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The British Columbia Federationist Jul 18, 1913

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Array ■■■A-.       ■   *r- y    ■
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5^.r, wf
THE BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL UNITY: BTMNOTfl. ■
FiF-mTBAB, x$<>:m
MINERS RESOLUTEW AWAIT NEXT
HC^MENTACffiNeY
ONBWWY1D PROBUX
DlKAin>mO ATTENTION
OF MUNIOTPALITIM
Shutdown of law and Shingle
:    Wll* Further AMravatea
ffinitadUOMrttrkat.
■ To farther add to the troubles and
prospects of the unemployed. of
Greater Vancouver several aaw and
shingle mills have given notice that,
they will close down for a few months.
Quite true, most of the employees ere
Orientals snd Hindus, but these will;
- now be compelled to-drift Into other
. avenues of the labor market, with con.
sequent. results- of further Increasing
the competition for lobs, and Inasmuch
as thsy work for practically nothing
and- board themselves even the pres-
ent standard of wagea will likely receive another jolt
In addition to this general shutdown
the government's bohused Old Country
emigrants Cfarm hands") are arriving at ths rate of about one hundred,
a day, snd religiously camping In the'
'elty.' '   ..- ■-'',;-'   '
The municipalities of Point Oroya:
Burnaby, South Vanoouver, North
Vancouver and those adjacent to theee
are a« making vigorous efforts to sell
start much-needed public
works, but with little success. The
' sKastlon baa become so acute that the
reeves snd councillors of these rnunl-
clpslltles are seriously discussing what
to do nest
In Vancouver city proper the labor
market remains about the same, with
possibly s few hundred lsss msn seeking work than last week, many having
agdpped for Interior points snd scross
the. line. Mayor Baxter seems fully
•jnHve to the necessity of something
definite being dons to provide work
before the winter season Seta in.
In some quarters It ts being urged
that the provincial government raise a
loan of a few million dollars with
which to purchase civic and municipal
bonds, but there la not much likelihood ot Sir Richard doing anything ot
' the glad.
Weather conditions have taken a
turn for the better aad this may help
The proposal to run excursions from
the coast to the prairies.tor the harvest sssson would undoubtedly'relieve
tbe pressure here, but reliable reports
from prairie industrial centres Indicate
-ttast-tease.ai'oairaaflt-fsaviaat job-
less men en tbe ground to garner the
harvest.
NANAIMO, OH NANNV-MOI
OR, GETTING THEIR OOATt AT
LAST.
Br. W, R, BUT INSKI,
I remember hearing a stranger en
route west declaring that ho waa going to Nanny-mo, and his pronunciation
evoked some smiles among his hearers.
BUT, after all, Isn't there much ot the
goat about Nanalmo?
Landing at that point the visitor hss
need of a sure-footsdness at the outset
as he climbs Into the main atreet of the
city. (It li a olty, Isn't UT) Thsn that
strset—It's ss angular aa the hind leg.
of a "Billy" and haa more untoward
corners.'than a whole fleck of "Nan-
The Important buildings are the Jail,
the oourthouse, the post offlce and tbe
new opera house, the poet offlce and
the new open house -which Is -not
built yet) while In the 'business section" every block runs to a sharp
point which leaves ths visitor on ths
horns of a goa—no, a dilemma—
should he turn round end then try to
guess which street he la really In.
Ex-President Wilkinson of the B. C.
-Federation of Lsbor once stated that
"Nanalmo would be all right If It waa
' not for Nanalmo," and he left people
to pussle over the paradox—aad that's
Just lt—Nanalmo'a a-paradox,
Najnslmo haa hai sense enough to
send a ireal representative to the legislature for a number of years, but
couldn't organise a decent union to en-
sble the Inhabitants to Invest In the
milk of human kindness—In feet they
were "kids" et the game. Mast places
have first effectve Industrial, then political expression; but, true to nature,
Nanalmo reversed the order. Tua never did expect a goat to be orthodox.
There's Iota ot eps and downs at
Nanalmo—everything and every place
Is either up or down. There's lots of
monotony, but nary a dead level any.
where. Just now the miners are-all
up and they are net In any hurry to
go down. One of the mines blew Its
whistle the other de'y for the miners
to go down; BUT, wonder of wonders,
the* force of habit's been broken—even
In Nanalmo, and they stayed up and
positively refilled to go to "Pot,"
though it "Jingled" never so wisely.
Whrti I ssy they-stayed up, I don't
mesn .In ths sir—that's where the other fellow Is—ln the sir, because the
mine workers are now United Mine
Workers, snd they're united because
the' United Mine Workers separaM
them—the sheep from the goats! We
said Nanalmo wsa ajiaradox and sines
thsy were sorted out the goats have
been very sheepish.
. Everybody knows about a goat's digestive powers; end the leading feature about the Nanalmo goat la hli
willingness to swallow almost anything. I remember seeing a would-be
friend to dumb animals very carefully
wrap op a piece nt cheese.In paper
and throw lt out of the window to.an
old goat; BUT "Billy" shook ihe
cheese out and ate the paper. Re was
of the Nenslmo speclei of goat whieh:
baa shaken out the subitanttil support
from the United Mine Workera and
shown a strong penohant for "documents." : .■'..■; ;- " ..-'".-,«■■■•. ,
An old paorerb says that "a goat
will browse wbere he Is	
been mlrhty poor for somo time past.
Maybe It'a the love which the goat
herds have expressed for them whieh
streaks their horlion with hope for the
future; BUT you can Sever, analyse
the mind of a goat
It's much easier to snslyss ths mind
of the goatherd. The affection of a
goat can be retained on next to nothing. Tou can give him a "document"
tor breakfast and he Is nappy, and It
everything else falls at dlnner-ttme bs
can eat the labels off the tomato cans
of a whole neighborhood. Further It
Is quite a common sight to see a goat
standing on hla hind legs esting tho
posters from off the boardings tor sup-
peri It hss been stated that aome of
the nanalmo goats actually got Indigestion from doing the latter stunt.
Certain It Is that they got food for
thought If not for anything else snd
for several weeks thsy browsed around
the notices on the telephone poles In
the olty.
It's an interesting iltustlon. Goats
snd sheep have formed the theme for
many'a discourse. Juit now the wise
men from the eest are studying the
question snd trying to effect a reconciliation between the goats, tbe goatherds snd the sheep, to the end that
tlia Sheep may again be willing to be
_ ! shorn and the gotaa to be milked;
_ _ tied." and i BUT you cajnnot persuade ths sheep
maybe there's something In that tying to live on what appears to be enough
business, for the Nanalmo goats have for the goats. No really wile msn
never seemed to wander from the will consider mire goats to be a cri-
fann-rerd_»ltboogh their browsing has tertoa In any community.
"Yes, the Inquiry Is over," ssld; Jaa.
H. MoVety, when asked to make a
statement for Federatlonist'readers
with reference to the Investlgstlon
Into tbe Cosmopolitan Employment
Agency, against which a complaint
was made by the Tradee and Labor
Council when an sppllcatlba wae made
to Ottawa tor a license under the provisions of P. C. loll, a new order-In
coundl passed for the purpoie of protecting Immigrants from employment
•hsrks. Y
The agency, of which Mr. J. H.
Welsh Is proprietor, whsn ths license
wu held up owing to the complaint,
uked for aa Investigation and thr
Superintendent of Immigration ordered
that an inquiry be held before Mr.
Malcolm Reld. Dominion Immigration
Agent end Mr, F. F. Qulnn, the newly-
appointed employment agencies Inspector. --•-.- ;.' ■;■■
. The ease tor the Tradea Council wu
presented hy Hr. MeVety, while the
defense of the agency wa|s In the hands
of D. O. Marshall ot Davis, Marshall
and McNeill, solicitors for the Canadian Northern railway aad other Mac-
kenste ft Mann interests throughout
the provinoe.
The. complslnts against the agenoy
were both general end specific, it being
alleged by tke witnesses for the Coun.
oil that as— were •continually being
hired aad seat to various parts of the
province under false pretences, finding
on thslr arrival at their destination
that conditions hsd been misrepresent,
ed and. in-many cues strikes exlatsd.
The teen were then forced to pay their
way back to the elty and were In every
case wone off than It they had aot accepted the employment, being out.the
fee end also the travelling expenses
both ways.
* Mr. ManhaH, counsel for tbe agenoy,
continually complained about there he*
ing "nothing spsclfle" that could bs
met, but before thu conclusion ot the
Inquiry, which luied the beter part
of two weeks, ths evidence and exhibits became "sufficiently specific" to
please him.
In many cues ths actual "Job tickets" were produced and receipts showing that vsrlous unlona bad been compelled to pay the tans and expenses of
men who had been shipped to various
points and had hern told that "every,
thing Is quiet, there la no strike,"
Threats had been made by Welsh
about what he would do to spy-one who
' -fend with men engaged by hla
. cy affl ipehBHg genetturrlt wu
held by the Trades Council that Mr.
Walsh wu apt a fit and proper person
to do business "with Immigrants and according to Welsh'n evidence, 90 per
cent of thejiustness done with employment offices Is done with people
coming'within that definition.
The defence witnesses were confined
to two miners, win had previously
signed ah affidavit stating thst they
had been brought from England under
false pretences and afterwards, In ths
offlce of the colliery, company, sighed
another repudiating' the first' One of
these men wu aa atheist who placed
no value on an oath or affirmation. Mr.
L. Ferris, sales agent for the Canadian
Collieries (Dunim'ilr) Ltd, was the
principal defence witness and described at great length the manner In
which he had secured It men from
Edmonton and Calgary, ail of whom he
loot en route and his connection with
the IDO brought f/om Durham, Rag-
land, at a cost of over 110,000, and of
which number 65 were lost to the
unloni on account of having beea
tooled regarding the true conditions,
Welsh, according to Ferls, wu the
best employment rigency in the city
and at another place he said that wbat
the company he represented required
wu miners, ho emphasis being placed
on the manner Jn which they were to
be secured,
Welsh's evidence In his own behalf
was a series of statements about hew
he always told everyone shout the
strikes, but he had no answer to the
"Job tickets" or witnesses who told
the opposite ilde of the story. He
introduced 199 tickets showing, or
purporting to show, that he had refunded the. employment fee* to that many
men, all of whom had lost the money
spsnt In going end coming to ths
Jobs, He said that he had shipped out
10,000 men and would put In the carbon eoples of the Job tickets covering
their caws, He frequently laid that
the unloni wore not smsrt enough to
catch him, evidently forgetting that
If he wu conducting hts agsnoy In a
proper manner that there would be
'-H.:
Ns»*«,»'
.*».
STREETRAHiWAY
VANCOUVER
LOYEfiS OF
WESTMINSTER
AND VICTORIA PRESENTING CASE
Some 2000 members of the International Straet Railway Em-
ployeee' Association, embracing
Vanoouver, New Westminster and
Victoria, are Involved in the decision, under the Industrial Disputes and' Investigation'Aay *>■ -
twesn the big unions and ths B. C.
electric.Rsllway Co, Judge Murphy Is ohslrmsn of ths board,
Moses B. Cotsworth represents the
smployeee snd H.O. Alexandsr the
compsny. At lsst night's meeting
of Vanoouver Trades snd Lsbor
Council e report by the Strsst Rsllway Employees' dstsgatu wu
mads covering negotiation up to
snd sines Juns 30th, the date of
•xplramsnt of the old working
agreement
Del. Hoover reported the status of
the Street Railway Employees In the
and Labor Council, j Preaident Benson
presided and all the executive offlclsls
were present        ,
Credentials tor new delegatee ware
received from the Palntera, Builders'
and Common Laborers, Bricklayera,
Letter earners, Meters, TBrUrtrs,-
Amalgamated Carpenten, Brotherhood
ot Carpentera and Barbers, and those
present obligated by Preeldent Ben.
son,
A communication wu received from
the B. C. Women's Suffrage League, requesting that a delegation be heard
and upon motion the request wu
granted, at a date to be fixed by the
league, ».:: ";"■■'
From" Point Orey municipality, declining the suggestion of. the council
thst ths municipality ask the provincial government to purchase bonds,
lied.
From New Westminster city council,
negotiation of their new scale with the advising that council's letter, had been
B. C. Electric Railway Co. A federal
board of Inquiry Is now sitting In
Vsncouver. The compsny Is stubbornly protesting every Inch ot the old
sgreement and IS trying to take away
from the employees msny of the con-
ceislons In the working arrangements
which.have prevailed for years. The
seniority system Is being vigorously
assailed u far as ths mechanical departments are concerned, The Industrial nature of the union Is lso being
attacked, the company favoring the
splitting up of Its employees Into some
of tbelr respective crafts, to be dealt
with separately, a position which the
employees feel would tend to' disintegrate tbelr organlsstlon, The question of wsges hu not yet been reached
by the board. Most ot the propositions
so far have been discussed by the
board, but In moit oases laid over for
further consideration later. The membership of three tig unions, some 2000,
Is Involved, covering Vsncouver, New
Westminster and Victoria,
Election and Installation of offlcen
for the July-December term of o....ce
occupied the major portion of lut
ntght'a meeting of Vancouver Tradei
no necoislty tor anyone to try to
catch him,
When the evidence wu all In, Mr.
Marshall uked that ths charges
against the agency be withdrawn u
there wu no evidence that warranted
ths government In "taking away the
livelihood of Mr. Welsh." This request
wu, of coune, rafused.
While the case Is still subjudlce,
the decision should be against the
agency securing a license on the evidence submitted end the verdict when
resched, after a perusal of some four
or five hundred pages of transcript
will reflect the worth or worthiest-
nets of the new order-ln-couhcll.
Mr. H. H. Stevens, M. P., wu an
Interesting listener during the grester
part of the hearing.
referred to the finance committee.
Filed.
From Building Tradee Council, with
application for affiliation. Received.
