by and for our
friend the enemy to a great extent
removed. I would like to see a larger
measure of support accorded auch
papers as the B. C. Federationist and
the Miners' Magazine, and I would
suggest that the delegates take up
this matter in their local unions and
endeavor to Induce a little "sub."
rustling. In conclusion, I wish to express my hearty appreciation of the
kindness and courtesy with which I
have been treated by the members of
this association with whom I came In
contact during the past year,' and my
gratitude for the assistance that was
freely given me every time I asked
tor lt. It is' my hope and wish that
district association, No. 8, will meet
with a full measure ot the success lt
la aiming to achieve and of which lt
is abundantly deserving. Respectfully submitted,
JAMES CUTHBERTSON,
President.
Mlnard'B Liniment* Co., Limited:
Some .time ago I had a bad attack ot
quinsy which laid me up for two weeks
and cost a lot of money.
Finding the lump again forming ln
my throat, I bathed freely with MINARD'S LINIMENT, and saturating a
cloth with the liniment left It on all
night.
Next morning the swelling was gone
and I attributed the warding off of an
attack of quinsy to the. free use of
MINARD'S LINIMENT.
St. John.. Q. P. WORDBN.
HOTEL   CANADA
C. a MULLER, Prop.
Phone connection in every room. Hot and Cold
Water in every Room.      :-:      European Plan
Transient Rates, $1.00 per day up.    Special Weekly Rates
Merchant's Lunch, 11.30 to 2.30 p.m., 35c.
i Dinner a la Carte, 6 to 8 p.m.
Free Bus
518 Richards St.
Exchange Phone Sey. 1571
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat       .  Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rstes te Permanent
Cassis
C0TTINGHAM * BEATTY
Proprietors
GRAND CENTRAL HOTE
GAUM A DUMAMSQ, Freprieten
FULLY MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
The Leading Hotel. :: 'Auto Parties catered to.
European and and American Plan.
PHONE EBURNE 13S
Corner Fourth Street ud River Road       Eburne Station, B. C.
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
Vancouver, B. C
921 Pender St, West Phone Seymour 5860
RATES $1.00 A DAY UP
First-class Grill in Connection
F.  L.  WALIilNDPORD,  Manager
PENDER HOTEL -^Wh&gbr
tltrSSXDWa Hlpst W*SST Hans ~M per Day and Up.
Palace Hotel Bar and Cafe
Items SI par wssk]    -..,_,        , I Telepfceae, Hat aad
Up. Good Service Throughout      C.U Water ia ..A
i. F. Tmanm, trt. —— — 1 Raw.
33-35 HA8TING8 8TREET WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SMOKE THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
ASK FOR THEM, SEE THAT TQU GET THEM, AND DON'T LET
DEALERS FLIM-FLAM YOU WITH CHEAP. TRASHT SUBSTITUTES
THE -
PEOPLE
Believe in Vancouver—in
its future — and in its
people.
They have proved this
by spending over $270,000
last year in Vancouver,
and by buying all supplies
and raw material in Vancouver when they can obtain it there.
They believe in a fair
deal to all employees—
their wage sheet for 1913
was over $125,600.
Only union workmen
are employed in the
CASCADE plant.
At three for a half, and
six for a half. Why should
YOU not always use
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES limited
wwssmwhi	
^SSkSllSMlaWS^^l^^^-^TV How the Vancouver Island Strikers view the "Kept Daily Press and Paid Pipers of the Coal Barons and their Hired Governmental Help.
Courtesy of The Maasea.
AT GOOD WAGES
IS OFFERED BY THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT TO
Farmers, Farm Laborers, Domestic Servants
' i
THESE ARE THE ONLY CLASSES ADVISED BY THE DOMINION GOVERNMENT TO
COME TO CANADA. ALL OTHERS ARE ADVISED TO HAVE SUFFICIENT FUNDS TO LOOK
AFTER THEMSELVES IN CASE OF FAILURE TO OBTAIN EMPLOYMENT.
FARMING IN CANADA OFFERS TO SKILLED WORKERS OF EVERY CRAFT, AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET AWAY FROM THE GRIND AND WORRY OF INDUSTRIAL PURSUITS
AND ALfcO TO ESCAPE IN A LARGE MEASURE THE EVER INCREASING COST OF LIVING
IN CITIES.
