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The British Columbia Federationist Jul 4, 1913

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Array COOTBR    TRAOB8 —7lrt> LABOR COUNCIL, AM» B. 0. nMOATION OF LAB&B.
v.Aa*<dOTJVEB, b o. f,ridat*.fitly $
THAN CROTHE
vv-feS.,   J'Mi  jaf    |
|«9 J« ^> - A***/ "
_ja_ *****•>". -■SM-f
J*iU4t't»wa
vmar    Oa—Mta
ad Not
tt.
—■ to press
operations
nployment -
hold up .of
he federal
or Vaua-
Douncll,   ta
I yea-
[aloolm J-
agent.
been act-
in an
sent order-
Sect, —raatt
' ot wlt-
>*     District
Otrtfsaj*?""
not being
Canadian
:klng pur-
loat front
for tne
Bvlll arrive
th    Chron-
8>cotia
irray.   who
police   for
t   Cumber-
iclared   at
Collieries
on    June
st      Is     ln-
ne    will
eakers.    It
himself
urlng     tbe
>-v-a  Scotia,
•well
of   tbat
a Vancou-
Tho mine
worried
le toy the
Xar. ot JL.
;helr host.
Columbia
i or telo-
mbera of
tag them
the house
tbe Btrike
f open up
account.
oal   con-
SLIGHT IXPKOVlEMENT
IN OONDITION OF LABOR
IN VANOOUVER
Scores of M*n, Including Unloa-
ista, "Leavl&f Otttj, bnt Immigrs-
tlon BSor* Than Beplaoss.
Trade conditions during tha paat
week have improved a, little, but' despite tb*. number of building permits
issued at the city hall a comparatively
small amount of the work has actually
been begun.
Quite a number of wane-workers are
leaving; tbe city for other parte ot the
province, and not. a few are hiking tor.
Seattle; Spokane and other Industrial
centrea  between here and 'Frisco.
Immigrants continue to arrive at a
rate that is not at all reassuring to
those already out* of employment.
A .ali-ght Unpe^vensent ta noticeable
In tbe printing tradea, hot there are
still quite a number ot Job and ad.
men idle.
Business agents of various unions
report tbat tbey are holding their own
ln the matter ot membership, enough.
being added from week to week to
take the places of those who have left
tbe  city.
Tbere are no big strikes on at present ln tbe city proper, but a few new
'wage scales are pending, among them
tbat of tbe Streetnailway Employees,
affecting a membership of over 1009
ln Vancouver and 100-per cent, organizations at New Westminster and Victoria.
Weather conditions have Improved
during tbe past few days, and thla
-will bave a tendency to ease oft the
surplus in the local labor market for
a few weeks at least.
Tbe fishing industry, of course, now
tn full bloom, is largely in the hands
of Orientals, and consequently falls
to extend its pay-roll where it might
do more good to all concerned.
The same is largely true of the milling industry ln the lumber trade.
rt   to
lement of
itandlng,
>e given
of the
rloa.
ass to the
■ na nee-
It must
of Mr.
i* of the
and    the
ss-ely   in-
thout the
ra —tan eac-
r-     Justice
UNION MXKTIMCW
AT LABOR TEMPLK
FOR OOMTNO WEEK
Sunday, July 6—Bartenders, 8
p. m.
Monday, July 7—(Elevator Constructors; Boilermakers; Electrical Workers No. C21; Street
Railway Executive; Electrical
Workers, 213; Teamsters; Builders Laborers; Bro. ot Carpenters.
Tuesday, July 8 — Cement
Workers; Sign Palntqrs; Barbers; Shinglers; Pressmen;
Amal. Carpenters; Stone Cutters ;  Bricklayers.
'Wednesday, July 9—Stereotypers, 4 p.m.; Marble Cutters;
Amal. Carpenters; Street Railway men. 2:i>0 p.m.; Plumbers.
Thursday, July 10—Retail Employees; Horseshoers; Marble
Cutters Helpers; Painters;
Sheet Metal Workera; Machinists.
"Friday, July 11—Structural
Iron "Workers; Parliamentary
Committee; Floor "Layers; Building Trades Council.
Saturday, July 12—Bakers.
8TBEETBAILWAYI11N
WILL SUBMIT 0A8B TO
FEDERAL INQUIftT BOARD
Loesl Joint Executive Committee
of Their Division Fail to Kaaoh
. Agreement Witt Ootnpanjr
Division No. 101 of ths Internstlonsl
Association of Streetrallway Em-
ployeea, embracing the entire mechanical and operating departments of the
B. C. Electric Rallwsy Co. In Vancouver and branch lines; Division No. 109,
Victoria, and Division 114, New West,
minster, have, named a Joint eiecutive
committee to look after the interests
of t.helr respective memberships In
the negotiation of a new schedule of
working conditions and wages. The
old agreement expired oil June 90.
Local arbitration baring been refused
the employees mode application for a
federal board, under the Industrial
Dleputee and Investigation Act.
Moses B. Cotsworth, ot NeW Westminster, has been nsmed ae the representative of the men, H. 0. Alexander has
been retained by the B. C, Electric Co.
and yesterday these two finally agreed
upon Supreme Court Dennis Murphy
as chairman of the board, the name ot
Mr. A. E. Lees, submitted by the employees, having been refused by the
company's representative.
"Every possible effort, at many conferences between the compsny offlclsls and our committee, has been
made to secure an amicable settlement," said Int Org, Hsngue Sinclair
to The Federatlonist lsst evening.
"We went ae far aa to offer a compromise proposal to the company, ln order
to bave the contentious points adjusted. We have no desire to break the
good relationship of the psat with the
company or to be compelled to call
upon a federal board of arbitration.
The officers of the company, however,
remained uncompromising, with the
result that we were compelled to
requisition the Industrial Disputes Act.
This waa only done after the company
hsd refused local arbitration and sll
concessions as between the old sgreement and the new one now submitted
by the Divisions, Including a clause
providing for local arbitration In esse
of dispute,
"I regret," concluded Org, Sinclair,
"that the company hss plsced Itself
upon record as ln opposition to the
principle of voluntary arbitration,
which Is today the recognised method
of practically all railway companies of
adjusting such disputes. The situation at present Is thst ths strained re- „,. .
latlonshlp has csused some soreness _»"'''
among a goodly portion of our msm-
bershlp. I hope, however, thst there
will still be s satisfactory settlement
arrived at, as the requests msde upon
tbe company In ths proposed new
agreement ln the matter of wsges and
working conditions sre, to my mind,
very reasonable Indeed."
TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL TO ASSIST
TBE COAL MINERS
Last night's meeting of Vanoouver
Trades and Labor Council waa well
attended end quite a number ef aew
delegates were seated, it hetag the
end ot the elective tenn et moot of
tha afflliated unlona.
Preaident Benson presided sad all
other offloers were present.
A communication from tha ..dty
clerk advised the council that st last
meeting a bylaw had been passed
providing. far ths appointment of a
soaflWdlng t-upatjar aad totals* hb
duties, to beoooirUsMive lassedlate-
ly. Another letter lto* the same
source said .the. council's suggestion
re asking the provincial government
to Invest lta surplus In drie bonds,
would be referred to the next epos
council meeting.
A communication from Secretary
Morrison of the American Fedsratfcm
of Labor, In response to a request tor
the. services ot one or more organisers,
regretted the Inability of the eiecutive
council to comply at once, bnt as soon
ss possible thla would be arranged.
Secretary Morrison suggested a local
campaign by the eeatnl; Ubor body ht
the meantime.
Minister ot labor, T. W. Crothers
advised the coundl he would be tn
the elty shortly snd Invited anion representatives to meet him while on the
Coast. Upon motion a committee of
three was named to Interview Mr.
Crothers, along with nominees ot other onions, with especial reference to
the eoal miners' strike on Vsncouver
Island. Committee: Dels, Wilkinson,
McVety, Manson and .(Mlee)
bane, ',.. : , .
A protest waa received from the
Molders* union against tha council
sending delegates to the Progress
Club.
A letter from 3. C. Watson, Csmble
street, depleting working conditions
on the O.T.P. up north, was read, and
referred to the minister ot labor Hid
the B. 0. lahor commission. Ths contents reveal many reasons why there
Is a "seardty of labor" In construction campe.
In answer to an lnjulry from the
Buskin College regarding the effectiveness of the federal Industrial Disputes
Act, the council named Del. McVdy
to reply end state that It wu opposed
to the Act, inasmuch as It had repeatedly hampered the efforts of organised
labor ln securing better conditions,
A committee of three was appointed
i co-operate with the civic commit;
tee In urging the acquiring of the. old
courthouse site ss a publlo path. Committee: Dels. Trotter, Mldgley and
Campbell.
No reports were made by the organisation and parliamentary committees.
- Del. Cumock reported for .the Labor
Day committee that a preliminary
meeting had heen held. They were
now awaiting a reply from New Westminster Trades snd Labor Council
regarding its plans for that day.
Del. MoVety reported, covering the
council's fight against employment or
strike-breaking agencies In Vanoouver.
A federal Investigation wss now In
session, specifically Inquiring Into the
shady operations of the Cosmopolitan.
The report was received ss one of
promts, and the secretary was Instructed to write the city council asking for certain amendments to ths
bylaw governing employment agencies
ln order that lt should harmonise with
tho recent federal order-ln-councll.
Del. Mldgley read his report to the
International executive of the Building Laborers' union covering an effort
to consolidate the two locals.
Nomination ef Offleen
It being tbe drst meeting of the
current term of the council, Presldsnt
Benson wss tendered the following
nominations:
President—Dels. McVety, Manson
(Pres. Benson declined nomination.)
Vlcefliresldent—Dds. ' Ksvanagh,
Pipes.
General Secretary—Dels. Wilkinson,
BIDfaOLNBLTWA-rOa*
— T-riiTTmii-nwMg
vbSmmT
yean of disregard for
aay eence of deocaey it tt reallyworth
while to aeta the saddaa ehMge la
the conduct    of -local aaaaton&_.
To Whloh Doss Hs Refer?
_ • • Taking everything Into
consideration I cannot see why the
McBride ' Incubator should not rank
among the best of them when known.
It hatches better than any I have run
and I think any one In need of a
MACHINE should give It a trial.
• * *" So reads a paragraph In the
Cranbrook Herald over the signature
of W. J. Atchison.
Every
rington.
knock   a   boost—for   Far-
Overalls and Shirts are Vancouver-made, Union-
In addition to this they are backed by
made.
our   own guarantee to
make good any defects
within 30 days
ASK YOUR DEALER
FOR "BUCK BRAND"
The campaign for the uie
of   Brltlih   Columbia  made
Rood*, and the products of
le farms of thla province
In the homes of Vancouver
to be undertaken by the
Progress Club, la rapidly
taking form. A letter has
been drafted which will be
stent  to  every women's or-
J-an lis. tlon ln the city, urg*
ng them to use, Insofar aa
fioanlble, only goods made
n British Columbia, and
also asking for their support In this movement—
Dally press news Item,
ff-     J.    McMASTEB   AND
5 Homer Street
SONS,  LIMITED.
Vancouver, JJ. C.
Treasurer—Del. Campbell.
Sergeant-at-arms—Dels. Burkhart,
Pipes, Bstlnghausen.
Statistician—Del. Foxcroft.
Trustees—Dels. Trotter, McVety,
Knowles, Burroughs, Pettlplece, Kav-
anaugh.
Nominations to remain open till
next meeting, when elections will tske
place.
Del. McVety Introduced the following resolution on behalf of the striking coal minora on Vencouver Islsnd,
sad lt was unanimously endorsed:
"Whsress ths members of the
United Mine Workers on Vsncouver Island hsvs now been angsgsd
In s struggle for ths right to or-
gsnlss, for the lsst twelve months,
end during thst tlms hsvs psld
out approximately 1270,000 In
strlks pay; tharsfsrs bs it
"Resolved that Vanoouver
Tradee and Labor Council expresses Its sdmlrstlsn of ths splsn-
did efforts of ths United Mine
Workers of Amerlcs on bshslf of
ths oosl miners of Vsnoouvsr Islsnd."
Meeting adjourned 10.10 p.m.