Also application from the new Press
feeders' union.  Received.
From Building Trades Council using the central labor body to name -a
committee to meet a similar committeo to discuss ways and means of placing a businsss agent In the field.
From City Clerk re scaffolding In,
spector. Filed. -
From Union Label League uklng
that delegates be sent to represent
the Council at League meetings. Con.
curred in.
From Trades snd Labor Council,
announcing tbat the next convention
would be held at Montreal, commenc
ing on Sept 23, aad uklng for -deto.
gates.
Upon motion, laid on table for one
month..
From the Longshoremen's union, notifying the council tbat they hsd de-
elded- to .withdraw- from the. central
body, Upon .motion a committee ot
three wu named to Interview the
Longshoremen's union.
D. 8, Cameron, preeldent of New
Westminster Trades sat'Labor Council; Aid. Dodd, R. A. Stoney and Harry
1lbb, chairman Ot the Royal City Labor
Day committee entered the hell at thia
stage of the proceedings and wen Invited to the platform.
MINISTER OF
MEETS ALL PAR-IPS'
COAL MINERS* DEPUTE
 '-***-!- ■•—; J r»'*    '.'m
-.*rim
t*,w.or Korrimua
PRESENT A STRONO CASE
FOR ■ AtMRISVED MINERS
NANAIafbVV.XJatf i*M_o-
clsl te The Fe"*erattenlet)—Tha
minuter ef ■. laj^Ji* vjsttW
voj0    0ewVTMK   wMnMQ   SwHpt   Qf
■ JtriM*  "CoiBIPtltllsM' m MMM*V tt
«Mh •* thtt* ilMiiMn mm Mm
m4. cMstntttsti wWf-, jpwIWirtMnf
gNevaaoM in east) quaatrty thai It
"    M eenvlnu any ftgkftthlnking
that the cause ol elf tke
a present
parliami
entary com.
SEATTLE CENTRAL LABOR
BODY BUSY PREPARING FOR
•    BIG A. t. OP L. CONVENTION
Seattle unionists, through ths
central labor body, are buay preparing fer the big convention ef
the American Federation of Leber, ephsduled te meet then In
November next, A convention
committee hss bssn et work for
sows weeki, with gratifying re-
cults. The Washington lists
Federation of Lsbor hu voted
•280 to the fund! the Brewery
workera hsvs Isvisd s spsolsl ss-
ssumsnt of 50 canto ssch upon
ths msmbenhlp of thslr several
locale, and many ether unlona
will follow ault The Women's
Lsbsl Lssgus will also aaalat In
ths tssk of raising sufficient mon-
sy to sntsrtsln and ears fer e convention of such rnsgnltuds.
If It Is ths Intention of Vsnoou-
vol's esntrsl lsbor body to Invite
the A. F. of L dslegatu to spsnd
s day In this olty It Is time something definite wss dene.
organisation and
mlttoM.
The Home and Domestic Employees'
union would probably, seek affiliation
at the next meeting.
Del. Midgley reported tor the committee which went to Victoria u a
part of a large clvto delegation to uk
that the Courthouse, site be conserved
for the city's uss.  Received.
Del.- McVety reported for the committee named to interview Hon. T. W.
Crothers, minister of lsbor. Practically the only question discussed wu
tbe coal mlhsrs" strike, Received. Del.
McVety also reported relative to the
federal Inquiry into the operations of
the Cosmopolltsn Employment Agency.
No decision had u, yet been banded
down by the -department Inspector
Qulnn seemed to be keeping a watchful eye on employment offices general-
ly.  Received.
Del. Curnock reported tor the Labor
Day committee, end read a letter trom
New Westminster Trades snd Labor
Council uklng for the co-operation of
Vancouver unionists on Lsbor Day.
Prss. Cameron addressed the council In support of the Invitation. In the
coune of his enthuslutlo appeal, Mr,
Cameron ssld that Victoria Trades and
Labor Council would also be uked to
run an excursion to the Royal (Sty on
that day. Chairman Otbb urged- the
united co-operation of Vancouver to
make Labor Day a huge success.
Whether a parade would be put on had
not yet beea decided, Aid. Dodd Joined in the Invitation of the previous
speakers and usursd the delegates
that everybody who attended would
have a good time. Del Stoney rounded out the quartette of booster! snd
feelingly referred to the fsct that the
Royal City was the best organlied
town In Canada. Closing with sn earnest appeal to the Council to "come on
over."
Tn"e Bartendera reported that the
Aator hotel wae now on the fair list
The Barbers reported thst three
unton shop cards had been withdrawn
during the week. Asked union men
to demsnd the unton sbop card.
The Plumbers reported they would
(Continued on Page Four,)
by the keasea at the
mlaea,,ani'e)nphsslsed she neese-
elty fer organisation.
One »f ths things brought te the
:< sttentle* ef the minister at Cum-
- bartend waa the', granting ef oo*
, tUcatee aa miners and firs buses
te Inesneoenoee men.
That point hu been ampheoUed
today through the kerning, In an
: explosion of gas at Cumberland, of
: seven man, whloh 11 Is stated se-
curred. through the Inefficiency of
one of theee who recently received
papers ae fire beea, '
- There le no change In ths situ-
alien;, only m the men-gat a
clearer-eenuptlOn ef It they on
bsesmlng more determined than
• ever thst work will not be resumed
without recognition of the United
: Mine Workere, and a aule agreement ef wageo and eondltlona that
will,Insure asaoe snd prosperity
• to.tlMwi aWiihe wholeoommunlty
during tha life of the oontreet
ROBERT FOSTER,
Prse. District 40, \3. M, W. of A.
Publlo attention haa been somewhat
centered upon the coal mlnen' die-
pute with Vancouver. Island operators
during the paat week, Hon. T. W.
Crothers, federal minister ot labor,
Samuel Price, special commissioner,
Mr. Crother"s private secretary, F. H.
Shepherd, M. P. for Comox-Atlui, and
other governmental offlcen have beea
looking oyer the strike, sons with a
view t? finding some method ot bringing about • aettlement Quite a num-
* newspaper rumors hsve bun
floating around, but a long distance
phone meiasce from U. M. W, of A.
headquartera -laat night elicited the
Information tbat the situation, on the
surface, remains about the same. All
tha locked ont end striking miners
an remaining firm, enjoying-their
strike pay and.awaiting developments,
confident eMh» victory that Is shortly
to crown their united demsnd for the
right to organise In a territory that
hu for yesrs been dominated by Dunsmuir tyrants and "foreign" labor
sxlnnen.
COAL OPUUTOBS B01T
•ooT^No*nnooo»t»T
'  tOMi
Ttatnsa Fnfls WtSot
'■.-' aMpfaV&t^^,
The arrlralot Minister of Leber
Crothers hu not rettrded the offeda
of the mbw oparatora at Cumberlaad
to seeniis ecaba. In fact the prospect
of aa) Investigation sums to- have .
stirred the procurers now scouring tte
country to greater activity. Sjagler'
meat saenciu aad special ageM aira
stoopla* to every law-doWa taofla"
mm
"Buck Brand" Overalls and Shirts are Vancouver-made, Union-
made and the best made.   In addition to this they are backed by
our own guarantee to
make good any defects
within 30 days
ASK YOUR DEALER
FOR "BUCK BRAND"
Tho campaign for the um
of  Brltlih   Columbia  mad*
80011*1 and the product*: of
ie farms of thu provinoe
In the home* of Vancouver
to be undertaken by the
Program Club, Is rapidly
taking form. A letter haa
been drafted which will be
Bent to every womea'i organization In the city, urging them to uae, Insofar aa
possible, only goods made
In British Columbia, and
also asking for their sup-
Bort   In   this   movement.*—
tally press news Item.
WM. J. McMASTER AND
1176 Homer Street
SONS, LIMITED.
Vancouver, B. C.
NANAIMO, V. I„ July M.-A com
mittee of miners, along with the offlclsls of tbe U. M. W. of A., met end
discussed the strike, situation with the
Hon. Minister of Labor on Friday,
July 11.:-
At a meeting of the mlnen, held
Friday morning, the mlnen decided to
present written statements of their
grievances, such as.the unfair placing
ot the men, I.e., taking men out of
good places, putting them In deficient
places, snd using the good places fer
the favored ones. Cases of direct snd
Indirect discrimination were given to
the Hon. Minister,
Generally speaking, men who have
been discriminated against on the
islsnd have to seek pastures new, or
rather a different place to extract coal
wltb the aid of a new pick and shovel.
Tet we still had men on hand who
could prove to an Impartial man that
they had been discriminated sgalast
Again, caaea of breaking the Coal
Mines' Regulation Act were given to
the Hon. Minister of Labor; also caaes
where men had been discriminated
against, becauie they had applied for
compensation, which la allowed tbem
by law for Injuries received whilst tot-
lowing their, employment Dlscrimln-
sted agslnst by being put ln deficient
plsces, or fired right out without sny
excuse.
Of course the agreement, "the sacred
agreement," wu under discussion,
The sgreement since 1107 has been
like ths Isws of the Medes snd Per
slans ln so fsr that tt changeth not.
In September, 1911, the men had to
negotiate an agreement. They chose
a committee of five. The committee
then visited tbe general manager of
tbe Western Fuel Co., and he pre-
sented them with the old sgreement.
Thla wss taken bsck to the men. After some discussion the men Instructed
the committee to get certain concessions put Into the agreement. Theae
were refused. "You can either take It
or leave It," were the words ot the
general managsr. The committee then
signed up without bringing it bsck to
the men for ratification. Two of the
committee withheld their signatures
for s considerable time, but being dependent on their job for a living they
eventually signed.
It was pointed out to tbe Hon. T. W.
Crothers that.only some two hundred
snd fifty or three hundred men attended the meetings dealing with the
agreement, tbat In the strict sense of
the word It could not be called an
agreement, for lt was forced upon
them under compulsion. They were
disorganised, and had no voice In tbe
making. It waa pointed out that what
waa needed was sn organisation, so
that they could have a say and voice
In the making of an agreement that
would be binding on both sides alike.
The committee claimed that the
agreement had been broken on numerous occsslons by the offlclsls of
the Western Fuel Co.
When the Hon. T. W. Crothers visited Nanaimo in the month of July,
1912, not any of the Nanalmo mlnen
were before bim to give evidence on
their general conditions, being afraid
of being discriminated against If thsy
attended.
It was slso pointed out that wagea
had stood still In Nanalmo for a considerable time, but ln the meanwhile
the coat of living hsd -been steadily increasing, therefore meaning that tbey
bad actually suffered a reduction In
real wagee. It waa pointed out to htm
known to each reptiles to Snd ,	
ployed men whs ate willing to Miay
their class aad Join with the OriMtak
now employed in the mla« to defeat
the looked out minen. i" • -. >
■■■ However, the wage-workers of "British Columbia havs been pretty vMf
wlaed up to the situation and the ax?
parlance of Procurer Purvis, related
below, la only one of many. A miner
employed at Herrltt, B. C, thla west!
wrote to a Mend at Nsnaimo aa fellows:
*'*. TslMals Letters,
. "I would like to know If yea ie>
celved my telegram concerning a scab,
herder by the name et Purvis, wbo
came up here on Tuesday night to W
and get some ot the men who easM
out to this country with Mm.to go to
Cumberland to work aa strike-brack-
ers. He began by telling them that I*
bad been to Cumberland and invent*.
gated and told them there wss ao
strike on; it wu called off. Bat they
were wise to his tootles, however.,
knowing that it wu something he bad
got from the officials of the company
to delude them. Notwithstanding thia
they began bawling him out hy laying
tbat although they had- been brought
out to thie country without money, by
false promises and misrepresentations,
they Intended, u long u they lived,
to remain trad to their principles,
whieh their forefathers had,so often
fought and lacrifioed their lives for,
snd hoped to rotate the same, u they
bad some manhood about them eat did
aot Mat to sell that manhood tor a'
few pieces of silver the same u he
himself (Purvis) had done. Hla partners got- alter bim ao hot that Purvis
uked them to let the matter drop, u
he himself would ault and look far
work, ss he wu here In Merritt Bat
before; that he himself had betrayed
them by going to Cumberland to aet
u a strike-breaker, and the sooner he
got out of Merritt the better for himself, u they did net Want to associate
with men of hli calibre. So Purvis
finally had to be escorted by a policeman to the train to go back to Cumberland, to be taught how to dig coal
by a Chinaman. I thought I would
write you and let you know hm bail'
ness and.the treatment he received
from bis own countrymen."
'
Hsrbor Commissioners Named.
Announcement ta msde thst the new
harbor commission here Is to consist of
F. Carter Cotton (chairman), and
Jsmes A. Fullerton end Samuel He-
Clay.
■sksra' Union Officers. ■
President, A. M. MacCurnch; vice-,
president, H. Lee worthy; recording
secretory, W. Rogera; Unsocial secretary snd business agent, J. Black trsae-
urer, V. Livingston; sergeant-at-arms,
O. Ferguson; trustees, A. McCurraok,
A. Furendon, W. Pringle.
Alberta Federation ef Labor. .
At the conclusion of the firat annual
convention of the Alberta Federation
of Labor lut Saturday evening In Medicine Hat, President John O. Jonu wu .
re-elected preeldent end B. W. Bellamy
et Medicine Hat wu named u secretary to succeed L. T, English, who declined renomlnstlon. Upon motion of
Clem Stubbs It wu decided to hold the
next convention at Calgary on the sscond Mondsy In October, 1914.
Vsncouver Tradu Union Lsbsl Lsague
An Interesting meeting took place on
Tuesday laat Sevenl new dslegatu
turned out. Tbe various locals are not
giving us the support they ought to
give. However, our finances are very
fair, and It Is to be hoped that at ths
next meeting there will be a record
attendance.