IN THE VAST WHEAT FIELDS OF THE WEST A FREE FARM OF 160 ACRES IS
OFFERED TO EVERY MAN, WHILE IN THE EASTERN PROVINCES IMPROVED FARMS MAY
BE ACQUIRED AT PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF THE MAN WHO HAS A LITTLE CAPI-
TAL AND PREFERS FARMING IN ONE OF THE OLDER SETTLED PROVINCES.
IF YQU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS, WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED
LITERATURE TO
W. D. SCOTT Superintendent of Immigration OTTAWA PAGE EIGHT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
-*-J
| Vancouver's Largest Gas Range and Heater House
> Fails-Entire Stock To Be Sacrificed BELOW COST
The Greatest legitimate Sacrifice Sale ever made to
the people of Vancouver. Read every word carefully
The well-known Burnslde Gaa Appliance Co. having been forced to
assign, thla stock MUST be sold by the first of February. I have
secured this stock far below actual factory cost; lean sell It for less
than half price and atlll make a legitimate profit. Already thousands
of dollars' worth have been sold. The extension on the lease expires
on the first day of February. On or before that day every article In
thla store must be sold regardless of price. I am therefore offering
this atock at prices which makes It the lowest price sale of Its kind
evsr held in Vancouver or vicinity. Read the advertisement—com-,
pare the prices—judge for yourself.
the Lowest Prices on Enamelled Gas Ranges Ever
Quoted
Blue Enamelled
Ranges; side ovens and
broilers. . Reg., value
$145. Sacrifled to $67.50
Other Blue Enamelled
Gas Ranges with side
ovens and broilers. Reg.
$125; cut to .... $59.00
(Above prices include gas connections)
Gas Ranges at Less than Wholesale Cost
Ideal Gas Ranges;   aide oven  and broilers,    Regular $60.00 value.
Cut to    $36.80
Moffat's Canada Gaa  Rangea; full nlckelled;   side ovens.    Regular
$60.   Muat go at   $33.76
Acorn Gas Rangea; right and left hand aide oven and broilers. Regular $46.   Cut to   $30.00
Moffat's National Gaa Ranges cut to  $14.00
(Above prices include gaa connections).
Prices on Gas Water Heaters Cut in Two
Lawson's  Gaa  Water   Heater,  double   copper coll.    Regular $28.
Cloasd out at, each   $10.00
Aoorn Gas Water Heatera, triple copper coll.   Regular $26.
Cut to    $10.00
Garland Gaa Water Heatera, with copper coll.   Regular $16.
Cut to, each , $6.50
'Vulcan Gas Water Heatera.   Regular (24. Cut to, each $8.50
Humphrey's Instantaeona Automatic Thermal Water Heater, auitable
for barber ahop, large homes, etc.   Regular $135,
Sacrificed at       $50.00
KITCHEN HEATERS, best make, Regular 125.00; cut to 110.90
ACORN GAS OVENS, with three-hole gas plate attached. Regular wholesale price 819.80; cut to  86.50
GAS HEATERS.   Begular 84.00; cut to 81.50
TWO-BURNER HOT PLATES. Regular 82.76! cut to 81.90
IDEAL GAS BROILERS, suitable for restaurants or for large homes. Regular 115.00; cut to  a 17.50
HUMPHREYS' also WELLSBACH GAS LAMPS and MANTLES, quantity
cut to less than ONE-HALF.
OBLONG WAFFLE IRON, gas burners attached.   Regular (25; cut to 16,50
GAS TOASTERS.   Regular 26c; cut to   10c.
WATER FILTERS.   Regular 16c; cut to .-.., 5c.
A full line of the leading makes of COAL and WOOD RANGES and
HEATERS at SACRIFICE PRICES.
Thsrs have been other aales In Vancouver—Interesting, money-making
sales—but no householder In Greater Vancouver ean afford to overlook this one—the one big legitimate, bargain aale of the year, It
meana dollara In your pocket, it coats you nothing to investigate. Thla
atock must be aold, and price reductions will have to do It. That'8
all there la to It.   Investigate.
All Office Fixture* for Sale, Typewriter, Deak, Delivery Horaea and
Wagons
Call at the store to-day, at once, only a few daya left to .buy at theae
prlcea.
F.ANDERSON
843 GRANVILLE ST.
Near Robion
ADVERTISEMENT
By BAM ATKINSON.
Arrangement are being made for
the next dance. Keep your eyes open
for the announcement of the date.
DISHEARTENING.
