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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 20, 1912

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Array f
:*JPS$Sr|*^
C/f'dLA^iON;   WW.
HE BRI
COLUMBIA
'   utTKriAL PAtis*.:   VAi.COL nun /jLuy^il
COUNCIL i^D a C raDSB»oON u« l^ijMil.
InDttSfPlAL ONtTT
itit3feftr;*"lfdi;fil*
E EJNEMPLOVED AND HIHWIY
DECIDE TO PROTEST EN MASSE
Vancouver Trades and Labor Council Votes Money
• ~ and Decides to Join in Vigorous Demonstration
B.C.M. tf L CONVEMTIOH WILi ACT AT CAPITAL CITY
Organised'Labor Will Demand That Provincial GoV-
vernment and Civic Authorities Immediately Provide Work for the Thousands of Angry and Homeless Job-Seekers, Recently Imported' Under
Government and Salvation Army Auspices From
Old Country    ■
Ragluar meeting Vancouver Trade**-
aid Labor Council convene* on Thursday evening at  8 o'clock,   President
Wilkinson In chair and other officer*
erssent
Minute* previous meeting read and
affirmed. '
Biecutlve report read and adopted;
Credsntials.
Bakers—H. MeDanlel, W. Sellings
and B. Hutchlngs.       ,
Building Trades CouncuVrJ. Kavanagh and V. R. Mldgley.
Lathers—Joe Morrow and Bro. Blah-
up, vice Bros. Selllck and A. H, Roberta,
Amalgamated Oarpentert-!>D. Mor-
gan, vice Bro. Peardon, resigned.
'  Civic   Employees—B.. Trainer,   0.
Gibson, J. Hurst, J. Jeffrey*, 0. Harrison. "*:.
Bookbinders — M. Mowat and f.
Milne.   '.•''■'
Molders—H. H. Donaldson.
Plumbers — Bros. Sharer, Welsh',
Holmes.
Bartenders—Thomas Fay, Andrew
MoDonald, Geo. W. Curnock, George
Kelly, John A. Frasur.
Credentials received and delegates
seated.
Resolution read tram Plumbers'
unhm, re. plumbing Inspection; en.
domed and forwarded to executive of
British Columbia Federation of Labor,
for the consideration of the convention to be held In Victoria next week.
-Carried.
Report received from Moving Picture Machine Operators' Union, In re.
Wellington theater. Laid over till
next meeting,- It developed In the discussion that the new city electrician
waa the new mayor'! son-in-law. .
Parliamentary Committee.
Resolutions condemning present women suffrage civic franchise being
baaed on property qualifications.—Con-
Another resolution recommended
and adopted by the council was aa
follows:
"Whereas, The Dominion Government have assured the Hindoos of the
province that certain restrictions on
Hindoo Immigration shall be removed,
"Be It Therefore Resolved, That tale
committee request that the Trades and
Labor council take action to have Influence brought to bear on the govern-
ment to nave them retain all restrictions on Asiatics obtaining at present"
President Watters of the Dominion
Trades  Congress of Canada, being
present, was Invited to give   a little
speech, and received a vote of thanks,
Organisation Committee.
Delegate Mldgley reported that an
organisation meeting of Steam Engl'
neere had been held under the am
pices of the B. T. 0. A number ot
engineers present had made application for membership In the International Association of Steam Engineers,
and another organisation meeting had
been arranged for. Tuesday, Jan, 30th,
S. C. P. r*. OP LASOB      .
MEITtON MONDAY
On. Monday morning next,
the 22nd last, the second annual convention of the Bj,C .
Provincial    Federation    of
Labor will open Its setsloat-..
at Victoria, B.C Credential* .
to hand Indicate a large attendance and a lot .of wbrk-'~
for the delegates to dispose
of. The Federation haaan affiliated membership now of
well over '8,<H» trades unionists throughout the province,
with additions  being made
dally.   Vice-president J. W. .
Wilkinson  will  officiate  aa.
chairman pending election ot
officers and it la generally
underatood that be will be a,
candidate for the office.  The'
. deliberations arid-decisions of ^
the convention will bVwateh-
ed with Interest, and It can
be-safely asserted that during
next week the eye*' of .the
labor world will be fixed upon the capital City.
m *VAIJCOUViBR, %$$ SA*lIBpaY, JAOTASY 20,1912.
In Labor HaH, 112 Cordova street'east
Report of Statistician.
.   Attendance
Unions .-,
Amalgamated Carpenters.
Brotherhood of Carpenters
Bricklayers  .'...-.
Barbers ....•..,.',,..;. 50
Building Trades Council...'■ 20
Bartenders.
Bakers  ...>.....
Boilermakers	
Bookbinders - ..'....■•.:.
Clgarmakers ...........
Cooks .................
Cement Workers	
Electrical Workers, 213.
Electrical Workers—121,
Glass Workers.....-.t,.
Amalgamated Engineer*
Steams Engineers .......
Iron Molders ...........
Utter Carriers ........
Lathers	
Machinists	
Musicians	
Western Fed. of Miners.
Plumber*	
Painters  ....'	
Street Ry. Employees...
Stone Cutters	
Typographical	
Tailors	
Tile Layers ............
Pattern Workers ■.,.-,-...
Printing Pressmen......
Garment Worker* ......
Stage Employeey ;.. 20
Sheet Metal Worker* ...".' 50
Shlngler* .....■:'....v..'... 20
Walter* ../,,,,.,.. 30
Opholrterere ............. M
Brotherhood of Carpenter*, '■■
ot North Vancouver .... 30
SO
36
B0
40
10
20 .
40
60
SO
20
,60.
60
20
80
80
M
I
18
2>
" 26
6
•14
10
»
7
1
3
1
J2
'•»■
10
The Hudson's Bay Company's
MIDSEASON
t4t
.'■■■••'  -■•>•; : ■ i ,.     ,, tf    ..
With the excqjtion;or
Groceries, Liquors, Conn
tract Articles, everything
in the store will be reduced ,
CORKER Or OEAKVILLR AMD OEOROU ttWOSkl
If Only Labor Wen Really at tie Helm I
,50
Civic Employee* ..........
Commercial Telegrapher*. 20 3
Moving Picture'Operator*. 20 1
Gross attendance,.'five month*, 6(2;
average per night,: 00.2.
The following, delegates   have   tittle* everymeeting during the term:
J; key. L; H. Burnham, J. Campbell, A.
Goodwin, F. Phillips,  G. Mowatt,  V.
Iildgle>, Bd. Morrow, J. H. McVety,
A: Beksley, D. Evans, F. Blumberg, J.
M.', >illla&; ■.•'<•.
/''Shape Regulation* Act
Delegate McVety .reported in con-
nectton with the prosecution under the
. "Shop* Regulation Act" The case
14 against DOdson** Bakery bad been dismissed by the magistrate on the ground
that the act did not provide for trial,
of cases brought under this act before
him.   '
Del. MoVety read correspondence
between himself and Attorney-General
Bowser, In which Mr. Bowser agreed
to db anything necessary In the way
of legislation to make the proceedings
successful. A sufficient number of
amendments were presented to allow
Mr. Bowser to make good hla promise.
Report .■ and recommendations
adopted.
Inspector had closed an underground
bakery, but, after taking legal advice,
openly disregarded the law, In view of
the recent decision In local courts, as
result of action entered by tbl* coun
cil;
Report* of Union*.
Reports of union*, upon motion, dispensed with for the evening.
Notice of Motion*. -
Delegate Gow'* motion to have
council meet on fifth Thursday of
each month In which such occurs.—
laid on table until completion of new
Labor Temple.
Del. Tralnor'* motion to delete first
paragraph of Sec. 3, Art. VII, waa lost.
Chinese Railway Laborer*.
' Communication from W. B. Reed, of
Kamloops, regarding the employment
by the Canadian Northern. Railway
Co. of Chinese labor. Referred to executive of B c. Federation of Labor.
.. Nomination and Election.
President—J. W. Wilkinson; H. Muller.
Wilkinson, 69, elected; Muller, 15.
Vlce-f resident—Kerhlghan, Gow, McMillan, Muller.
McMillan, elected, 8»; Muller, 26;
Kernlghan, 10; -Gow, 7.
General Secretary—R. P. Pettlp.ece,
by acclamation.
Financial Secretary—Jas. Campbell,
by acclamation,
I .Statistician—Mr*. R. L. Gardner, by
acclamation.
Sergeent-at-Arms—F. A. Hoover; B.
C Knight.
I Hoover, elected, 63; Knight, 16.
Mad* unanimous upon motion of Del.
Knight
i   Trust***—Mldgley, Burnham, Kavanagh, McVety, McDonald, Welsh.
I   Mldgley, elected, 50; MoVety, elect-
; ed, 47;   first-ballot
I   Kavanagh, elected, 83; Burnham, 21;
Welsh, 11.
Installation of Officer*.
Put President McVety, upon request duly Installed the officers-elect.
Unemployed Problem.
■ Delegate nichol raised .the question of voting financial aid to the unemployed In Vancouver, and gave a
graphic description of the lamentable
condition of the many Jobless men in
the.dty.,, .
.. Dels. Nichol, Tralnor, Pettipiece,
Fraser, Weloh, Hunt Gow, Wilkinson,
Burnham, Mldgley, Butterly, McVety,
Knight Burkhart, Blumberg, discussed the question from every angle,
and what waa said of the governmental authorities, responsible for the
tremendous importation of thousand*
of Jab-seekers, which ha* resulted In
the. creation of *' serious problem,
would not look well in print
:• It waa decided that the acuteness
of the situation would be suitably presented' to .the provincial government
now in session at Victoria, by the a
O. Federation of Labor, which meet*
In the Capital City next Monday.
NleholV-Knight—That the sum of
136 for organising an unemployed
demonstration, be voted by this council, and that we go on record a* being
In hearty accord' with the effort* of
the unemployed demonstrators and
promises to give every assistance pos
sible to secure relief for the starving
Jobless. i-> '.,£.■<
Clvie Employs.,.
Dels. Wilkinson, MoVety -and Pettlplece were named aa a committee to
co-operate with the Civic Employee*
In urging adoption by the city of preelection promise*.
Burnham—Welch.—That the secretary be authorised to place Wellington
Moving Picture theater on the unfair
list It satisfactory arrangement*- cannot be arranged. -a '■'■/. .
Delogatee Preeent
Amalgamated Carpenter*—J. W.
Wilkinson, J. A. Key, W. -Hanson, J.
G. Smith, W. West W. Foxcroft, D.
Morgan,
.. Brotherhood of Carpenters—Ed Lothian, A. McDonald, 0. William*, U
H. Burnham, W. G. Milne, Jas. Campbell.
Bricklayer* and Masons—G. W.
Judge, W. J. Piper, S. Gow.
Building Laborers—J. Roberts, J
Swift G. Nichol, M. Butterly.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, T. Mc-
Couch, W. Sutcllff.
Building Trades Council—J. Kavanagh, V; R. Mldgley.
Bartenders—A. McDonald, G. Kelly,
J. A. Fraser.
Bakers-H. W.. McDahlel, W. Sell.