The Salvation Army In Vanccuver
have thla week taken out a clvto permit
to erect a building to be used for Industrial purposes," To those familiar
with similar Institutions In the old
country the news need cause no excuse
for Jubilation. Probably an extension
of wbst takes plus In their local wood
yard project,
If nothing else comes out of the revelations of Col, Mulhall, an Inalght Into
tbe methods of controlling elections
that is being Introduced by the National Association of Manufacturers, ud
tho unmssking of crooks snd "working-
men's Mends" who have acted the Ju-
du part for many yean, will be of
some advantage to the working people,
whose exploitation, enslavement and
degradation were end are the stakes
played for by the members of the N. A.
M., and the corrupt tools who served
them.—Cleveland Utlien.
that men with families were working
for less than what he himself considered s living wage, vis., $8.
The committee presented their eau
before the hen. minister In en ebte
straightforward manner. In summing up thslr esse, thsy told him the
9rtly wsy thsy could get their griev-
snoss .remedied, the only way they
could be cure of enforcing the law, ef
stopping dlaerlmlnstlon, end mala...
mining their standsrd of living In the
face of advancing prloes of the niiswl
tlu of life, was by having recognition
of their erganlutlen.
1f.-iilW&4y,. .-',.■"■'■_ ._i
ir'Sl'-a PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
The Royal Bank
of Canada
nraoaroKAf ns isss
raia-up capital
Besstvs
Total i
111,800,000
11,800,000
Siacodo.ooo
wa allow or.
nun o> »i-
rosns nr ova
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar win opea
 nst, anl yaat
kaslBMs wm be wai-
ooma be It large or
TAMMUVaW
1j_ INCORPORATED
Jmt 18(6
Banko/
Toronto
Capital & Reserve $11,176,578
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
In the BANK OF TORONTO are proving to
be s great convenience to
msny of our friends.
With these ucounts either of two persons of tke
household may deposit or
withdraw money. Interest is paid On nil balances
twice a year. In event of
death of either party tha
survivor msy withdraw
"* the money
MAIN OFFICE
446 HaatJnia Street West
. NEAR RICHARDS
Branches
Cor. Hastings & Carrall Sts.
New Westminster    Victoria
Merritt
WHEN ORDERING A SUIT
See -that thia Label is Sewed
in the Pockets
aU that Union
Labor Stands for.
""■ PRINTING
with the LABEL on it
SEE US
' —r-"—:—:—:—^	
Cowan & Brookhouse
tekor Temple      »<-ae Say. 4410
HATS
Veloun, Straws and'Felt*
ALL COLORS
CAPS AND GLOVES
—: AT—-t—i
PERIARDS
186 Hastings St. B.
THI RIW
ORPHEUM
Granville Btreet
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
500 Gallery Seats at 15c
UNION PRINTING
ON
Union Made Paper
The Only Shop
in British Columbia usingpa-
per stock bearing the watermark (label) of
/ thelnternation-
al Paper-makers Union
Mill Orders Promptly Filled
E. T. KINGSLEY
Phone Seymour 824
LABOK TEMPLE
VANOOU vTBH, B. 0.
1 It FEMINIST
Published weekly by The B. C. Feder-
ationlat, Md., owned Jointly by van-
couver Tradea and Labor Counoll and
tha B. C, Federation of Labor, with
which la afflliated 18.000 organised wage-
workers.
Issued every Friday morning.
Preaident Jaa. Campbell
Vice-President J. W. Wllklnaon
Vice-President 3. McMillei
Treasurer...*.— 4. H. MoVety
Managing-Editor. P.. Parm. Pettlplece
Advertising Manager...... J. H. 6raham
Oflcet   Boom S10, Sebor temple
•re*., aav. seto.      • ■
Subscription:    11.00 par year;   in Vancouver City, 81.26:   to unlona aub.
aorlblns In a body, 76 centa.
'Unity of tabor; tto hepe ef the world."
190 WATCH THE LABEL ON TOUR
«« PAPER. If thla number la on 11
your nubscrlption expiree next Issue.
FRIDAY JULY 18, 1818
THE POWER.
The Eminent Financier called his
faithful lieutenant to his private office,
"Have you Instructed Murdock to
violate the agreement on the P. ft U
O. so as tp force the men to strike?"
"Yei sir.'
"Very good. As soon ss the stock
is down to 78 1-4 buy all that offers,
hut quietly, so as not to excite the
market, then Instruct Murdock to settle with sll unions."
"Very well sir."
"I wish you to Instruct our agents
In Scanpaulla to atlr up the Scanpau-
liana against our people. You will alao
Issue s statement to the Associated
Press that terrible outrages sre being
committed by the Scanpaullans
against foreigners. That will stir ap
feeling here and excuse anything we
do. Our rivals must bs driven' from
the oilfields."
"I will make a note of It air."
"Whst have you beard from tbe revolution In Texico?"
"Our men on'the side of the revolutionists regret thst the manifesto,
"Free Land and Free People," supplied
hy you, has roused such popular enthusiasm that victory seems certain.
The man we have on the Government
side has become one of tbe president's
confidential advisors. He reports that
the president is almost persuaded to
cancel the concessions held by the
Pyrotte Interests, and Issue others
in our favor."
"If he does so, withdraw ail support
from ths revolutionists snd see to
It thst the government fls sustained."
"Very good air."
'As you are aware we are now
heavily Interested In steel. Our Board
has drafted a naval bill which will be
presented to parliament thla session.
Give Mudhal Instructions to hsve the
bill paaaed without amendment (un.
less the amendments provide for greater appropriations!. Tell him to spare
no expense, if he haa to attend to each
member separately. You will also Instruct our editors to start a vigorous
campaign for a greater navy, and see
that agitations are commenced In the
leading papers of foreign powers for
greater navies there slso." ,
"Hake a donation of 160,000 to the
Foreign Mission Society on condition
that missionaries are sent to the Hoi-
pman Inlands. They will be killed by
the natives, and we can then.have
the government ssnd troops there.
There Is valuable timber and much
mineral on theae Islands which we
must have. The natives will alao have
to be forced to work afterwards snd
we will probably need more missionaries, but that can come later."
"Yes sir, very well air."
'That will be all for today.;, If you
wish to find me this evening.(will be
at the. Men and ' Religion Forward
Movement meeting where I am to deliver on address on the 'Promotion of
Honesty snd Uprightness of Character
Among Our Youth.' Good afternoon."
"Good afternoon air."
THE DUTIES OF A SOLDIER,
As school children we Were taught
to look upon soldiers as heroes and
worthy of admiration. In fact most
of history wss based upon the wars
of the nation with other nations, colored to meet the requirements, But
with age snd experience the workers
are learning the hypocrisy of lt ail
and are commencing to read history
anew from the viewpoint of those
who have been compelled to do the
fighting for another class.
It Is ever becoming more difficult
for the ruling class to Inveigle wage,
workers into the ranks of professional
murderers. Not only that, but the
workers are every day receiving bitter
lessons that even during times of
peace the, function of the soldier la
something more than wearing brasa
buttons and street parading. The
employers and corporations of every
country under the flag of capitalism
sre using them ss strike-breakers at
times when Industrial workers are
endeavoring to better their working
conditions or wages, In (aot there
sppesrs to be no doubt as to who will
do ths dirty work for.governments.
It Is now the avowed rtutv of soldiers,
ably ssBlsted by "spaclsl" police, A
recent Incident Is reported by the
dally preas from Oran, Morocco, which
serves to show to whst depths of degradation tbe duties of a soldier will
lead. Read It and then ponder over
permitting boys to become Just such
servile tools of the modern Industrial
! pirate.
"Hans Mueller, s 17-year-old
German waa blind-folded and
. stood up against the wall of the
Oran barracks while a firing
aqusdron of the French foreign
legion riddled his body with steel-
Jacketed bullets. An hour after
the boy dropped his mother arrived with a pardon signed by
President -Polncare, of France,
When she saw the body of her
son she swooned and returned to
consciousness a hopeless lunatic."
LABOR AT THE LINE,
The latest report of Canadian labor
organisation, Just Issued by the Department of Labor, contains some Interesting facts and figures, says the
Ottawa Citlsen. It reports a strong
and steady growth of organisation
among tbe skilled trades of Canada.
While the unskilled Isborer Is still left
to his own Individual resources, and
the chance of demand for his ervlce,
those who sre ln the skilled class are
more and more perceiving the apparent necessity of organizing for defence and successful aggression
against the citadel of higher wages.
An Increase of almost 20,000 during
FRIDAY......      JULY 18, 1118
1912 shows clearly the advance being-
made along this line.
But the point which would appear
to be of greatest slgnlllcsnce Is that
unionism pays practically no attention to the fact that a boundary line
divides this country from the republic
to the south. It is stated that the
great majority of the unions are afllli.
ated with those on the other side. The
Canadian membership of the American
Federation ot Labor. is about one-
twentieth of the whole which. Judged
from the standpoint ot comparison of
population, la a very large showing.
Over 136,000 Canadian workera are
members of international organizations.
All of this meanB that labor unionism Is fsat becoming a very strong
bond ot union between the. nations.
Much has been said of late about the
force.brought to bear upon International relations by the unity of purpose and interests thst have caused
tbe workers of one country to assert
their amicable Intentions of remaining
at peace with the Workers of some
other country; It Is a very real and
potent power concerning which more
will be heard In the future than in the
past -
Its effect upon the relationship existing between Canada and tbe United
States is Immediate and Important.
Boundary walls end tariffs and all
kinds of exclusive policies are In
reality powerless agalmt thli natural
and inevitable gravitation to a com.
mon centre of economic Interest or
the forcei of organised lsbor. It Is
quite Impossible to stop its Influence,
If such were Judged to be the best
policy, And It Is probably equally
sure that auch union will mean nothing but good to the two countries. The
interests sf labor the world over are
one, and the revelation of the fact cannot be much longer postponed. When
It Is fully and clearly made and understood, a new future, and a better
awaits the world.
Married men should worry.
Force ls.no remedy.—John Bright
Ons only thinks they have trouble
—until they get a motor cycle.
"It Is only at aalea that the real
feminist movement is to be seen."
Worrying over pBSt failures Is a
powerful method of preventing future
successes.    >
Not st sll unlikely that automobile
nnd tomb-stone manufacturers may
organise the next big trust.
"We sre going on a wedding trip,
said the elopers to the parson; "will
you Join us?"
If "industry slone rules" why are
industrial kings so eternally busy on
each succeeding election day?
The doora of the, modern church
are open one day a week, "holding
service Instesd of rendering service."
Agitators invariably come in for a
lot of praise—after thdy are dead
long enough.     _
"So many men confound prejudice
and bigotry with Intellectual Integrity
and moral stamina."
"To sell one's friends for flnahclal
gain is but another form of selling
one's soul to the devil."
"Character assets .are of much
greater Importance to the true man
or woman than financial possessions,
"No man can leave greater legacy
to his children thsn he whose death
Is sincerely mourned by all who knew
him In life."
"It has been well ssld that experience Is s hard school, but fools will
learn In no other, and some will not
even learn In that"
Sir Edward Carson Is at least establishing s few precedents for the
suffragettes. "Resist to the end, even
If It comes to the necessity of using
violence." Only equals sre equal before the law.
South Vancouverltes have "their
own ideas snd methods of. righting
what thsy deem to be civic wrongs.
As mass-meeting promoters they sre
In a class by themselves.
If lt costs |20 and costs to call a
strike-breaker st Cumberland a scab
whst would It cost to have the provisions of tbe Coal Mine's Regulations
Aot enforced?   -
Local members of organised labor
generally will be well satisfied with
the resignation tof ex-Snpt Wylle,
of the Vancouver garbage department,
Hts new Job tn South Vancouver alio
appeara to have pinched out. It's a
long lane ot garbage with no tomato
cans.
If a fraction of whit the various
factions of the I. W. W. say of each
other Is true there is mighty good
reason for the wsge-workers of this
continent sticking to the old A. F. of
L., with all Its faults snd shortcomings.
What the labor movement needs Is
some or the fighting spirit evidenced
by the suffragettes. How msny union
men of todsy would risk ss mm*
energy to attain their.alms? The
women seem to be contributing the
best "men" of the world. "s
If 8,968 wsge-workers can produce
enough wealth to provide for a popu-,
lallon of 200,000, what's the matter
with "dividing up" the hours of labor
end giving everybody a chance to each
have a family of 22, the proportion
now living off each wage-worker in
Vancouver?
Premier McBride has evidently
solved the question of wbat to do with
political Job.seekers not already on
the government pay-roll. Simply appoints another "commission" to "sit"
on things ln general. Then the re
ports sre pigeon-holed ln the government museum (or persussl by generations unborn.
Replying to a question recently by a
woman, 3. Kler Hardle aald it waa a
fact that the present Government were
training soldiers as rallwaymen, as
drivers, guards, signalmen, and so on,
so that these men should play the
part of blacklegs when the next strike
fame. '
''In every civilised epoch, the prevailing mode of economic production
and exchange, and the bocIbJ organisation neceBBarlly following from It,
form the basis from which Is built
up, and from which alone can be explained the political and Intellectual
history of tbat epoch."—Marx.
Organised labor must at least commend the attitude of H. H. Stevens,
federal member for this riding, towards the Hindus and Orientals. There
are already some 10,000 too many of
them In British Columbia.
Reeve Kerr of South Vancouver municipality stated to a mass meeting of
employees recently laid off work because of lack' of ready cash, that he
hoped to be ln s position to commence
munloipal work again by Aug. 1st.,
fiscal, agents of the municipality having succeeded In disposing of a portion
of the bonds nOw on tbe market
The United Mine Workers gained
18,000,000 In wages during the recent
yejar, the Western Federation of
Miners following with 83,214,600,. the
boot and shoe workers with 12,200,000,
and the maintenance of way employee
obtained, an Increase in wages of
12,000,000.