1 i	
Judging by letters received by District 88 local officers from old country
coal miners' unions It Is probable
aome of the Durham recent arrivals,
who made affidavits that they had
been deceived by employment agents,
were none too particular about taking
out travelling csrds before they bur
riedly left. It Is reported thst shout a
dozen of them were afterwards picked
up by the cosmopolitan pirates and
Inveigled into Joining the scabs si-
ready at Cumberland. Their names
will be forwarded to their home
union snd when they start out to look
for Jobs after the present strike Is
over there will be the price of scabbing to pay.
aa-enwu--. ,
teal weak the 1W.1
ranoellatinn at tha «—-
l^iSi'^SSf _*Ya7aaaia~i	
of gross violation ot the rassat sssaaS
ordsMa-soaaeU. PietttasarWeeTSy
-MeaexeeadiW^taktteaS^
week, aad now daessada at* Tamil
nation." Ubor Tenia —»—^m.
cmubopehewuljSir "ruSlfhu
ne'er been told, end en osportaato
be shown that this -nltisassd est*
Is nothing more than a eMkeprak*
tog egesyy in the tatsnpts STK
BUI and Dso. dear frleedoof the Mc
Bride goveraassot, aad alleged am,.:
■t____$mi_*-' OolUertee CoTS
f-at*-__?*.,a "**"■ M *•*
be en "tovssttgatioB." -
Herbert Hloks a Co. en Csrpet
This week the Herbert Hkks ft Oa.
Agsnoy, which conducts business, by
♦"•W, right across from tha Cosssi
wlltsn bunch, were compelled to Hew
back with the tee and fare Itched
from at least one vteKs.'     mmm»
P. A, Runser, aa "tomlgraat," paid
•ISO for a Job ssld to be ss biakeemaa
12 S. ]a—i*t °*"» — —* **-* —»
ot the Fraaer Blvar. 'to waa uaable
to locate the Job. He returned to the
offlce and demanded the return ef hia
$1.50 and the fare paid. Tale was re-
fused. He went to the poHep statJea.
There he waa referred te the Labor
Terapls. The Ubor Tsesple offleUa
got busy. Federal Inspector f. ».
Qulnn responded to a hurryup tele,
phone call, secured the evldoaeo uid,
along with the vleUm, proeeeded to
the offlce of Messrs. Hicks ft Oa '■
As a reeult Mr. Runser got hie tee
and fare returned without delay.
Whether further prosecution will tallow remains to he seen.
Ubor Temple union offlclsls have
made up their minde to make It their
business to see that the provisions at
P. C 1011 are carried ouC est wttt
the assistance of Inspector QeaWwM.
do so, provided the federal Ispsifsat
stands pat
This "employment agency* tons et
petty larceny has rim lta course. It
must and will be stamped out.
The city counoll will be uked at
once to make certain smendaeats to
the  bylaw  regulating  employment
agencies, la addition to the federal
regulations.
Every wage-worker, regardlsss of
nationality or color, union or nonunion, Is Invited to make known thslr
grlevsnces to Ubor Temple union officials or to Ths Federatloiilet offlee
direct There Is now ao need of ha-
Ins mercilessly bilked by mea Who
take undue advantagee of the necessities of ths out-of-works. Help the
unions to sss that it le cut oat tor
good.
DRYBDALE'S IIQ STORE
WILL CLOU ON SATURDAY
AFTERNOONS TOR A TIM!
Over ISO employees la the big diy
goods store on Oranvllle atreet at
Messrs. Gordon Drysdale, Limit *
will have an opportunity daring
coming two months of not only booming memben ot the Retail Clerks'
Association, but will be able to put tnto
practice one ot the objects ot the association. Beginning with thla weak,
Drysdsle's will doss the big store at
1 o'clock every Saturday, Irrespective
of what other Vanoouver stores any
decide to do. The precedent la one
worthy of emulation, and will be appreciated by these who practice what
they preach. Drysdale shoppers should
remember the Saturday early closing
edict end govern themselves accordingly on the other days of the week.
Another U. M. W. of A. Victory!
"Frenchie" Valse of Benton, Wssh.,
wbo put It sll over lot Bayley, lightweight boxing champion of Canada, ol
Victor's, lut Tuesday at the Brighouae
arena, is a paid-up union member ef
the United Mine Workere of America,
ind one of the hoys who bave beea es
strike for some months ovsr there.
'It wu a great win tor the U. M, W.
A.," exclaimed one of the enthusluts
Id The Fed. offlce, "a sort of good omea
of the victories to come," added the
Nanalmo striker, who happened to be
in Vancouver, keeping i
ployment agency sharks.
Among ths Beksrs
Marcel Wllle, general organiser for
the Internstlonsl Bakers' unloa, who
haa. been In Vanoouver and Victoria
for the put few weeks, left for Beattle
yesterday, where he will take up a tew
questions affecting tbe local there.
Org. Wllle hopes to return to Vaaeon-
ver In the course of a few weeks.
Effective work Is still to be canted
on by tbe Vanoouver local In their
sticker campaign booming their Unloa
«'"-<   The membenhlp la gradually
Incresslng, and the outlook la
brighter than for some time.
Revelstoke Clarke Oifanlae
Revelstoke retail clerks,
and other employees la the retail
trade have organised en association,
the objects of which are "the procur-
In? of better working condition end
general early closing day saeh
week," A second meeting will bs held
ln the city hell oa July 7th to receive
new memben and plan their campaign. _____m__
TRE BBITISH .COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY...
...JULY 4, 1913
The Royal Bank
of Canada
\    #'    "■s:-"-''. ■ '
* nrooavosATSB iaes
P.ld-oj, capital        . g 11*60400
lam i ***i«'l<M>00;
xotai Assets ' eise^oe,eoe
J   tsbsst oar »*•
'•"' *    posits nr over
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ou Dolltr will opsa
"t»s soooMt, nt your
tsslaass will te w«1p
ooau be tt large or
rotmnaw amuroxaa »
VAwooovas
Published weekly by The B.
_.lonlst,   Lta.,   owned  Jointly   _.    	
couver Trades, and Labor Council and
C. Feder.
by  Van.
the B. C. Federation of Labor, with
which is afflliated 16.000 organised wage-
workers.
'Issued, every FrldayihorlUlig.
President	
Vice-President...
Vice-President...
Treasurer,
 ..Jas, Campbell
...J. w. Wilkinson
 J. McMllIar
.J. H. MoVety
Managing-Editor. R. Parm. Pettlplece
Advertising Manager... '..J. H. Graham
omce:   Boom SIS, Labor Temple
TaL aev. SSK.
Subscription:" 41.00 per year;. In "Van*-
'   couver Olty, $1.25;   to ualonn subscribing in a body, 78 cent*.
'Unity of Labor; the hope ef the world."
11 ft WATCH THE LABEL ON TOUR
HO PAPER. If thla number Is on It
your Hubucrlptlon expiree next Indue,
tt*
INCOBFORATED
1I9S
Bankq/"
Toronto
Capital* Reierve $11,176,578
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In the BANK OP TORONTO are; pnwiiig to
be a great convenience to
'. many, of   our   friends.
With these accounts eith- -
er of two persons of the
household msy deposit or
withdraw money.  Interest is paid on all balsnees
_? tWiee a year. "In event of
,""' death of either party the
-  ft survivor msy. withdraw
•     themoney-
.   MAIN .OFFICE
448 Haatiaga Street Weat
'       .   NEAR RICHARDS
?'"*". Branches
Cor; -Hastings & Carrall Sts.
New Westminster    Victoria
Merrltt
WHEN ORDERING A SUIT
'See.tiit this Label is'Sewed
.- in .the Pockets
'stands for'all that Union
..... labor Standi) for.
«,t.PRINTING
with the LABEL on it
;..    '     SEE US
Cowan & Brookhouse
Labor Temple      »<•«• lor. 4410
HATS
Velours, Straws  and Pelts
ALL COLORS
CAPS AND GLOVES
-AT-
PERIARDS
.    136 Hastings St. II.
FRIDAY JULY 4, 1913
TRUE PATRIOTISM
Dominion Dsy was celebrated Jn
Vsncouver with due pomp and dignity.
The Vancouver Dally Province of July
Si speaks of the occsslon ss follows:
Several hundred- Canadians of
Seattle and neighboring cities
held a picnic at the Arlington
Town and Country Club's grounds
yesterdsy ln celebration of Dominion Day. Dr. J. A, Macdonald,
editor ot the Toronto Globe, was
the orator of the day. He spoke
of the friendly relationship maintained between the United States
and Canada. 'Canada's place and
function on this American continent are determined by ber place
In the British Empire. This
young' nation holds this half of
the continent, dividing with the
United States the resources - of
America and sharing responsibilities for American civilisation,
and the duty America owes to the
world. Millions of citlsens have
changed from one to the other,
making vital the ties of Interest
and of business which defy all
boundaries and barriers. Canada
did more business with the
United States laat year than with
Britain and all the rest of the
world combined.'
Dr. Macdonald but gives expression
to the views held by sll broad-
gusged and public-spirited men of both
Canada and the United States who
recognize that though separated by a
geographical line of demarcation that
both nations are dependent one upon
the other and that the common good
of all Is best served by a rcclproca.
exchange of fidelity and goodwill.
What a contrast between the ringing truth of. this great man's words
sad the puny efforts of the narrow-
gauged and selfish, demagogues who,
hiding behind a cloak of mock patriotism, are striving to shield a system of unrestricted greed and injustice existing in the mines ot Vanoouver Islsnd, and who, ln order to accomplish their work of iniquity, are
pandering to,national prejudice and
publlo favor; by shouting "foreign
union" against the United Mine
Workers of America.
FOR BETTER OR FOR W0R8ET
The  mining   industry   in   the
province, he said, was never in
better shape. There was no boom,
but   the   output  last   year  was
632,000,000, as against $6,000,000
ton years ago.—Premier McBride
at Vancouver Progress club luncheon, as reported by telegraph in
Nanaimo Free Press.
If the honorable premier says the
mining industry was never- in better
shape, it must be true.    Everything
depends on what the best shape Is.
The presint shape ol the mining industry Is analogous to that assumed by
the victim of partial paralysis.    It
this Is a better condition than any
previously Indulged in by the mining
industry, then ultimate perfection can
only come with the complete arresting
of all activity.
The premier applies this reasoning
to the Conservative party, we trust.
If so, he must conclude tbat that party
Is now in the uttermost depths of
misfortune, and jean tonly be truly
successful when It has been annihilated at the polls. All who draw
less than three dollars per day from
the government will join ln wishing
Sir Richard a full measure of this
kind of success.
Have wages made you rich?
"The wsy to Stop war is to stop
going to war,"
Miners are paid for tbe coal they
dig—out of the Coal they dig.
"Most crimes sre offenses against
property."
Speaking of lacrosse: How would
you like to be the referee? Or the
hangman?
By the way: Were you at the last
union meeting? Better Join the
"clique thst runs the unton."
He who advertises his virtues far
and wide invites suspicion aa to the
parts of hla character not revealed
"Every man is willing to protect
every woman from every other man
but himself."
"Statute law is not bssed on natural
lsw; they sre the antithesis of each
other."
Defeat ts nothing but education,
nothing but the first- step to something, better.—Wendell PhilliPB.
. "Governments cannot accept liberty
as their fundamental basis of Justice;
because' governments rest upon authority and not upon liberty."- ,
THE NEW
Onuiville Street
VAUDEVILLE
■ Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c
THE POINT OF VIEW.
Times were prosperous, business
good, and the comfortable merchant
stepped from the bank with aa air of
satisfaction. He was accosted by. a
coal miner who proceeded to argue
with him on behalf ot the Ill-paid
wage-workers of the town. Listening
politely for a while, the merchant
finally settled the argument- by saying:    .:,■./■',
What you ssy Is very true, and my
heart goes out to the poor, But, my
desr sir, it is all ln the struggle for
existence. Those, like myself, who
have laid up a few dollars by industry
and thrift, have shown themselves fit
o survive. You must not forget thst
It Is the fittest who survive In the
struggle."
The years sped by. The wage-
workers, grown finally weary of miserable, wages and conditions, went on
strike to enforce decent trestment
from their employers. The employers
were obstinate and the strike lasted
many months. Again the merchant
stepped from the bank, but this time
with an air of serious dejection.
