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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 6, 1912

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 Fouls Tfear. No. 50.
ION:   5,600.
OFFICIAL PAPER:   VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   8TENOTH; POLITICAL UNITY;
VANCOUVER, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1912.
$1.00AYB4H
TRUES AND LABOR COUNCIL
REVIEW CIVIC CANDIDATES
.£ ■%
RtPes of Candidates, and Those Who Failed to
Reply, Carefully Noted and Will be Acted Upon
PRE8. WILKINSON SUMMARIZES A. F. OF L. CONVENTION
Nomination of Officers for Ensuing Six Months—Reports from Unions and Committees—Large Number of New Delegates Seated—Election and In-
stalation of Officers Takes Place Next Thursday,
- Jan. 18-Mayor Taylor's and James Findlay's Replies to Council.
Some seventy delegate* signed the,
MI at hurt meeting of Vancouver'!
central labor body, Jan. 4:
President J. Wm. Wilkinson, after
an absence of some weeks, presided,
and all other officers were In place.
A large number of new delegates
for the ensuing six months, were obligated.
The executive report was short, only
the passing of a few accounts.
Parliamentary Committee.
Del. McMillan reported that at last
meeting of the Parliamentary Committee the topto of the evening was "Civic
Government by Commission."
Mr. W. Porteous Jack had been present and addressed the committee; a
general discussion following, which resulted In the recommendation that the
question be passed up to the open
council without recommendation.
Owing to the pressure of other matters, the report was laid on the table.
Shops Regulation Act.
Del. MoVety reported that the case
now before the. court, being prosecuted
by the council, to ascertain the usefulness of the Act, had that morning
been again been adjourned.
Del. McVety asked for authorisation
to draft necessary amendments to the
Aot, for submission to the B. C. Federation of Labor, to be taken up with
the executive council of the government Report received and request
granted. '
President Wilkinson.
At the request of a delegate. President Wilkinson was asked to give the
council a brief report of the proceeding! of the recent convention of the
American Federation of Labor at Atlanta, Oa., he having been a delegate
from the Canadian District of the Am-
algamated Society of Carpenters and
Joiners. President Wilkinson reviewed the proceedings and gave the
delegates the advantage of tome of
his Impressions of the parent trades
union body and lta personel, making
special reference to the convention discussion of the National Civic Federation, and certain Influences which were
at work in the control of the A. F.
of L.
The report was listened to with interest, and much food for reflection
was provided.
Reports of Unions.
Waiters—Del. Lewis reported progress: is per cent, members working;
called attention to non-union Winter*
Grill, Hastings street west.
Painters—Del. McMillan: Two new
members at last meeting, and more In
sight; going ahead; smoker netted
|323 In aid of an Injured brother.
Musicians—Del. Evans reported progress.
Cooks—Del. Muller reported Al's
Cafe unfair to his union; membership
growing; 361 members In three crafts.
dgarmakera—Del. Craig reported
favorable to lifting ban on Province;
had subscribed for five shares per
member In Labor Temple Co.; trade
PROVINCIAL
LAWS IGNORED
BY LAWMAKERS
The bluff of enacting "labor"
legislation, and then winking
the other eye on the part of the
government, civic, provincial
and federal, la over, so far as
the workers of this province
are concerned. Either the laws
will be enforced or shown up
as being a worthless decoy to
beguile silly suckers on election day, The last straw has
been broken. Organised labor
intends to call a halt. This is
No. 1.
fair; few members had been out of
work; four new charters had been Issued In November; international growing; asked for demand of Cigarmak-
ers' label; It would Increase local
membership; retailers make more
profit on cheap Eastern made nonunion goods.
Bakers—Del. Hutching! reported re
Inspector's delinquency In violation of
law.
Bricklayers—Del. Gow reported thai
Rogers' sugar refinery waa unfair to
his union.
Waitresses—Del. -Mrs. Gardner reported late Winnipeg (now Home)
Restaurant non-union; membership increasing; intended to enter upon extensive organising campaign; asked
for unionists' co-operation.
Amalgamated Carpenters—Del. Key
reported trade conditions very quiet;
taking In new members every meeting.