Your union Is your bread and butter
soolety. By reason of union Wages
you are enabled to belong to fraternal
societies. Isn't it Important, therefore, that your union should have
your first consideration and that you
should ba a constant attendant at
union meetings?—I. T. U. Journal.
"The man who does not attend his
union meetings and then kicks at tbe
measures adopted, la like unto the
man'who does not vote and then kicks
against a municipal administration."
In the election laat week for the
Reichstag in the Juterbog district, Herr
Ewald, socialist, defeated Herr Von
Oertsen, free conservative. Herr Von
Oerizen was elected ln 1912 but his
election was annulled on account of
irregularities. ,:
TRe railroad brotherhoods having
federated their own Interests for mutual protection, should take the next
step and affiliate with the A, F. of L.
and kindred organisations. Electricity and other modern developments
In the railway world will compel this
action aooner or later. Why not anticipate the Inevitable?
"When a man Is not a product of
forced motherhood, or dependent
motherhood when he Is not born un
der compulsion, It may be that he will
resent with greater energy the fact
tbat he lives under compulsion. But
as long as he Is conceived of slavery,
nurtured ln slavery, and reared ln
slavery, It can only be expected that
at maturity he will think slavishly."
A vaat majority of benevolent Institutions are gotten up to gratify the
aesthetic tastes of the public: exhibit
the wealth and generosity of the founders; and furnish places for officers,
Tbe beneficiaries of the Institutions
are simply en apology for their existence; and having furnished that apology, the least said about them the
better,—Jane Grey Swlsshelm.
"The nations of the world are vicing with each other In the conquest of
(he air, not for. the advancement of
civilization not for the acquiring of
knowledge, not to lessen the load of
the: worker, not for the betterment of
mankind; but for the sake ot war,
Invention pays beat today, If there is
In the new Idea a possibility for
slaughter. In the meantime, hundreds
are. killed while searching for the
means that will make killing easier."
The officials of the Western Fuel Co
will be mixed up with the courts of a
"foreign" country et San Francisco
for the next few weeks,on "charges of
conspiracy to defend Uncle Sam out
conspiracy to defraud Uncle Sam out
of nearly a million dollars by the al-
leged evasion of coal duties, snd the
'short weighing of the government fuel
orders." This Is the ssme Western Fuel
Co. which denies the right of Its coal
miners to belong to a "foreign" union.
The larger the number of union men
who demand the presence of the union
lsbel on tbe articles they buy the
larger will be the membership of the
various unlona, persistently remarks
the Lsbor Clarion of San Francisco.
It is just as much the duty of the union
man to see thst the members of hts
family demand the label as It Is that
he does so himself. The man who
falls to do his full duty In this regard
Is not s true union man. He Is a de
caption and a fraud,
The Progress Club Is responsible for
the Information thst there are 178 Industrial establishments In Greater
Vsncouver, with 8,966 persons on the
payroll, Including men, women and
children. The aggregate market value
o,f the total output of Vancouver In.
dustrles is estimated at $16,000,00, out
of which the owners hsd to return
((,600,000 to wage-workers tn the form
of wages. Thus lt ll made plain that
during the past year Vancouver wage-
workers paid their employers $9,600,.
M0 for the privilege of earning their
own wsges. Bnt what would we do
without an employer to give us work
and "divide up?"
Wonder what portion of that $46,000
J. H. S. Matson la spending, through
the Nanaimo Herald, to serve the ends
of the Western Fuel Co. tn sn attempt
to prevent tbe coal miners • belonging
to a regularly constituted International
trade union? The same Mr. Matson,
by the way, who controls the McBride
government dally press organs of Vsncouver and Victoria, the Colonist and
the News-Ad. Inasmuch as Premier'
McBride's special police drove the
Orientals at Cumberland into the
mines and the union miners out of
their homes It Is certainly In keeping
with the eternal fitness of things that
his chief press agent, Mr. Matson
should carry on tbe campaign against
the union through the Herald.
The Nanaimo Herald, operated under the editorial masthead of J. H. S.
Matson, Premier McBride's hired man,
has now linked forces with the Inter,
national Soriallst Review, published at:
Chicago by the same kind of "foreigners" It so often rails agalnat. The
International Socialist Review II now
the organ ot the Industrial Workers
of the World, and if the Herald's new
affinity had Its way there would be
merry Industrial hell to pay not only
on Vancouver Island, but In every construction and mining camp of the province, Inasmuch as the I. W. W. re
(uses to enter Into working agreements with employers. Perhaps, after
all, the Herald's new-found friends,
the I. W. W., should be given a few
weeks' reign at Nanalmo. It would
surely settle the present controversy,
and Incidentally the Herald and Mr.
Matson.
was probably a fair type of ihe method
of teaching history today, but a type
which baa surely been outgrown. It Is
recognised todsy hy anyone who studies fundamental causes that ware
and battles are not the most significant events in a country's history.
They are simply abnormal events. At
most tbey are but tbe culminations ot
movements the study of which is vastly more Important than the study of
the final military chapter. It Is by
Its Industrial end social work that a
nation Is built. The relation of Its
classes and their inevitable conflicts,
though never evenutatlng into open
conflict, give,the real clue to the historian. The cause and the sequence
of every war may be discovered ln the
Industrialism and social conditions ot
the people who tok part. It is surely
time, therefore, that less time were
given to the superctal and spectacular events of history and the high
school pupils were taught concerning
the real forces and events that make
a nation great or otherwise. A child
may know all about a nation's battles
and yet know practically nothing of
tbe real history of Its' life and development.—Ottawa Citizen.
Hlatory Examinations,
In a recent examination In Cana.
dlan history at the Ottawa Collegiate
Institute more then hsll1 the questions
submitted to the pupils ln two classes
hsd to do with wars and battles. This
Csuss for Reflection.
"Samuel Oompers and John Mitchell
appear to be on the black list of the
Manufacturers' Association as unpur-
chaaable." This is one ot the facts
brought to light ln the corruption expose of the late ex-secretary of the
Manufacturers' Association. Comment
unnecessary, but there is a heap of
room for reflection on the part of many
of the labor and socialist traducers
of these two leaders of the American
labor movement. In the light of the
Mulball exposures that Incident which
we commented upon ln these columns
a month ago, where Klrby and another
ex-presldent of the Manufacturers' Association, got up ln convention and
called God to witness thst the association had not been opposed to legitimate
organized tabor, shows what dramatic
cusses some people can be.—Winnipeg
Voice.
Force and fraud are in war the two
cardinal virtues.—Bobbes.
—v->—-
Freedom Is a new religion, the re
llglon of our time.—Heine.
stones >o a. o. raxoas
The name of the present recording
secretary of every, union In B. C. la
wanted by The Federationist for Its
union directory list Kindly see that
this information Is furnished without
delay.
moMuxioir weans
Information Is wanted of the where-
about* of MSrtin Trulson. Trulson la
a miner by occupation, but la now supposed to be following railroad construction work at the Coast. Anyone knowing
hit present address will confer a great
favor by writing to A, Shilland. Secre.
tary Miners' Union,.Sandon, B, C.
UNION DIRECTORY
Carda inserted for $1.00 a Month
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets in annual convention in- January, Executive o..,cers, 1913-11: President, Christian Slverti; vice-presidents,
J. Kavanagh, J. Ferris, A. Watchman, O
A. Burnes, J. VV. Gray, Jus. Cuthbertson,
J J. Taylor; sec-treas., V. R. Mldgley,
Hox 1044, Vancouver.
TRADES    AND    LABOR    COUNCIa	
Moots first and third Thursdays.
Executive board: H. C. Benson, president: W. Manson, vice-president; J. \\*.
Wilkinson, general secretary, Room 2-10
Lahor Tomple; -Jas. Campbell, treasurer;
W. Foxcroft, autlsticlan; W. J. Pipes,
sergeant-at-arms; F, A. Hoover, V. R.
Midgley, J, H. McVety, trustee*.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors:: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety James Brown. Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. \V. Wilkinson, R. P,
Prttlplece, John McMillan. Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Manas-
Ing director,' J. II. McVety, Room 211.
Sey. 6880.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUN-
_ OIL—Meeta 2nd Monday In month.
President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary, F, R.
Fleming, P.O. Box es. "
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR-
penters and Joiners—Room 209.
Say. 2908. Business asent, J. A. Key;
office hinivs, 8 to 9 a.n,. and 4 to 8 p.m.
Secretary of management committee,
H. McEwen, Room 209, Labor Templs.
Branches meet every Tuesday and Wedneaday In Room 501.
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Joiners, Local No. 617—Meets
Monday of each week, 8 p.m. Executive
committee meeta every Friday, 8' p.m.
Preaident, Ed. Meek; recording secretary, Jno. Oeo. Porter, 308 Labor Temple; finanoial secretary, O, W. Wllllama,
305 Labor Temple; treasurer, L. W. De-
slel, 80B Labor Temple. Phone Sey. 1380,
BAKERS' AND" CONFE«-
A __a _ Honors' Local No. 16-
Meets sccoii'l and fourth
Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. President, A. M. MacCurrah;
corresponding secretary, W
„,   , Rogers: Business Agent. J.
Black, Room 220,, Labor Temple.    Tel
Sey. 3138.
BARBERS' LOCAL, NO. 120—MEET"
aacond and fourth Thursdays, 8:30
P-m. Preaident, Sam. T. Hamilton: re-
corder, Oeo. W. Isaacs; secretary-business agent, O. P. Burkhart, Room 208,
Labor Temple, Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7
p.m.   Sey. 1776.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL NO. 676.—OF-
flce Room 208 Labor Temple. Moete
firat Sunday of each monthi Preaident.
Wm. Laurie,- financial secretary, Ooo. W.
Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple, Phone
Seymour 1764.
COOKS', WAITERS' AND WAITRESSES'
Dnlon.—Meats first Friday In each
month, 8:80 p.m., Labor Temple. W. E.
Walker, bualneaa representative. Ofllce:
Room 208, Labor' Temple. Hours: 8 a.m,
lo 10:80: 1 p.m. to 2:30 and 5 p.m. to (:||
p.m. Competent help furnished on ahori
notice.   Phone Sey. 8414.
BRIDGE AND STRUCT ORAL I30N
WORKERS'- International Union,
'.ocAl 87—Meets second anil fourth I-'rl.
Uy, Labor Temple, s p.m. President,
f. A. Seeley; secretory. A. W. Oaklev
768 Semlln Dalve, phone Say. 689.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NC* I
—Meets every Tuesday, 8 p.m., Roui:
307.   President, James Haslett; corros-
Eondlng secretary, W. S. Dagnall, Boi
3; financial secretary, F. R. Brown;
bualneaa agent, W. S. Daarall, Room
115.   aty. 8798.   '
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NU
218..—Meets Room 301. every Mondu\
8 p.m. Preildent. Fred. Fuller; vice-
president, G. S. Phllpot; recording
secretary, Jos. Russell, Labor Temple:
financial secretary, Dan Cummlngs;
treasurer, Geo. Hesaell; business agent,
W. F. Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION NO.
105—Meets third Tuesday In every
month, In Room 80S Labor Temple.
President, F. 3. Milne; vice-president, H.
Perry; secretary, George Mowat, 818
Dunlevy avenue.'	
BROTHERHOOD OF ncMLER MAKERS
i.n,l Iron Ship Builders and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. 1. 4—
Meets first and third Mondaya, 8_p.m
President, F. Barclay, 358 Cordova East:
-sarelary,: A. Fraser. 1161 Howe ftree.
CIGARMAKBRS'    LOCAL,    NO.    357-
Meets flrst Tuesday each month, 8
p.m. President. Oeo. Qerrard; secretary,
Robert J. Craig, Kurtz Cigar Factory;
treasurer, S, W. Johnson...
COMMERCIAL TELEGRAPHERS',
British Columbia Division, C. P. System. Division No. 1—Meets 11:30 a.m'.
third Sunday in month, Room 204. Local
chairman, T. O'Connor, P. O. Box 432,
Vancouver, Local seety. and treas.,
H. W. Withers, P. O. Box 432, Vancouver.
ELKCTBICAT. WORKERS-, LOCAL ~NO'
621 (Inside Men)—Meeta first and
third Mondaya of each month, Room 205,
8 p.m. 'Preaident, H. T. McCoy; recording aeeretary,-Geo. Albers; treasurer and
bualneaa agent, F, L. Estinghauson,
Room 202.   Sey. 2348.
LONOSHOREMENS' INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, No. 88 x 62—Meetfi
every Friday evening, 146 Alexander St,
President,  W.  Elliott;   secretary,  Thos.
Thmis That Handy
Men Are Wanting
25 lbs. WHITE LEAD 12.60—A flrst class white lead and
an opportunity not to be missed.   ,
READY MIXED WHITE; PAINT—Quart....,, -.We
FLOOR PAINT—Ready mixed, in two shades of yellow
, and two of grey.
GOLD ENAMEL, for your picture frames,  A bottle—UtD
SHINGLE STAIN, any color,
gal. —j»1.(»
LINSEED OIL, raw or boiled,
gsl..  »1.00
TURPENTINE, gsl ..11.4!
FLOOR LAC, quart ,80c
,   Pint  .46o
Half pint .25c
FLOOR ENAMEL, half
gsl 8)1.76
Qusrt „.. too
WALLPAPER CLEANER,
"Smoky City," psr tln....25o
Two tins ....4JO
'PUTTY—Mb.' tins	
PAINTS, In special; shsdes,
dark, rsd, heavy, brown snd
white—
Gsllon :.«275
Hslf gsllon....
Qusrt	
Pint	
Half pint ......