' Again he met the coal miner to whom
he complained bitterly that the strike
was ruining bim. The men should he
driven to work, he said: no honest
merchsnt could mske a living. To
which the coal miner replied:
"What you say is very true, and
my heart goes out to the poor merchants. But, my dear sir, lt is all In
the struggle for existence. Those, like
myself, who have been, by their industry snd thrift, laying up honeat
dollars for other people, are now out
for a few for themselves, and are
showing themselves fit to survive.
You must not forget thst It la the fittest who survive In the struggle."
UNION PRINTING
'   ON
Union Made Paper
The Only Shop
in British Col-
'. umbia using paper stock bear-
'      ing the water-
.   mark (label) of
*    thelnternation-
al Paper-makers Union
Mailorders Promptly Filled
E. T. KINGSLEY
Phone Seymour 824
LABOR TEMPLE
VANCOUVER, B, 0.
KINDERGARTEN STUDIES.
This is a boat.   It Is a steamboat.
Is It s good boat?
Yes, It is'a good boat.
How do you know It ia?
Because the owner told me so.
Who does the boat belong to?
To the Union Steamship company.
Will the boat upset?
No, lt will not upset Just now,
Why will it not upset?
Because 11 is tied to the wharf.
What makes It lean over like that?
Nothing makes it lean over; lt Just
does so.
Is the boat safe to ride on?
Yes, if the water Is perfectly calm,
and the boat doea not go far from the
wharf.
Are there brave sailors on ths boat?
Yes, sailors on tbat boat do not fear
death or they would stay on land.
NEW BOOKS.
Tbe Debt Tbat Never Grew Less or
Tho Disappearing Surplus, by Price
Ellison and Richard McBride (King's
Printer, Victoria). The strange Btory
of a surplus that lived through many
a stormy campaign without ever being
Been, The villain ln the plot is a
certain Publlo Debt which the Invisible surplus aa the hero sots out to
destroy. An Interesting character Is
a rancher, Parker Wllllsms hy name,
who engages, throughout the volume,
in a vain hunt for the hero, but Is
constantly confronted by the Debt
which, although Insistently destroyed,
never decresses In size. We recommend the work to anyone desiring to
while away an hour or two with a
little llgfet reading.
litany are destined to reason
wrongly; others do not resson at all;
and others to persecute those who do
reason.—Voltaire.
Puzzle: If Jordan, Foster, Pettigrew, Pattlnson, Irvine and Farrington never mined any coal at Nanaimo,
how much has the editor of the Na-
nalmo Herald mined?
"Murder Ib lawful only to the makers of law, to the state or tho government, which indulges its own murderous Inclinations, legitimately, by capital punishment and by war."
A press dispatch lsst Monday makes
the startling statement that a policeman at Reglna had died suddenly ot
"brain trouble." The report Is not
credited in well-Informed circles.
Perhaps you've met the specimen ot
mankind who Is willing, to bo miserable bo long as he knows some one
else who la a little worse oft than he
is. Thank goodness the breed Is getting soarcer.—Industrial Worker.
The militia department has issued
an order that upper lips must not be
shaved In the Petewowa and Niagara
camps. This Is no doubt an effort to
impart a male appearance to the occupants of those camps.
Seventy-two per cent, of the people
of (he land of Starves and Strikes do
not own their own homes. Let the
same percentage In Canada Join with
Uncle Sam In that touching hymn,
"My Country 'TIs of Thee!"
It won't take the Minister of Labor
long to tell the workers of the west
about "all" the legislative measures
passed at the session Just closed,
the Interests of wage-workers.
Msny a safety appliance Is not used
because it costs money. Life Is the
cheapest thing on earth. A tralnload
of slaves are not worth powder to
blow them off the- map. Just whisper
"Men Wanted" and lota more will appear to take their places,
A conservative estimate of the disfranchised wage-workers ln British
Columbia would be thirty per cent.
Changing employment and electoral
law restrictions, combined with the
apathy ot the workers themselves, are
among, the causes.
New directory statistics credit what
Is known ss Greater Vancouver with
a nay-roll of over 240,000. With no
more legitimate pay-roll Jobs available than when the population was
100,000. '
"Wars have been profitable to the
military class and some of the capitalist class. The military class obtains salaries, positions snd honors;
the capitalist class receive Interest
on war debts, and profits from making guns and battleships and furnishing supplies."
The "volume of business" may be
Increasing in this province, as so
eloquently stated by the premier
representative of big business, but
the wages of the men snd women
who make that "volume of business"
possible Is not Increasing In like proportion.    . ..
The more laws tho more Ignorance
of them; the more Ignorance of the
law, the more laws are broken; the
more the laws are broken, the more
criminals there sre; snd the more
criminals, the more policemen, detectives, lawyers, Judges, and other offlclsls that go to make up a strong
and expensive government.—Charles
T. Dprading.
How would you like to be the bust
ness agent? Not, of course, a business agent or attorney for some big
company or corporation, but a com.
mon everyday labor union "walking
delegate." One who has to act as
the shuttlecock between the employer
and employees snd take all the criticism from both employers and em.
ployees?
According to a decision handed
down last week by the.-' King's Bench
division of the High Court of Justice
no transportation company, Including
tbo White Star line, can evade, the
responsibility or Hability for loss because of the condition being set forth
on printed tickets. In other words,
not even the passenger has tbe power
to sign away the right to prosecute.
A Very proper ruling-and bne'fchat
everybody ought to bear In mind.
A minority number of South Vancouver councillors are protesting
against the employment Of. Mr. Wylle,
late of the scavenging department of.
this city, to the position of street
superintendent at 3)225 a month at a
time when other forces are being, re-
duced. Mr.'Wylle resigned his Vancouver sltjSae "ihe alleged result 'of,
tbe findings of the federal arbitration
board, instituted by the Civic Employees'; union,, and there will be no
tears shed among union workmen it
he gets a dose of his own medicine
at the hands ot the South Vancoucer
municipal councillors. Some people
can learn in no other manner.
The capitalization of any company
or corporation is Justified In proportion to Its ability to pay the normal
rate of Interest. The vslue of a compsny or corporation's holdings do not
rest in the natural or other, wealth
stored up In its possession In one
form or another, but ln the capacity
ot lis omployeea to create wealth and
thus provide for the payment of their
own wages, profit and all the things
Incidental thereto. The real value,
then, of any company or. corporation
depends upon the number of slave*
employed on the instalment .'plan,
other-conditions being normal.''Labor
not only creates all wealth, but every
speck of value on the planet Is wrapped up In the flesh,-bone, sinew and
brain of the working class. What a
company or corporation, then, really
owns is just so many jobs, with the
legal privilege, enacted by the workers themselves, of making the job-
seekers pay all. they create over their
wages for the privilege of earning
their own wages. ,„ -   •
One of the best government reports
ever.. Issued "from -the department of
labor at Ottawa is. that received during the past week- under the cover
title of "Labor Organizations In Canada, 1912.". From cover to cover lt Is
chock full of reliable and up-to-date
detailed Information covering all Industrial labor organisations In Canada. The introductory report ot
DeRuty Minister of Lalibr F. .A. Ack-
land, ably, assisted by Frank Plant (
a 'conspicuous information-gatherer at
every session ot the TradeB and
Labor Congress of Canada), to the
Hon. T, W. Crothers,,as head of.the
labor department, is well worth reading by eveiV Wage-worker In the Dominion, and The Federatlonist will
reproduce It at the earliest possible
date. ' As compared with the 1911 report lt Is in a class by itself and
contains much .Information for even
unionists themselves. The conclusions drawn by the department officials are 'fair end Impartial and
seem to be based on statistical facts
which must have taken a great deal
of work to gather and compile. It
will prove the handiest labor's year
book in any unton official's office.   ,
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.-
Ship    Carpenters . and    Caulkers-v-Wm.
.   White, Vancouver. Heights; B..C,'{ ■
Teamsters—J. G. Kelly, Room 220,'Taft-
bor Temple. . ,
Telegraphers—B. B. Fcppln, Box ,432.  '
Trades and Labor Counoll—J. W. Wilkinson, Room. 210, Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box 66.
Tailors—W. W. Hocken, Box 603.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Gordon
Martin, 657 Prior street. •
Tllelayers and Helpers—A.- Ei Morrison,
1157 Eleventh avenue eait.   \v-
tlpb'olstorers—A. Puthte, 1063 Homer St.
tmjoir atranraas '__■      _
AOB1TT DtaatKOBT
Paste .In .your hat for1, reforence.
Amalgamated Society Carpenters—Room
200; John A. Key; Tel. Seymour 2908
Bartenders—Room 208; Geo. W. Curnockj
Tel.  Sey... 1761.
B. C. Federation ot Labor—Room 208;
Vlotor R. Mldgley,
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room 804
and 305; Geo. W. Williams; Tel. Seymour 1380.
Bricklayers—Room 215; Wm. 8, Dagnall; Tel.- Seymour 8700.
Bakers—Room 220; Tal. Seymour 8362.
Barberaa—Room 208; C. P. Burkhart;
Tel. Soymour 1776.
B. c. Federatlonist^-Room 210; R. P.
Pettlplece; Tel. Seymour 3680.
Hod Carriers, Bulldera and Common Laborers—Room 220; B. Tralnor;   John
.- Sully; Tol. Soymour 3120.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 203
W. B, Walker: Tel. Soymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207;,-W. V. Dunn; Tol. Seymour 9156.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 202;
F. L. Istlnghausen, Seymour 2348.
Engineers (Steflm)—Room 216: ISO.
Prendergast; Tel. Sey. 6487.
Lahor Temple Co,—Room 211; J. H.
McVety;   Tel.   Seymour  6860.
Longshoremen's Association — Offlce,
146 Alexander street; Tel. Seymour
6369.
Miners—Room 217; O. A. Rowan; Tel.
Seymour 6487.
Moving Picture Operators—fl. R. Hunill
ton. Room 100, Loo Bldg.
3046.
Musicians — P.   Howltt,   640
street; Seymour 7816.
Painters—Boom 303; W. J. Nagle
Seymour 1380.
Plasterers—Joe
Tel. Soy.
Robson
Tel.
Tel.    Sey-
Bngolf;
 - -    Hampton
mour 1514.
Plumbers—Room   218;   Melvln
Tel. Seymour 3611.
Shinglers—Percy Sabln: Labor Temple
Cigar Store; Tel.  Seymour 3128.
Street Railway Employees—H. Schofleld
phone Fairmont 088.'
Trades and  Labor Counell-^Room 210:
J. W. Wilkinson; Tel. Highland 710L.
Typographical—Rooms-,212,    213,    214
n. H. Neelands; Tel. Seymour 2329.
UNION DIRECTORY
. Cards Inserted for $1.00 a Month
Things That Handy
Men Are Wanting
25 lbs. WHITE LEAD $2.60—A firat class white lead and
• an opportunity not to tie jhigjied. i
, BEiADY MIXSJD WPP PaiNT—Qaart....v,. .ffio ,
I FIiOOB PAIWVBeady iniied, in two shades of yeiipy
and two of grey.   Quart.................. ■ 696
GOLD ENAMEL, for, your picture frames.  A battle.-15o'
8HINGLE STAIN; any color,
»slj."...,. :. ,;..^...»1.00.
LINSEED OIL, raw or boiled,
gsl , .",1.00
TURPENTINE, gsl. ........$1.45
FLOOR LAC, qusrt..... 80c
Pint 45o
Hslf pint 2So
FLOOR ENAMEL, hslf
gsl ; $1.75
Qlisrt   .(0o
WALLPAPER CLEANER,
"Smoky City," psr tln....25c
Two tins .4So
PAINT8,  In speoial  Shsdes,
dark, red, heavy, brown snd
Whits—
Gallon .$8.76
'; Half'gallon $1.50
Quart 80c
Pint 50c
Hslf pint :..........S0e,
All other shsdes, gsllon..$2,40
Hslf gsllon $1.25
Quart  * ,...85o
Pint., 35c
Hslf pint       25o
OOLD BRONZE, for picture
frames, 25c tins.. ....16o
PUTTY—Mb. tins  v	
10(1
WHITE LEAD in Mb. tins	
10ft
MUBASCO and ALABASTINE,
in 5-lb. packages,, suffl-
4Be
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
MACHINISTS', NO. 182—MKETS SEC-
ond and fourth Thursday*, 7:36 p.m.