Iron Molders—Del. Lanlgan reported
90 per cent, of membership working;
plan waa being formulated to organise
a Pacific Coast district conference.
Building Trades Council—Del. Kav-
anagh reported building trades all
slack; lots of men out of work.
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
and Joiners—Del. Burnham reported
good progress, In spite of adverse labor market and trade conditions.
Walters—Del.Lyons reported a number of non-union eating houses, and
asked for assistance, of unionists by
demanding their card.
Machinists—Del. Haddon reported
his union favorable to lifting ban
against the Dally Province.
Barbers—Del. Burkhart reported his
union In favor of council's action In re
The Province; had Initiated two new
members since last report. Ex-Secretary Stowe had left city. Hoped soon
to see Barbers' union Join organised
labor In a.ll lta undertakings.
Unfinished Business.
The notices of motion of Dels. Gow
and Tralnor were upon motion, read
a first time.
Nomination of Officers.
Pres.   Wilkinson   announced   that
nominations for officers were In order
for the ensuing term, nominations to
remain open till next meeting, Jan. 18,
VANCOUVER ISUUtO COAL MHOS %
HAVE REORGANIZfl) TMHR UNIONS
International Board Member Geo. Pettigrew Has Been
on the Job for Some Months.
AFFILIATED WITH U. M. W OF A. AMP B. C. P. F. OF L
With International Backing and a Live Bunch of Material, Several Local Unions Have Been Put in
Working Order, and It Looks Like a Hundred
Per Cent Territory Within a Few Months-Join
B. C. Federation of Labor.
The Hudson's Day Company's
MIDSEASON
Clearance
SALE
Commences Monday
January 8
Great Bargains Will be Presented
With the exception of
Groceries, Liquors, Contract Articles, everything
in the store will be reduced
Hudson's Bay Company
OORNIB OF ORANVILUB AND GEORGIA STBMST8.
When Will Organised Labor Cut the Rope }
President—Del. Wilkinson, by Del.
Pipes.
Vice-President—Del. Mldgley, by
Del.^Kavanagh; Del. Kelnlgban, by
Del. Pipes; Del. Gow, by Del. Tralnor;
Del. Muller, by Del. Lyons.
General Secretary—R. P. Pettlplece,
by Del. Kavanagh.
Financial Secretary—Del. Jas. Campbell, by Del. Burnham.
Statistician—Del. Mrs. Gardner, by
Del. Pipes.
Sergeant-at-Arms—Del. F. A. Hoot-
er, by Del. Key.
Trustees (three to elect)—Del. Mldgley, by Del. Pipes; Del. McMillan, by
Del. Fletcher; Del. Burnham, by Del,
Williams; Del. Kavanagh, by Del.
Hutchlngs; Del. McVety, by Del. Had-
don.
Replies of Civic Candidates,
Secretary Pettlplece read replies received from some ot the civic candidates, who were up for election on
Thursday next, Including Mayor Taylor and Jas. Flndlay.
Mayor Taylor's.
1. Are you in favor of none but
union men being employed on all city
work?' Answer—Yes, as to skilled labor; no, as to unskilled labor, because
the city Is bound to give temporary
employment to such labor to prevent
destitution.
2. Are you In favor of a forty-four
(44) hour week and a minimum wage
of thirty-seven and a half (37%) cents
per hour? This to Include all day labor and contract work. Answer-
Yes.
8. Are you In favor of the abolition
of the contract system, to be substituted by day labor?   Answer—Yes.
4. Are you In favor of an amendment to the city charter providing for
the recall ot civic officers? Answer-
Yes.
6. Are you in favor of the abolition
ot property qualification for civic office?   Answer—Yes.
.   Are you In favor of the abolition
of private employment offices and the
substitution therefor of a free civic
employment bureau?   Answer—Yes.
L. D. TAYLOR.
Mr. Findlay's.   „
4th' January,' 1912.
R. P. Pettlplece, Esq.,
Secretary Trades and Labor Council,
Vancouver, B. 0.1
Dear Mr. Pettlplece,—As per request
in your letter, dated December 27th,
asking for candidates' reply to questions enclosed in separate sheet, numbering from one (1) to six (6), I wish
to make to you an answer the same
as announced by me on the public
platform In the Orange Hall, last evening.