Ings, B. Hutchlngs.    .
Tile Layer* and Helpers—W. Johnston.
Sheet Metal Workers—0. Kramer,
J. Shelding, 8. Scarlett'
Shlngler*—Q, Peterman.'   '
Waitresses—Mrs. Lout* O. Gardner.
Walters—Fred C. Lewis, W. Line*,
A. Graham.
Upholsterers—W. Johnston. ■'
Painter*—J. McMillan, J. Freckleton, C. Jorglnson.
Street Railway Employees—J. Fletcher, F. A. Hoover, W. B. Seattle, F.
Halgh.
Typos—R. P. Pettlplece. -.,,.
Tailors—M. Williams, A. A. Parnau,
F. Holler.
Bookbinders — Geo. Mowatt, F.
Milne.
Clgarmakers—R. Craig, M. Nugent
J. C. Peuser.
Cook*—H. A. Muller.   .
Electrical Workers, 218—A, R. Roberta, C. L. Hardy, E. C. Knight.
Iron Moulder*—F. H. Donaldson, J.
inlgan, H. Partridge.
Lathers—Del. Bishop, A. Roberts.
Machinists—Jas. H. McVety, A.
Beasley. . .--'.
Musicians—D, Evan*.- •■.•,.■
Plumber*—Bro*. Shapee, Welch,
Holme*.
Western Federation of I Miner*—A.
C. Webb.
Civic Employee*—B. Tralnor, O.
Gibson, J. Hrr*t J. Jefterys, O. Harrison.
Total attendance, 78, .
Adournment, 11:60 p.m.
TOlMPLOTin moomwo
a positive innsANcrc
Organised labor from every quarter
of Weetem Canada baa been vigorously protesting against: the tremendous Importation of jiA-seekers into
tbl*.territory for the put two years,
and have suffered much, a* the result
of the glutted labor market for some
time put along with the victim* themselves. So congested ha* become tbe
unemployed that even the employer*
themselves are moved to Issue a warning; after having to turn away so
many applicant* for work that it ha*
become a positive nuisance. Here's
what a prominent Canadian Northern
railway contractor hu to say In the
dally press: "In all my experience In
railway construction work I never saw
the supply of labor so ample u It 1*
this winter. For several week* I have
been tuning down over 100 application* dally." In the name ot Labor
and all that'* decent surely this
should suffice to convince the federal
and provincial government* of the
folly of Intensifying the condition by
bonuslng and further . encouraging
needle** emigration,from the glutted
labor market* of the old land.
SHOPS REGULATIONS
ACT PROVES TO BK
A "BOWSER" JOKBJt
Vancouver Trade* and Labor Conn-
ell ha* demonstrated that the Shop*
Regulation* Act enacted by the provincial government Is not worth the
paper It la written upon.
Though amended lut- year by Attorney General Bowser by adding penalty clauses, at the solicitation ot the
B. C. Federation of Labor deputation,
the act still contained a Bowser Joker
ot sufficient rise to nullify It* enforcement when not to the test
The cue Initiated by the central
labor, body was dismissed lut week,
because the lawyer*' union could not
decide the question «f Jnrisdtctloa.
In fact, no provision whatever seems
to have been made for a prosecution
under the act
Needles*-to say, there will be something doing at Victoria next week In
this connection, during the session of
the second annual convention of the
B. C. Federation of Labor.
PRESIDENT WATTERd
LEAVES FOR OTTAWA
J. C. Watters, president of tbe
Trade* and Labor Congress of Canada, wu In Vancouver lut week en
route to Ottawa, via San Francisco,
where he go** to nek tbe affiliation
of the International Cement Workers'
union with the Congress. He hopes
to reach the Capital City on or about
the 20th Inst, where he will immediately usume the dutle* of hi* new
office.
Mr. Watter* ha* resigned u president of Victoria Trades and Labor
Council and u president of the B. C.
Federation of Labor.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS'
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
Local 213 of the' International
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
ha* elected officer* for the ensuing
term, u follow*:?.
President H. E. Durant; vice-president, C. L. Hardy; recording secretary, R. 8. Morris; financial secretary,
H. Sander; treasurer, Sam. Cawker;
trustee, H. T. Johnston; foreman, W.
P. Carr; 1st inspector, B. O. Shop-
pard; 2nd Inspector, C. W. Tray; bual-
nes* agent, E. L. McMillan.
HYfDCWTCAl MASK
mmm
Resolution Introduced By Mine Workers CsiiSSt
Compere Administration Much Anxiety.
"IDEWTITY OF liTEtEST" AMSTttTtC it EXHWO
Warm Discussion Brings Out A CudidtlaW That
Throws Discord Into Harmony of Gompers'
Annual Ratification Meeting—Mis Hayes Makes
Brilliant Exposure of Attempt to Wed IiTecondl*
able Conflict of Interests Between Owners of Jobs
and Those Who Do the World's Work
The.only'really  full-dress  debated
during the whole of the recent con-
ration of the American Federation of
Labor wu that brought forth by the
resolution Introduced by the United
Mine Worker* of America, catting on
the officer* of the American. Federation of Labor to withdraw from their
membership In the Civic Federation.
The resolution wu'adopted at the
but convention ot the miner*, and
their delegate* were Instructed to Introduce. It In the convention of the
A. F. of L.
Whilst personally they had no
choice but to Introduce the resolution,
yet It became obvious before the debate had gone vary far, that there
wu a wide divergence of opinion
amongst the Mine Workers them-
eelves u to the wisdom ot bringing
It In.
Tbe supporter* ot the resolution contended that the officer* ot the A. F. of
L. should not be member* of the Civic
Federation because by coming Into
contact with such men u Belmont,
Carnegie and other financial magnate* and employer* of labor, they
were thereby-demoralised and rendered ineffective u representative* of the
worker*.
On the other hand, tho*e who opposed the resolution contended that
the Civlo Federation had done much
good for organised labor by bringing
capital and labor together to harmoniously discuss their difficulties; and
they further cited many instances
where. In their opinion, strikes had
been settled or averted by the Intervention of the Civic Federation, which
had thus proved the value of its services to the workers.
The whole of the executive council
of the' A. F. of L. were ot this point
of view, u alio were many ot the
officer* of the international unions.
Included amongst the latter were
John Mitchell, late president of the
United Mine Workers of America;
June* Lynch, president ot the International Typographical union; W. D.
Mahon. president of the Street Railway Employee*; Timothy Healy ot
the Stationery Firemen; James O'-
Connell, lata president of the Machinists; D. Hayes of the Glass Bottle
Blowers, and many others of equal intelligence, but less note.
Prominent amongst those supporting the resolution were D. McDonald
and B. S. McCullough of the Mine
Workers; also T. L. Lewis, a former
president of the Mine Workers; and
needless to say, Max Hayes, the Socialist editor of the Cleveland Cltlsen,
and a Typographical union delegates
During the course of his speech,
Mitchell made the statement that the
convention of the Mine Workers,
when the resolution was adopted, had
been "packed."
He said: "I say, 1 suspected when
the action was taken, and I now know,
that a large number of delegates—
about fifty from one district alone—a
large number of men not elected by
local unions—sat in that convention
DNIONIITt SHOULD
OET ON VOTERS'L»»
era! election make* it Imperative that every antes, th Brit-
- ish Columbia should at one*
get buy registering tMr i»
■pectin memberships. Th*
chairman at next
should appoint a
to see  that eligible
workers have their   i	
placed on the provincial voters' list at ones.
'-I
:■':■'!
with credential* fraudulently ruralaa- <l
ed to them, and cut th* vote* that
sent tbe resolution to this convention-
denouncing the Civic Federation."
On being asked by McDonald It b*
would furnish proof of that states***!
to the next convention t| th* Mm*
Workers, be said: "I Stall b* delighted to furnish th* evtdsaa* on which
my statement* ar* mad*."   '
So there 1* every chase* of a glorious time at the next convention of
the Mine Workers.
After listening carefully to all th*
speeches -for and against th* resolution, and bearing In mind what has
been said so often about th* A. F. of
L. by thou who are of the same way
of thinking u Haye* and other supporter* of the resolution, I casts to
the conclusion that all th* debater*
should have been la on* camp.
Mr.' Qompers and alt (upporter*
were in the right plaoe, because titer
were logical; Max Hays* aid th*
others were In tat wrong payee become they were lllcgkat and wart lss-
lilylng, by their arguments, that th*
A. F. of u policy wu something which
they had always said It waa not
The policy of the A. F. of L. hu always been to recognise lb* "Usatlty-
of-lnterest" Idea- -that the satsustl «t
the workers and the Interest* ed the
employers were essentially tat same,
but that the workers mutt organise
up to the "pure and simple" point of
trade unionism—but not beyond that—
In order that they might collectively
bargain with the employer tor a "tolr
share" (whatever that may mean) of
the result* of Industry.
The "get-closertogetoer-ta-ordtNo-
avold-trouble" Idea aa* been the policy
ot the A. V. of L, and It ****** to me
that Compere and the others who hold
that view have been entirely logteel
In seeking the society of to* employers via the medium of th* Civic Federation.
Hayes and other* who ban continually exposed the "tdentitr-oMntereet"
policy ot the A. F. ot L should bar*
pointed out that for th* officer* to
be members of the Civic retention
wu both a natural and logical out-
Continued on Pig* 4.
VANCOUVER   BUILDING   TRADES
COUNCIL, A. P. OP L.
The officers for the next six months
an a* follows:
President—J. Kavanagh.
Vice-President—J. Bltcon.
Secretary—J. McMillan, 112 Cor
dova St. W.
Financial Secretary-Treasurer—W.
F. Herforth.
Business Agent—J. McMillan, phone
Seymour 9406.
Meets every Monday In the Labor
Hall.
District It, Miners' Convention.
The "call" for the ninth annual convention of District 18, V. M. W. ot A.,
has been Issued by President Powell
and Secretary-Treasurer a. J. Carter.
It win meet at Lethbridge, Alt*., on
Monday, February Wth.
U. M. W. of A. Convention.
A good deal of Interest is evidenced
In British Columbia among unionist*
In th* annual convention of the United
Mine Workers of America, which convene* at Indianapolis this week. There
promises to be a warm session over
John Mitchell In particular and the
Civic Federation in general.
Labor Temple Board Busy.
The directorate of Vancouver Labor
Temple Co., Ltd., Is busy with detail
work consequent upon the approaching completion ot the new $150,000
Labor Temple, upon a $100,000 site.
All the space of the five floors has
been practically let; unions nave arranged for halls and night* of meeting, and everything la in order for tbe
word to more; la fact a tenant already occupies th* basement.
The recent sash and door factory
Irs and the displacement by water of
torn* of the brick cornice work last
Sunday, hu caused some further delay, but by March 1st Vancouver union-
hit* should be In possession of th*
driest labor temple In Canada.
. The "financing" struggle I* about
over, and the director* will soon be
enabled to settle down to routine
work, and move on to other effort*
for the furtkerment of wage-worker*'
Interests. _
SHIRTS AND OVERALLS
Union-Made, Well-Made  .