President, Chas. Mattlnson; recording
■jeui-etary, J. Brookes; lln uncial secretary.
J. H. McVety.    Sey, «360.        «
B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention in January, Executive omcers, 1913-14: President, Christian Slvertz; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, G
A. Burnes, J. W, Gray, Jas. CuthbertBoi-i,
J: J. Taylor; sec-treas., V. R. Midgley,
Boic 1044, -Vancouver.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 233,.I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of eacli month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President, J. H. Fletcher;
aecretary-treasiirer, A. O. Hansen; business   agent,   G.   R.   Hamilton.    Offlce:
iHoom lQO, Loo Bldg.    Tel. Sey. 3045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F, of M.~
Meets second Sunday of each month, 840
Robson street. President, J. Howyer:
vlce-presldenti F. English; secretary, C.
P. Howett; treasurer, W. Fpwler.
TRADHJS AND LABOR COUNCIL—
Meets flrst and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H. C. Benson, president; W; Manson, vice-president; J. W.
Wilkinson, general secretary, Room 210
Labor Temple; Jas, Campbell, treasurer;
W. Foxcroft, statistician: w.
sergeant-at-arms; _F. A. Hoover,
Mldgley, J. H. McVety, trusses.
J. Pipes,
V.  R.
NOTICE MB. a VHIOIW
The name "of the present recording
-Becretnry of every union' ln B, C. Is
wanted hy The Federatlonist for its
union. directory   lint.   Kindly   see  that
this   information   is   furnished   without
delay.
nrroBMAito mwaktsd.
Information is wanted of the where*
about? of Martin Trulson. Trulson ia
a miner by occupation, but is nuw aup<
posed to be following railroad construe*
tli'ii work at the Coast, Anyone knowing
hi-! present address will confer a grout
favor bv writing to A. Shilland. Secretary Mlner.s' Union, Sandon, B. C.   '
LOOAX. UJTIO* MOSBTABIM
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred A. Hoover. J. H.
McVety, James Brawn, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J^v. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdock McKenzle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing director, J. H. McVety, Room 211
Sey. 6860, ,
ALLIED  PRINTING   TRADES ' COUN-
CIL—Meets 2nd Monday in month.
President, Geo. Mowat; secretary. F. R,
Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
AMALOAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR.
penters and Jolnera—Room 209.
Jey. 2908, Business agent, J. A. Key;
offlce hours, 8 to 0 a.m. and 4 to S p.m.
Secretary of management committee,
H. McEwen, Room 209, Labor Temple.
Branches meet every Tuesday and Wednesday in Room Mil.
vxctobia, m. o.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets flrst and third Wednesday, Labor HaU, 731 Johnson street,
at 8 p.m. President, A. Watchman, secretary, L. H. Norrls, Labor Hall, Victoria, ac,
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTER-
„ NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No, gfl-
Meets first and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, Oi Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumptar; financial secretary, D. Scott: treasurer, I; Tyson; business agent, E. R. Still. Phone
Sey. 1614,
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 138—Meet every
Thursday, 7:30 p.m. President, J. E.
Phillips; flnanclal secretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour St.; recording secretary, George Powell, 1560 Fourth Ave.
W.; business agent* W. J. Nagle, Room
303, Labor Temple,
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, 8:00
p.m. President, J: Marshall; corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
financial secretary, K. McKensle.
ImasVf&oYt
Temple.   Tel, Sey. 3129.
BAKERS' AND CONFEC-
tloners' Local No. 46—
Meets second and fourth
Saturday.1*, 7:30 p.m. President, ,T. Kinnalrd; nor-
responding secretary, IV.
Rogers, Room 280, Labor
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 120—MEETS
second and fourth Thursdays; 8:30
p.m. President, Sam. T. Hamilton; recorder, Geo, W. Isaacs; sec retary-business agent, C. F. Burkhart, Room 208,
Labor Temple. Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7
p.m.   Sey. 1776.
Allied   Printing   Trades   Council—V. R.
Memlng, P. o. Box 66.
Amalgamated   Carpenters—H. McEwen,
Room 209, Labor-Temple,
Bakers—W.   Rogers,   Room  220, Lahor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 203, Labor Temple,
Bartenders—Geo. W. Curnoch, Room 203,
Labor Temple.
B, C. Federation of   Labor—Victor   R,
Mldgley, Box 10.44.
Blacksmiths — A.   E.    Hlllyard,    2252
Fifth Avenue West.
Bookbinders—Geo, Mowat, .616   Dunlevy
. avenue,
'Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1161 Howe St.
Hricklayers—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple,
Brotherhood of Carpenters—A, Paine,
Rooms 304-306, Labor Temple.
Had Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers— li Tralnor, Room 22ft, Labor
Temple.- ,,*,,,
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, care Kurtt
Cigar Factory, 72 AVater Street.
Cooks, Walter*.. Waitresses — W. E,
Walker, Room 203, Labor Temple.
Cement lyorkors—
Elevator Constructors—James Cowan,
1867 Sixth Ave. West,
Electrical Workers (outside)—W. F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple,
Electrical Workers. (Inalde)-rF. L. Es-
tlngliausen. Room 202, Labor Temple.
Engineers—B. Prendergast, Room 216,
Labor Tomple. .•
Firemen, Locomotlv? — James Patrick,
1183 Homer Street
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.,
Garment Workers—Nelllo Boden, 101
32nd avc, South Vancouver, B. C.
GlHHSworkers—Charles Roberts, Labor
Temple.   ■
O round men's Union (I. R. E. W.)—F.
Urquhart, Nanaimo Road,
Horseshoero — A. C, MacArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Let ter curriers—M. Buck, P. 0„ City.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick, U S3 Homer street.   .
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Sollowny, 1033
Pacific.   Tel. Soy. H071L.
Longshoremen—Thos. Nixon, 146 Alexander Street.
Maenlrilsts—J. H. McVety, Rndm 211.
Labor Temple,
Metal Trades Council—Fred. Barclnv,
Labor Temple.
Marine Engineers—E. Read, 8 69Thur-
low street. -
Miners, W. F. of M.—O, A, Rowan, Room
217, Labor Temple,
Musicians—P. Howltt, Room 6, 640 Robson Street.
Marhleworkers—J. Bullock, 822 Pender
Street West.
Marble Setters' Helpers—T. Abblnson,
266 Union Street.
Molders—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operatojn—A. O. Hansen, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo • Engravers—A, Kraft, Dominion
Engraving Co,, Empire Block.
Painters—W. J, Nagle, Room 303, Lahor
Temple. .    , .
Plumbers—W. Paton, Room 218, Labor
Temple.
Plasterers—John James. Cornish, 1809
Eleventh Ave. East. ;
Pro-smen—W. Spratt, Labor Temple.
Pattern Makers—Tom Smith, 943 Broad-
- way weat. ...
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.    *
Railway Conductors—G. ,W. Hatch, 761
Reatty wtrfeet.      * '.    '
RHlIroart Trainmen—A. E. ''McCorvIHe,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A, Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
flhimrler"—Percy Sabln, Labor Temple
Cigar Store.
Senmen's Union—W. S.. Burns, Labor
Temple.
Stoiro Kmployees—c. Martin, care Orpheum theatre.
Structural Tron Workers—A. W. Oakley,
788 Semlln Drive.
hinrw'uttern—James Rayburn, P. O. Box
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C, Dougan, No.
6, Fifteenth Ave, West.
Street Railway Employees—A. V, Lofting, 2686 Trfnlty Street,
BARTENDERS'- LOCAL --NO. ■ 676.---OF-
flce Room 208 Labor Temple.. Meets
first Sunday of each-month. President.
Wm. Laurie;'flnanolal secretary, Geo. W.
Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple. Phone
Seymour 1764. V*
COOKS', WAITERS' AND WAITRESSES'
Union.—Meets first Friday in each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, business representative. Offlce:
Room 203, Labor Temple. Hours: 9 a.m.
to 10:30; 1 p.m. to 2:30 and 6 p.m. to 6:88
p.m. competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phone Sey. 9414.
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPEN
ter* and Joiners, Local No. 617.—
Meets Monday of each week, 8 p. m. Executive committee meets every Fridav, ti
p.m. President, A. Richmond; recording
Kecrotary, Jno. Geo, Porter, 305 Labor
Temple: financial secretary, O. w. Williams.-306 Labor Temple; treasurer, L,
W. Deslel, 806 Labor Temple. Phone,
Sey.  1380.       .
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners. South Vancouver No.
1208—Meeta Aahe's hall,' Twenty-first
and Fraser Ave,, first and third Thursday of eaoh month, 8 p.m. Preeldent,
w. J. Robertson; vice-president, J. W.
Dlckieson; recording secretary, Thon.
Lindsay, Box 36, Cedar Cottage; flna.*--
clal secretary, J, A. Dlckieson; treasurer*
Robt, Lindsay; conductor, A. Conahor;
warden, E. Hall.
BRIDGE AND STRUCTURAL - IRON
WORKERS' International Unlcn,
Local 97—Meets second and fourth VtU
lay. Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President,
t. A. fleeley; secretary, A, W. Oaklej',
738 Semlln Drive, phone Sey. 689.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS',  NO.  1
—Meets every Tuesday, 8 p.m„ Rouni
807.   President, James Haslett; or
Bonding secretary,  W. ~   "
3;  flnanclal   secretar-
huHno^B   agent,   W.   8
■115.    Rt»7. R79B.
Dagnatl,   Ho*
'.ft   Brown
F.   ...
Dagrall,
Room
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO
?18.—Meets Room 801, every Manila.*.
8 p.m. President, Fred. Fuller: vice-
president. G. B. Pbllpot; recording
secretary, Jos, Russell, Labor Temple;
flnanclal- secretary, Dan Cummlngs;
treasurer, Geo. Hessell; business agent
W. F. Dunn. Room 207, Labor Temple.
HOOKBINDERS* LOCAL ' UNION NO.
106—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, In Room 205 Labor .Temple.
President, F. J. Milne; vice-president. H.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat, 615
Dunlevy avenue.    - ■ •	
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Ship Builders and Heluers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. l'i—
Meets flrst and third Mondays,. 8 p.m
President, F. Barclay, 363, Cordova East:
Rwretary; A. Fraser, 1161 HowePtreer
CIGARMAKERS'    LOCAL,    NO;    367-
Meets flrst Tuesday each month, 8
Sm.   President Geo. Gerrard; secretary,
obert-J. Craig, Kurtz Cigar Factory;
treasurer, ,S. W. Johnson.
COMMERCIAL TKLEGfeAPHEnS'
British Columbia Division, C P. System, Division No, 1—Meets 11:30 a.m>
third Sunday In month, Room 204, -Lonel
chairman, T. O'Connor, P.-.O. Box 432,
Vancouver. Local "seety, and treas.,
H. W. Wither* P. O. Box 432, Vancouver.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS', LOCAL NO
621 (Inside Men)—Meet every Friday Room 206 8 p.m. President 8. 3
Duff; recording secretory, L. R, Salmon
treasurer and business sFtent, F, L, But-
Imrhn.isrn.  Rnnm Mi!.    Sev. 8848.
LONQSHOREMENS' INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No. 88 x 62—Meetii
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander St.
President W. Elliott;- secretary, Thos,
Nixon,   , .
l'ATTKRN     MAKERS'     LEAGUE    OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
Trinity Branch meets ist and 3rd l'"ri-
day* nt Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st„ room 206. Robert C, Sampson, Pirn, 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph Q<
Lyon, Fin.'Sec, 1721 Grnnt st; Tom
Smith, Rec Sec, 043 Broadway: west.
Marine Engineers—E,  Read, 869 Thur-
HTEROTVPERff AND ELECTROTVP
ers' Union, No, 88, of Vancouver
and Victoria—Meets second Wednesday
of each month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple,
President, Chas. Bayley; recording secretary, Chris Homewood, 249 13th Ave.