Unfortunately I have disfigured the
enclosed sheet and therefore will give
you my replies In writing in this letter.
I have answered these questions
conscientiously and as likely the chief
magistrate of the city.
Answer 1—As the chief magistrate
of the city should and must represent
all the citizens and ratepayers ot the
city and not one class, dealing In equity and fairness with all, I say that I
muat answer this question In the negative.
Answer 2—1 am In favor of three
dollars (13.00) per day wage for an
eight (8) hour day, knowing as I do
the high cost of living and the broken
hours. I do not consider this wage
excessive.
Answer 8—Yes, In as far as Is consistent with the best results from monies expended and wherever possible.
Answer 4—Yes, but only when Just
cause Is given and after a special commission, properly appointed, have decided that the recall is Justified.
Answer 5—No, that the qualifications now existing are reasonable and
the government of the city should be
when the elections would take place.
Audit Committee (appointed by
chair)—Dels. Mowat, Beasley and Gra
in the hands of those who have a direct Interest as ratepayers.
Answer 6—Yes, I am in favor of a
free civic employment bureau and the
abolishment of the private employ
ment agencies,
I am yours truly,
JAMES FINDLAY.
W, S. Cameron.
1. Answer—So far as possible.
2. Answer—Yes.
those elected by
3. Answer—Yes.
4. Answer—For
the people, yes.
5. Answer—Yob.
6. Answer—Yes.
E. B. McMsster.
1. Answer—YeB.
2. Answer—YeB.
3. Answer—Yes; except In cases of
emergency.
4. Answer—Yes, If officers elected
for a long term, as under the proposed
commission form of government.
5. Answer—Yes; it's a farce as it
is now.
6. Answer—Yes.
W. E. Flumerfelt
1. Answer—Yes, so far as skilled
labor. Is concerned, but believe unskilled labor should be paid 83.00 per
day for an eight-hour day.
2. Answer—Yes.
8. Answer—Yes, as far as possible
and If city had plant of Its own to do
the work; then I would say altogether.
4.   Answer—Yes.
6.   Answer—Yes.
6.   Answer—Yes.
A. C. Kiraehfield.
1. Answer—Yes.
2. Answer—YeB.
3. Answer—Yes.
4. Answer—Yes; government by
commission.
6.   Answer	
6. Answer—Yes. Very necessary
and should be supported.
Wm. Davis.
1,   Answer—Yes.
2;   Answer—Yes.
3. Answer—Yes.
4. Answer—Yes.
6. Answer—Not entirely; they
should have some qualification, such
as some property, two years' continual
residence, or a petition of at least ten
per cent of voters.
8.  Answer—Yes.
S. Miller.
"In reply to your of the 27th ultimo,
I beg to state that during my representation of Ward VIII on the City
Council, not one dollar of our money
has been expended on contract work.
Standard wages have been paid and
satisfactory results obtained.
Forty-four hours per week at 37%
cents will receive my hearty support.
I would not condemn a non-union
man to starvation, nor place any obstacle In the way of his Joining the
union and becoming alive to his own
Interests.
Other proletarian Issues would receive my careful consideration; and I
would endeavor to ascertain the views
of my constituents thereon."
William W. Winn, Vancouver and
R. O. Hodgson, candidate for reeve In
South Vancouver also addressed letters too unsatisfactory for publication.
These, anions with others who failed
to respond will be dealt with at Labor
hall during the week.
Smith-Key—That the replies be received and carefully noted by the delegates and referred to various unions
for action; the secretary to supply the
press with subsequent replies received.
Carried.
New Business.
McVety-Plper—That this council reaffirms Its endorsatlon of the project
to build a tram-line In Stanley Park.
Carried.
Midgley-McMlllan—That the executive board be requested to consider
the practicability of establishing, or
having established, a store In the new
Labor Temple, that would handle exclusively union-made goods.   Carried.
- An Apology.