Made-in-Vancouver    i
WE   REFER   TO   THE
Buck Brand
Bearing This Label
itlia
Ow^
ASK YOUR DEALER FOR THEM
Give them a try out; and we are willing to abide by yotir verdiot—That's
why our business is growing and deserves to.
Wm. J. McMaster&Sons
LIMITED
1176 HOMER STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH
fBDBRATIONIST
SATURDA?. ;. ii.JANtfAttV SO,' 1918
Traders Bank of
d Canada □
;    INCORPORATED 1885
i: '   113 Branches in Canada
Paid-up Capital
, .. and Surplus $ 6,550,000.00
^Total Assets -   50,000,000.00
Special Attention Given
$ Savings Accounts
Deposits of 81.00 and
upwards     received
and interest allowed
at'current rates
One Dollar Will Open An
Account
Vancouver Branch
Hastings Street, Comer of Homer
Opsin Saturday Evenings 7 to 9
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1NI
Paid-up Capital,   $  6,200,000
Reserve 7,200,000
Total Assets 100,000,000
- WE ALLOW IN-
TEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
busmen will be welcome
be it large or small
TIN BRANCHES IN VANCOUVER
Imperial Bank
of Canada
Capital SuUcriUd -   6,000,000.00
Capital Pskl-up •    5,996,900.00
Raa.no FusJ    - -    5,996,900.00
Total AhcU ■   - - )7A000,000.00
Interest allowed on deposits
of ONE DOLLAR and up-
w»rds FROM DATE OF
DEPOSIT
Main Office—694 Hasti gs
Street West.
Hasting* and Abbott St.
Branch — 84 Hastings
Street West.
Fairvjew Branoh — 2013
Granville Street S.
Main Street Branoh—Cor.
Main and Cordova Sts.
THt NANOH OFFICES ARE OPEN
•MUMMY EVENINGS 7 TO 0
GO TO THE
Haskell & Odium
8TORE8
FOR   TEOHNIC» L
BOO K S
Textbooks on all Trades
and Professions
Books of Special Interest
to Wage-Earners Wishing to educate themselves
lta luksll-Oslsa llillsasri, IMttd
681 Granville St. 583 Main St.
alas it New Westminster end
11* Tissues iiniiitrf ft., Uallrt
826 Hsatlngs Street West
IMOKI
TUCKETPS T. tk B.
CIGARETTES
UNION MADE
1 B.C. 1M0NIST
Owned «nd published by Vancouver Trade*
and  Labor Council, with which It titillated     fifty-two    unions,    embracing    t
, membership   of  6000  wage-workers.
Issued   iwlce-a-month,    etch  Saturday  following Trades and Labor Council meetlm.
Address:  2349 St. Catherine* Straet.
Muaflni-Eilltor:    B.   Pannater Pettlplase.
Phones—Office:    8ey.   1380;   Ree.   Fair. 486.
Subscription:      Si.00  per year;    to  unions
subscribing In a body, 60 cents.
Advertising Rates: Five cents per line per
issue; 14 lines to an Inch. Contract rate*
on application.
subscription expires next Issue,
_    ON   TOUR
PAPER.   If 'this number is on It. your
"Dally of Labor; tbe hop* ef th* werld.''
SATURDAY JANUARY 20, 1912
PATRONIZB    B.    C.     FBDBIUTIONIST
ADVERTISERS—AND TELL THEM   WHT.
President
Suspenders
art' th* most comfortable suspenders because the principle
at their back adjusts Itself to
•very bend of the body. Every
pair guaranteed. Look for
"IHwaMant" ou the boo-
kiss. Trimmings east*
not rutt. Mad* heavy or
light, wide or narrow,
Prlca 50e.
J
THE B. C. F. of L. CONVENTION.
Ere next Issue ot The Federatlonist
the second annual convention ot the
British Columbia Provincial Federation ot Labor will have met and adjourned.
From every quarter of the province
delegates, representing In the aggregate some 10,000 Unionists, will have
convened-ut the Capital City and discussed questions affecting the dally
life of the working class.
The attention of the membership of
organized labor throughout the province, for the coming week will be centered upon the deliberations ot the
most notable gathering of representatives of waqe-workerB ever responded
to In British Columbia.'
For the roaron that during the past
two years the government, now In
session at Victoria, has made absolutely no concessions to labor's demands, the outcome ot next week's
convention, and Its meeting with the
executive council of the government
at Parliament buildings, will he
watched with keen interest. It may,
Indeed, mean more. It may prove the
turning point In the career of tbe Mc-
Bride government..
The Federatlonist will make no attempt to forecast the business of the
convention. Wherever British Columbia Unionists "are gathered together"
in these stirring days of the International labor movement, there Is sure
to be happenings and results that will
add to the equipment of the men who
are entrusted and retained to direct
the workers' onward march to triumph
and Industrial freedom.
THE BUSINESS AGENT.
Many people, Including Unionists
themselves, have a peculiar conception ot the duties of a business agent
The bosses, many of them, look
upon him as a "dammed nuisance,"
an animal with agttatorlal horns; a
trouble-maker; a grafter and a parasite upon the poor misguided and misled worklngman; In fact, were It not
for,the walking delegate," "we," the
bosses, could do as "we" like.
The same bosses are paid-up members of the Employers' Association;
pay a permanent "secretary" and office staff; retain the highest-priced
"counsel" to be found In the closed-
shop lawyers' union; engage "lobbyists" to draft legislation; spend
plenty of money In securing the passage ot such "laws" as they require to
safeguard their "Interests," and contribute huge Bums to finance newspapers and election campaigns, all of
which comes out of the 'difference between what the workers earned and
receive In the form of wages,
The wage-workerB have formed
Unions; the Unions have organised
central labor bodies; provincial federations of labor; federal trades and
labor congresses, and parent trade or
ganlzatione.
From the Unionists' meagre earnings they have, In some cases, dared
to take a leaf from the employers.
They pay an aggregate per capita tax
which makes possible the building of
labor temples, the burying ot the
dead; the caring for the sick; the employment of Its membership, In a
measure caring for the unemployed;
they select one or more of their number as secretaries or business agents,
to do for them what they, have not the
time or ability to do for themselves.
To a limited extent they try to
emulate the bosses' legislation; but,
having failed to get as busy on election day as the bosses, the. Unionists
find the cards stacked against them.
This places the "counsel" or business
agents of organized labor at a disadvantage and forces them to light
against tremendous odds.
But tho underlying principle or procedure Ib the some.
The business agent or Union official
has become Just as much a business
or profession as that of "secretary" or
lawyer retained by the bosses.
As with tho boBses, the Unionists
expect their paid officers to get results, or they do not hesitate to "con"
them.
The business agent has a more dlfn
cult task to hold his job than the law-
ver, secretary, or lobbyist retained by
the hopsrs. He has to go against ail
the powers and Influences of the workers' own election day folly; he has
not only to stand up against these,
but he must nlso buck the bosses' alios in Ills own ranks, and Is expected
to flrlit. the tattles ot the workers on
'ess money In the total than the
tosses' representatives would consider
"wine" sundries while banquettlng
ho law-makers elected by working.
clasB votes. .
The business agent is made the le-
Htlmate prey for criticism end knocks
'rom hlB own people; Ib the "goat"
tor tho hosFcs' press, and apologists
n .every quarter, and, oft times, re-
delves pcant. support from those who
"pay" him to do what must be done
If tho workers ever expect' to get
their noses away from the grindstone
of Industrial slavery.
The sooner the status and function
of the modem business agent Ib under*
stood, the better for all concerned.
True, there has been, there Is, and
there will be, zealots and Inspired
men with "missions," ever ready to
sacrifice self and take the worst of It
In an effort to arouse the workers. It
Is well that thin should he so. But In
the end, the best results will spring
from the adoption, by wage-workers,
of a well-laid and defined business
plan of systematic organization, and
the retention of men grounded In the
historical mission of the working
class; armed with a knowledge of
the task Involved, and a thorough conception of the ultimate goal—Industrial freedom.
DO YOU KNOW
THAT It is about time there was
something doing in the health department of this city?
THAT the fellow who cries the loudest "keep politics out of the union"
Is one of the first to line up with the
same political party as the boss?
THAT lunatics never organise?
.THAT the laundries of this city need
attention at the hands'of Inspectors,
including those of the hospitals?
.THAT the British Columbia Lawyers' Union has refused to admit s
woman to membership? Being lawmakers by profession and.having a
sufficient number of their union on the
Job, there was no- difficulty In enforcing a tighter "closed" shop than was
ever attempted by a trades union. It
demonstrates' the value ot writing the
law.
THAT there are two distinct types
of Idiots'In every community: The one
who explains how an election was
lost; the other, the fellow who pays
any attention to It
WHERE IS THE FUN?
Where is the fun In having to pay
out one-third of your wages In rent?
Where Is the fun In having the
price of meat and clothes and groceries soar sky-high while wages remain
almost stationary?
. Where Is the fun In having to pay
dividends to the.Idle lieli while the
Industrious poor go without the necessities of life?
Where 1* the fun In making children labor In the workshops of mammon Instead of giving them an extended education In the high schools
and colleges?
Where Is the tun In having to cringe
before a boss In order to hang onto
your Job?
Where Is the fun In having to tramp
the streets when out of work looking
for a master?
Where Is the fun In bavin* to work
long hours under disagreeable conditions for miserable wages?
Where Is the fun In having to be
always on guard against swindlers of
one type or another?
Where is the tun In often having to
do without medical attendance when
sick?
Where Is the fun In having to
sponge on relatives or accept charity
when you are down on your luck?
Where Is the fun In being thrown
unon the human scrap heap when too
old or too worn out to produce profits
'or some capitalist?
Where Is the fun In not being able
to hear the best musicians, to attend
the best plays, to send your children
to the best schools, In short, to enjoy
the best of everything civilization has
to offer?
I take It, my friend, that as you are
passing through: this world only once,
vou want to have a good time.
And von not only want a good time
yourself, but you want everybody else
to have a good time.
If I am right In this assumption,
then you will subscribe to The Federatlonist, Read ft and pass-It to your
friends.—W. R. 8.
The Working Girl.
God bless the girl who works. She
Is not too proud to earn her own living, nor ashamed to be caught at her
dally task. She smiles at you from
behind the desk and counter; she
greets you kindly In the shop of office,
and she meets yon pleasantly and
cheerily In the marts of trade and
commerce. There la a sweet memory
of her In everything she touches. She
Is like a brave mountaineer, already
far up the precipice—climbing, struggling, rejoicing. The sight is an Inspiration. It Is an honor to know this
girl and be worthy of her esteem.
Uft your hat to her, young man, as
she passes by. She is a princess among
the tollers. Her hands may be stained
by dishwashing, sweeping or factory
grease. But they are honest hands.
They stay misfortune from the home;
they support the Invalid loved ones,
maybe;' they are moving, potent
shields that protect many a family
from the poor houae. God bless and
protect the girl who works—Baltimore Labor Leader.