East s       ,
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple, second and
fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and first
and third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President,
H, Schofleld, phone Fairmont 988; recording secretary, Albert V. Lofting, 2636
Trunlty Street, phone Highland . 1672:
financial secretary, Fred A, Hoover, 2409
Clark drive.. • ' •'
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners, Victoria
Branch. Meets every Thursday, 8 p.m.,
Labor Hall, Johnson St, Victoria. Business Agent, B, Simmons. Offlce hours,
8 to 9 a.m.. 1:30 to 2:30, 4:30 to 6:80
p.m. Secretary, A. E. Wrench; office
hours, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p,m» and 2 to 6:80
p.m.; phone 2668. P. O. Box 770, Vic-
torla, B. C. ;__	
MXVXBB' VVXOVI.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 109
Western' Federation, of Miners-
Meets Sunday evenings, ln Union HaU,
President, W. Fleming; secretary-treasurer, M  P| Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B.C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
> No. 2888. U. M. W. of A.—Meets
Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President, Sam Outhrle; secretary, Duncan
McKenzle, Ladysmlth, B. C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.of A.
—Meets every Monday at 7:30 p.m. In
the Athletic Club, Chapel Street Arthur
Jordan, Box 410, Naniamo, B. C. .
ROSSLAND MINERS' UNION, NO. 88,
Western Federation of Miners-
Meets every Wednesday evening, In
Miners' Union hall, Band and orchestra
apen for engagement. Theatre for rent.
President, Sam Stevens; secretary, Herbert Varcol, Box 421,  Rossland, B, C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 106, W. F. Of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7:30 p.m. President
F. W. Perrin: secretary, Frank Campbell, Box 26, Trail, B, C.
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF, SOCIAL
DEMOCRATIC PART* — Public
meetings In Dominion Theatre, Granville Street Sunday evenings. Secretary, O. L. Charlton, >3828 Main Street
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATION-
y al Local 397—Meeta first and third
Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204, ,Labor
Temple. Financial secretary, E. prendergast, Room 216. '
TAILORS, JOURNEYMAN TAILORS'
•UNION OF AMERICA, Local No,17S
—Meetings. held first Tuesday iff each
month, 8. u.m. ■ president J.-T, Ellsworth; recording and corresponding .secretary. W. W. hocken. P. O. Box 503:
financial secretary, L, Kakely, P. O. Box
f03.   ' .....
TILE LAYERS" AND HELPERS', LO-
cal No. 62—'Meets first and third
Wednesdays each month, 8 p.m. 'President J- Kavanagh; secretary, E. A. E.
Morrison, 1769 Elevcnjth Ave. East.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 226—
. Meets last Sunday each month, 2
P.m. President, A. E. Robb; vice-president. A. H. England; secretary-treasurer,
It. H. Neelands, P.O. Box 66,
nw wsintnrana, o. o.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES ft
Labor* Council—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday- at 8 p.m., ' In
Labor Hall. President, R. A. Stoney;
flnanclal secretary, J, B, Chockley; general secretary, B. D. Grant, P. O. Box
834.   The public Is Invited to attend,
AMALGAMATED   SOCIETY   OF   CAR-
PENTERS AND JOINERS meets every
second, and fourth Thursday of each
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St, at 8 p.m. Preildent J.' L. Hogg, Hankey Blk., Sapperton; Secretary, A, McDonald, 831 Royal
Ave., New Westminster.
PLUMBERS' and STEAM FITTERS' LO
cal 496—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7:30 p.m, President, D, Webster; secretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 066, New
Westminster, B. C.       ,-
UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CAR-
'penters, Local Union No. 1689—
Meets every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Ten*
pie, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, M, C, Schmendt; secretary, A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westminster, B. C, -_•_ f   *_
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEETS IN
Lahor Temple, Now Westminster, corner Seventh street and Royal avenue,
every second Sundny of each month, at
1 rlto p.m, President, P. Paulsen; secretary, S. W, Jameson, Visiting brothers
Invited.. ...
wrnaiCM mvwawamT, b.o.
PRINCE RUPERT TYPOORAPIHCAr
, Unlrtn No. 413—Meets last Sundny
in month at Carpenters' Hall. President, Glenn Searle; secretary-treasurer,
W. D. Black, P.O. Box 849.
snroMzi or coal immio aaov-
unon,
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and lh a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of 81 an .acre. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leased to one applicant
Application for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district in whieh tha
rights applied for one situated.
In surveyed territory the land must he
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
stoked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of |6, which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the.rate of five cents p/br ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full Quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay flic ... .
ty thereon.   If the coal mining .rights
chantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon.   If the coal miniitj -■• • ■
are not  being  operated,  such
should be furnished at least once .
The lease will include the coal i
returns
rights only, but tho lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may ,be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of $10 an acre.
.For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Lands.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N,   B.~Unauthorized   publication   of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
PATRONIZE!    B     C.     FKDB RATION 1ST
^nVHRTISBRB— AND TELL THBM  WHY.
AND
Porter
_ . Of America riQaf*
cbwihht aTwei msMMisTiasB leea
Use Electric Irons
Comfort
Convenience
Economy
The coll (or continuou. operation it only a few cents per hour.
The iron "operated from an ordinary household socket.
The iron, sold by this company sre comttucted on the beit principle.,
this mean, an appliance which il hot st the point and sool st the handle.
Th; iron bean the manufacturer'! guarantee,
Carrall and
Hsstings Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
PHONE SEYMOUR 5000
1138 Granville St.
near Davie FRIDAY..;
..JULY 4,1111'-"
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIBT
New Middy Bowes
Ut THJ5 JTOlOE BTORB
We show an excellent range of these popular models
for girls of 8 to* lfi years of age. Ton will do particularly
well to tee them if yen requireajqrtbiug in that line. For
style and qutflity "represented, the price* are decidedly
moderate. Note these: •' ,  .    ^
Middy blouses in white,"   Middy blouses with  de^
with navy, scarlet and    . taehable collar and
saxe   blue   collar  and      cuffs; come in white, in
cuffs,  and  laced with      plain or Norfolk style,
'    cord to irfatch, at...$2.00 .   at .82,00
Norfolk middy blouses, with patent leather belt; come in
white, with collar and cuffs of navy, saxe, blue or
scarlet, at ..::-. ■--■■ ......82.60
(Unrhnn Srga&alf, aCitnttpJi
575 Gramlilt Street      Vancouver, B.C.
Every Union Man in Vancouver Should Be a
Patron of the
LABOR TEMPLE
Cigar and Newstand
UNION LABEL CIGARS
Cigarettes and  Tobacco
" THE SMILING SCOTCHMAN ON THE JOB "
JAMES STARK __&.
 nI  ' . ■   *       —*Mmm-A»t—-—t9ami—t
bastctqs i
Charming Assembly New Summer Suits for Women
The most bewitching styles that ever a spring hu seen are here on
- -■  *    - -       •-■ -*-•*— * lay.   The unusual beauty
  _, j great measure due to the superior quality
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display.    Some "of them**in our window today"
these new spring suits \a In a '—
attractive suite we have'ever shown. Practicability Is the great feature
of these garments. They are designed in the newest and most up-to-date
atylea; smartly tailored, daintily finished and most becoming to all women,
A Few Distinctive Models Are Briefly Outlined Here
Smart navy tailored suits, of line
French aerge with semi-fitted
coats, notched collars and revers.
The coats are cut with either the
new atralght or cut-away fronts,
with .breast pocket and lined with
grey satin. Skirts are In two-
panel styles, showing new Bide" effects. Price .988.00 and 9M.00
Handsome suit -of light .grey
Bedford cord. The coat la cut on
straight lines with two-button fastening and rounded front, coat collar and black satin revers, three-
button fastening, lined with
grey satin. Neatly out skirt,
snowing pleats on aide gores.
Price ,.. |38.00
Dressy tan suit, made of the new
plplln material; The coat shows
cut-away front and fancy shaped
back, collar and cuffs, smartly
trimmed with cream- and brown
Eponge, two-button , fastening,
lined with tan measallne. . Tha,
skirt Is made with high waist line
and new wide front   Price I
Fancy black and white Bedford
cord ault The coat haa a slightly
cut-away front, fancy shaped col- '
lar and blac kaatln revers, three-
button fastening, tailored sleeves
with fancy cuffs, lined with grey
satin. Four-pieced sklrta with
panel front and back. Price "~" ™
PHONE FAIR. 447.
2337 MAIN STREET. .
TOOLS-Best Assortment in City
Closest Pripes. Satisfaction Guaranteed
If a Tool is not satisfactory to yeu in every
way, we want you to bring it back. We will
replace it, br return .money without questien.
J* Aa FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2327-2328       111 Hastings Street West
Honest and Artistic
Dentistry
The most scientific snd
up-to-dste-methods
DR. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
301 DOMINION TRUST BLDC.
Open (rom 9 s.m. to S p.m.
RING   UP   SEYMOUR   2364   FOR   APPOINTMENT
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hsstings Street Weit
DR. BRETT ANDERSON-Den/w/
•J Opetatet by the' latest, moit Kientific sad psinleu method.
Specialist in Gown, Bridge, Piste snd Geld Inlay Work
Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
British Columbia Land
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying
Stock and Poultry
British Columbia Grants Pre-emptions of*
160 Acres to Actual Settlers at
$1 ftBB; A£RE
TERMS: Residence on ihe land (or si least .
two yean; improvements to the extent oi $2.50 '
* per acre) payment oi $40 st the end oi two
years, snd die balance of $160 (i.e. $1.20) in
3 annual instalments of $40, with interest st 6%
For Further Information Apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Intimation, Victoria
Stoves M5 Ranges
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters tor Carpenters'Tools
and all kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
OWEN fc MORRISON
WAGE WORKERS'FORUM
Tully Boycs snd the O. M. W. of A.
Editor B. O. Feaeratlonlst: In a recent Issue ot the Nsnslmo Herald, one
Tully Boyce propounds a number ot
questions relative to the miners'
strike. The questions are directed at
the.undersigned and are, I take it, designed to establish the tact to Mr,
Boyce's satisfaction that the United
Mine Workers of America Invaded.
Nanalmo without the solicitation of
the Nanaimo miners. Or, to use the
vernsculsr of the, little chaps, he
wants to prove that we "butted In."
I am admonished by Hr. Boyce to
answer hts questions "truthfully and
fully," and I am warned that ''flffe-
spun theories, glittering generalities
and evasive answers will not be satisfactory," Mr. Boyce also hss the following to ssy: "That no misunderstanding may arise ss to tbe nsture
of the Information required, not only
by the employees of the Western Fuel
company, but also by an Intereited
public, I am taking the liberty of leading up to: this Inquiry, by a series of
questions."
lam equally anxious thst no misunderstanding may arise, so I shall
have to Inform Mr. Boyce at the outset, thst, stlde from his own assumption, I have had no advice as to his.
having been selected ss the spokesman or the official Interrogator for
the "employees of the Western Fuel,
company or an interested public.".
Hence, I em forced to conclude thst
Mr. Boyce hss usurped his position,
and will, I fear, unless restrained,,
occupy muoh the same position he
seeks to establish through his series
of questions Is the position occupied;
by the D. M. W. ot A. Furthermore,
In the absence of any advice as to
Mr, Boyce's official status, I shall;
have to regard him as an Individual,
and as an individual I shall address;
him.
Now, Tully, for your Information, I
advise that I havs nelthsr time nor Inclination to Indulge ip a newspaper
controversy with every Tom, Dick and
Harry who sees fit to ssk me a string;
of questions. It keeps me very busy,
trying .to protect the Interests of]
Vsncouver Island miners sgalnst designing snemles and working out
plans whlcb will eventually compel
the mine owners to concede to the
men at least a reasonable measure of;
the justice they should have, and inasmuch as you are' doubtless thoroughly familiar with some 61 the Influences at.work to accomplish our,
dsfest, you will understand that I
have no time for cavil. Moreover; It
seems „to me that you have gone a
long way afield to secure the information you wish to have, and, lest one
of my doubtful Integrity should,
through Inadvertence or by design,
resort to "fine-spun theories, glittering generalities and evasive answers"
and fall to satisfy one of your exacting temperament, I would suggest that
you desert your old crowd and Join
the U. M. W, of A., attend their meetings, and I think you will find right at
home 1200 or 1600 of the boys who
will he able to answer any essential
questions you msy have to ask, lt not
to your satisfaction at least to their
own, snd while you may not gain as
much publicity by this means Sb you
do by making your Inquiries through
the newspapers,-you will get Information Nrat hand.
Then you should belong to the
union at any rate, .because the union
hoys are fighting the game Of* men,
and. It la much more Itaanly to defend
the rights ot men than to defend evil
greed.