...11.50
 80c
.......60s
...i...S0e
All other shsdes, gsllcn..|2.40
Hslf gsllon .....|1.26
Quart ,....„»5e
Pint -   35c
Hslf pint..  :.26e
OOLD BRONZE, for picture
frames, 26c tins 16c
   100
WHITE LEAD in Mb, tins..*. : „... lOo
MURASCO and ALABASTINE, in 5-lb. packages, sufficient to do one ordinary size room.  Pride 48o
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
_ NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
Trinity Branch meeta lat and 8rd Fridays at Labor Temple, Dunsmuir and
Homer st„ room 206. Robert C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy ave.; Joseph 6.
Lyon, Fin. Sec, 1721 Grant at.: Tom
Smith, Rec.  Sec,  848 Broadway wast.
MACHINISTS', NO. 182—MEETS SBC-
ond and fourth Thursdays, 7:16 p.m.
Preaident, Chas. Mattlnaon; recording
secretary, J. Brookes; flnanclal aeeretary,
J^H. McVety.   Bey. 6360. -
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 238, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. Preaident, J. H, Fletcher;
aecretary-treaaurer, A. O, Hansen; business agent, G. R. Hamilton. Ofllce:
tRoom 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel, gay, 8046.
'MUSICIANS'   MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 148, A. F. of M	
Meets second Sunday of each month, 640
Robson street. President, J. Bowyer;
vice-president, F. English; secretary, C.
P. Howett; treaeurer, jr. Fowler,
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTBB-
„ NaVTIONAL ASSOCIATION. No. 8-
Meets flrst and third Wedneaday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m, President, G. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal secretary, D. SCott: treaeurer, I, Tyson: business agent, E, R. still. Phone
Sey. 1614,
PAINTERS', PAPERHANGERS' AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meet every
Thursday, 7:30 p.m. Preaident, A B.
Phillips; flnanclal secretary, J. Freckelton, 811 Seymour St.; recording secretary, George Powell, 1660 Fourth Ave.
W.; business agent, W. J. Nagle, Room
808, Labor Temple.
PRINCE RUPERT TYPOGRAPHICAL
Union No. 418—Meets laat Sunday
in month at Carpenters' Hall. President Glenn Bearle; secretary-treasurer,
W, D. Black, P.O. Box 848.
TioroaiA, a. o.
VICTORIA' TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets flrat and third Wedneaday, Labor Hall, 731 Johnson Btreet,
at 8 p.m. Preaident, A. Watchman, .aeeretary, L. H. Norrls, Laber Hall. Vic
torla, B.C,
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS
and Jolnera—Meeta every Tuesday,
8 p.m., at Labor hall, 781 Johnston St
President J. E. Bryan; recording secretary, Geo. L. Dykeman; buainasa agent
and financial secretary, w. A. Parkinson, Box 286.
KIMBKKLRV MINERS' UNION, NO. |tf
Western Federation of Miners*
Meets Sunday eVenlnga, In-Union mil,.
Preaident w. Fleming; secretary-treaa-
urer, M P VUleneuve, klmbarlay, B.cT
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 2888. U. M. W. er A.—Meets
Wedneaday, Union Hall, 7 p.m.   Prut-
dent  Bam Outhrle;  aecretar-   "	
McKensle. Ladyaffl'.th, B. O,
STONECUTTERS', VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second Tuesday, 8:00
'P.m. Preaident, J. Marshall; corresponding secretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047;
flnanclal secretary, K. MuKenxlo.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U.M.W.of A.
-Meeta every Monday at 7:30 p.m. In
the Athletic Club, Chapel Street Arthur
Jordan, Box 410, Nanlamo, B. C,
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTBRMBN'S
Union, No. 108, W. F. of M.—Mead
every Monday at 7:80 p.m. Praaldant,
F. W. Porrln: secretary, Frank Campbell. Box 16, Trail, B. C.
SXEHUTYPEllS' AND ELECTHOTYP-
era» Union, No. 88, of Vancouver
and Victoria—Meeta second Wedneaday
of each month, 4 p.m., Labor Temple.
President, Chas, Bayley; recording secretary, Chrla Homewood, 248 13th Ave.
East.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple, aecond anfl
fourth Wedneadaya at 2 a.m., and flrst
and third Wednesdays. 8 p.m. - Praaldant,
H. Schofleld, phone Fairmont 988; recording aeeretary, Albert V. Lotting, 2636
Trunlty Street, phone Highland 1672:
financial secretary, Fred A. Hoover, 8408
Clark drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTERNATIO.V-
al Local 397—Meeta- first and third
Wednesday, 8 p.m.; Room 204, Labor
Temple. Financial aeeretary, E. Prender-
gsst. Room 216.
TAILORS, JOURNEYMAN TAILORS'
UNION OF AMERICA, Local Mo. r,»
—Meetings held flrat Tuesday ln eaoh
month, 8. u.m. President' 3. T. Ella-
worth; recording and correapondlng aeeretary, W. W. HOcken. P. O. Box 508;
financial secretary, L. Kakaly, P. O. Box
r'*3. ■
TILE LAYERS' AND HELPERS', 1.0-
cal No, 62—Meeta flrst and third
Wednesdaya eaoh month, 6 p.m. Preaident, J. Kavanagh; aec-etary, B. A. E.
Morrison, 1769 Eleventh Ave. East.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 826—
Meeta last. Sunday each month, 1
p.m. President'A. E. Robb; vlce-prealdent, A, H. England; aecretary-treaaurer,
R. H. Neelands, P.O. Box 66:
a. o.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meeta every aecond
and fourth. Wednesday at 8 p.m., in
Labor Hall. President D. B. Cameron:
financial secretary, H. Glbb; general
secretary. B. D. Grant, P. O. Box 984.
The public la Invited to attend.
AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CAR.
PENTERS AND JOINERS meete every
.second and fourth Thureday of eaoh
month In Labor Temple, corner of Royal
Ave. and Seventh St., at 8 p.m. President 3. L. Hogg, Hankey Blk., Sapperton; Secretary, A. McDonald, 881 Royal
.Ave., New Westminster.
PLUMBERS' and STEAMFITTERS' LO-
cal 496—Meata every aecond and
fourth Friday of month in Labor Hall,
7:30 p.m. President, D. Webstar; aeeretary, A. McLaren, P.O. Box 916, Now
Westminster. B, O.
UNITKD BROTHERHOOD OF CAR.
penters, Local Union-No. 1639-
Meets every Monday, 8 p.m., Labor Temple, corner Royal avenue and Seventh
street. President, M. C. Schmendt: secretary, A. Walker, Labor Temple, New
Westmlnater, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOOAL 784—MEETS IN
Lahor Temple, New Westminster, corner Seventh Btreet and Royal avenue.
every second Sunday of each month, at
1:80 p.m. President, P. Paulsen; secretary, 8. W. Jameson. Vlaltlng brothers
Invited,
LOCAL VANCOUVER OF SOCIAL
DEMOCRATIC PARTY — Publlo
meetings in Dominion Theatre, Granville Street, Sunday evenings. Secretary. O. L. Charlton, 3828 Main Street,
arnrovaia or ooal Sanaa b«oo-
LAXioare.
Coal mining rights ot the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northweat Territories and In a portion of the Provinoe
of British Columbia, may ba leased for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of 81 an acre. Not more than
2,560 acres will be leaaed to one applicant
Application for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district ln which the
rights applied for ore situated.
In surveyed territory the land muat be
described by sections, or legal aubdivla-
lona of aectlona, and In unaurveyed territory the tract applied for.ahall be
ataked by the applicant himself.
.Each'application must ba accompanied
by a fee of 96, whloh wtll be refunded If
the rights applied for are. not aaallable,
but not othorwlae. A royalty ahall bs
paid on tha merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave centa per ton..
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of mer- '
chantable coal mined ana pay the royal-
'" " "    "* " '  —    Inl. ~ — '
ty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being. operated, auch returns
ahould be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include .the coal mining
rights only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
aurface rights may be considered necea-
sary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 910 an. acre.
For full Information.' application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion
Landa.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.    ■
N. B.—Unauthorised publication or
this advertisement will not ba paid for!
PATBONIZC    B     C.     FBD8RATIOXI8T
ADVanTISERS—AND TILL TH8W WHY
AND
Porter
^&>  OF AMERICA   r4Q»T
to-rntr awn _______ taea
Use Electric Irons
Comfort
Convenience
Economy
The coat (or continuous operation it only a few cents per hour.
The iron it operated front an ordinary hoiuehold .socket,
The irons told by this company are con'stiucted on the best principles,
this means an appliance which is hoi at the point and tool st the handle.
The iron beaft the manufacturer's guarantee.
Carrall and
Hastings Street
B.C.ELECTRIC
PHONE SEYMQUR 5000
1188 Granviile St.
near Davie
\ jsp*f?*lWP!pPSSHP
wt^ffiE,
"PPPH
.^'Slfta' ■
FRIDAY...
... JULY 18, IMS
TfiB BBI-HSH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIS*
New Middy Blouses
nr tmi jpwiob aiora
We ahow an excellent range of theae popular models
for girls of 8 to 18 yeara of age. Ton will do particularly
well to tee them if yon require anything in that lln*. For
style and quality represented, the prices are decidedly
moderate. Note thaw:
Middy blouses in white,   Middy blouses with  de-
with navyr-scarlet and      tachable collar and
saxe   blue   collar   and      cuffs; come in white, in
1 - cuffs,  and laced' with   ' plain or Norfolk style,
eord to match, at....$2.00      at ................13.00
Norfolk middy blouses, with patent leatW belt; come in
white, with collar and cuffs of navy, saxe, blue or
scarlet, at ..■■■ .: ■'„.'....„ ...JftM.
dttthon Irga&al*. fitertkii
575 Gramllle Street       Vancouver, B. C.
JA
MES STARK limited
Htww Abbott tn\& Owrwll.
_________ ut. _____
___ -Direct from tho mill to the. million. ..fair real worth and
value we are indeed famous.   In all our varloua section* there li not .
a department that claims more attention than thla.
TMlOmiOg—Bought m the very best market* of the entire world.
We follow fashion and keep up with the minute.   Out-of-date trimmings have no plaoe In our store.
AU MOD*—Refinement goei band In hand with taate. Artistic
display combines with utility and servlcablo merchandise.
MBIOII-We can claim a stock and variety that cannot be excelled
on the ettlre Pacific Coast. Value, taste and economy are the features.
WHMfAB—Correct models. Perfect cut. Perfectly In accordance
with good taste. Always a comprehensive display al reasonable
.prices. (
MLKi-In this feature of our merchandise the greatest care Is taken
In buying good weights and weaves. Latest colors and rook-bottom
prices are our sheet anctiors.
■OTWsUTiTif Mn-nyr- a useful tju'antlty kept In the O nt's Furnishing
Department. This Is a department that only keeps the best of everything. ,"/- . ■ ;-
VOROV*—Our business became so great that we had tb enlarge the
department. Everything not only kept, but In stock every day at all
times.'    •      '
■nut—Our specialty—Beautiful tailored styles. We have garments
bought In the best markets of Canada and the States, Paris models,
and nowhere ere we so near perfect as ln this department for styles
and prices, a
Stoves m? Ranges
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools   ■
and all kinds of Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
OWEN & MORRISON
PHONE FAIR. 447.
2337 MAIN STREET.
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Phones Sey. 2827-2828
Hardware and
Sporting Goods
111 Hsstings Street West
FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS
Label
Tht use of the label on your printing (no extra cost to you)
will help us do our duty in fighting: tuberculosis
Hardware and Tools
1A splendid stook of the best in the world's market.
We make a specialty of supplying every need and requirement of the artisan in our Una
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
7 Hastlngi Btreet West Phons Seymour 634
Padmore's Big Cigar Store
642 GRANVILLE STREET
TOBACCOS and CIGARS
Honest snd Artistic
Dentistry
The most scientific and
up-to-date-methods
DR W. J. CURRY
' DENTIST
301 DOMINION TRUST BLDG,
Open from 9 s.m. to 5 p.m.
RING   UP   SEYMOUR   2SS4   FOR   APPOINTMENT
. 101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street Weil
DR. BRETT ANDERSON-Dcn/w/
•J Opeialei by the latest, moil scientific and painless methods
Specialist ia Gown, Bridge, Plate snd Gold Inlay Work
. Hours 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dsiiying
:•:''•' Stock snd Poultry'
British Columbia Grants Pre-emptions of
160 Acres to Actual Settlers at
$1 PER ACRE
TERMS: Residence on the land for at least
two yean; improvements lo die extent of $2,50 ■
per acre; payment of $40 at the end of two
yean, and the balance of $160 (i.e. $120) in
3 annuel instalments of $40, with interest # 6%
'  For' Further Information Apply lo '
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
EMPLOYEES COMBINE TO
FIOHT FOB "OPEN SHOP'.'
ooHDmoNsnrwiM
Nelson Branch of Canadian Mann
factureri' Association Adopts
Vancouver
Employers recognise the. necessity
ot organisation. They themselves organize. - And when It comes to the
framing and adopting ot constitution
and by-laws-that sre binding upon the
membership the employers occupy a!
seat on the front row. Some months:
ago The Federatlonist published ex-,
cerpts from the book ot laws of the;
Vancouver Employers' Asoc.atk.ii.
That the organisation Is provincial in
scope and Jurisdiction and affiliated
frith the Canadian Manufacturers' As.
soclatlon Is well known to any who,
care to avail themselves of plain facts.
That the employers also appreciate
the value of watching legislation Is
evidenced by the construction ot their,
articles of association. The Federatlonist is ln receipt of a copy of the
constitution snd by-laws of the Nelson
branch of the Employers' Association,
snd a few of the clauses and provisions are herewith reproduced:
"Sscond. The adoption ot a uniform legitimate system whereby mem.
bers may ascertain WHO IS snd WHO!