Upon motion ot Vice-President Ker-
nlghan, Del. Tralnor was asked for an
apology to the council for his conduct
at last meeting, Apology tendered to
the council by Del. Tralnor. 1
Delegates Present.
Typoe.—R. P. Pettlplece.
Sheet Metal Workers.—Nil.
Shlnglers—G. Peterman,
Waitresses—Mrs. Gardner, Mrs. Wilkinson, MIsb Ray.
Waiters—Fred Lewis, W. Lyons, A.
Graham.
.athers—V. R. Mldgley; A. H. Roberts; Ed. Morrow.
Western Federation of Miners—Fred
Blomburg; A. C. Webb.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowatt.
Cigar Makers—R. Craig; M. Nugent;
J. C. Peuser.
Cooks—II. A. Muller.
Machinists—J. H. McVety; J. L. Haddon; A. Beasley.
Civic Employees—E. Tralnor; G.
Harrison.
Bakers—B. Hutchlngs.
Letter Carriers—John Cass.
Upholsterers—W. Johnston.
Brotherhood of Carpenters—E. Loth-
Ian; A. McDonald; G. W. Williams;
L. H. Burnham; E. Slstereon; W,
Milne; J. Campbell; S. Kernighan.
Amalgamated Carpenters—J. W. Wilkinson; J. A. Key; W. Manson; J. G.
Smith; W. West; A. Peardon; W. Fox-1
croft.
Bricklayers—J. De Camp; G. W.'
Judge; A. Gordurn; W. J. Pipes.
Builders' Laborers—J. Roberts; J.
Swift; G. Nlchol; G. Morrison; M. But-
terly.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart; W. Sut-
cliff.
Street Railway Employees— J.
Fletcher; F. A. Hoover; W. B. Beattle;
W. H. Cottrell; F. Halgh.
Tailors—M. Williams; A. Parnan.
Tile Layers & Helpers—J. A. Mathe-
son.
Boiler Makers—Ross Coy.
Musicians—D. Evans.
Plumbers—A. Holmes.
PalnterB—J. McMillan; J. Freckle
ton; R. Anstle; A. Rosen; C. Georg
klnson.
The coal miners of Vancouver Is*
land are evidently making good prog-
towards   reorganization   after
years of ips and downs, chiefly downs,
Though much has been accomplished
through the election of working class
representatives „iid consequent "labor" legislation, such aa an eight-hour
bank-to-bank work day; Workman's
Compensation Acta, etc., It has been
found by the coal diggers that then Is
still need for Industrial organisation,
a lesson that should not be overlooked
by many economic students among the
workers of this Province.
Org. Pettigrew on the Job.
International Board Member Geo.
Pettigrew, who has been on the
ground for some months, writes:
"... About fourteen months ago
the men In Ladysmlth had. reason to
kick, owing to the operators Introducing a new explosive at an Increased
cost, which meant a reduction In their
wages.
The agitation continued for some
days and at laat a meeting was held
and a committee selected to Interview
the superintendent. After some discussion the question was settled satlsfac.
tory to the men.
The question then arose at the meeting where the report was submitted
as. to whether or not If a union waa
here If many of the conditions then
existing couldn't be remedied.
A committee was selected to consider the question and report to a meeting later. They Immediately got In
touch with the presidents of the W.
F. M. and the U. M. W. ot A. A reply
was received from the former saying
they did not take In coal miners, and
from the latter, T. L. Lewis, saying
that once the men on the Island made
some show for themselves they would
consider the question.
The Ladysmlth men were not to be
daunted; they formed a local union,
then known as the Canadian Federation ot Miners, and later put one ot
their men In the field as an organiser
to go into some of the other camps
and have the men lined up.
The local unions were In existence
In Ladysmlth, South Wellington, and
a small number In Nanalmo. The
Cumberland men said the U. M. W. of
A. or nothing. Resolutions were later
submitted from all the camps and sent
to President J. P. White, who bad by
this time been elected. He agreed to
send National Board members to investigate conditions, and later the
Board agreed to have the Island organized in the month of September. Two
national organizers were sent here to
hold meetings and find the feeling of
the men. Good meetings were held
all over and then permission was given
to charter the local unions. Good work
has been done all over and early In
this month a convention was held in
Nanaimo and a district formed, a constitution drawn up and officers selected.