Now, as to tbe havoc which.you allege we have worked In Nanalmo, you
need labor under no further mental
distress because of the possible belief
tbat I am unmindful of our respon
Blbllity. I assure you the: burden
weighs heavily with me. I am In full
sympathy with the men, women and
children who have to endure the suffering snd make the. sacrifices, and I
often ponder over the cruel inhumanity and fiendish rapacity of such concerns ss the Western Fuel company,
who mercilessly force men, women
snd children to the last degree of endurance In order to perpetuate their
reign of Infamous Injustice, and, Mr.
Boyce, you should bear ln mind that
it is the men of your type who make
the burden heavier and delay tbe
coming of relief.
F. FARRINGTON.
Vancouver, June 27.
Mr. Woodman and ths O, M. W. of A.
Edtlor B. C. Federatlonist: In the
June 22nd Issue of the Nsnslmo Herald there sppeared, under the. caption
"Nanaimo's Loss Washington's Gain,"
an article written by one .William
Woodman, -tn which he pretends to
prove thst the officers of the United
Mine Workers of America are In
lague with the Washington mine owners to cspture the markets formerly
supplied by tbe Vancouver Island mine
owners.
Of course we understand Mr. Wood-
nun Is one of the faithful lteutensnts
of the Western Fuel compsny and that
his article Is only a part of a general
scheme Inspired to create distrust and
turbulence and Anally a break In,the
ranks of the striking miners. We do
not think even Mr. Woodman actually
believes this canard to which he Is
giving circulation, and,'by reason ot
psst experience, we are convinced he
Is too closely allied with the company,
and too strongly prejudiced tn their
favor, to allow himself to be penetrated or influenced by any argument
we might advance 'In opposition to
his specious Insinuations. Therefore,
lt would, be a futile waste of .time to
debate the question with him.
However, for fear Mr, Woodman
would parade our silence as sn evidence of guilt, we will make a brief
analysis of his article.
When cunning tricksters wish to
defame an opponent they resort to the
use of slanderous chicanery, carefully
worded In such a was as to have the
desired effect and yet unable the
trickster to escape legal prosecution
for his aot. Similarly for this reason, Mr. Woodman does not reduce
bis insinuations to. a clean-cut charge
that such s conspiracy does exist and
thereby lay himself amenable to the
law.
For example: I could lie convinced
ln my own mind that Mr. Woodman
was only a slinking lackey, a prostituted tool of the Western Fuel company, who. was using his Influence
to Inveigle the msn to- desert their
union snd return to work, snd no man:
would have the right to deprive me of
my conviction and I could continue to
hold it with impunity. But If I were
to give expression to my conviction by
making a tangible and unequivocal
charge that Mr. Woodman "was a
Blinking lackey, a prostituted tool of
the Western Fuel company and was
using his Influence to Inveigle the
men to dessrt their unloifahd return
to work,' 'then I would make myself
amenable to the law, and Mr. Wood-
w. a. ooon
Whs kas esse atssssa te iiirmsl ths
Btfts* (msi of atta—ttat fa»Sf-
hsumsMtatswTsstiesM Boeasstsr,
Ft, t—_g M-esartst Hi
MONBTMt HUBPABAMS
ENDOW W RIOT OF PON
AND FROLIO ON SATURDAY
Nanaimo Miners, Their Wivea,
Ohlldren sod Priendi Herald
Day of Freedom's Triumph
Beating a. requiem for the deceased
hopes of the coal mine employers, fifteen hundred pairs of feet sounded an
Inspiring tattoo on ths pavements of
Nanalmo last Saturday.' Symbolic at
once of savage despair and victorious
power—the despair of capital and the
power of labor-r-the rhythmic tramp
of those marching feet heralded the
arrival.of Organised Labor to the
mines of Vancouver Island.
Fifteen hundred striking miners,
with their wives and children, marched In tbe. greatest parade ever seen
in Nanalmo for the purpose of demonstrating their solidarity to all who
cared to witness.
How different were these people to
the vicious pictures drawn of strikers
by tbe, hirelings who devote their
pens to such miserable service! Confident in their unity and the Justice
of their cause, their faces shone with
serene snd smiling assurance. On
their way to a pleasure ground, rather
.than to riot and 'destruction, they
fairly radiated a spirit In wblch there
was no shsdofr of a thought of failure,
, The parade ended ln a "riot" of fun
and frolic. There was some oratory
too, but the audience of miners listened In vain tor the "wild statements of
blatant agitators," reported to be always forthcoming at meetings of the
strikers. Wbat they heard wss common sense snd earnest appreciation
of their wrongs from men of their
own kind, such as are Pettigrew, Pattlnson, Foster, Meikle, etc. Dlavld
Rees, of Fernle, was there too and
gave voice In a ringing address, to
tbe determination of all present, to
stand by the two great words: "No
Surrender."
That the coal miners who were recently brought here by tie Canadian
Collieries Co., to ecab at Cumberland,
were not Just exactly "right" with
tbelr home union Is shown by the letter below. Hew union fash, to such a
number, could be herded off hurriedly,
without even taking out clearance
csrds, Is somewhat difficult to understand. However, most of them appear
to be making amende for their mistake In believing all they hear at the
hands of unscrupulous scab procurers.
The letter reade:
Mlners's Secretary,
Wheatley Hill Lodge,
Tbornley, B. O.
June I, UU.
J. McAllister, Sac-Trees.,
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir: Tour letter of Msy 18th
to hand, and I beg to reply by saying
that I read your letter out to a special
general meeting of bur lodge aad our
men are really disgusted at the action
of these men, whom we know very
well,    .
Councillor: P. Lee moved a motion
condemning the action of these men
end disassociating . ourselves from
them. They did not get an International clearance card from ue, and
should they return at any time they
will be. published In the county of
Durham.
And moreover, If they remain for a
period of time after July It of this
yesr thsy will, on their return, have
to pay all arrears up, also Insurance
act contributions.       ..'■'■■•>
Councillor F, Qulnn seconded tbe
motion snd I wss Instructed to write;
you.
I have sent a copy of your letter to
The Dally Citlsen, the national labor
organ of tbls county.
I am afraid some of them have been
misled, ss when they were here they
were solid trade unionists.
If possible get them together and
read my letter to them. I appeal to
them to step Immediately, for their
wives and families' sake, as well ss
for their own, If they will stop work
immediately, all will be well. If not I
cannot hold out any sympathy for
them.
It waa our Intention to get their
lying on money paid over to their
wives, but tbat la null and void now.
Yours ln unity, I remain,
FRANCIS QUINN,
Miners' Secretary and I. L. P.
Councillor.
man could secure legal redress for
sny injuries suffered because of my
charge.
We do not find Mr. Woodman making any direct charge of conspiracy,
and he craftily evades legal prosecution by use of language which follows: "It Is my firm conviction that
the underlying motives and the real
object of the officers is to promote
the coal interests of the state of
Washington." Now, If Mr. Woodman
will make a definite charge and sped.
fy names so that legal action may be
taken, we will guarantee bim an opportunity to expose tbe conspiracy
and Mr. Woodman ahould do this or
else quit driveling about his "firm
convictions."
Now let us see If his article la
really the result ot "firm conviction,"
or simply the deceptive scheme of a
vile hypocrite. Obviously, working
from the hypothesis tbat the "truth
halt told Is more Injuriously than a
He," Mr. Woodman pretends to support his "firm conviction" by quoting
in part only an article written by myself and published ln the United Mine
Workers' Journal of March 27, 1913.
If he had quoted a continuation of the
same article he would have shown
the Nanalmo miners that I also had
the following to aay:
The duty devolving upon the
United Mine Workers of America
is to organize Vancouver Island
and adjacent territory, raise the
standard of employment and act
as a balancing medium in the establishment of equitable competitive mining rates.
Do the Nanalmo miners object to
the United Workers of America doing
this for them, and la Mr. Woodman
sincere when be attempts to deceive,
by refusing to tell all the facts In the
case?
Furthermore, there Is another fact
the Nanaimo miners should keep ln
mind, which is thst the Vancouver
Island mine owners can place themselves In position to reclaim their
markets, sny time they wish to do so,
by agreeing to give to the men the
prices for their labor and conditions
of employment, and the protective
rights they are entitled to.
F. FARRINOTON.
Vancouver, B, C, June 27,
Thoas Woodman-Boycs Letters.
Editor'Federationist: I would like
an opportunity to refer briefly to the
letters of Tully Boyce and W. Woodman In the Nanalmo Dally Herald.
Boyce asks a lot of queatlons of U. M.
W. of A. offlclsls, knowing that they
have no time to waste on his nonsense. Having not much to do myself, thanks to the stubbornness of
tbe Canadian Collieries Co,, I will devote a little time to these freaks.
Boyce asks if there was any grievance between the Western Fuel Co.
and the men. He should worry about
this as the men have already answered
It by laying down their toots. He
wants to know by what right the union
has done various things. By the
same right the mine owners used
when they discriminated against our
fellow-miners, for telling the truth
about the mines. By the same right
that tho employers use when they
withhold compensation from widows,
misrepresent contritions to poor men
in England and commit all the other
acts of depredation for which they
are notorious. I refer to the right of
power.
Boyce asks us why we prevent the
Western Fuel Co. from protecting its
property. We do not prevent, and
have no objection to the Western
Fuel Co. protecting any of Its property. We do, however, object to protecting It for them,
Woodman says the mine owners of
Washington have given Bro. Farrlng-
WPNTEO WNEIS
NEW WESTMINSTER AND
VANCOUVER TYPO. UNIONS
ASKED TO AFFILIATE
Phllo Howard, representing the
Northwestern Typographical conference, with headquartera; at Seattle,
was a visitor In Seattle during the
week. Last Sunday he attended the
Typo, meetings of New Westminster
and Vancouver with a view of securing the affiliation of both these unions.
In both esses tor. Howard was given
a good reception and hearing and the
question has been referred to the
executive committees or each union
to report upon at next meeting.
The Typo, conference embraces
within its Jurisdiction the states of
Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Wash-
IngtOn, and tbe province of British
Columbia, and it "shall owe allegiance
to and be subordinate to the International Typographical union."
The primary objeot of the conference is to more thoroughly organise
the outlying districts of cities, bring
in all men and women working at the
printing Industry within the ranks of
the International, and for which pur
pose it Is recommended that sll locals
comprising this conference extend
their jurisdiction to Include such outlying districts, by application to the
International president Immediately,
to maintain a more uniform scale, better working conditions, and to asslsl
one another by all honorable means,
to advertise, protect and promote the
use of the union label within this jurisdiction; to create public sentiment
against and assist in combating the
white plague, so disastrous to members of our craft; to work In conjunction with allied craftsmen, and when
deemed expedient, to send representatives to master pritners' associations,
that a better understanding may be
reached relative to the preservation
and conservation of the craft.
Parker Williams st Colllngwood
With declarations that the Salvation
Army was one of the most unscrupulous go-betweens between labor and
religion, Parker Williams, Socialist
M.L.A., for Newcastle, Vancouver Island, stated to an East Colllngwood
audience last Sunday night that the
Army dumped down hundreds of men
right ln the city of Vancouver under
an agreement with the government
and collected a bonus from the government for doing so,
For a long time past, continued the
speaker, the C. P. R. had dominated
matters ln Canada, and It was about
time the people dealt with things as
they were. Now a new corporation,
tbe Canadian Northern, had come Into
existence, and he wished to know why
the C. P. R. had allowed It to come ln
and supplant It without any opposition. There was something more than
a lack of competition between the two
railway companies.
The worker was tn exactly the same
position as sny other msn who had
anything to sell, but If he missed the
sale he could never catcb up the loss.
The government and other big combinations were working against him',
and a million and a half dollars were
put down by the government tn dumping foreign labor Into tbe markets.
Although the government had talked about a "white BrltlBh Columbia,"
the province was a seething horde of
Mongolians, and nothing was done to
limit the number of Asiatics who were
comneting against white labor.