Another Department Proposed,
A resolution waa Introduced In the
last convention of the A. F. of L. proposing, as soon as practical, the calling
together of the representatives of'this
organisations comprising, the wearing
apparel Industries for the purpose of
forming a Wearing Apparel Trades Department After considerable discussion the entire matter was referred to
the executive council to ascertain
whether the trade* comprising this
particular Industry desired or deemed
necessary the organisation of tuoh s
department
Tailor*' Unlen.
Election of officer* tor the ensuing
term has taken plac* and a hustling
organisation committee elected. Several of the wlde-»w»ke members have
agreed to take hold ot things and
make 'em hum,
The International 1* growing rapidly
at the present time, and Vancouver
must keep up tbe general average at
least, and do better If possible. So
everybody wake upl
"JUDGE NOT, THAT
, YE BI MOT JUDGED"
(By Rev. Charles Stelale.)
When tbe average man—on the other side—thinks ot organised labor, his
mind reverts to acts of lawlessness
committed by members of trades
unions. When he thinks of corporations, he recalls the acts of shame
done in the name oi "big" business.
When he thinks ot the church, he
flings at you the weak or Insincere
actions of a handful ot men In history
or men la present day life. And It's
always a cheap way ot praising one's
own virtues, or the virtues of one's
class.
If the whole truth were known, It
would stand out In condemnation of
the self-righteous critics of their fellow-men. Trades unions and corporation and church have eaoh been guilty of enormous otfencee, but each
may be proud of prodlgous endeavor
to make for the right and the true.
Just now organized labor Is In ths
crucible. It has been there before,
but It has never failed to come out
cleaner and purer. That's what *
crucible Is for. The hotter the fire,
the purer the gold. The discussion
of the alleged evils In the trades union
Is; sure to result in a discussion of the
good, and the pointing out. of the
weakness will unquestionably develop
Its point of strength, For the men ot
labor are no fool*; They naturally
resent the Implication ot weakness—
for aren't they human?—but they
themselves are not-so blind but what
they see wherein they look,
Meanwhile—and- this Is a general
Injunction, Issued by the Great Ruler
—"Judge not that ye be not Judged.".
wtu*,ifioMi mi
DonrffrosTtawAOE
WORKERS. OF WOULD
Industrial   Workers Who  Refuse  to
Join Unions Usually Join in
Little Else.
There an many persons, within
and outside the pale of a union, who
ask what the unions do for tbe workers. Such persons are of the opinion
that their: skill, their courage to get
the top wages, are the factors that
get them what they have. All those
that do not get It in their opinion are
Inferior In workmanship or haven't
the courage to ask for more pay. They
are still laboring under the Idea and
the old teaching that they must have
pluck to get ahead. Such person* do
not understand the labor movement
nor the struggle that la going on between the masters and tbe working-
men, says the official Journal ot the
Glass Workers, editorially.
We are living In a period where all.
things are done on a large scale,
whether It be of a business enterprise
or whether It be ot .workingmen to
accomplish a certain object,
the little business man le nowadays
nothing more than an agency for one
or more large concerns. Business Is
so closely figured that profits from
any salea would just about give him a
fair living.
This 1* also true, generally speaking, of the worklngman. Tbe work-
Ingman of twenty or thirty year* ago,
working for less wages, secured a bare
living, and;he only gets that now,
when wage* are higher. This Is due
to the fact that the cost ot living Increased In many Instance* more than
the Increase In pay.
There Is an unrest among the people and tbe trades unions have been
organised to rectify many abuses and
secure better conditions, shorter hours
and Increased pay. They have succeeded, for their conditions, hours of
labor and Increased pay Is 20 per cent
better than that of the unorganised
worker*.   .
It doe* pay to be one of the organized workers. If the men were not
organised the conditions of labor
would be worse. The organised trades
are not only Influential In, increasing
the pay and bettering the conditions
of the members of a trade, but they
also assist In securing Indirectly such
benefits to the unorganised.
Who are the people that established
the nine, the eight-hour day, the forty-
four-hour week? The trades unionists.
Who It Is that advocates the abolishment ot child labor? Who Is it
that says women should receive same
pay aa men when equal service Is rendered? Who asked and who is It that
sees to It that sanitary conditions shall
prevail In the shops, factories, etc?
And who is It that la raising Its voice
to establish an old-age pension, an employers' liability and compensation
law? It Is the organisation ot the
workingmen. . He not only seeks this
for himself but for all tho tollers, Including even the muck-despised strikebreaker.
Do labor organisations pay? Sure,
they do, not only In Increased pay, but
In preserving tbe health of mankind.
The unions foster education; they
are the literary club; they make
thinkers; they make noble men and
women, who make for a better state
ot society. -They teach good fellowship and co-operation.
It Is the duty ot every man, to become affiliated with the union of his
craft. It Is only through a thorough
organisation that we can make quicker and easier progress to fulfill our
want*, our Ideals
The man who doe* not belong to a
union hampers the progress of society; he la a load that organised
labor must carry. Therefore It Is our
duty a* union men to educate those
still distant to us. Educate him;
show htm the good that organised
labor It doing and what Its ultimate
aim Is—the emancipation of the working class from wage slavery,
REVISED VERSION B7 A ,
LOCAL MODERN PROPHET
(By J. Kavanagh.)
For I am an Owner and I said' to
the Slave, "Thou art an Agitator and
are accursed, and thy hour* on the
job shall be^ few, tor thou sowest discontent among my other stave* wanting them to demand higher wage* and
less hours, snd for this shalt thou be
cut Into the exterior darkness and
tby children (ball suffer with thee, and
thy brother staves shall not support
thee but shall revile thee before me,
lest they too be separated from their
jobs!
He aald nothing, but threw down
hie shovel and put on hi* garments,
and then, turning, reviled me, saying,
"Thou tool,, thou thlnkest thou art an
Owner, whereas thou art but a skinner
who Is being skinned. Thou crlngest
before Architects and Speculators,
who In turn prostrate themselves before the Tnuti tad Morgan, who art
the ruler* of this earth; but tbe time
I* coming when I, and the etas* to
whloh I belong, *hall realize the truth
that they alone are the real owner*
ot tbl* eartu and Its products, and,
rising in our might, we shall destroy
this system under which we are degraded, even to the very root, and tbe
etas* to which thou belong shalt be
*• naught, and thou and the rest of
that class (halt be compelled to go
out *nd dig In order that ye may eat,
and th* worker* ot the world shall be
free, and gladness shall fill the land I"
1 knew that he was a fame prophet.
Yet wu I affrighted, and I prayed for
help, and, lol a horseless chariot came
down, filled with armed men, called
.Guardian* of the Piece, and they smote
him and beat him Into submission and
brought him before the High Priest ot
Morgan, who wu called the Cadi.
And the Cadi, frowning upon him,
said: "With what Is this man
charged?" And I answered: "He is an
Agitator and a rebel, and revlleth our
glorious system." And the Cadi, turning to him, said: 'Thou hut offended
the dignity ot the Law, and hath sinned agalnBt property, and for this thou
wilt be confined In the house of Penance In Westminster, which house le
known as the Pen.''
And tbe slave, turning, was about
to reply when the Guardians of the
Law fell upon him, and seizing him,
hurled him Into the darkness ot the
torture chamber.
And au this wu according to the
Law, for it Is written: "The Agitator
shall receive It where th* chicken got
the axe, which Is In the hack,"
Wage  Workers Forum
(By I. Kovanagh.)
Craft union* In Vancouver, all over
the Pacific coast la tact, are about to
be called upon To JeaT with "aYroblei
which hu already appeared in the
older countries and whloh I* commencing to appear all over the North Anjer-
Ican continent: that 1*, th* unemployed In the rank* ot the organisations. . ...j     |   '
Overstocked Labor Msrket ■'
There has been and 1* a constant
stream of Immigrants belonging', to
tbe skilled trades. They com* to tbl*
country owing to th* roseate pictures
of life on this continent which are presented to them by government officials
and other labor-aklnnlng scencies.
They drift to whatever point me nest
conditions prevail for the'craft-which
they follow. Tbe majority Join th*
unions of their craft In order to
strengthen them, ■too to share the
benoflte which the union* have been
strong enough to take. Added to tbl*
Influx Is th* number of apprentices
and helper* tt th* various cram who
are constantly coming Into thtlnhk*
of the Journeymen, and who, up to the
present time, have been sufficient to
till any demand In the tabor inarket.
Cut-Throat Competitions    :
The excessive cutting of' trice*
among th* contractor* and builders,
due to Increased competition, hu been
followed by urn* member* of all the
labor organisations working at t life
or death pace In order to exceed the
production of their fellow-worts*™ In
the.same craft; du* alto to lucrautnn
competition and th* fact that there
are more slave* than buyer*. -■■'
In the fact of all thlt competition
the trade untonr have established a
nlnlmum wage sc.le In order that one
member may not work at a cbetper
rate than another, forgetting the tact
that It Is Impossible to prevent this
unless they also fix a maximum rate
of production.
The man who work* at top speed In
order to excel In th* quantity produced
Is working cheaper thai his fellow
man, because he 1* receiving let* of
the value of hi* product.
Buxom Slav** th* "•tesdles."
The cheapest worker I* th* one who
1* the longest employed tnd u soon
a* trade begin* to slacken ttiose who,
either from physical Inability ir a self
consciousness, are not so productive,
are elmmedlately discharged.. '.M-
They, however, are not allowed- to
retaliate by offering to work at trass
wage, nor do I advocate any such
thing; but If the labor union Is to
remain a bulwark against oppression
until such time as the majority of the
worker* become clue conscious, then
the mode of procedure must be altered.
Into whtt class of Intelligence can
we place* man who—on hearing that
hi* employer hu taken a Job at a low
figure, says: "We must work llk*'h>-
ln order that he may break even." And
unfortunately there are thousands who
possess no greater knowledge of their
economic position. ''-
I would ask; Sine* when had *ny
employer In tny place and at any
time, been known to tell hu stave*
to work easy because be had got a Job
at a high figure?
As the worker never receives the
ralue of hi* product, what matter*' It
to him whether hi* employers' profit*
be great or sm»ll? Of on* thing he
can be assured and that It, If the profit* are not great enough, hi* employment will terminate very rapidly.
"Divide Up" Hour* ot Labor.
What I desire to suggest I* tbtt
during the slack periods members M
craft unions reduce their working that
one hour or two hour* dally, u majr
be needed In order that mor* of their
membership may be kept In employment
This' system hu been worked In
the older countries tor a considerable
number of years. •
It would be useless to uk for a mat-.
Imum rate of production, for material
Interest compel* th* majority to attempt to outdo their fellow workers
In order to hold their Jobs.
Incldenally thlt •how* th* Impossibility of craft ot Industrial unionism
solving ths problem for the working
clsss, while they allow another class
to own th* Jobs. ' i
The competition between the workers of the Pacific coast Is not one ot
quality so much u quantity, and tti
the American worker I* th* cheapest
In t he world, in Ilk* manner I* th*
Pacific Coast worker the cheapest on
the American continent.