The men are now coming In fairly
good In all the camps and before long
we hope to have the organisation complete, when It is hoped the result will
be better conditions for the men here
THE LAW MUtT:
■I ENFORCED
' OR WIPED OUT
Assumng that the report ot
Del. Hutchlngs,'.ot the Bakers'
Union, Is leas than half true, the
alleged Bakery Inspector ot this
city should be flred peremptorily. Permits to deliberately
brek the law, especially so-
called labor laws, aay ha viewed aa the right thing to do by
Chief Chamberlln; but organised labor hereby serves notice
that It will not stand tor It In
this case. The Shops' Regulation Act win either be enforced
or shown up tor the farce It Is.
on the Island, and also the disappear
ance of the competition between the
operators on the Island and Washington, this preventing reduction In
wages.
The men on the Island are delighted
that an organization Ilka the U. II. W.
of A. has been established, tad that
valuable help hat been given tram
District No. 10, its president and
board member. ..."
Meet in Convention.
- The Coal Digger, Wllkeson, Wash.,
also prints a report from a Ladysmlth
correspondent, In which he says:
"A convention of the various local
unions ot the United Mine Workers ol
America was held In Nanalmo, B. C,'
on December 5.
A strong delegation representing all
mining camps on the Island waa IB
attendance.
A new district waa created and the
territory assigned to the District waa
all ot Vancouver Island and the adjoining parts of British Columbia that
are at present unorganised and can be
taken care of.
A full staff of district officers was
elected from the floor of the convention to hold office for. a period of throe
months, while nomination blanks can
be prepared and a set of officers elect,
ed by a referendum vote.
The best of harmony prevailed
throughout the entire proceedings,
which occupied three days, out of
which two were taken up with the report of the constitution committee,
which, after some discussion and
amendments, waa adopted.
The representatives of the International organisation were International
Board Members Russell and Farrington
and International Organizers Mike
Purcell and John L. Brittan. District
President R. H. Harlin, of Washington
was also present, all of whom were
given a hearty welcome by the delegates.    *
The delegates expressed themselves
as perfectly satisfied with the results
of their labors and felt confident that
their actions would be endorsed unanimously by their membership upon
their return home."
Subsequent action taken by the new
organisation of the Island miners Is
dealt with elsewhere In this Issue, covering application with the B. C. Federation of Labor.
PARTIAL LIST OF
VANCOUVER CITY'S
UNION MEMBERSHIP
Following Is a partial list of local
unions, showing membership In the
years 1906 and 1911:
1906   1911
Tilelayers        37
Lathers       22      90
Glass Workers       8      211
Iron Molders   200     175
Builders' Laborers        33
Walters        93
Cooks       104
Waitresses        73
Street Railway Employes.. 200    860
Clgarmakers     40      63
Bricklayers     75    380
Typographical       87     267
Painters     75     159
Bro. Carpenters. S. Van        32
Electrical Workers, No. 213.   80    310
Upholsterers       34
Garment Workers       7      20
Boilermakers      20      42
Musicians     85     205
Tailors       15    100
Stonecutters      25      80
It will be noted that the above compilation does not include the two big
local carpenters' unions and others
that would materially Increase the totals. A sufficient number are glve.y
however, to Indicate the general
growth of the trades unions In the Terminal City.
Oh Vou Grouoherl
If you stay away from union meetings, do not criticize the action of
those who did attend. And If you
went am1 said nothing, keep on saying the svne thing.
If AH Union Men in
British Columbia, especially in Vancouver, who wear
Overalls and Shirts would wear only our Union-made,
made-in-Vancouver
BUCK   BRAND
and insist upon the garments be-tring
this label
there would tie FIVE HUNDRED
men and women employed hi our
establishment, under clean, sanitary
workshop conditions, at highest union
wages. Did yon get that 1
Wm. J. McMaster & Sons
LIMITED
1176 HOMER STREET
VANCOUVER, B. O.