A newa item conveys the information that desertions from the ranks
are disheartening the Michigan oopper
strikers, fourteen men having returned
to work at Ahmeek Village. Thla
leaves only a dlamal knot ot 9,986 men
to carry on the struggle, out of the
original 10,000. Let these brave) defenders of a. forlorn hope, though so
cruelly deserted by their heartless
comrades, remember Thermopylae, and
die in the faith.
Carpentera Get lncreaae
Beginning June 1st of this year,
Montreal union carpenters will work
eight, instead of nine hours a day,
for 45 cents an hour, instead of 42 y2
centa as at present. An agreement
to this effect haB Just been signed
with the contractors.
Judge Howay should now be satis-
fled. One of his victims, a youth of
21, died In prison Tuesday morning.
R. Rossi, of the Brlcklayen and
Masons who waa operated on for gall
atones some time ago, Ib now out of
hospital. It will he some time, however, before he will be able to resume
work.
The Bricklayers and Masons held an
Informal smoker at the Labor Temple
Tuesday night, W. J. Kerr being in the
' chair. Over 100 membera and friends
were present, and all passed an enjoyable evening.
Elect Officers
The regular meeting of No. 170
Plumbers and Steamfltters was held
last week when officers for the ensuing year were etected and installed aa follows; W. Barton, president; L. O. Dahl, vice-president; W.
Colbourne, recording secretary; F.
W. Welsh, financial secretary; H.
Lyall, assistant financial secretary;
F. Blckley, treasurer; J. Flynn, inside guard; O. Coghlll, A. Ironsides
and J. Cowling, trusteees; W. Kemp,
J. Cowling, R. Butterworth, A. Iran-
sides and C. Smith, executive board,
A Few Definitions
Politics—The art of government.
Parliament—An assemblage of the
governing class (or their agents) who
meet to discuss and enact laws for
the maintenance of their position as
a class of owners of the meana of life.
Working class—Those who have no
means of existence other than by the
sale  of   their mental and  physical
energies.
On Saturday mid-day, as he was
going home from work, R. J. Dawson,
of the Bricklayers and Masons, was
thrown out of a car on Oranvllle Btreet,
broke his leg and Injured hla back and
head. Bad luck was rubbed In atlll
further, as, before he could be picked
up a rig ran over him, adding to his
injuries. Under the care of Dr. Turn-
bull he la progressing favorably.
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The regular weekly meeting of
Vancouver local No. 12 of the Social
Democratic party will be held on
Thursday evening at 8 p.m. in room
204, Labor Temple,
The subject ot the lecture ln the
Colonial theatre, corner of Oranvllle
and Dunsmuir streets next Sunday,
January 86th, will be "The Rights of
Man." There will be a musical programme with an organ recital at 7.45.
You are cordially Invited to be present.
THE UNEMPLOYED
Many people regard tbe unemployed
as an Industrial reserve army upon
which the capitalist Bystem rests.
This is not the case. The system
rests upon the private ownership of
the means of production and such a
Bystem will not work without a constant reserve of unemployed. There
are two principal kinds of unemployment. These are (1) acute and temporary unemployment, and (2) chronic and permanent unemployment.
These can be best shown ln tabular
form as follows:
Acute and Temporary Unemployment
Seasonal-r Per cent, of total
Due to changes   in   climate and
fashion  2.25
Vacation   6.45
Industrial Displacement-
Due to changes in tools and processes, removed sbopa, combined plants, repairs to plants,
business failures, strikes,
shortage of material, legislation, tariff, etc 19.59
Immigration 10.00
Temporary disability-
Due to sickness 22.54
Due to accidents...  1.66
Panic—
(Due also to exploitation)
Chronic   and   Permanent Unemployment
Industrial reserve-
Due to economic'anarchy .and exploitation  33.29
Personal inefficiency—
Due to laziness   3.87
Due to drunkenness. 26
Due to lack of training	
((Due also to exploitation)
Chronic disability-
Due to sickness and rain	
Due to accidents  	
(Per cent, of total included In temporary).
Old age-
Due to 40 to 75 years., 08
There are many honest efforts being
made to relieve this condition, but all
such efforts will fail, as there is only
one solution. In Ghent, for example,
the municipality have a method of
insurance against unemployment
which they are carrying out in con-
Junction with the trade unions of the
city. The members of the unions are
assessed a nominal sum each month
for this purpose, and the municipality subscribes an equal amount. That
is to say, if the membership of the
steam fitters is 200 and the assessment is 25 cents a month, the city
will give |50 to that particular organization for that month. Then, when
relief Is necessary, the city have the
co-operation of the union, bo that
loafers can not take any advantage,
but the real needy workmen can have
the benefits of insurance.