What they would have to do, he
nverred, was to flrst break the work-
logman's confidence in Toryism, then
they could talk facts and bring along
better men.
ton a million dollars to help organize
the mines on the Island. Well, If victory was probable before, now It Is
certain. I hope the story is true, but
don't see how tt can be, coming, as It
does, from lickspittles for the company and traitors to the men. In regard to patriotism, I would point out
that a white striker here was turned
out o fthe house he was occupying by
a Jap landlord. Chinese and Jap
scabs sre in proportion to white scabs
in the Cumberland mines aB 100 to 1.
There are practically no experienced
miners working here at all. The
prospects for victory could not be
brighter,
ROBT. WALKER.
Cumberland, B. C, July 3.
.- j.       .   -—i?m——^—^—___^___wtama_a\
Overalls and^Glovea
We carry a good etook ot Carhartt Overialle, bltia,*
v    .". . blaok and etriped-— •..•l-^-JfaJO'''*
Kentucky "Jean -— -■——, -~ Wfc..
Buok Brand Overalls — —Z ■-£— -tjmy
Carhartt Gauntlets, $1.60 ~ ^—% Msfe*
tt B. K. Gauntlets, 75o to .',,.,,   yi-.i'i.^jtSg,-; %..:
CLUBBA, STEWART
softs
SHOES FOR ViWt
•HOIS POR SERVICE
SHOE! FOR DREM
' UNION SHOE* FOR COMFORT
POR EVERV RETIREMENT
We've pioked winners to Men's Fall Bhoea. We're at the eervioe
of every man who desires the beat shoes hia money oan buy.
W    T    O P P   2°* MAIN STREET
UNIOJ^SO
AMH
no matter what I ,    	
plain and readable impression ef this Stamp.
*" '   s without the Dnien Stamp are
Alls
always Non-Union.   __^__^___
Beet A *ho« Workare' Uaslon
ZM Summsr Street Boston, Mass.
1. F.Tobln, Pres.    C. L. Bains, aee.-Treaa..
Padmore's Big Cigar!
642 GRANVlLLF STREET
TOBACCOS and CiMRS
ore
you* SUMMER STJIT
Should be Tailor-made and made by Union Tailors. Fine stock to select bam
FRED PERRY Ubor T**&* *-*«
*   ***■"»*■"''    *  "M*"*!*.* *   &„„ Hmw __ Ds-wn, Sums
Hardware
<J A splendid etook ot the beat in the-yore's ftarkatj?
We make a specialty of supplying every need and requirement of. the artisan in our line,
McTAGGART & MOSGROP
7 Hastings Street West
Phone Sejmonr CM
Get Your Money's Worth
^^v^^VrN^c
i.iv*s
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
Union
The use of the label on your printing (no extra coat to you)
will help us do our duty in fighting tuberculosis
___h "7^gj£ Wh'*'"1 \* "> '■ 11 !<■■ mm; .-n'lil
^PRESIDENT
^» SUSPENDERS
'Work with the President and
the President worts with you"
•   VsasMsst ftufwdsrs Oaaisatsse
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES
LIMITED      V PAGE FOUB
THE BRITISH COLPMBTA FED1RATIONIST
FRIDAY...
.JULY 4, IMS
Mr. Union Man
Here ia the plaoe to
buy a union-made
HAT
We oarry the largeet
assortment of union-
made bats in
SOFT
STIFF
TWEED
VELOURS
-nr oanada
Leader Exclusive
.00 Hat Store
$2
8.W. Comer Hastings and
Abbott Streete
Largeet Canadian Betailers of
H&00 Hate
STRIKE ON
Minera Keep Away
THE striko is itUl on at th»
1 Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, »t Sheep Creek, B. C.
AU working men urged to ittf
■way until thia strike ia fettled.
Order This Mikibs* Union
Aci-mb the canon of tha
Bulkey River, Brltlih Col-*
umbla, the Slwash Indlani,
many years ago, built a
wooden bridge In which the
cantilever principle of the
modern engineer la crudely
embodied. One hundred feet
long, lt .swung high above
the river, and here, after
many yeara, lt waa discovered by engineer! surveying
for the Grand Trunk Pacific.
The bridge waa anchored on
each aide by rock. When It
waa examined lt was found
to be constructed of wood
and wire,   Thla   wire,   ln-
?iutry showed, waa stolen
rom the abandoned line of
the Western Union Telegraph Company, which was
Intended to extend from
America to Asia by way of
Bchrlng Strait. The operation of the Atlantic Cable In
1865 caused the project to
be abandoned, though surveys had been made far Into
the forest. Slwash Indians
inhabit this part of British
Columbia, and among them
muat have been one who
lacked only the refining Influence of civilisation to
make him a conatructlon
engineer. He and members
of his tribe built the bridge
of the crude materials at
hand. The suspended span
was truss-like and constated
of three panels. All the
timber was securely *
with telegraph wire.
cahtiuvm amoor suilt by ihoiami.
Eight-hour Law for Oregon
All workeri employed directly or
Indirectly by the state, of Oregon will
have an eight-hour work day, the matter having been put to a referendum
and carrying by 66,508 to 48,078.
At the same time that this measure
waa carried, another measure which
provided tbat permits to hold public
meetings of protest In public buildings
or on public grounds, must have the
consent of the mayor In the dty In
whioh they were held, was defeated
by a subitantlal. majority.
The elections ln Holland have resulted In the downfall of the Conier-
vatlve-Clerloal majority. The Socialists snd Radicals have made great
suited ln the downfall of the Oonaer-
galns over the united reactionaries
and are In a position to block the government's measures or enact measures
of their own whenever they shall find
common ground for action,
SUMMER
R A C £
MEETING
—Courtesy Bridesmen's Magaaliie.
ANNUAL NEWSPAPER HEAT.
Seven
High-Class
Races
Daily
The westhsr Is very hot In Chicago,
New York, Baltimore, Toronto and
other Eastern cities.
With an unblemished reputation for
veracity to risk, ws unhesitatingly
state that It was hot In those places
last July, and also the July, prior to
that. In tact, history records a great
dearth of cold spells In the month of
July of sny previous yesr. Likewise,
it requires no very great meteorological prescience to forecast a warm spall
nsxt July.
But to read the press despstches,
one would Imagine that this Is the
first time It ever really warmed up tn
the Bast. The startling performances
of the mercury are featured aa something hitherto unheard of; whereaa
the mercury hasn't had halt a chance
to show what It can do yet. Ninety-
two ln the shade la no more than comfortable If folks have an opportunity
to seek comfort.
And there's where the trouble comes
ln. People sre dying, not at all from
excessive heat, hut from their miser
able condition of existence., naturally
slightly accentuated by. extremes of
temperature. It a man wears summer
clothes out on a prairie.when It'is ten
below sero, he will likely freeze to
itAsth, but the weather could not be
said to be extraordinarily Severe. Also
If, In the summer months, he constructs a habitation designed to collect and ooncentrate the sun's rays so
aa to form s sort Of Dutch oven, he
will suffer—from his own folly.
This Is precisely what has transpired In the conatructlon of modern
large cities. Crowded, suffocating
tenements designee to bouse, not to
shelter, brick snd concrete walls between which lie miles of boiling, stinking pavements, stuffy offices and stuffier workrooms, together with a poverty-stricken population that must
stay, suffocate and be damned, Is whst
mskes warm weather unbearable.
Don't let us blame It on the sun.
If ths newspapers would devote
some six or seven temperate months
to" agitating tor some preparation for.
the extreme weather, Including sufficient remuneration to permit more of
us to take a fay-off in that period, the
death rate would be more Inclined to
stick around the norms! throughout
the year. Instesd of that, they prefer
to wait tor July to come around, then
start waving thslr arms and howling
puny Imprecations at Old Sol, who,
ems here flrst and has been conduct-1
Inst, bosh-ess In the ssme way sines
about a million years before New Tork
and Chicago were thought of. |
BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL
RECOMMENDS FEDERATION
OF TWO LABORERS' UNIONS
At the regular meeting ot Vancouver Building Trades council President
McDonald ocoupled the chair and all
other officers were present Minutes
of previous meeting approved aB read.
Communications: From Granite
Cutters' looal.   Received.
Prom Tile Layers' International organisation.   Received.
Prom Plumbers' International organisation.   Received.
From T. M. 0. A., re labor ln new
building. Received and a committee
appointed to Interview contractors.
Committee: Delegates Nagle, Sully
and Watchman.
Committee re laborers' dispute
recommended that No. 230 go over to
No. 86 ln a body, and If they are unable to obtain justice In that body to
make application tor a separate char
ter. Received and concurred In, and
secretary Instructed to forward copy
to   headquarters   of laborers' inter
Furthsr Civic Rsduotlons   '
More than 100 men have heen laid
off by the olty from sewer snd road
construction  gangs during ths  last
week or so, because of the curtailment of tbe board of wOrk appropriations by the finance committee,—
Dslly Province.
»"
District IS Executive Besrd Msst
The executive board of District 18,
U. M, W, of A„ met at'Fernie on Monday and were In session until Wednes-
dsy.. After the tellers- report wss submitted, J. E. Smith was Installed as
district preeldent.
Vice-president Jones snd Secretary
Carter tendered their resignations to
take effect on August 1st. An election for these respective offices will
be held on July 23rd.
"Hat" Prsssmen Orgsnlxs
Local 179, International Printing
Pressmen snd Assistants' Union of
North America, bss been orgsnlsed ln
Medicine Hat, the charter having been
received today from Jos. C. Orr, Inter
national Secretary-Treasurer, Rogers-
ville, Tenn. The temporary oncers
are L. R. Adams, uhalrman,*and A. O.
Gray, secretary- Tbe charter members sre J. R. Conley, L. R. Adsms.
fl. McCann, 8, W. Busse, R. Workman,
W. Chtpperfleld, H. F. Greene, B. N.
Dawson snd A. <3. Gray.
- A Little Comparison
The following significant advt. appears ln s Winnipeg paper:
"Cooking with electricity mesas a
smokeless, dustless kitchen. It also
means better cooking tor with the
electric range the beat Is uniform at
all times.. Call'and see our stock of
electric ranges, snd get our prices.
Remember fuel only costs one sent psr
kllcwstt. Gas Stove Department, Winnipeg Electric Railway Co,, "122 Main
St.   Phone M.2622."
The Vanoouver rate Is 11 cents
gross, as compared with the Winnipeg
rate of 1 cent,
Vancouver Unionist Goes te Seattle
E. Staples, treasurer of Palntera'
union No.' 138, secretary of the Build.
ing Trades Council, snd a delegate to
tbe central labor body, has resigned
those offlces during thie psst week, snd
will lsave for Seattle 'tomorrow, where
he hopes to secure employment at his
trade. Mr, Staples hss been a resident
of Vancouver and Victoria for the past
six years, snd sn active worker all the
while In the trades union movement
He will be very much missed is Labor
Temple circles, and his friends will
join with The Fed. ln wishing him bet-
ter luck In snother of; the Bound dttss.
Necessity of s job makes countless
millions move.
TRAINS LEAVE
GRANVILLE ST.
STATION
12:30,1,1:30,2 p.m.
Ths Sins ef the Fsthsr
Tommy csme  boms  from  school
rather morose.
Well, my son," obssrved the father
cheerfully, "how did you get on at
school today?"
Tommy said that he had been whipped and kept In.
"It was because you told me ths
wrong anawer," he added. "Laat
night I asked you how much wss a
million dollars, and you said It 'was s
hell of a.lot.' That Isn't the right
answer."
J. W. Hlnchcllffe will speak ln
Labor Temple on Sunday evening,
July 6, under the auspices of ths S.
D. Party of Canada. Subject: "Signs
of the Times."
MEN ARE WOLFED
. AND MALTREATED
IN RAILWAY CAMPS
Wages   Docked—Outrageous  Charges
for Food and Transportation-
Charges Toronto Pspsr
The. fakir's slogan "to the west, to
the west to the land of sweets and
honey snd lots of employment, high
wages, great opportunities of attaining remunerative positions and not-
manent wprk," Is fraudulent,. mallei-
out snd criminal—a graft for employment agencies, a fee. for railway contractor's foremen, snd a continuous
Income for the railways themselves,
says the Toronto Telegram ot June 23.
Young men, beware of the tempting
<ner of advanced fare and a job ln unknown regions st "the end of the
steel." The end of the steel might
well be tbe point ot a gun held at the
pilgrim's head, considering the outrageous form of Intimidation used by
brutal railway contractors snd their
henchmen against friendless unfortunates who thus fall Into their clutches
out In the wilds.