■asssassssBBaass
-M_
1
uAl PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED IMI
Paid-up Capital   $   6,200,000
Reserve 7.200,000
Total Assets 100,000.000
WE ALLOW IN-
TEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
businets will be welcome
be it large or small
TEN IRANGHE8 III VANCOUVER
Imperial Bank
of Canada
CaeUsI SelxcriM • 6,000.000.00
Capital Paid-up • 5,996,900.00
rWmFusd • • 5.996,900.00
Tol.lA,«i.   ... $74000,000.00
Interest allowed on deposits
of ONE   DOLLAR and upwards FROM DATE OP
DEPOSIT
Main Office—694 Hasti gs
Street West.
Hastings and Abbott St.
Branch — 84 Hastings
Street West
Fairview  Branch — 2013
Granville Street S.
Main Street Branoh—Cor.
Main and Cordova Sts.
TNt MARCH OFFICES ARE OPEN
SATURDAY EVENINC8 7 TO 9
Macdonell, Killam
& Farris
SOLICITORS
Trades and Labor Council
Labor Temple Co. Limited
Machinists' Union
PACIFIC BUILDING
Cor. Hastings and Howe Sts.
Phone 8080
GO.TOTHE
Gaskell & Odium
STORES
FOR   TECHHI C A L
BOOKS
Textbooks on all Trades
and Professions
Books of Special Interest
to Wage-Earners Wishing to educate themselves
Tks tnkill-HIn tUUseere, UalUd
681 Granville St.     6S2 Main St.
also at New Westminster and
Tic TkSMH Mlllsssfl (•., U«l
826 Hastings Street West
SKATES
Ground while you wait 25c
and done right too
Elliott, Rear Lafcor Temple
WM. DAVIS
Candidate for
ALDERMAN
WARD V.
An itemised statement of moneys
spent published every year
The appointment of a Scaffold
Inspector
Fair  Treatment to All
GENT'S
FURNISHINGS
UNION MADE
goodsa
specialty
CAMPBELL MRIFFIH
144 CORDOVA ST. WEST
PRINTING
E. T. Kingsley
LABOR TEMPLE PRINTER
"The shop where progressive thought is
merged with the
artistic"
PHONE SEYMOUR 824
THE B. C. FEDERA1
Owned and published br Vincouvar Trade,
and Labor Council, with which i. tfflll-
l>t.d fifty-two union*, embr.clni ft
membership   of  8000  wage-worker..
luusd  twlc-a-month,    each  Saturday  following Trad., and Labor Council meeting.
Addmat 2349 St. Cfttharlaea Straet.
Managing-Editor,    R, Parmater Pattlplan.
Phones-Office:   Sey.  1380:   Be.. Pair. 486.
Subscription:      S1.00 par y.ar:    to union.
■ub.crlblng in a body, 60 cent*.
Advertising Rate.: Flv. cant.'per line per
Issue; 14 line* to an Inch. Contract rat*,
on application.
a—WATCH     THB    I.AUBI.    ON    TOUR
PAPER.   If this number I. on It, your
subscript Ion expire, nest le.ua.
"Unity of Labor! Iba hap* af lb* w.rld."
SATURDAY JANUARY 6, 1912
THE "MACHINE."
This has been termed the "Machine
Age." In our day and generation Industry is carried on and made possible
by the use ot machinery. Without
machinery, the world, as we know It
today, would come to a sudden standstill, for the workers, robbed ot their
skill with the hand tools, would be
unable to produce sufficient to feed,
clothe and shelter the millions who
compose the world's Inhabitants.
Think of the contusion and chaos
caused by the temporary derangement
ot the machinery used for the production of electrical energy and then Imagine the result if the stoppage became
permanent. Carry the Illustration Into all Industries and It will be readily
apparent that whatever advancement
has been made by the human family
has been due directly and entirely to
the Introduction and Improvement of
machinery.
Even the governments are carried
on by a machine, tor do we not hear
of "The machinery of State?" Political parties, fraternal societies and all
other aggregations, are termed machines by their opponents, especially
when they, happen to be well organised. Labor unions have not yet arrived at the place where It can be said
that they are machines, employers and
weak kneed members contending that
"a clique runs the union," the clique
being composed of the members who
attend regularly and carry on the
affairs ot the organization.