That spirit can not be hoped for ln
British Columbia. The provincial government are now employing men at
Point Orey to whom they pay 25
centa an hour, and charge them 35
cents for their dinners, and If the rain
interferes with the work the wages
for the time thus lost are deducted.
The only successful' way to deal
with the question will be to change
the industrial system. To do away
with that which produces the unemployment problem. The real remedy
will be;
1. Social ownership of social utilities,
. An industrial democracy for the
democratic administration of these
social utilities.
3. Production for use to replace
production tor profit.
4. The progressive reduction of
hours of labor aa the productiveness
of machinery increases, and the progressive increase of the Individual income from the process of sooial production. \
It will be a source of surprise to
many that ln the United States that
the moat conservative organization,
the Typographical union, has already
under way an urgent agitation for a
six-hour day. We may have a rep!-
tltlon of the Haymarket experiences,
but certainly this, with a demand for
the present wages for that six-hour
day, Ib a step In the right direction.
A local CookB, Walters and Chef's
union has been organised In Hamilton, Ont
ROOKKEEFTSR — Salary    8
start.   Muat   come   well   recommended.   Box 1844 Province.
STENOGRAPHER WANTED —
Business college graduate. Unusual opportunity for the party
who can make good. Apply letter
only to Mr. King, 814 dole Build.
Ing.	
WE HAVE AN OPENING FOR
era) nffla-a> man; muat ha
Every day you seo advertisements
like the above.
Don't Answer Unless
Tou Are Trained
Merely "having a try at It" won't
do. Vou must be certain of making good. Graduates ot this School
—tbe largest In Canada west ot
Toronto-are Ulllng Important positions because properly trained.
Writs for Ifospeotus
Phone Sey. 1810
VANCOUVER BUSINESS
INSTITUTE
Vancouver, B.O.
EIGHT HOURS A DAY
TO TAKE EFFECT
Timber Workers' Convention at Aberdeen, Wash.,
Adopts  Resolution
Minimum Wage of $2.25 a
Day in Timber Industry
Decided Upon
At Aberdeen, Wash., on January
14th, the Timber WorkerB' convention
voted.unanimously by roll-call for an
eight-hour day with a minimum wage
of $2.26 a day ln the timber Industry.
ThlB will go into effect on May 1st
next, However, it remains optional
with district No. 2 to adopt the proposition. This came aa no surprise
to the membership that have kept in
touch with the growing sentiment
that has been bo prevalent among the
timber workers for aome time ln regards to the shortening of hours of
labor. Further* thla meana that the
delegates representing their respective locals were unanimous ln their
opinion that the membership Is willing and ready to demand a shorter
work day, and If It comes to the point
where they have to battle for this
concession from tbe lumber barons
they are willing and ready to fight to
the laat ditch.
The last issue of the Timber Worker prints this good piece of advice:
"You have three months and a half
to prepare yourself for the flght In
some mills and campa our demands
will be granted; In others we will probably have to flght for our demands.
Therefore it behooves each and every
one of ua to save what we can, atand
shoulder to shoulder, and victory will
crown our efforte."
New Westmlnater Hotels
Among the Royal City hotels making special preparations for the entertainment of B. C. P. of L. delegates
during the coming week are the
Savoy, Strand; Central, Dunsmuir,
Kings, Province, Merchants and Commercial.
Alberta F. of L. Executive
The Calgary News-Telegram says:
"Typographical union No. 449 has
been asked by the Alberta Federation of Labor to nominate some member for the ofllce of Calgary vice-president of that organisation, and lt ts
probable that L. T. English will be
selected for that office. In order to
bold offlce In the Alberta Federation
it Ib necessary that the candidate's
union be afflliated with the federation.
Vp to the present only two or three
of the Calgary unions are affiliated."
DEATH OF YOUTHFUL
MINER ATmSON FARM
(Continued from page 1)
Sunday afternoon. He aaw deceased
and thinking lt was a caae of severe Indigestion, prescribed a simple mixture.,
It never dawned on him that the case,
was so serious as lt turned out to be.
On Monday evening he again saw deceased and thought he looked better,
the vomiting had oeaaed and there was
no pain. He gave further instructions
and heard nothing more ot the caae
until after death. Deceased had been
previously operated on for a similar
ailment.