I venture to say, that, owing to the
excessive competition amongst employers and the speeding up method 01
working which I* prevalent In th* majority of th* craft*, t h* standard of
quality In work performed on t he Pacific Coast It deteriorating, and I*
liable to become lower than In tny
other part of the world. -
It will continue to deteriorate while
tbe present cut-throat system of production for profit 1* In existence.
Not until the wag* system I* abolished, and production I* for ut* only,
shall the quality of commodities produced Improve.
Th present system 1* degrading humanity and all work performed I*
likely to be on a par with the measure
of their degradation.
BUSTING THE
TRUSTS
—is no concern of the union man. How he can use
the Truit is much more to the point, f The advantages that accrue to the big concern oome freely in
the natural course of business. The tame advantages
oan express themselves only in two ways—lower prices
hot higher profits and competition decides on low prices.
§ Low prices rule at Spencer «, You oan buy almost
any article hero, and buy it at a lower price than you
oan elsewhere —Grooeries, Meat, Drygoods, Wearing
Apparel, Furniture—everything wanted in everyday
lite—Tou oan save money here, f On' one principle
and on* alone you should buy your commodities here.
IT'S TO YOUR INTEREST
David Spencer, Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. 0. .
TRADES UNION DIRECTORY
II Secretaries are requested to notify manager of change of officers.
UNION   CARDS   INSERTED    FOR   OOo   PER   ISSUE.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL FBD-
•ratloa or Labor—Swti In ennua! oun-
veatlou In January of each year. Bteoutlve
orders, 1BI1-1S; Presldeut, J. o, Walton.
SSI
Wibot . oireet,
president,  J.   Wm.   1
Vaocouvori    second  ' _._ 3 _.
tton.r.  Boa lot. Now Wo.lmlnst.ri. third
-■--•protUW   — '—
Victoria:     first   vino-
Wlltlnion,    Boi  llBb,
vIco-prMidont,    R.   A.
w. new weetmlneter;  third
  —, Christian Blvorlo, 1878 Dan-
man street. Victoria: fourth vlv.-pr.sld.nt.
Jaa. H. eJeVety, 1T44 Broadway wool, Van.
couver; general Hcrolary. R, Parm Petti-
piooo, SS4B St. Catharines street, Vancouver; oocrotary-troaouror, Victor R. WdSlay,
Boa list Vancouver: delegate to Trades
ana Labor Congress of Canada, i. c
Watters; fraternal dolosato to Washington
Statu federation of Labor, R. Parm Pettlplece.	
V*"OOUV«R TRADBB AND LABOR
v council—llsoto first and third Thursday, Labor hall, 11B Cordova street west.
(upstairs,) President, J. W. Wilkinson:
viee-proetdont. a Kernltban: general secretary R. Parm, Pettlplece. IMS St, Catherines atroot; phono Fairmont 486; aoc.
retary.treaauror. Jas. Campbell, ISM Fourth
avenue wool, phono Bayvlew 8S3R; statistician. Mrs. Roao I* Gardiner: esrg.ent.at-
arras, Fred a. Hoover; trustees, John McMillan, James H. McVety. Victor R. Mldt-
TtUILDINa TRADIt COUNCIL—MBBTS
ft every Friday In Labor Hall. 118 Cordova street west. President, Jas. H. McVety; vloo-prealdonl, J. Kavanagh; recording eeeretery, John McMillan, Labor
Hall; nnanclal secretary and treasurer,
W, M. Herferth, 8138 Main street: bueln.es
agsnt, Jahn McMCIan, Labor Hall. Phone
Seymour 13tO; office hours, t to 8, 18 to
1. and 4:30 to S:30.
LLLIID  PRINTINO  TRADES  COUNCIL
of Vancouver—Meets eecond Monday In
-   month In Labor Hall.     President. -
Jarman,    Prseemoa'e   Union,
Hornby
street; vloe-prealdent. Oeorge Mowat, Book-
Maters' Union, tit Dunlevy avenue; secretary, A. H. England, Typographical Union,
l*T Hornby atrool, P. o. Bos 6*.	
TTNIT1D BROTHIRROOD OF CARPBX
V   torn and
Local  No.    611,
Btecutlv* commit!** itfMtt *v*ry TuMdfty
•vtMBff • p.m. PrMldtnt, Mnrdo McKtn-
■U, rMordhfl Montarr, Ooo. C Loitty;
flruieUI fKr-urr L. H. Burabftm; trw-
uror. J, W, IflktinMn; builntw lint,
Oto. W. Willlnmi. pfeoM Seymour ISM,
Labor HsUI.   ^
INT1IWATIONAL BROTHIRHOOD OF
_ BleKtrloft. Woritm Loc*l **nion No.
611 (IMM* Hon)—Motti la Btrtndm'
Htlt, M Cordova ■InH wMt, Mooad' and
tourth Wtdaotdaya at • p.m, Prwldoat J.
Honttomtry; vlM.prta.daat, P. Duff; rae*
•trdlajr Manury, J. H. Camay. Brnprota
Hotali financial atcratary, r. Wooda;
tntM***. W<   '•»*•;  ImtlRM* agant,   r.
BBAVBR   LODQB    NO.
tlonal    AMoalatlon
IN,   INTERNA-
.     . „,     of    HachlnlHsV—
Htata in Labor Halt aacond and fourth
Thundaya at 7:15 p.m. Praaldant, Robart
Thomson; vtM>prt)*lderit, John Hamilton:
recording taeratary, John A. Molvar; financial aaentaty. Jaa H, IfoVaty. 1744 Broad
way waat. Phona laymour U46L.
INTRANATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF
Blaclrlcal Workara. Local No. 815-
Maati avary Monday avtnlng at a p.m. In
Labor Hall, 118 Cordova itreot welt.
PMiiflant, H. B.l Purant; vlca-preaJdant. C.
L. Hardy; recording lecretary, R, a Mor-
rla; financial .secretary aecretary, H, Lauder; treasurer, 8am Cawker; trustee, H, T.
Jotintton; foreman, W.  P,    cart; flrat in-
ritor,  a  O.  Sheppard;  second  Inspector,
W.  Teat: business agent. B, L.  IfoHH-
Ian, 75 Broadway west. .	
AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION OF
Street and Electric Hallway- Bmploye**
of America, Pioneer Division No, 101—Meets
In Oddfellows' Hall. Mt. Pleasant, aacond
and fourth Wednesdays at 8:45 p,m, and
flrat and third Wednesdays at 8 p.m, Pratt-
dent James Fletcher; vice-president, H.
Bchofletd. recording secretary, Albert V.
Lotting. Boi 178, City Heights p. O. Financial secretary, Fred A. Hoover, 8409
Clark drive.
CIGAR MAKERS' INTERNATIONAL
Union of America, Local No. 567—
Meat* In- Labor Ha>U on the flrat Tuesday
In each month at 8 p.m. President, Robert
J. "Craig; vice-president, D. A. McMillan;
secretary, J. C Peuser, Mainland Cigar
rectory, 118 Cordova street west; labi
custodian, and treasurer, S. W. Johnson;
delegates to'Trades and Labor Council, J.'
C Pemer, Miles Nugent, R. J. Craig.
BARTBNDEHff INTERNA TIONAl
League, No. 676—Meets S14 Reefer
street, flrat and third Sundays ot each
month at 8:50 p.m. President, elms. Lehr;
vice-president, H. H. Harrison, secretary,
Richard Dalton; treasurer, Wm. Mottlthaw;
business agent, John A. Fraiier, 814 Keefer
straet.   Phone Seymour 6BB8. ■
JOURNEYMEN BARBERS' UNION OF
America, Vancouver Local No, 180—
Meets flrat and third Wednesdays In Labor
HaU at 8i50 p.m. Preildant, C B, Herritt;
vice-president, J, W. Oreen; recording secretary, aeo. W. Iaaaoa; secretary-buslnaaa
agent, C. F. Burkhart, 459 Abbott street.
Phone Seymour 817a
JOURNEYMEN BAKERS AND CONFBC-
tlonere' International Union of America Local No. 46.—Meets In Room 4, Labor
Hall, avery aacond and fourth Saturday at
7:30 p.m. President, McCurrach; vice-president 5, Hendricks; treasurer H. Loaworthy;
secretary, and business agent, B. Hutchlngs.
Phone 1580, Labor Hall.
AMALGAMATED SHBBT METAL
"• Matal .Workara* international Alliance.
Local No. Ma—Meets every Thursday 7:30
p.m. at 111 Cordova straet west. Room 4.
'Praaldant. A. J. Crawford; vlct-president.
H, Spear; recording and corresponding secretary, Jaa, Jamleaon, 081 .Drake street,
financial secretary, B. A, Bdwortby, 118
Cordova street west. James Muds, treaa-
urer; business agent, J. Peters, Labor Hall,
PAINTERS,
•t     Decorators'
TOURNBYMBN BTONBCUTTBRg OF
w North America. Vancouver Branoh—
Meets In Labor Hall aacond and fourth
Tueertaya at • p.m. Praaldant, FreiT
Rumble: vlee-preeldent, Henry Hague; cor-
responding secretary. Jamee Rayburo; financial secretary. Wm. Jardlaa; treasurer,
P. Tainan,
AMALGAMATED  BOCIKT    OF    OAR
_.    nantera and Joiners;    Vancouver DU'
trlat—BuslBaaa agents, J. W. Wilkinson and
J. A. Key; office hoars at Labor Kail, 8
• e-m. and 4 to B p.m,; phone Seymour
RANCH NO.  l.-MBBTS    ALTBRNATB
Tnssdaya   at ■ p.kn. In Labor   Hall,
"  ifr. Wright; aecretary, H. Carter,
—., J.  Tltlayj
Pacific straet.
Fraal-
r,  853
B""R*tNOH NO. 4—MEETS FIRST AND
third Thursdays la Room 4, Labor
Mail at • p.m. FiMdant o. Lambsrton
(nctory Worker*); secretary, J. Thompson. 14V Tenth avenue east
ORANOH NO. C—MBBT8 ALTERNATE
•XJ   Mondays In' Orange    Halt at 8 p.m.
Prw^*sJf%.A' Y«*ii •«Mtam a, ■*«•
Uren,  1038 Richards street.
tpBNTRAL FARK BRANCH MBBTS AL-
\J   ternata Fridays   in Arglcultural Hall,
Central Park at 8 p.m. Praaldant, O. Man-
«nj  secretary.  J. Andsrsoa, jr. Boa 883
Central Park, a A
Couth Vancouver  branch mbbts
rant
THEATRE
The Home of High-Out
Where Everybody Goes
Many of the world's greatest
heme* are never heard of by the public Many of them do not themselves
know th*t they are heroes, because
thtv (Imply did whtt they thought
they ought to do and attached no unusual Importance to tt. Yet there are
many thing* In life that men ought to
do which require herolo conduct for
accomplishment.".
A GOOD PLACE TO CAT
Mulcahy's
Cafeteria
N     THE BEST OT
EVERYTHING
Moderate Prioes
13? Cenktva Street W.