IS NOT worthy of employment
'Fourth. To endeavor to make It
possible for any person to obtain employment WITHOUT BEING OB-
LIGBD TO JOIN A LABOR ORGANIZATION, aad to support such persons
In their efforts to d<* so If discriminated against by organized labour.
"Fifth. To protect its members In
such manner as msy be deemed expedient against legislative, municipal
and other political encroachments.
"Sec. 8. Any person,' firm or corporation engaged in a strike or lockout
msy make application for and be accepted as a probationary member pend
Ing an examination of hla case by the
Conciliation Committee. If ln the
judgment of the Conciliation Commit,
tee, after careful consideration, it is
to the: Interest of the Association to
advance a' probationary member to
full membership, the same may be
done by two-thirds vote of the Executive Committee.
"Sec. 4. No member shall be en.
titled to the benefits of membership
In the settlement of any difficulty
which may arise between him and his
employees before he shsll have been
a member of tbe Association for a
period of one month, except by the
unanimous consent and approval of
the' Executive Committee.
"See. 8, Whenever, In the Judgment
of the Strike Committee, an emer-
«-e«cy has arisen requiring the though,
tul consideration and attention of all
members of this Association, lt shsll
bs the duty ot the President to call
the members for consultation and deliberation.
"Sec."4. When a member is engaged
with a strike, or from other cause is
unable to obtain aad bold other workmen In place of those on strike, or
previously employed by him, on account of interference on the part ol"
any labor organisation or their .allies,
the Conciliation Committee shall when
requested by such member, .invest!
irate the situation and may recommend
to tbe Association, st a special meet
Ing called for the purpose, If necessary, the offering of reword In such
forms as may appear to be wise to
persons who shall remain ln the employ of such member during the continuance of such difficulty.
"Sec. 6. If a member shall settle
a difference or strike Involving a
question of general Interest ot the
Association without first obtaining tUe
approval and consent of the Concilia
tlon and Executive Committee, then
In Such event such member shall repay
to the Association all money which lt
may have paid out on account of said
dlffsrsnce or strike, snd the Association shall be relieved of all responsibility ln the premises.
"Sec, 7. Whenever the Executive
Committee msy deem It wise and proper to protect a member bv wholly or
partly compensating htm for loss sustained through a strike or difficulty
attributed to labor organisation, It
shall make proper recommendation to
the Association at a regular or called
meeting thereof,, and If such recommendation be apprpved by tbe two-
thirds vote of tbe members present
at such meeting, the amount of such
compensation shall be paid them,
"Sec, 8. At the request of a member
directly Interested It shall be the
duty of the Executive Committee, subject to* the approval of the Association, to authorize, order and conduct
the prosecution of the leaders of mobs
or. persons threatening or doing In-
Jury to the property of the members
also those Instrumental In establish
Ing so-called bnvcotts against tbelr
production and the expenses of such
prosecution shall be paid by. the Association.
"Sec. 8. When a demand Is msde
on a member through a committee of
any labor organization said member
shal be privileged to refer to such
committee to the Conciliation Committee of tbls Association, and once
having done ao he shall not thereafter
negotiate a settlement of such demsnd
without the consent snd approval of a
majority of said Conciliation Commit,
tee, which committee shsll appoint
three members of the Association to
take charge of tbe matter, snd the
members so abpointed shall Immediately proceed, tn conjunctfon with the
member on wbom the demand Is made
to effect a settlement, which settlement, If not satisfactory to the ssld
member, shsll bs referred back to the
conciliation and executive committees
for such action as tbey may deem best
In the premises. ,
'Sec. 1. Tbls Association may dissolve and cease to exist at any time
when three-fourths of Its members, tn
good standing and wbo shsll not be
in arrears In the payments of dues
and assessments,' shall so determine,
and In event, of snch dissolution all
funds, sfter paying all debts and obligations of the Association, shall be
redistributed among Its members in
proportion to tbe total amounts paid
into the Association by the said members respectively, provided, however
that notice of such Intended action
shall hsve been mailed to each member st least thirty days prior to such
action, and provided further that all
dues and assessments due, the Association shall first be deducted from
each member's proportion of auch redistribution. This section shall not
be changeable or amended except by
an affirmative vote of four-fifths of
all the members, who shall be duly
notified as above provided.
"Sec. 1. The secretary of this association may provide each of Its members wltb recommendation cards,
which shsll be used for the purpose
of recommending any employee who
may be honorably discharged from,
or who shall honorably quit, the employ of a member thereof,
"See. 1. ill matters of polities rei
latin* to municipal and legislative at.
fairs In so tar as snch matters may
effect the object of thia association,
shall be,proper subjects for discus,
sloh at Its meetings and action Its
members aa saeh.
"Sec, 2. It "shall bs ths duty ot
each member ef or participant ln
this association to report thereto any
political or legislative matters, ss pro.
vlded in Sec. 1 hereof, which may
come to his notice.
"Sec 3. All expenses for protection of the property ot any member,
threatened with Injury or distraction
by combinations of employees and
their sympathisers shall be paid by
the association, provided the Conciliation Committee shall bave approved
of such protective measures.   -
TRADES AND LABOR
CONGRESS OF CANADA
By W. R. TROTTER
Organiser Trades and Labor Congress,
Ths call, to the twenty-ninth anneal
convention of the Tradee and Labor
Congress of Canada, has been lsued
thla week. Talcing plaoe, as the convention does .this yeer, In the largeet
city cf ths Dominion, there Is erery
prospect that last yesrt record at.
.tendance of over 350 delegates at
Guelph, will be exceeded.
Each succeeding year has wltnsssed
the etsady growth of the congress,
numerically snd financially. This has
been accomplished In spite of obstacles, the peculiarities of which have
been little understood and therefore
not fully apprepclated by the average
trades unionist; although these might:
Well be pardoned, seeing that It has
taken a number _af years to render
the executive heads of the International' movement sufficiently familiar
with the work, status and objects of
the congress—but particularly the
status—to Induce them to place their
organizations In proper relationship
toll.
This period, however. Is now past
and the International trades union
movement of the North American continent recognizes for Industrial pur.
poseB their respective international
executive . for legislative purposes,
North of the Boundary Line, tbe
Trades snd Labor Congress of Can-
ada, and to the South tbe American
Federation of Labor. These two bodies
Issuing in their respective- Jurisdictions charters to provincial and state
federations of labor to carry on local
legislative work In tbe workers' Interests. .
The growth   of   the congress Is
shown In figures from the last report
of the secretary:     -
.Summary.or the Receipts and Expenditures for the paat twelve yeara.
Member- Expen-     Bal-
Vear ahip Receipts dltures ance
1801 8,881 81,008.88 8 908.00 I 101.88
1902 13,488 2,848.41 1,708.67 548.84
1908 18,108 3,888.84 3,383.38 494,98
1904     22,010   3,747.98   3,346.29      401.87
1906 22,004 4,700.28 4,001.38 808.98
1006    27,676   6,747.40   3,070.08   1,774.62
1907 32,296 7,474.79 0.670.26 904.68
1108 40,728 fi.906.44"" 7,442.00 1,464.85
1000    36,071   7.890.47   6,607.74   1,281.73
1910 51.000   0,482.34   7.103.56    2.878.78
1911 67.269 12,496.10   9,139.64   3.866.96
1912 66,128 15,689.97 10,219.82   6,479.97
The affiliation of International
unions Is also a growing roll, particularly Is this noticeable when it Is remembered tbat In 1906 only nine of
these unions were paying tax on their
Canadian membership direct from
headquarters, and now almost every
International union Is ln line.
The spade work and constant application necessary to build up the Congress when the Individual unions had
to be appealed to for affiliations and
ths immense teritory to' be covered
ln doing lt, Is a piece of history snd
hard work, the success of which Is a
testimony to the earnestness and untiring efforts of tbe officers of the
period,    -
Today tbere are 44 trades and labor
councils In as many cities, reaching
from Victoria, British Columbia, to
Sydney, Cape- Brenton, si holding
charters from, and maintaining flnan.
clal relations with the Trades and La.
bor Cobgress of Canada, while the
unions In the provinces of Albetra
and British Columbia have organised
and established provincial federations
of labor under charter from the same
body.
;    Representation st Conventions.
City trade councils are entitled to
three delegates ta the annual conventions and provincial federations to one
each. Tbe remainder of the representation being composed of delegates
from loesl unions on a basis of one
for each 100 of membership. International unions paying tax upon their
entire Canadian membership are entitled to one delegate each as Inter-
national representative, but this delegate must be a member of some Canadian local ot the order. Thus every
delegate on the floor at conventions Is
a member of some Canadian trade or
labor union.
When this latter fact Is fully understood lt will be seen that those
charges are ridiculous which have
from time to time been made that the
Canadian congress is under the domination of the American section of the
movement. Thst there Is sgreement
on fundamental principles Is prefectly
true, and .It could not well be otherwise, seeing that the same Industrial
organizations form tbe component
parts of both the Canadian congress
and the American Federation of labor. The existence of the famous Eu.
ropesn Tripple Alliance does not Imply the subjection of any one of the
nations to the others, nor would the
'IP THESE II A**
BiMDnrr^iwoou)
;.■    Ull TO ENOW"
Thli Wee Pree. Poatar'g Request
of Mfadster at Ubor Orothen
onatoptemberJO, JM3.
"If there Is any remedy we would
Uke to know." Thla la what Robt,
Foster, president of District 18, united
Mine Workers of America, Nanalmo,
wanted io know laat Sept. 30th, when
be addressed, a letter to the Minister
of Labor. Mr. Foster was at that
time a new member ot a aew organization and of course not aa well verssd
In the forms,ef procedure necessary
to put It up to the department ot
labor ss seems.necessary, The Federatlonist is of the opinion that If
Mr. Crothers had been particularly
snxlpus to break Into the miners'
trouble at that time Mr. Foster's letter gave him the opportunity. "If
tbere Is any remedy we would like
to know," surely the'sversgs working-
man's method and form ot seeking
Information. Mr. Foster's letter, of
which Mr. Crothers had the only
copy (a further evidence of Mr. Foster's Inexperience). Is only available
since Mr. Crothers' files became accessible.   It leads:
Nanalmo, Sept. 80,1813.
Hon. T. W. Crothen,
Minister of Labor, Ottawa, Oat
Deer Sir—A short time sgo If you
remember. In the Wilson Hotel, you
mads tbe remark that If you could
do anything in yonr power tor the
benefit ot the workers that yoa would
only be too pleased to do so.
Now I will endeavor to give yon
a full explanation of the trouble which
we are engaged.In at the present
time, -
Our men have beea openly discriminated against snd the compenles refuse to give any reason whatever;
They refused to meet our committees and we claim the right to cues,
tion at-any time why our men are
discharged.
The companies refuse to concede
that right to.us snd what do we find?
They put ns up sgslnst a lockout.
Our men are compelled to aot on
these gas - committees' and we dan
find no other reasons why they are
discriminated sgslnst.
Of course the companies are able
to prove that they are not discriminating against our men on sccouat
of their actions on gss committees,
but tbey do not submit/ sny reasons
why they have discharged our men
unquestioned.
' That Is the only question at Issue.
IF THERE IS ANY REMEDY WE
WOULD LIKE TO KNOW.
Trusting you will give this question
your Immediate atentlon and that we
will receive an early reply, I km,
Fraternally yours,
ROBERT FOSTER
Pres. Dlst. 38, tJ. M. W, of A.
Mr, Crothers' Only Reply.
Ottawa, October 7th, 1813.
Dear Sir: I have your letter of the
30th ultimo, and I hasten te acknowledge lt. I went, however, to consider
the matter before taking any further
action. I will do so and write you
later.
Faithfully,
T. W. CROTHERS
Robert Foster, Esq.,
Box 798, Nanalmo, B. C.
WHO'S WHO?
Samuel Landers, proprietor of the
Hamilton utbor News.—Born three
miles and thirty cents trod Jerusalem..
Father was.of the tribe of Israel. Son
inherited his gift of the gab, Looks
like an Italian, Fondness for spsghettl
responsible, Came to this country
when a boy. Started to read Bellamy's
Looking Backward. Turned labor
leader. Very honorable man. Settled
more strikes than Eugene'Debs. Well
thought of by capitalists. Never took
a bribe In his life. Editor and proprietor of the Hamilton ' Labor News.
Great sheet. Brilliantly edited. B. L.
can dull more scissors and use more
psste than a trio of paper hangers,
Very honorable man. Once saw three
reporter's at police court take a bribe
to suppress a name. Shocked him so
ho squealed to their editors. Reporters
almost got fired, Samuel smiled at
them Just the same next day. Never
took a bribe In Us life. Very honorable
Wears rubber collars. Shaves his own
neck. On august occasions wsxes his
moustache with lifebuoy soap. Can
talk ebout himself and Karl Marx for
three hours. Thinks hs is a cyclone
because he has wind on his stomach.
Has a brazen eye that never betrays
his heart. Once played Judas ln the
Passion Play. Very honorable man.
Admired by the garment workers. Is
a real good fellow.—"Jack Canuck."
British consider they were ln sny wsy
dominated   by   their Japanese ally.
Signatories to these alliances are rec
ognlzed as on terms of equality.
The "Nstlonsle" Opposition.
As opposed to the Internstlonsl
character of the affiliations or the
Trades Congress of Canada, there has
existed for some Ume a "purely" Canadian aggregation, now known ss the
Canadian Federation of Labor, which
undertakes to Issue charters to trades
councils and local unions. Notwithstanding that this organisation has
had the blessing of the associated employers (who are swift to recognize
the value, to them, ot ai possible dls-
Intergatlng element) this organization has made no headway.