In reply to questions Dr. Hoyes stated that the cause of death was localised tubercular peritonitis of the small
bowel—a disease moat easily recognlted and yet most easily overlooked.
He made a trip to the prison every
Sunday and at any tine when called
upon.
Dr. J. S. Conklln gave particulars regarding the autopsy. He Bald that on
examining the body he found tt to be
well nourished, there being a scar on
the abdomen pointing to a previous operation. Death waa due to tubercular
ulceration of the bowels. The other
organs were normal except that the
base of the left lung showed an old
pleurisy. The malady waa . of long
standing and an operation would have
been useless.
Thomas W. Haalam, head Jailer, Bald
that deceased reported sick on the 14th
and waa given stomach mixture and
cramp medicine. The doctor gave a
prescription on Sunday and on Monday witness went to New Westminster
and got It filled. On Monday evening
he stayed ln the alck ward up to 11
o'clock and on Tueaday morning, seeing a change for the worse he went
out to get a hot water bottle. On returning, however, death had occurred.
In reply to questions, witness said
that a number of prisoners reported
tick and the officials had to guard
against malingering. If a prisoner
took his food lt waa concluded there
waa not much the matter with him.
Malingerers were punished by being
put on short rations. Mra. Dewar was
denied admittance on Sunday for
routine reasons and not on medical
grounds.
Joseph Mairs, ar., testified that he
saw hla son a fortnight ago. He did
not then complain about his health, but
spoke about having to put paper qn his
cot to prevent being bruised as he
only had' one blanket. He also disliked the presence of a bracket In the
cell. An operation had been performed
on deceased In Glasgow about six yeara
ago, since when he had enjoyed good
health.
The Jury, after a short Interval, returned the following verdict:
"We the Jury, empanelled to enquire into the death of Joseph Mairs,
Jr., flnd that he came to his death
by tubercular perltonitia with adhesion causing obstruction of the
bowels, while an Inmate of the
Okalla Prison Farm, Burnaby Municipality. The death occurred on
Tuesday, January 20, at 8:20 a.m. Tbe
Jury condemns the system In practice,
whereby a period of 72 houra elapsed
trom the time the deceased's cellmate
asked for medical attention until the
medicine was administered; and considering that there are 2u9 prisoners
In this Institution we recommend that
a resident physician bo provided."
In thanking the Jurors the coroner
Bald he considered It a proper verdict.
The Jury was composed of J. H. MoVety (foreman), O. Palmer, O. Almon,
D. King, N. Almon and O, .leddle.
FRIDAY JANUARY 28, 1911
BOBTAIL CREEK*)TS.
Where Thla Town Now Standa Was a
Wilderness a Few Years Ago.
The regular meeting oi the Bobtail
Creek Improvement Association was
held on Wednesday evening in the
schoolhouse. Several Important resolutions were presented. One endorsing the action of the Imperial government ln connection wltb tbe Panama
canal waa carried amid enthusiasm by
a vote of three for and one against
Hiram Spruckles is preparing a minority report in order that the government will not misunderstand his attitude.
William Blng, who lectured ln the
schoolbouse recently on "Modern Architecture ln Farm Buildings," haa
been engaged during the past month
ta building a poultry house. It fell
down last Thursday morning.
Mrs. E. Whacker will read a paper
before the Ladles' Aid next Tuesday
on "Dress Economy: Ne.w .Uses for
Old Gunny-sa/ika."
Clarence Cawdle, of London, England, arrived recentlv and will settle
ln this district He was heard to say,
after looking at the land, "The new
homestead law should be called an
'Act' to promote the. reduction of agricultural enthusiasm." We are glad
he takes a calm view of things,
Eli Scrubb'B once faithful dog has
disappeared from our midst A cruel
hand struck him down ln tbe prime of
life. We have no intention of mixing
In any quarrel, but would aay that the
party who said "that mangy mongrel
wasn't lit for no man to have," is
known and ia likely to be moved
against.
Two more letters and one newspaper
were handled at the post offlce this
week than last week. 'Tie hard to
realize that but a few yeara ago, all
was wilderness where Bobtail. Creek
now stands.
IDLE GOSSIP
Peace, Perfect Peace
In discussing the peaceful' character
of the TradeB and Labor council meeting last Thursday night John Sully,
the newly-elected sergeant-at-arms,
said lt reminded him of a conversation he overheard at the Antrim fair
ln Ireland over thirty-five years ago.