Basement Hotel Cordova
Opp. Labor Hall
SL1R
anew no. _ 	
faerlk wodaaedare
tan ana osre «»«. _
.-_„  W.  IfiasMj seerettrr,
foulk WM. B. O*  .    _
_ RANCH NO.   t-alllTt
-MHTa
atdeya la
SBOOND   AND
URaritt
-     D.   MUch.il,
pa    .
P   afoatara al t e.m.    la  isdfs room,
MM Orakrllle Hroel soul* ——
*,bv   la  lotto
e&l'stii.
tt.
la (oota^Hin
ejhoolhouas, toulh Van-
Ill a.h*..m        H.,, *..,
tat  fourth  rrlatro  si
—i  Rarnor; r   *
Vancouver,
sserstarr  R.
BairacLATiar and haioni- intbr-
aallaaal Balm,   Na. 1—Meats   erori
Tuesday, 1  s.m„  O'Brlen'e    Hall,   rarnor
Hosier aa* Tlaatlnaa .ireeta    Prs.id.ni.
" ""   vleo.prosldent J. J. Welch;
aeorotarr,    W,   a   Dtsnall.
ilal aeoreiarr, r, R. Brown,
■a atsnt. w\ *. Datnell,Jo* Haellat.
eaeti etoao tomoer tw*.	
Hosier and Tlaatlnto
Jam.. Haelsttj vloe-pi
corrooaoedlat aeoretai
Boi St; flaboM mo;
Baelaaoa atsnt, W. I. 1
07000, WIM AND WTAt, LATHMUT
Vt international Uelen,  -      ~
■  hit	
No.  SOT—
Brides
Heels la Bartender* Hall, avsrr Bridal
evonlnt *i t p.sa. President T. Andoraoni
aoorotarr an* baejases ai.ot, viator   ».
HlStler.   P.  O.   ta  list,  or  Labor   Hall.
V**ODOVBB TTPOOBAPHICAI.  UNION
V   No). m-Moota la  Labor    HaHlaat
•uadar oraaok month al
-iCk. c	
ttr-    -■
ttfi
^t   W. B.
 , .. .. Boi tSTi■erieantat-arma, N,
Williams;   eseoutlr*  commutes,   president.
srvw
»i  wcf*tarr>traaMi
F.  O.   ~
itarjr-treaanrar,
 I. oWt/T. J
to Allied  Trades  Cow
vlca-prealdont. aacrei.
old, W. Tartar. B. H.
ft*"    "■ -"
committee,   „._._-_..
—wrsr, T, Har-
T. Xeaa. Dale-
Bttaa to Allied Trades Council. Burp*,
•elands, Vnilaad. Dsletatai to Trade!
and tabor Oouaoll: H. C. Benson, B. P.
Pettlplece. W. R. Trotter. A. H. Bnfland.
UoneT Ward. A. B. Burai,
PAPBRHANQER8        AND
... Union, Local No. 138—
In Bartenders1 Hall, 34 Cordova
strait waat. every Thursday evening 7.30
p.m. President, Duncan Campbell; vice-
president, J. Bradley: recording secretary,
W. H. Lawrence, 1310 Seymour street; financial secretary. P. J, Harris. 1388 Pander
■treat west; treasurer. B. Staples; Agent,
B. Matheaon. Phone Seymour 9186.
INTERNATIONAL HOD CARRIERS' AND
Building Laborers' Local No. 830.—
Meets alternate Tuesdays at B p.m. In Labor
Hall.   Praaldant, Sid. Fern; vice-president,
LHatmltt; recording-secretary. J. Phllllpa;
Ineei agent,    0.    Morrison,    Labor Hall.
Phone Seymour 1380.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS' UNION OP
America, Vancouver Branch No, 178—
Meeting! held on the first Friday In each
month at O'Brlen'e Hal), corner Hasting*
and Homer streets, B p.m. President H.
Nordland: vice-president, A Laraen; aau-
retary, W. W. Hocken, 1388 Thirteenth
nvenua east. p. 0. Bog 303; financial sec
rstary, L,.Waltley, Box 303.	
VANCOUVER LABOR TBMPLB COM-
pany, Ltd.—Directors, Fred A. Hoover,
Chas. Stows, s. Thompson, Jaa H. McVety, James Brown, Biward Lothian, James
Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. p. pettipiece, John MoMiKan nnd Murdock Mc-
Kansle. Officers: President Jas. Brown;
vice-president, John McMillan; secretary
and managing director, Jas. h. McVety.
Labor Hall, phone Seymour 1380, residence
1744 Broadway west, phone Bayvlew 114L;
treasurer, Jaa. Campbell, residence 1994
Fourth avenue wast, phone Bayvlew 9BSB,
SKATES
Ground while you wait 25c
and done right too
EKJottsReir Labor Temple
PRINTING
THAT'S OUR BUSINESS
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
Phone Btvmqnr 4490 410 Haitian W
BOYS' DEPARTMENT
  .
CTTTTC We are proud of our boys' elblUng binhest, and proud1
|3WV nine (act that we have built it up by selling boys' cloth-
snjMuoufhttoUtoiauthebvorof our cuitomen, who connder the
quality of material tad workmanship, where you can and cannot tee it.
Union Label Overalls, Hats. Etc
CLUBB A STEWART
mom IHTMOUR 70i JM-818 HASTINGS ST. W.
d^ ■SJetp
SATURDAY.,,,..JArWAKi* M, iili
wm
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEpERATIONIbl
(Jflritatt Si gaiialf, Eimttrt.
-      575 GramllU Strut
Wdmien's & Children's Knit Underwear
AT LESS THAN USUAL PRICES
35c GARMENTS 25c—Women's white fleece-lined cotton vests,
in high neck and long sleeve styles, With drawers to match.
50c GARMENTS 35c—Women's wool and cotton vests, nude
with high neck and long sl«vet,"drawen ankle length to match.
$1.00 VESTS 50c—Women's wool and cotton vests in high neck
and long sleeve styles; fine quality and well finished.
$1.75 GARMENTS 85c—Women's Silk and wool vests in high
neck and long-sleeve styles, with drawers ankle length to match
CHILDREN'S VESTS offleece'lined cotton, bfhigh neck and
long-sleeve style; open or doted fronts; drawers in ankle length
to match; regular 35c and 40c values for 25c a garment
•Suite Brga&ak, Wmittb
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone 2354
Dentistry that it Artistic and Honest
DR. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
The one method that makes filling and crowning of
sensitive teeth painlcti
301 DOMINION TRUST BLDG.
Office Open Evenings
Hours 9 to 8
DR. BRETT ANDERSON
DENTIST
Bank ef Ottawa Building
Cor. Seymour, and Hastings
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE LANDLESS
MILLIONS OF ACRES OF
FERTILE SOIL OPEN TQ
. PRE-EMPTION   .;."
ilendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying
Stock and Poultry .
Britain Colombia Gr*nu Pre-cmptioni of
J60 Acrei to Acted StttUn at
$1 PER ACRE
TERMS: Residence on the land for at leait -
two yean; improvements to.lhe extent of.$2.50   ,
per »cre; payment of $40 at the end of two
■•" years, and the balance of $160 (i.e. $120) in
3 annual instalment, of $40,' with interest at 6%.
For Further Information Apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
The Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information
Victoria
Padtnore's Big Cigar Store, 642 [Granville Street
Macdonald, Marpole Company, Ltd.
COAL
HEAD OFFICE:   427 SEYMOUR STREET
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE: SEYMOUR 210
TWISTY-FIVE YleUta
OF B. 0. MOVEMENT
The Struggles of B. C. Workert
in Various Forma for Put
Quarter of a Century.
ues .the publication or a series or artloloo eon.
piled by an old-timer In the ortaalsed labor
movement from authoritative eourcoo, - covering- too burtorr of.tho local labor move,
ment for the past 'twenty-five years. That
the review will bo appreciated by even
those who are busy "making, history" la
those stirring daye-4ays; worth living—Is
certain).—Kd.  Federatlonist.
ARTICLE IV.
The Legislature Acts.
The B. C. legislature was m session
at the time of the anti-Chinese crusade (In 1887) In Vancouver, also at
Victoria there was a strong feeling
and an active campaign was being
waged against the Oriental. Down
there a vigorous agitation for the local
authorities to enforce the health bylaw*, which provided that a certain
number of oublo feet be contained in
a living room for each person. And
the Chinese "expulsion" movement
was a strong Issue In local politics.
There wa* no such thing as a Tory
or Grit party In provincial politics-
only the "Ins" and "out*." The "In*"
ot the day at this time were led by
Premier Smythe (after whom a street
In Vancouver was named). His gov
eminent waa thoroughly pro-Chinese
In it* tendencies.
. Attorney-General Alex B. B. Davie,
Q.C., Introduced a most iniquitous bill,
providing that a special magistrate
and some forty constables be sworn In
at Victoria and sent to Vancouver to
take charge of civic affairs. And It
was farther provided In this martial
law act that Vancouver shall pay 18,00
a day to each of the said constables.
This famous document also recited
"assault upon peaceable Chinese," and
went on, to say that as the city of
Vancouver was unable to suppress or
prevent such outrages, It was expedient that provision shall be made by
the government ot British Columbia
for the preservation of peace within
the limlta of the said olty.
Hon. A. B. B. Davie tald that It was
scandalous the way that the authorities at Vancouver acted. The constables there were in thorough sympathy
with the leaders and agitators of the
anti-Chinese movement, the latter hailing from Seattle, Tacoma and other
Sound cities.
Hon, D. W. Hlgglns said that he had
heard on the most reliable authority
that the leader of the movement was
a Fenian, who, at Portland, was at
the head ot a plot-Mo blow up the doc
the head of a plot to blow up the
dockyard at Esquimau.
Other speeches on similar lines were
made by government members.
The only defenders in the legislature for Vancouver were James Orr
and John Grant. The former was representative for Westminster district,
whloh included the new city of Vancouver, and Mr. Grant (afterwards
mayor of Victoria) represented the
Capital City. Both these gentlemen
stoutly championed and maintained
the rights and ability ot the authorities tt Vancouver to cope with the
situation. The legislation of the government, they declared, was simply to
"lock the stabledoor after the horses
were stolen." They accused the leader* of the government as being too
friendly to the big mining and railroad
corporations and the workingmen
were made to suffer by bringing aown
such monstrous legislation as proposed
by the attorney-general (Her Majesty's loyal opposition then were four In
number).    .
The Victoria dally papers were now
thoroughly aroused over the "grave
crisis," and called upon all loyal and
gatrlotlc citizens tq stand by the government In Its efforts to maintain
peace and order. The rubbish and lies
that they printed and scattered broadcast were past Imagination. It had
Its effect, though, in the outside
World. One man In Vancouver' received a cable from the old country:
"Are you safe?" Another received one
from Toronto: "Are Indians hostile!"