In contrast to the Trfades Congress
with Its 1088 unions snd s direct
dueB-paying membership of 66,128, the
Canadian Federation of Lsbor csn
only boast of 49 unions snd 6940 mem-
behshlp: and seeing thst ths Nova
Bcotla Provincial Workmen's Association clslms 33 of the 48 unions snd a
membership of 6000, and that it Is
the latest recruit of ths "Natlonales,"
the latter body can scarcely be said
to have sn effective separate existence. This is further emphssized
when we note that of the 48 locals, 28
are those of tho Nora Scotia P. W. A.,
and of the remainder 17 are In Quebec and eight ln Ontario.
International Connections.
The Trades Congress provides for a
regular exchange of fraternal dele,
gates with the Amerlcsn Federation
of Labor, snd at tbe J911 convention
at Calgary, decided to Invite ah exchange with the British Congress. The,
succeeding convention of the British
Trades Congress heartily endorsed the
proposition, and elected as their first
delegate, Mr. Will Thome, M. P., who
will, be present at the Montreal convention In September ot thla year. The
Guelph convention last year confirmed
the Calgary decision snd elected Secretary P. M. Draper as the first Canadian fraternal delegate to the British
Trades Congress.
These exchanges wll be of advantage to the general movement In the
better undertaking of each other's
problems. In fact, the attention which
Is being paid to Canada, by the
moneyed classes of Britain, and their
close connection with every emigration scheme on the market, together
with their constant attempts to control and direct the departments responsible for emigration expenditures
is of Itself a sufficient reason for a
much closer connection between tbe
workers of the old land and those of
the new.
There being a more or less constant
buslnes relationship through the International unions between the two
recognized legislative heads on this
continent, the establishment and maintenance of British frsternal relationships appear to be the most Important
of the two. Especially so since the
British Congress has Invited an exchange between themselves snd the
recognized trades union combinations,
of several European countries, wblch
sre at present favorite recruiting
grounds for cheap labor. The chance
is thus afforded of meeting responsible representatives of those nstlons
by whom necessary tscts msy be con.
veyed to their respective constituencies with a much better understanding
and apreclatlon of any Subject dealt
with than when corespondsnes has
to be relied upon with a lapse of a
month between query and reply.
Although there has been no formal
exchange of delegates between -the
British Labor Party and the Congress,
Brttalns labor rsprassntatlvoo have
shown «wsldei»Me totsNst In the
Csnsdfsa moveneat, Mr. I. Ksb- Her-
die, M. P., steaded the 1808* convention-ln Halifax, N. 6., sad aaeia lsst
year at Ouelph, Oat, as fraternal delegate from the British Labor Farty
and st Quebec, Iq 1809, Mr. WW
Crooks, M. P., waa a welcome,visiter
from tbe same party. Walla acting
as stent of the Canadian Trades Congress In Britain, W. R. Trotter waa'
seated at the "Hull (1908) and the
Portsmouth (1909) convenOoos Of the
British Ubor Party ss Canadian fra-
ternsl delegate.
Orgawlaatloa. ,
The congress elects at saeh convention sn executive committee who keep
a watchful eye, In the workers' Inter
eats, en all federal legislation ,snd
press for the adoption of whatever
measures each convention has decided
upon. The organisation rests upon
them. Committees are also elected
who hsve charge of provtaolal measures In those provinces where no
provincial federation has as yet been
chartered.
It has bash the custom for a number pf years tor the congress to send
out representatives coverlag, as effect-
tlvely as fineness will permit, the ter.
rltory under its Jurisdiction.' This
method-hss produced the best of results not only for the congress Itself,
but In the Interests of lta afflliated in.
ternatlonal unions. . The majority of
tbe trades snd lsbor councils la the
Dominion have been thus organised.
This year there will be five organizers In the field for s limited time. Al-
phonse Verville, M. P., win visit the
Maritime provinces; G. R. Brunet,
who speaks both French and English,
will work In ths province ot Quebec!
Vice President Bancroft will attend to
Ontario; W. R. Trotter has again been
allotted the prairie provinces as far
east ss the lake cities, and 3. W. Wilkinson hss been requested'to attend to
congress Interests In British Columbia,
"Future Conventions.
While lt is true that each convention
decides where the next hu to be held
It Is also true that there Is a fairly
general Idea as to ths geographical
disposition of the next meeting piece.
Last yesr st Guelph the city ot Montreal detested St. John, N. B. by the
narrow margin of two votes. There
wae no other contestant and tt Is almost certain that the 1914 contention
will be held In the tar Bast Vancouver delegstes lsst year made It known
that tbey would place this elty In
nomination for the 1918 convention—
tbe year of the-Panama Bxpoeltlon et
San Francisco, when eutern delegatee
Would probjbly be able to avail them-
selves of excursion rates snd so provide for a larger gathering on the
Paello Coast thae 1
SFSus.  ..
the 191* eoaveastoa.   AB '*.
<a a meeeare Qlsstiataa tsWl
which Is being takse Meeta
hbersttons treat eSoeMi'
inton■ ta 't*v,oiamtpW$
«ith to the deetrfee or
of the fittest, there Jew
In. recordlag that; u the _    _
of  Cansdtan . ofgaalM  latni'
Trades snd Ubor Coagreea of Ot£
sds Is something mor* lhaa a saistsal
today.
lta*
"On* Msn, On* VhtoV -••
Tbe Mil lo sbobee-ptsiat vothaf as
ns last atfbt after a asottoa to reject the boThad been defeated 884 to
». Tbls bill passed tto flrat rsattti
on April 8 by a vote of 808 to 107. tt
embodies the principle'of "One araa,
Tito.".,
Calgary Irickleyera Strike.
After, vstaly .asgotlattng with the
builders' exchange for a raufleatjoa of
a new schedule ot 79 osata aa boat,
the bricklayers of Calgary weat aa
strike Monday for the Increaaed wage. ,
Business Agent Ivies states that'
twenty-three of the contractors had
taken back the awn at the now scale,
Tbe old scale which has been la forgo
tor the paat two yesrs Is I7H cents.
"melts ef Catrftal."
Tueeday night two brothers, Pets
snd Steve Andrews, were otngkt la a
cave-In at the Bankhead, Alta, mtat,;
and before they could bs rescued both
young men wet* suffocated.    Without warning the roof aad alio wall fell
on the two men, snd their eomrsdee
made frantic efforts to clear the tall
and release their Imprisoned Meade.;
But despite herculean strivings thai"
could not release the bodies to tune.
Efforts, were made at srUndal resplr-
stlon, but with no results.    ,
Que Pringle a Cosst Visitor.
Gus Pringle, associated with Arthur
W. Puttee In "The Voice/' Wthnlpe*
accompanied by Mrs. Pringle, le a vta>
tor on ths coast this week. Mr, Pria.
gle at one tlmei "printed'' In New
Westminster, along with C. Stuart
Campbell and other well known old-
time Pacldc Cout typos, bnt hu net
been away for many years. Mr. and
Mrs. Pringle went over to Victoria oi j
Wednesday, will return tomorrow aid
will leave for home Sunday. Wbat Mr.
Pringle had to say of Vanoouver la
general aad the Labor Temple le particular can scarcely be used;In these
columns, ss the Progreu Club would
purloin It for publicity literature.
SHOES FOR MEN
SHOES FOR SERVICE
SHOES FOR DRESS
UNION SHOES POR COMPORT
FOR    EVERY    REQUIREMENT
We've pioked winners in Men's Fall Shoee, "We're at the service
of every man who desires the beat shoee hie money can buy.
WT    AOD   204 MAIN STREET
t'JtVIVR Opposite the City HU
Naroad Shoos Ar* frequently
Mode In Non-Union Factories
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE
no matter what its nsme, unless it burs a
plain and readable impression of thia Stamp.
All shorn without the. Union Stamp are
slwsys Non-Union. '.-..,'
Boot 0_ She* WorKere" Vnlen
246 Summsr Street Boston, Men.
J. F. Tobln, Pres.    C. L.Bsins, sec.-Treu
Get Your Money's Worth
; r in a c c \ t> rvvx-<>
-^PRESIDENT
I
SUSPENDERS
"Worit with the President and
the President wotlcs with you"
rnstssst aaspeaeers Ossisateea
J
Take Home a
Case Today
YOU will be glad to
1 have this pure Beer to
serve to vour family. It's
brewed from the purest
mountain water in America. Aged and, bottled
right. Contains the nourishment of Canadian Barley and the tonic properties of finest Hops.
AT ALL DEALERS
Pints—$1.00 the dozen
Quarts—$2.00 the dozen
w$L
BttWED AND BOTTLED W VAMCOUVOt BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES
Limited aiRSKpi"};
■■fm
PAGE POUB
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
FiaJiDRATlOyiBT
FRIDAT..
..-..JTOTll, Wll
Overalls and Gloves
We carry a good atoek of Carhartt Overalls, blue. .
blaok and striped •— •■ $1,50
Kentucky Jean  - ■•• 1.00
Buok Brand Overalls - 1.00     ,   ,
Carhartt Gauntlets, fl-.fi0-- 2.00     •
H. B. K. Gaiintlets, 76oto~ ■■ -   £50
CLUBB St STEWART
soe-is atasuars at w.
Tei. Mr. roa
your SUMMER suit
Should be Tailor-made and msde by Union Tailon. Fine stock lo select from
rnrn DUDDV Labor Temple Tailor
rt\E.U rnxvKx _   u A . __■
Corner Hornet and Dunsmuir SiretU
"Best Three Dollar Hat on Earth"
Richardson & Potts
\   MEN'S HATS ONLY
417 Granville Street, Phone 3822
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
HATS WITH THE
UNION LABEL
THE MUSICIANS UNION
wish to announce that Mr. Franklin and members of his orchestra
are not members of the Musicians
Union. When engaging music for
your next dance or social, make
sure that your Orchestra is composed of UNION musicians.
For fall Information Phone Nnalelene' Union
Sey. 7815. 140 Robeea Street
SUMMER
RACE
MEETING
Seven
High-Class
Races
Daily
TRAINS LEAVE
GRANVILLE ST.
STATION
12:30,11:30,2 p.m.
AN EASY WAY TO SETTLE
TROUBLE  COMPLAINcfD  OF
IS SIGN WITH U.M.W. OP A.
If tbe mine owners ot Vsncouver is.
land are desirous of putting an end
to tbe conditions complained ol ln a
recent Issue of tbe Victoria Times, ss
quoted below. It might be suggested
that an sgreement with the U. M. Vf.
of A., similar to tbat under wblcb the
mines of Washington state are operated, will ensure quick action and a
prompt restoration of s normal coal
output.  Says the Times:
"So badly have the coal strikes at the
east coast mines demoralised the Shipping business tbat the Nanalmo pilots
bave practically been forced to quit,
and they have tied up their pilot boat.
The Coal City Is naturally Suffering the
greatest loss as a result of the tie-up,
bnt Victoria*! shipping Is how being
affected and Vancouver's marine is
also feeling the effects of the strike.
"Shippers declare that unless an
amicable settlement Is brought about
Immediately between the miners and
mine operators lt will be impossible to
forsee the ultimate conditions, but they
fear tbat the shipping of British Columbia may be paralysed. The great
fleet of tramp steamships which once
visited Nanalmo to flu their bunkers
with the finest cosl that can be obtained on the Pacific coast, no longer
come to British Columbls, but proceed
to the Sound, where coal of a very Inferior quality Is purchased."—Victoria
Times.
Lsbor Commissioner Hers.
3. H. Wallace, a member of the
Washington Stale Industrial Insurance Commission, representing labor,
was a visitor lh Vsncouver yesterday
and paid The Fed, a fraternal call.
It, will be remembered thst Mr. Wallace attended the last convention of
the B. C. Federation of tabor at Victoria as fraternal delegate from Washington Stats Federation of Labor, and
created a splendid Impression among
B. C. unionists, He Is one of tbe best
Informed men on Workmen's Compensation In America.
STREET RAILWAY EMPLOYEES
VANCOUVER, WESTMINSTER,
VICTORIA, PRESENT CASE
(Continued-from Page One.)
bold a boat excursion picnic on Saturday, July 26.  Invited all unionists to
attend, -
Committees Namsd.
President Benson named the following committees:.
Building Trades Council—Dels. Mldgley, England and Knight
Label League—Uren, Burroughs and
Lothian.
Longshoremen — Dels.   Wilkinson,
Sully snd Burkhart
Nomination snd Election sf Oltlcera.
Nominations for officers were called
for and Dels. Trotter, Burroughs and
Lothian Were appointed tylers.
President—Benson, Mldgley, Uren,
McVety. President Benson having accepted renomlnation, the other three
nominees declined nnd Del. Benson $as
elected by acclamation.
Vice-President—Piper, Kavanagh,
MoVety.
First Ballot—Piper, 7; Kavanagh, 28
McVety, 3«.  McVety elected.
General Secretary—Dels. Wilkinson,
Mldgley (declined), McEwen.
First   Ballot—Wilkinson, 46;   McEwen, 22.   Wilkinson elected.
- Secretary-Treasurer—Del. Campbell.
Elected by acclamation.
Sergesnt-at-Arms—Dels. Burkhart,
Pipes, Bstlnghausen, Mldgley, Sully.
Flret Ballot-Burkhart, 9; Pipes, 19;
Estlnghsusen, 12; Midgley, 29; Sully,
7.  No election.
Second Ballot—Burkhart, 3; Pipes,
20; Estlnghsusen, 11; Mldgley, 36.
Mldgley elected.
Statistician—Dels. Foxcroft (declined), (Miss) Brisbane, Pipes,
Uren, Curnock.
Flrat. ballot—Brisbane,' 34; Pipes,
11; Uren, 7; Curnock, t. (Miss)
Brisbane elected.
Trustees (three to be elected)—
Dels. Trotter (declined), Burroughs;
Pettlplece,'. Kavanagh, Knowles, Curnock, Pipes,. Sully, McEwen.
First bsllot—Burroughs, 21; Pettlplece, 29; Kavanagh, 24; Knowles, 12;
Curnock, 18; Pipes, 16; Sully, 9; McEwen, 24,   No election.