The serlouB business of the fair
would be done ln the early morning,
then a big dinner at noon; the afternoon being taken up with games,
races and also the settlement of differences of opinion that may bave
arisen since the last fair between residents of the neighborhood. Of these
differences, those who know Ireland,
and Antrim in particular, will readily
understand, there would be a plenty.
John says he heard one farmer greet
another and after the usual conversation about the wearther, prices ot
horses, cattle, etc., ask the time of
day. On being answered, he shook
his head and sorrowfully soliloquised:
"Twelve o'clock and never a blow
sthruck yet"
A "Strong" Union Man
Overheard at the entrance to the
Labor Temple, as he pushed open the
outer door:  "You muat be a strong
union man to enter here."
Reported at Council
"The  Brlmps,   the  Whuftleboom,   I
mean;
The Kls Kit and the Sprltch,
The Twlzsik and the Bruggerbutch,
The Fllg,  the Mung  a  Mung and
auch."
Speaking of Light!
The attorney for the electric company was making a popular address.
"Think of the good the electrlo company has done!" he cried. "It I were
permitted to pun, I would say, 'Honor
the Light Brigade.'" Voice of a consumer from the audience: "Oh, what
a charge they made!"
A CookB and Walters union has
been formed at Winnipeg, Man.
Whoever waa responsible for calling out the fire brigade when the present excuse for a city ball caught tire
during the week ought to be heartily
ashamed of themselves.
MINARD'S LINIMENT POR SALE
EVERYWHERE.
FOB THIRTY DAYS-MEN'S SPITS MADE TO
MEASURE, $15,00 UP.
LADIES' SUITS MADE TO MEASURE $30.00 UP
New Spring Goods in to select from.   Union Label
__ in each gal-ment.
M.LANGTRY
MERCHANT TAILOR.
392 HASTING!  STREET WEST.
There Is Unusual Value
In Corsets Here at $1.50
If you are interested in corsets of
modest cost, you will find it advantageous to see these models. Better
style and quality than you usually find
in corsets at this price and a better
range of models than many stores
present. We feature these $1,60
corsets for reason that we recognize
their splendid worth and we want to
impress the fact upon those who seek
the utmost value for their money.
See these models before making af
selection. You will appreciate our
calling your attention to them through
this medium.
Low, Medium or Girdle Top Corsets, ln
flne Imported Coutil, ln styles that conform to the present modes and embracing models for every normal type of
form. All corsets are furished with substantial hose supporters, which ln most
cases are four ln number. All sises, at
Per pair  (1.60
LIMITED
575 Granville Street      Vancouver, B. C.
HOMEOPHATISTS
We carry a full atock of.
Schussler's Tissue Remedies in Tablet and
Powder Form.
LET US 8UPPLY YOU
MARETT & REID
167 HASTINGS ST. W.
COLUMBIA THEATRE
HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE AND PHOTOPLAYS
Continuous Performance from 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.     Vaudeville from
2 to 4 and 7 to 10.30 p. m.
Complete Change of Programme Mondays and Thursdays.
WEEK OF JANUARY 26th
MONDAY, TUESDAY,
WEDNESDAY,
THE HAWAIIAN TRIO
THE TWO MORRISS'
WHITTIE AND JARVIS
DOROTHY LA RACE
THURSDAY, FRIDAY,
SATURDAY
NAPOLI  DUO
WESLEY  AND  FRANCIS
DELICIA AND POLLEY
THE  GREAT  HOLMAN
4—REELS LATEST PICTURES-*
10 Cents-ANY SEAT-10 Cents
AMATEUR NIGHT-WEDNESDAY.
PATRONIZE   THE "FED." ADVERTISERS
STRIKE
NOW ON IN THE MINING CAMPS OF CUMBERLAND,
NANAIMO, SOUTH WELLINGTON AND LADYSMITH
ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ALL WORKERS KEEP AWAY.   THE COAt BARONS ARE
BEING .AIDED IN AN ATTEMPT TO BREAK THE STRIKE
AND DEFEAT TRADE UNIONISM.
By Bowser's Special Police and Soldiers
THOUSANDS OF MEN ARE OUT OF WORK IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA, AND THERE IS NO CHANCE FOR A MAN TO
GET WORK UNLESS HE GOES TO WORK ABOUT THE
MINES TO SCAB AGAINST HIS FELLOW WORKMEN
SO KEEP AWAY FROM VANCOUVER ISLAND
BRITISH COLUMBIA

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