On the other hand the Industrial
News, a weekly labor paper, edited by
John M. Duval, was very strong In its
denunciations of the government, and
came out "flat-footed" In Vancouver's
behalf and held that the cause of Chinese "expulsion" at Vancouver wat
ustlflable and charged the government with being both Incompetent and
unfair.
A. \V. Vowell, Stipendiary Magistrate, was the special magistrate sent
up from Victoria to Vancouver In
-marge d'affaires,
Alex K. B. Davie, attorney-generel,
wired His Worship Mayor M. A. Mac-
Lean:
"A small force of provincial constables proceed to Vancouver with Supt.
Roycroft and a stipendiary magistrate
tor the province. Local constables are
expected to co-operate In maintaining
order."
This news was rapidly spread, and a
special meeting of the city council was
held to protest sealnst Vancouver being put under martial law, as tt had
been declared that no one should appear In the streets after 8 p. m. without explanations being given by pedestrians to the provincial constables
for being out or doors after that hour.
On March 1, 1887, the city council
convened In special session. The old
olty ball was packed to overflowing
with spectators. And when the mayor
took his seat perfect silence prevailed
City Clerk Thoa, F. McGuigan read the
mandate from the Attorney-General
and In a very few minutes a strong
resolution was unanimously carried
against the autocratic and high-hand
ed procedure of the legislature.
The council, after some spirited
speeches had been made by the aldermen, decided that Vancouver was
quite capable of attending to Its own
affairs. It was also decided that every
public meeting called In the city without the sanction of the mayor, aldermen or Justices of the peace should
be attended by a posse of city police,
who had Instructions to maintain order, and if Inciting speeches were Indulged In they were to break it up.
Special Constables.
The following were sworn In as special police: Duncan McCallum, Geo.
Milden, Thos. Morris, Archie McCrim-
mon, M. M. Parker, Thos, Crawford,
Frank McLorker, W. J. Allan, L. R.
Alvoril, Douglas-Poole, John Martin,
John Beaton, Pat Carey, M. A. Her
ran, Havelock Fife, C. Tetterley,
Michael Shanahan, John McKlnley,
John Collins, W. H. Williams.
Next morning (March 2, '87), Chief
Stewart and Sergt. John McLaren and
above posse met the Victoria boat
which landed thirty-six special provincial' constables, who were quartered at the Sunnyslde hotel (which
stood where the Alexandra hotel now
stands), most of whom were young
but husky men. Several said that they
were sorry that they ever came to
Vancouver on auch a fool'* errand.
For tome days all had a good picnic,
when they left tor home. Thutendoth
the brief history of the first anti-Chinese riot* of 1887 in Vancouver.
WOEKMBN'B COMPENSATION
ACT Of THI OLD COUNTRY
Simplicity  of  Operation Make*
Pouible  Bwjr  Enforcement
Without Lawyer* or feet.  ,
One ot the moat significant statement* nude by George H. Robert*,
British M. P., during his stay In this
clt* wa* in reference to the operation
of the British Employers' Liability and
Workmen'* Compensation Act
He said that while millions ot pound*
were paid annually as Indemnity for
Injuries, the legal fee* In connection
with the claims totalled such a small
sum that would scarcely be worth
mentioning.
Personally, he had conducted sev
eral *core* ot cases during the present
year and the beneficiaries In every
case had not to pay one shilling In the
shape of fee*,
The Labor members In parliament
bid succeeded in stripping the not of
legal phraseology and having the
clause* dratted la ordinary plain English, so that any person or average
intelligence could understand and apply them.
Trade union officials generally performed tbl* service, without compensation, in cases in which union members were interested, and often assisted in the tame capacity In behalf ot
persons outside the unions.
Before the redrafting and amendment of the compensation law, Its operation was an Important source ot
revenue for lawyers, who often retained the major portion of the, compensation .money as payment tor theit
services in collecting tt,
It will require very careful attention
on the part of workmen if tbl* salient
feature of the British law Is to be secured in the proposed compensation
legislation In Ontario.
The benefit of the experience of the
British Labor party In connection with
this sort of legislation has been assured members of the I. L. P. In On
tario by Mr. Roberts, and the Inform
atlon will unquestionably be found
useful.—Phil Oberineyer (Hamilton
Herald.
ae=
JgAGB
CULINARY WORURi
AND HOTEL EMPIOYEBS
Aim* and Object* of the Haiti ana)
Restaurant Employ**' International
Allla„ct and Barundere International Laagut ef America.
What has tho working class of B. C.
done for the McBride government!
Just put It tnere and paid its way.
That's all.
B. C. FEDERATION
OF LABOR
Declaration of Principles.
The British Columbia Provincial Federation of Labor Is organised for the purpose of voicing the needs and aspirations of
Labor, legislatively and otherwise; and to provide a place for
worthy members of Its affiliated
unions to participate In the discussion of those practical problems, upon the revlutlon of
which depends their welfare as
workers, Individually and collectively.
Whenlhe Introduction of the"
modern machinery of production
end the harnessing of the forces
of Nature, it Ib only fitting that
the wealth producers should par-
Itclpate In the benefits derived.
We, therefroo, pledge bur
selves to unceasingly demand a
universal work-day of eight
hours or Ices; so long as labor-
power Is sold as a commodity.
We believe there Is more efficacy In electing working-class
representatives to write the law
then by supplicatory methods;
and our efforts will he more In
that direction In future.
We are firmly convinced that
the future belongs to the only
useful people In human society
—the working-class.
KORTB VANCOUVER
WA0E-W0RKRR8 ARE
BUSY ORGANIZING
The membership of organized labor
In North Vancouver, a thriving Industrial center across Burrard Inlet from
Vancouver, Is keeping pace with other
Pacific coast towns.
A few local unions already exist, and
the Brotherhood of Carpenters Is affiliated with Vancouver central labor
body.
Other unions will be organized In
the spring by various Internationals.
South Vancouver Is also contributing
a number of unions and with the consummation of what Is called "Greater
Vancouver" a consolidation of border
Ing municipalities, Vancouver Trailer
and Labor Council will on a real Pal
llament of labor.
BETWEEN OURSELVES
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Nothing
so much exhibits the need tor Introducing a course In schools and colleges
to teach the coming generation ho*
to think as the attitude of the aver
age person on the subject ot punishment in particular, In the face of the
fact that all those who clamor for the
death penalty against the four young
men who killed the truck farmer are
alike capable of pointing to a single
age, country or community In all of
man's history that has been Improved,
made more gentle and civilised or been
freed from crime and misdemeanor by
punishing culprits or delinquents.
Punishment has always been an absolute failure as a preventative of
crime and has Invariably stimulated,
through suggestion, a degree of bru
tallty and irresponsibility that has
brought out the latent criminal Instincts and multiplied misdemeanor
a hundred fold instead of acting as a
deterrent ot crime through the fear
of punishment.
Those who are not taught to think
during childhood and are fed dally by
their teachers and parents with ready-
made conclusions, thus Inhibiting the
proper exercise of their own brain
power, when they become adults merely accept tradition at lta face value,
are guided by appearance, are Incapable of thought and generalisation
and are the vehicles by which Inefficiency and dull hypocrisy are handed
down generation after generation.
J. HARVEY ELLIS.
"Just got your sample copy of one
ot the best real workers' and thinkers' papere that I ever saw " • •
Enclose two bones, for myself and a
friend. • • * "—Joseph A.
Clarke, Edmonton, Alta.
To establish and maintain an equitable scale of wage*, and protect ourselves from sudden and unreasonable
fluctuation* in the irate of compensation for our labor, and protect, too,
Ju«t and honorable employer* from the
unftir competition of greedy, cheap-
labor, huckstering rivals; defend our
right* and advance our Interest* a*
workingmen; to create an authority
whose seal shall constitute a certificate of character, Intelligence and
skill; to build up an organisation
where all worthy members of our allied craft* can participate In the dlt-
cuttlon of those practical problems
upon the solution of which depend
their welfare and prosperity as work-
en; to foster fellowship and brother
hood, and shield from aggression the
isolated, defenseless toller; to aid the
destitute and unfortunate, and provide
for the decent burial of deceased member*; to develop and stimulate by association *nd metal, converse those
kindly Instinct* of humanity that most
highly adorn true manhood; to encourage the principle and practice of con-,
dilation and arbitration In the settle-
ment of difference* between '.f.bor and
capital; Incite all honorable effort* for
the attainment of better condition* ot
labor—shorter hours, Increased privileges, and greater enjoyment of the en
nobllng amenities of life, the concomitant* of culture; and civilisation: to
defend the defenseless, befriend the
friendless, and In all charity Inculcate
tenon* of Justice and good will among
men.
Just a Minute.
Are you a worker at any of our allied craft*?
Are you satisfied with your condi-
tlontt
Do you cork long- hours at small
w»get
Are your conditions such that you
would not accept improvement If It
came about legitimately?
Have you ever given the matter of
wages and hour* any consideration? .
Do you not at time* feel as though
you would like to get home earlier and
get acquainted with your children and
your wife?
Don't you feel rather lonesome for
the company of good, live men. occasionally; men who think, who act, and
who are trying to Improve not only
their own condition, but yours?
Don't you realise that almost every
el*** of employer 1* a member of an
employers' organisation?
What do you suppose your employer
Join* with his fellow employers tor?
If such organisation Is necessary for
him, what logical reason have you to.
offer for failure on 'the part of your
self and fellow craftsmen to organise
an Institution that will do for you
what It has done for the omployer?   -
Don't you know that other working-
men enjoy better conditions of labor
and secure better compensation than
you do? They are organised, that's
why.
Don't you serve people every day
that enjoy the benefit* of being organised; surely you don't regard them as
mentally your superior, yet they show
better Judgment, they got together,
they organised; that'* the keynote of
their success.
Yon end your fellow workers can
establish Just as good an organisation
a* any In your city; you don't require
special knowledge to do It, either; all
vou have got to do Is start; you will
find others willing to fall In line.
Don't wait for the other fellow to
start, he might be willing to wait for
still another fellow, and you know
what's everybody's business generally
turns out to be nobody's business.
Vinoouver Local, W. P. of M.
The membership ot Britannia Miners' Union, with headquarters at Vancouver, Is Increasing steadily. Secretary Webb hopes to Include a number of outside rock-workers, who are
now eligible for membership during
the coming few weeks. The Vancouver local la a sort of clearing bouse
and employment agency for the miner* all along th* coast district.
Button, Button, Who's Got the Button
H you mean the blue button, it it any UttioA,
Bartender. Demand tbe BLUR BUTTqtf
when being nerved by a bartender.
Bartenders' International League 676
"Genius of the Put" Doesn't Count.
I'm a self-made man," said the
proud Individual.
"Well, you are all right, except at
to your head," commented tbe other
part of the conversation.
"How's that?"
"The part you talk with Is out of
proportion to the part you think
with."
MINERS'
MAGAZINE
Official Organ of the Western
Federation of Miners
Subtcrlptlon $1 Per Year
Miners' Magaxlne US Railroad
Bldg., Denver, Colorado
QQWITH
THE
BUNCH
TO THE
BRUNSWICK
POOL ROOMS
NuMsttjo*. IheetAt* EfHatmttly
^on<ERiS7 Do not buy any Shoe
no matter what it* nam*, unltas It h*nn a
plain and readable unprestjeo of this 8tamB.