Second ballot—Burroughs, 21; Pettlplece, 26; Ksvsnagh, 21; Knowles, 8;
Curnock, 15; Pipes, 9; McEwen, 22.
No election.
Third bsllot—Burroughs, 14; Pettlplece, 24; Kavansgh, 18; Curnock, 9;
Pipes, 8; McEwen, 16. No election.
' Fourth ballot—Burroughs, 14; Pettlplece, 21; Kavanagh, 16; Curnock, 10;
McEwen, 16.   No election,
Fifth ballot—Burroughs, 19; Pettlplece, 21; Kavansgh, 13; McEwen, 16.
Pettlplece elected.
Sixth bsllot—Burroughs:. 26; Kavanagh, 18; McEwen, 18. Burroughs
elected.
Seventh ballot—Kavanagh. 14; McEwen, 22.   McEwen elected.
Adjourned 11:20.
STRIKE ON
MtaersKeepAwyr
THE strike is still on at tha
1 Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. O,
r men urged to stay
this etrlke Is settled.
All worklni
away until I
Okdis Ymit Minus' Union
Keep In mind W. D. (VANS
A Co. If you want to exchange
City Property for a Farm or
Farm for, Olty Property. We
bave lots of listers aad can offer
the best buys to bs found In the
northwest See us, If we please
you tell others. If wo do not,
tell us.
101 LONDON BUILDING.
626 Psntfsr Wsst
BRANDED AS "UNPAIR."
r*r\ with
VjUthe
BUNCH
TO THE
BRUNSWICK
POOL ROQMS
The following have been declared
"Ur.talr-*> Organized Labor" bjrCum-
berlsnd Miners' Union, and all union
men aro asked to govern themselves
accordingly:
Pitt Beseee-
CHAS. PARNHAM
F. JAYNES
- 3. QILL1SPIE
H. SLOAN
Flro Bsssss—
FRANK PEACOCK
JOHN DANDO
SID NORWOOD
3. FURBAN
BOB CAIRNS
A. ODQER8
MATT BRODERICK
WILLIAM SINCLAIR
JOHN CLAYTON
JOHN STEVENSAL
SAM JONES
J, D0RN8
JOHN BROWN
TOM MORDY
MR, SOPWORTH .  "
Brakemen—
ROBERT BURNS
ED JONES
ADAM MeKELVIE
JOE WHYTE
ED PARR
F. H. STEWART
LEE WALRATH
MR. KENNEDY
Loco Engineer*—
OEO. 8TEPHSON
W. MCLEAN
JOHN LOCHNER
LOUIS MAGNONE
THOS. LE CLAIR
Engineers, Stationary—
OEO, WALLACE
JAS. SCOTT 'i
A. JEFFREY
A. CAMERON .
Y. QUICK
— ROBERTS
Electricians—
H. B, LANG
G. A. HAYWOOD
W. 8. WRIGHT
EARNE8T HOIKWOOD
ROBERT GREY
A. HENDER80N
LEN PIKET
WILLIAM CORNWALL
W. K. HENCOI.K
W. CONLIN
Blacksmith*—
R. H, ROBERT8AL AND HELPER
ROSS JOHN8TALL AND HELPER
Mine Contractor—
TH08.BICKLE
W. JONES
Offlce Clarke—
J. V. MORGRIE.N
ft DALBY
W. HEN0ER89N
Mschlnlsts—
ED WALRATH
GEO. JAMISON .
W. HAGGARTH
JOHN* HILL
Pu'nipMosn-"''' "
HARRY BRYANT
— BOBBY
— BEARD
LENBANSELL
W. ROSE
H. SMITH   ,
Csrponters—
ARTHUR PEARSON
CHASiTAGGERT
ALEX-ARMSTRONG
T. BANkisL:'.
THOSaBENlvlfT
D. McDOtfALD
Laborers— '   v
GEO. WllfLIS'."*;   '
ID. JACKSlfL
J. BAN8FIE|.D I
GEO. LOYD-
Chlna Bosses—>
ALBERT HAYWOOD
W. ROSS    f .
D. WALKER'
J. OLLIE   i
JAS.- RICHARDSON
Lampmen—
H. T. McKAEV,
H, BARNETT
J. ROBERTSON
Weigh Bosses—
C. DANDO ,
J.  HILL
Stsbls Boss—- *
N. McKADEN
Wstchmen—
J. WALL
J. STRUTHlRS
Reps Runners—
CHARLIE SHILLETO
GEO, WARD    ■
J. BROWN
Elect Holstmsn— '
GEO. RAMSELL
Trsln Dtspatcher—
D. R .MoDONALD
Boss Elsclrlclsn—
W. WHYTE, SR.
Transit Msn—
G, RENNIE
BEN REAR
U. M. W, of A; Win Out
A Charleston, W. Vs., dispatch says
tbat ths strike on Paint and Cabin
creeks Is to be amicably settled. It
waa learned on Tuesday that negotiations between the Coal operators and
representatives of the U. M. W. of A.
sre proceeding satisfactorily.
Ths Rev. R. J. Btlllman will speak
In Hamilton hall, corner Dunsmuir
and Hamilton streets, on Sunday evening, July 20th.' Subject: "Land Tenure,"
"Jim" McMurray, an old-time Van.
cqnver print, Is holidaying in the city
this week from. Fort Oeorge, where he
is now holding cuss on one of tbe papers there.
TRADE UNIONISTS NOT
WELL ENOUGH INFORMED
OF THEIR OWN MOVEMENT
Some home truths for the workers
are contained In the anual report Just
Issued of the British Steel Smelters'
Association, observes tbe Dsily Citlsen. ;-:'
J'The British working olass," it says,
"baa more power ln lta hands than
that of any other oountry In the civ'
Used world, buttt cannot be said that
it uses that power the most lntelli.
gently.   .
"The trade union movement advances, not because of the Intelligent
Interest the greet bulk of Its adherents take tn Labor questions, but
largely ln spite of the obstacles these
place ln Its way. Fifty per coat nt
least of trade union members have
no conception of trade union principles, and no knowledge or apreciatlon
of the sacrifices of tbelr forefathers,
which made possible .the establishment of a movement by which they
have so largely benefited.
"For this the trade unions sre largely responsible. The scramble of sectional unions for members has produced a tendency to obscure trade
union obligations from the mind of
the average worker,' and the first
question the letter asks Is what hs
will get for hts coppers per week and
not whst service csn he render In the
great cause of working Class enlightenment and progress. The result Is that
while demanding trade union rates
and conditions for himself, bis wsges
are spent on bolstering up sweat-shop
conditions in othsr trades, while he is
unable to see that this re-acts to his
own disadvantage."
District 18, U. M. W. cf A.
A. J. Carter, wbo has been secretary-!
treasurer of District 18,'U. M. W. of A.
with headquarters at Fernle for the
past five years, along with' vice-president JO. Jones,'be* resigned, In order to clear up a little argument the
coal miners bave been having as an
outgrowth of the recent Alberta elections, when Vice-president Jones was
a candidate in the Lethbrldge riding,
with a conservative and a socialist
party oandldate in the contest Secre.
tary-treasurer Carter hss been ssked
to and hss sccepted nomination fog reelection,
I, A. T. S, E, Convention.
The twenty-first anual convention
of'the I. A. T. S. EL closed at Seattle
on Sunday morning last after a week
of busy sessions. The ratification of
a tentative agreement with the American Federation of Musicians was unanimously adopted. A delegation from
the Theatre Managers' Association was
present at the convention, with a view
to reaching a mutual understanding
as between tbe two organisations, snd
with this In view Joint committees
were nsmed to further the project .1.
H. Fletcher, presldsnt of the local
union of Moving Operators, which Is
also emulated with ths I. A. T. 8. E„
was a delegate from Vancouver, along
with pels. Spear and Harrington of
the Stage Employees' union: Tbey returned from Seattle on Monday, end
are loud In their praises of the work
of: the convention, Chas. C. Shay was
re-elected president for the ensuing
two years, while Lee M. Hart was returned to the office of secretary-treasurer by a narrow margin. "Tbe Northwest district," said President Fletcher
to The Federatlonist yesterday, ''Is In
the best condition of any ot the nine
districts M present covering Canada
and the United States. The membership Is Increasing.' The work of organisation will be further augmented by
the tact that In future conventions will
only be held bl-annually.Instead of
every year, and the money will be used
to place organisers lu the field, the
sum of 840,000 having already been
appropriated for that purpose. The
present membership of 16,000, If properly organised, should reach the 20,000
or 26,000 mark before the next convention." •
MULCAHY'S CAFETERIA
THE BEST OF
EVERYTHING
137 Cordoya Street W.
Basement Hotel Cordova
The Orpheum.
'The unusual novelty called "Dom
thy's Playmates" will ba the hesdllne
attraction at the Orpheum for the
Coming week. Theie are a dosen boys
and girls In the Oct. The hot Is of
the spectacular' musical comedy variety, with many sows, ensembles and
a mere thread of a plot to carry It
along. The art will' appeal strongly
to ohlldren because - of Its fairy-like
story.
Sager Midgley and a capable eaat
will present "Early Morning Reflections" as the added feature attraction.
The act Is one of hilarious comedy
with a rapid finish.
The Four Reading* whq> wilt be
members of the week's bill are without doubt the greatest hand-to-hand
acrobats tn the World. They Just recently finished a tour of the eaat and
prior to that were.a feature of the
London balls,
. Patrons will have an opportunity oi
placing their stamp of approval on
Mort Sharp, who comes to the Golden
West after a number of years of triumph ln the east
■- B. Kelly Forrest, a tramp comedian,
whO has been a great favorite In the
eeet for his timely songs, unctlous
wit and splendid voice, should be one
ot the comedy features of the week'*
hill. ;•
Steam Heated—Phone ln Every
Room—Elevator   Services;   Bath
snd Bhower Batha on all Floors.
120  ROOMS:   (0   BOOMS  WITH
PRIVATE BATHS
|I0TEL
HnONNAUGHT
I'l.    WBITI A FASBSalMI
PHONE SEYMOUR 7097-7098
auopeea Pisa, eieo far Dsy. Up.
Up-to-Date    Flrat-Class    Dining
Room and Cafe In Connection
'  «imn ar. w..
For Reliable Watches
Go to
MAXWELL BROS.
»» cmaimuu ar.
BNOLISH, SWISS AND AMERI-
,   CAN WATCHES REPAIRED
Oall a>* Sn Vs.
Berry Bros.
Agents fsr
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bicycle with the Reputation
Full  tine  of  accessories
• Repairs promptly executed
612 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Seymour 7608
If you have a range to buy,
choose our
•4
ft
Malleable Range
It is the only range that gives absolute
satisfaction. Everybody who examines the
Empress Range is most favorably impressed
with it. Everybody who has used an Empress Range sayB it is'absolutely, satisfae-!
tory.
The body of the Empress is made of No.
18 guage polished steel. The steel will not
rust, chip, peel-or turn white when heated.
It will not warp or crack. Hand-driven Norway iron rivets with cone heads hold the
walls securely and firmly in place.
No expense has been spared in/ making
a durable, long lasting, range that will give
perfect satisfaction. Buy no other range
until you have seen the Empress Malleable.
We have it in four sizes,,at these ]
$6*50, $70.00. $72.00, $75.00
HANGE SECTION-TOP FLOOR
Hudson's Bay Stores
OOBNIB OF ORANVOL1 AND GIOBOU
EVERYTHING  IN MUSIC
YOO ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND
Our Official Opening
COMMENCING SATURDAY, JULY 19
ENDING SATURDAY; -JULY 26
We want everybody in Vancouver te see our new and
up-to-date music store.   Therefore, for seven days we are -
keeping open honse, during which period we are offering
huge discounts on all our stock, excepting phonograph
goods, which are on contract.
85 FIR PINT. OFF BIPOLAR PRIOR OF ALL MU8I0
OOODS.
20 PIB PINT, OFF REOPLAR PRIOR OF PIANOS AND
PLAYER-PIANOS,
ALL POPULAR SHEET MPSIO, 6 COPIES FOR |1.00,
Every lady calling on the opening and closing day as
above will receive free one copy of popular sheet'music.
Watch our windows for bargains.
The Bowes Music House
.  A Few Doors Rest cf theB. 0. Eleetrio Tram
10 HASTINGS STRUT BAST
Stocktaking Sale of
FINE RUGS
•«■■■»■■«■—■—■■■■■,
YJ7E are slock taking and have a
number of individual rugs
which we are offering at greedy
■educed prices,
Hastings Furniture Co.
LIMITED
Wide-Awake Furniture
Compsny, Limited
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3887
FOR EXPERT
WATCH
and Jewelery
REPAIRING
CALL ANU SUE
Geo..G. Bigger
. 143 Hastings Street Weat
Mr. Union Man
Here is the plaoe to
buy a union-made
HAT
We oarry the largeet
assortment of union-
made bate in
SOFT
STIFF
TWEED
VELOURS
-IN CANADA
Leader Exclusive
$2.00 Hat Store
S.W. Corner Haatinga and
Abbott Streete
Largest Canadian Retailers of
♦2.00 Hate
Good and Reliable
W iM E S
and LIQUORS
Alwaya to be bad at the
Imperial Wine
Company
64 Cordova Stbmt Wist
PHOmfl*nr,955
It Is difficult to tree fools from tbe
chains they revere,—Voltaire.
SWEATERS
For All Occasions
For yaohtlng, motor Mating,
tramping, camping, hunting, golfing, sailing, Ashing, touring, pick-
nicking, looting er working.
T. B, Cuthbertson
* COMPANY, LIMITED
t4t Hastings W. NO Oranvllle
III Hastings W.
'—_^»i®-i$—&£?..&—**—_&

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