It Is ths same old story all through
the west In the rough work neither
English, Irish nor Scotch hss a look-
in. It Is the foreigner the bosses
want. Ignorance of the language, aad
accustomed subjsetlon In his Euro-
pssn home .all militate against hts
making a fuss when they put It over
him. The paid foreign ..Interpreter
Is a confederate of the foreman, and
aids and' abate him In hla nefarious
work. Ths poor dumb driven workmen thus fall an easy prey to unprincipled bosses, and foramen who levy
a tax on their jobs, .No tax, no job,
The foreman gets Us twenty-nve cents
a day, tha usual practice. This se-
counts for the preference given the
men who have neither the sense nor
the courage to resist such tyranny.
Then the system of "trucking," long
an offence against the laws ot Great
Britain, Is carried to the very last
stages of criminal extortion out here.
Goods vended et the only sources of
supply, the companies' stores, are aold
at prices 200 and 800 per eent, above
their value. Consequently tbere Is
seldom much much cssh due the worker." Tbe bslanee Is on the debit side
very frequently, no mutter how long
nor how faithfully he works.
Streetrallway Employees
G. B, B. Member Msngus Sinclair In
May organised Dlv, No. 613, Lethbrldge, Alta,, and reports favorably upon the new local. From Lethbrldge
he wae dispatched to Vsncouver, B.C.,
where Divisions Nos. 101, 109, snd
134, tbe latter two of Victoria and
New Westminster respectively, are Involved In work upon a proposed new
agreement This work wss ln progress
at the dose of the month.
A moot distinctive honor has been
conferred upon the International President of the A. A. of 8. * B. R. B. of
A, snd, Incidentally, upon the association, by tbe recent appointment of
Pres. W: D. Mshon upon the Detroit
Municipal Street Railway Board of
Commissioners. Ths position Is purely honorary, as It csrries with It ao
salary,—Motorman and Conductor.
' t
The Nanalmo Herald haa become so
slimy ln Its efforts to ssrvs the coal
barons and malign the striking miners
that the latter have refused to use It
tor sewerage purposes.
BRANDED AS "UNFAIR."
FOR EXPERT
WATCH
 ■fiama-f"—■■■       i
and j^BiiVelery
REPAIRING
CALL AND BEE     '
Geo. G. Bigger
143 Hastings Street West
MULCAHY'S CAFETERIA
THE BEST OF
EVERYTHING
137 Cordova Street W.
Basement Hotel Cordova .
Mr. and Mrs. Wrlgley Visit Cosst
Geo, Weston Wrlgley, accompanied
by Mrs. Wrlgley.^f Toronto, were
visitors on the coast this week and
left for the east todfy. Mr. Wrlgley
Is now Interested' ia a trade paper
publishing company iln Toronto and
finds It more lucrative than his old-
time association with tbe labor press,
In May. 1903, Mr. Wrlgley who, with
his Iste fstber, wasi Identified with
Citlsen and Country, came to Vancouver i and along with R. P, Pettlplece established Its successor, the
Canadian Socialist After a year or
ao of ups snd downs, mostly downs,
it became necessary for one of the
partnership to drop put, as the mesl
ticket had pinched out Mr. Wrlgley
remained on the coast for a time and
then went eaat, white It fell to the
lot of Mr. Pettlpieoe to stick, and
later The Socialist and Nanalmo
Clarion were consolidated under the
title of The Western Clarion. At this
stage of the Clarion's career Mr. B.
T. Kingsley waa Inveigled Into taking
charge and helping Pettlplece pay the
debts of the "only Socialist pspsr In
Canada," while the latter resumed
work at his trade (until November,
1911, when he assumed hts preeent
position as manager-editor ot The
Federatlonist, Mr. and Mrs. Wrlgley
sre still "westerners" and snjoyed re-
newlng acquaintanceships formulated
during their residence here and at
Victoria. J    .'   '   '' '
't, -        :
"The Rleke of Capital"
D. Meegar of Courtney died a tew
i days ago aa the result of bslng thrown
.off the top of a load of timber on a
Comox Logging company's train. On
a curve some of the; load slipped and
fell off, several striking Meegar, who
received concussion of the. brain. He
was rushed to Cumberland hospital ln
Dr. Millard's automdblle, but wee too
badly Injured to recover,
Two men were Injured, one fatally,
In an accident at tbe Highland mine
at Alnaworth, according to newa
which reached Nelson Friday week.
Dr. Gilbert Hsrtln fat called to the
mine and waa rushed to the ipene of
the accident In- a launch.
An engineer named James W. Mead,
29 years of age, waa accidentally electrocuted at Bellevuer Alta., last week.
The accident was caused by Us coming In contact with *«urreat'leakage.|
In an explosion wblch occurred In
the Bankhead mine 'laat Wednesday
two miners were Instantly killed. The
explosion took piece shortly before
the men were laid tiff for the night.
The cause of the fatality Is not known
but an Investigation Is being made by
the company, and Coroner Thomson
Is holding an Inquest: Into the dsath of
the two men. Application at the
I offices of the company failed to elicit
any Information, and the mine officiate would not even give out the
i names of the men who hsd been
I killed.
The following employees ot ths
W. F. Co., bave been declared "Unfair
To Organised Labor" by the executive board of Local Union No. 1155, U.
M. W. of A.:-
Flre Bsssss and Shotllghtara—
ROBT. MORTON
:    JOHN HAMILTON
ENOCH FRANCIS
ROBT. ADAMS
DAVID JOHNS
THOS. MILES
'   ALECK COOMBS
JAMES DUDLEY
JAMES JAMIESON
JOHN WALLBANK
MOSES WOODBURN
JOHN WEEKS
WILLIAM NEAVE  -
MATT GUNNIES
FRANK GREEN
ROBT. SEGGIE
GEO. BRAD8HAW
JAS..REED, Sr.
WILLIAM JOHNSTONE
JACOB 8TOBBART
Pump Men—
PETER FLYNN
MANOUS ROBINSON
JOHN DICK
Other Mine Employees—
SAM WALLACE
ROBT. GOOD
DAVID SCOTT .
JAS. AIKEN
JAS. PERRY
JOHN MONTGOMERY
OEO. JARDINE
J. LAVERICK
Machinists, Blacksmiths and Hslpero-
JAS. BOOTH
WM. MoDOUGALL
JAS. GILLESPIE
Engineer*—
WM. WOODMAN
PENORY HARRIS
JAB, VAUDEN
THOMAS NICHOLSON I
JOHN ANDREWS
JAMES CAMERON
THOMAS CHAMBERS
JOHN HOLLAND
Lampmtn—
GEORGE PEARSON      '
JAMES LISTER
Watchmen—
H. WOODS
JACK THOMPSON
THOMAS PEARSON
Carpenters snd Helpers—
THOMAS MoDOUGAL
HARRY JONES
JAMES KIRKPATRICK
HARRY BOYCE
ROBERT MALONE
JOE KNEEN
HAROLD KNEEN
W. CORLETT
WM. GALLOWAY
Good and Reliable
WINES
and LIQUORS
Always to be had at the
Imperial Wine
Company
54 Cordova Street West
Phone Set. 965
If you have a range to buy,
choose our
"Empress"
Malleable Range
It ia the only range that gives absolute '
satisfaction.  Everybody, who examines the
Empress Range is most favorably impressed
with it.  Everybody who has used an Empress Range says it is absolutely satisfac-
*2E£
The body of the Empress is made of No.
18 guage polished steel. The steel will not
rust, chip, peel or turn white when heated.
It will not warp or crack. Hand-driven Norway iron rivets with cone heads hold the
walls securely and firmly in place.
No expense has been spared in making
a durable, long lasting range that will give
perfect satisfaction. Buy no other range
until you have seen the Empress Malleable.
We have it in four sizes, at these prices:
$67.50, $70.00. $72.00, $75,00
RANGE SECTION-TOP FLOOR
Hudson's Bay Stores
CORNER OF ORANVILIJB AND GEORGIA
JOHN SMITH ___
WM. WATERS
CHAS. CARLSON
JOHN WHITE
WALTER MEECHAM
W, BROWNING
R. MoLOUD
JAMES SMITH
LUDWIO SAMMAN
FRED. NASH
WILLIAM CULLAM
SAMUEL BEVIS
JOHN BRAUNLEE
EUGENE LECOCQUE
DAVID LLEWELLYN
Miners—
ROBERT HAMILTON
THE CUMBERLAND LIST
Flrabseooe end ShstllgMsrs—
ALFRED PICKUP
JOHN THOMPSON, Durham, Eng,
FRED. BELL, Durham, Ens.
ELI ODdERS, Durham, Eng.
GEORGE OSWALD j
MoQLOUOHLAN, Lsdysmlth
THOMAS PARKINSON, Nanalmo
HUBERT SIMMS
Engineers—
SQUINT WALKER
THOMAS CAREY
JAMES WALKER
JAMES WHITE (?) AND A
BROTHER
JOHN FRAME
DAVID STEVENSON
Trscklayare—  ' .
ARCHIE MILLIQAN
Wslghmsn—
THOMAS COOK
ERNIE  PICKARD
Pltbosses—
BILL JONES, of Lsdysmlth'.
LUTHER 8AVILLE, ef Nanalmo.
Rops-rlders—
PATRICK COOMBS
Other Mine Employees—
WILLIAM CORNWALL
JAMES KENRIGHT
ALFRED JONES, ef FoJaley, Staffordshire
WILFRID BOOTH, of Mount Pleas-
ant, Staffordshire
ABRAM SANDLAM, of Mount
Plssssnt, Staffordshire
JOSEPH SANDLAM, of Mount
Plssssnt, Staffordshire
WALTER SANDLAM, ef Mount
Plssssnt, Staffordshire
WILFRID GOODO, Glssoote, Staffordshire
MR. CHETWIND, Gltseots, Staffordshire
.    MR. BADKIN, Townworth, Staffordshire
Mr. DANDO (sosb-hsrdsr)
MR. BROON, of Wlshsw, Scotland
JOHN ELLIOT, of Nanalmo
GEORGE CAVE (sosb-hsrdsr, now
on snglns)
JOSEPH NORRIS, ef Nanalmo
JOHN MILLIQAN
Rook Minors—
JOHN DOOKER
Pushsrs—
BENJAMIN OSWALD
MR. RODQERS
Trsnsltmen—
GEORGE BERTRAM
Firemen—
MR. BRENNAN
Miners—
JOHN TYSON
ELI YEARBY AND SON ALBERT,
Leicestershire, Eng,
ALFRED WILLIAMSi ef Nenalmo
WILLIAM CLIFFORD, Leicestershire, Eng.
JOSEPH JASPER
HARRY   LBIGHTON,   ef   South
Wellington
JOHN SPICER, ef South Wellington
MIKE CRAWL, of MIohcJ.Fsrnl*
JOHN CRAWU ef Mlehel-rerAle
Blacksmiths—
GEORGE ODQERS,  ef  Durham,
England
By order:
Ess. L. U. No. tile, U.M.W. of A. Seo.
Nsnslmo, I. ft, June M, IMS.
Stocktaking Sale of
FINE RUGS
———■—"
WE are slock tilting aad have a
number of individual ni|S
which we are offering al graauV
reduced prices. ,
Hasfygs Funjtvra Co.
LIMITED
Wide-Awake Furniture
Company, limited
41 BASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3887
SWEATERS
|  For All Occasions |
For yachting, motor hosting,
trsmplng, camping, hunting, golfing, sailing, fishing, touring, plok-
nicking, loafing or working.
T. B. Cuthbertson
ft COMPANY, LIMITED
Mt Hsstings W,  MO Oranvllle
Sll Heatings W.
QQ WITH
THE
BUNCH
TO THE
BRUNSWICK
POOL ROOMS
"Beat Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville Street, Phone 8822
VANCOUVER,  B.  0.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
THE MUSICIANS UNION
wish to announce that Mr. Franklin and members of his orchestra
are not members of the Musicians
Union. When engaging music for
yonr next dance or sotial, make
sure that your Orchestra is composed of UNION musicians.
For roll Information Pheae Mnsldans' Union
Sey. 7811.  8401* '
i     'i v-
+j*_ci'A
■■  t**v*; <.'**" „,-
:•«•"*"
^

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