AU shoes without th* Union Stamp an
always Non-Union.
l^ajteeorplaayeaaawfasehoiMs el Uaiaaitssst
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS* UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, M*a*.
John F. Tobln, Pro. Cht*. L. Bain, MC-Tro**.
Get Your Money's Worth
ASK f OR THEM AND INSIST ON GETTING THEM
Many dealer* will try to induce you to take tome other brand
Why?    For larger profits take.       Don't let them fool you.
MADE
^S>5 Or America J&r
EVERY UNIONIST WW
patronizes t Btr'tSouJd not only
matt upon being served by Unica
Mixologists, but demand
UNION MADE BEE!
The Keg* Bear the Label
ASK FOR UNION MADE Mil
"Boom all Union Labels"
<5 TRADES fefl COUNCIL >
PRINTERS'
LABEL
Don't You
Want to
Do That ?
—should receive the support of trades unionist*
above all labels. Every time it is used it meant
a boom for all labels and unionism, tj Union
newspapers are morofavorablo to organised labor
than non-union sheet* <| That's support you
want when in trouble. *J By demanding their
label you not only help printers, but advance
labor's cause, and that HELPS HUMANITY.
Hardware and Tools
Phone
634
Building Hardware, General Hardware, Tools for
the Carpenter, Cement-worker, Plasterer, Machinist
Bricklayer, and all the other trades. Lawn Mowers,
Bukos, Spades, Hose and the other requisites to
make your home look'jieat and tidy.
McTaggart & Moscrop
HARDWARE MERCHANTS
7 Halting*
St WT
LEST YOU FORGET, WE WOULC REMIND YOU THAT THE
8IMOND8 SAW 13 THE BEST SAW THAT CAN BE MADE.
If easy running, fast cutting and an absolute guarantee count for anything: in a hand saw, then every mechanic should use this Simondi Saw.
It is certainly much different from other saws. Let ut tell you why,
or better yet, let the Simondt tell its own story.
SOLE AGENTS FOR. VANCOUVER
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
111 Hastings It. W.
Phone Seymour 204
The Beer Without
a Peer
Phone
Fairmont
429
The Vancouver Breweries
Limited \
'timM-"^^*:
lei*
>AOi|ffl-
EDGETT'
lewjttore
invites you togit
the store to Iook
Swell as to buy
ILECISLATUK
— I  ui L AfiMY JOBLESS
Fiffl^fcT^ f    ^^Tv^SciTV
1 ' "Tpioysd -",'1""
3S9#<B$»
iJfc (ByJotnUM.rtU.-r       .   I   Tbe     ^,.yedI-**- lj.  (f
lipping* VrjT
Tf»W<>wn,<»
th« Potato I
"win .c'°?k'.*>!!
MttWt
i from
»t-w»'*5?!j^
Our Januar
Gr^aterThanEyil
Sale
:«.i-^Sff«»WSPM*?
.s^^i^afc^ssiats ssgt^gg**
3&Z%\
THE  HOME
lion .be «, ?J£J^»»^TvW2*;J& VZ& to J-l-jagtfr. than ^ro>K|a tower ^^wJJjftS
any other time or phvoe.    ^     ^ UrttJerTv««f
w-       -«f h .lUT °» ,oe p^,e curiosity or »P«=«'»";S: 5 P^'t"*J8 ie brought to »« ^Snrmore than •J»LJfffi(l
Everything   fer^^^
irntn who went to ™"" JJ wo* It
Money Saving
Everything
PficeB
to Eat
Saving
Prices
■*~jaJawe*J»^!T^^lW»JBKr*J^ "       «?«!»..... «-«-0" •< ffi
AH furs
!SP2£&>°>
liBBL
unloves of tne »""    hour.
James
Stark & Son** P#
i Abbott and Carroll
H.^S^tW-t.betwetn^
Cor. Pen
Phone 1
,8„dCambieSt*
■e Sey- 5«W
criminal* and
ConUnu***"^,
l?ti^^
JS^Sra^ls^H^^
duoed
high
cost of living tare-     pon,t
if you
J,  the »ecM""lS.t from the «««
Socked l»*»r„XnStltwa*»bov»
nolnt of the capltalitt» w     ^
minimum i
groceries from
puyj—B'   _0lr^Q
iSr^ttrf- -»d Bro«lw«ty B.
Ft**D«Uv*ry
.thlsoccM'on; ffi 'It«" ^".^mai who hat adopted
...7,1   man  of 37„rt0rnthwalte, «»"»?.„ th- b»t- tearing
,    , hire* * man to work I HJVtSSlr- '«*. resign from
point oi u.._-■--.      tnis »»»"--: but...»«:•»„d,]2  the man wi
level usually «»»«".. ,  man of Hawthornthwalte, m       |n ,
The attitude «»,,?,„ nu advocacy " gBt through »'»* ",;,, who
did
»!*W"em
resume of the evo'««- - ,„„,,,
Sdurtry from to«»i«»£. ^th
..!■ e»nlt»H*m, tnd, «i«"   how
Phone
F»ir.
tftriSSS?*?**!!! JKr    '.■'„„,    crimln*llty   .'•"■lern l-"Hflfi:Si eiposed «•»
"Wave*"  of    """_ .^artty-ln- do"** <$ „J merelles* logic bow
(X^OpCACEtOEAT
Btitte GttW
^^-^^^smms^m^^mMmmmMm
day (the 16th)-"
who Is the sole
Federation
lanta.      '___- ■  , I enm°"^ilCy' that ..-
 ZteFederaUon   of mg » p0th7„MPle and
p,ed Pe^y
MERCHANT
TAILOR
Hftpjft
to518 HombyS;
« taw A»rs horn
Pender. Before you
orje, t suit come in
aid look over our
£ck. UsetheltW
Ureen to bum, buL'i u*invlt*d W an- tbl* •*•*• * _!___—==
p     fwrnnla.  Bvewone 1* ,B!jJ|( ,, he preeent  — —
fromwhom tneyiar^Mr.  lire. «■ "j.v.r I   bui "■» c^. >h« flood-gate-  The |;»_ „M„t the »ttor»*J*' ,hll ^jj a | _-a
the land1'
support *
ulators.
(or them.
^mM^m^mMmmmm^^
community *^»t|t»^SJ
.van) who will Pro%%a3arl»t r
Dy Parker ™»»2i2S2Sfi»*
^?I^^1!P£^!IIMS?,:
Port Mann
;th*
comp»»»»,15n
^r/e Invito
^^iHpnpBpWsf
Clean Sweep
Sale
Bargains in Every
Department
WORKfcWj0""*
London, Dec.«,!»";
-  F*der*Uonl.t:-Oo»-l
m msBrisay Wat**
lit Oranvin* St
GENT'
nJhMiTSHTN
will leave Jiere on o „„
kUTSfr'thrconvenUon
UNION MADE I gSBBli , nun)oe, of ctr-
«ood*» Thereare quite »nta¥((n, 0P«
good*
ipeoialty
affifflA'-»^£?5feS8S
a-wv.—- many, ">« ■ul"'" ;;mni«iely monopo- Mess ana ""••;■ 7nmrnatln( >or" ■"
TTtMsHrtod OonnJnecettlUei being comPleW"  tot0 g%r paper■ tt* figEJffi oooiwr-
OampbtU a»W"T"  S,ed by him.   HeM*      ^ngmns, We,teni pollUf*. J*»•" you *« »P-
a«i«dTl»•*lWd,,,,*0,,1     Na*,W,n^dArtKXofHvln«J^ Snoot-
001 ftllltet). hi. W?J«'J^^l* wlfw»»ory-- ptaimy, y,°»Bai.a^fSrt» oi twj; «* ,
.!f-Si. after watch-L-mb one* saM. iwj on*. *T*r
otf- KerrwM
Bin-Return* for Those Who
BSeTin Before Townsite
Sale
DAVIDRBOJg
tfl^nd^i5^couver,EC
Overall*, Hats
^lovesKPMtt
Seeb^rSpeciJWor^'Special
^USmVf^*15to*f ,_
WILLIAM.DICK,. JR-
W*> M*»-1-
Union
**•*•
during
»'l1».r-,CP.n,.'d.
THE CfcOTMHM* I-
»»■« ,a cr  WEST  lllrecevedthroMh^^        B 1; the g(j. •*» ^,f..t. „, arted he«elf thetam^   not wd I .ppolntment. y«W     „,, M*«»X^
4Si47,4»H»tln«tStr*tt]
144
S,rBova s-nwEsr
PRINTING
E T. Kingsley
^RTEMPLEPWNTW
•th* »hop rhere, .Hs
Passive thought it
"'mer^vaththe
- artistic
PHONE SEYMOUR 824
THOUSAND8,
who I Messrs.
H««-!s,r^.wofthe|:^..^^
gg^WMIl^GriffiWir*^^
fratarnally,
.eason.may^,
have
"done" aoo"t all
tie harm they on|y mem!
returned.      trMieet Mr.
For tehool trunw
.a^Bajssriea-*
^.*^«satfJg5KSiW.!«S3Rfe^
r^uttbert*o»&eo,L.m.ted
141 H*»M"*» W
I1t rl«*tlm» w>
tn ornnvllf*
i West-
Of these books selling
Arthur McPonald,
1 dent. j^fjjg Local 1689,
LKvlcM.r^^
Bertram Thos. «!»»*_,«.„«
Bouth Vancouver,
ho ca»o tecono ■»      reM„t se
T.«h*r. »ho««ot0rKBohU.^
IfYo»W«»«
IfTo«««»v»
"Ti^; ing.r..U- -««   III ^W-T McDona
Si nontv •l««oht*r« '""      and J-Hoal. Broi.
fArd
NM^'.PIK. ■*«*»*
 ''"'"    200
Wue*tlon, P«w»r''-' HMCR.
TM Bvalutlon of M*n. ""   ja,
^ &^""   "■%.
Huxi*y
.... «*°
mp^^f9tow
MCMwViW'
hrlstle, A. McDonald, j»                  •""'•^^ ild* •« tne £$ ti»che™ ^re"0^,^. wtotter the future pan- w torn j*?',S, fi MP**"1-
MurdS, B.D. 07^'^fourth »«- "kl\lrfo^«*v^%fe?*j____ ^ whit. race.___  «-•* 5T- .^^Sa.fitehi- '
in uncommonly
,HOOS|^
tm/9C»n
GotK
•/or Tow
#•«•»«"»
Sec'ret*ry-Tre»»urer.       ^^^eh,
rreiwoT afflffiC
tJt^BMHMlCSnw-:
»t*v*t»
,. t^nWuS»'»«
I Swat" Britain wm re>—  Tbr Red* it »^ >J^^U^ »»•
i»ra1 election ■ *   J", Wrly tt» ««M rat* wa* »*
2»^undSgCrtt*a-^
far**
-asr"
fitMlf"'
tlon

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