After all, what Is a machine but a
number of parts brought Into unison
for the carrying out of a common purpose, the common purpose, under present conditions, being the reduction of the cost ot production and the
Improvement of the product? Workers who think, will have no adverse
criticism to offer Of the use of machinery and no desire to return to the
drudgery of the past. The problem
confronting the workers Is not the retardment of machine development, but
the future ownership of the means
whereby they must live. Without
machinery the workers would starve,
and with the ownership vested In
others than themselves, they are not
permitted accesa to tho means by
which they must live, except at such
times and on such terms as the own-
era dictate. With machinery, the
workers are able to produce five times
as much as they receive In the form
of wages or five times as much as
they are able to buy back from the
owner of the machines with their
wages. When the owner cannot aell
the product of HIS machines to his,
or other workers, at a profit, he refuses permission to his workers to operate his machines, even for their own
use. Simple Is It not? When refused
permission to operate machines In
their regular occupations, they seek
employment elsewhere, and finding
conditions the same as In the Industry they themselves were shut out of,
they are compelled, through the necessity of providing their bodies with
nourishment, to gain access to some
machine.
The owner notes their condition and
suggests a smaller percentage of the
product of their labor as wages. Necessity compels acceptance and the
workers already employed are discharged to make way for those whom
necessity has compelled to accept a
fmailer percentage of their product.
This process continues until the weaker and less competent workers finally
find themselves unable to secure employment of any description, use alcoholic stimulants to give them courage to bear their miseries, and ultimately wind up in the dock of a police-
court charged with "vagrancy," meaning "loose, Idle, disorderly person,
without visible means of support and
being' unable to give a satisfactory
account of themselves." For this
offence?" for which, In a majority of
Instances, they are In no way respon
Bible, the representative of the class
which owns the machine, calmly
orders an Incarceration of three
months, this being intended as a warn
Ing to keep at work, regardless of
the conditions the machine owner may
dictate.
The effect of ownership on the workers has been shown. The next question that suggests Itself Is, how Is
the ownership held by the few against
the many? Strangely enough, the
machine again becomes a factor. The
owners of the Industrial machines,
realizing how well the workers are
enslaved by the machines ot Industry,
apply the same principle In the organization of a machine for political
purposes; for In political supremacy
lies the ownership of the "machinery
of State," and In the State Is vested.
In the last analysis, the ownership of
the common property of the nation.
Their progeny are educated as lawyers—to write the laws—preachers—
to Inculcate the doctrine of humility
and soldiers to enforce both humility
and law at the point of a bayonet, fixed on the business end of a Ross rifle.
The lawyers, preachers, merchants
and owners of machinery have a common interest, but In order to fool the
workers, they organize not one, but
two political machines, each fighting
the other for supremacy on such vital
Issues as "Reciprocity," "More Railways," "White Canada," one side
wrapping Its candidates with the national trade mark and Insisting that
the other Is trying to surrender the
country to some foreign power. The
workers are greatly enthused by a
few cheap cigars and drinks and gladly take sides on these Important questions, on election day being allowed
to unhitch the horses from the carriage of the winning candidate and
to draw It through the streets, while
the machine owners, knowing that
one side or the other must win, and
it made no difference to them which,
sit In the club and laugh merrily at
the way In which the workers are beguiled by a sham battle. In the ranks
of the workers themselves, the owners
find a number of Judas Iscarlots, who,
for a number of pieces of silver, often
less than thirty, are willing to assist
In decoying unwary workers to the
support of one or the other of the
political machines organized by the
owners, for the perpetuating of their
ownership of the machines of industry.
There is no fault to be found with
their methods, l'hey appreciate the
fact that by ownership,.and ownership
alone, can they expect to become more
wealthy while the workers become
more poverty stricken and to maintain their position, they scruple at
nothing.
How better can the situation be reversed than by following the example
and precedents already established?
The workers have the numerical
strength. All they now require Is a
machine to unify their efforts and
throw the load from off their backs.
Let us get the machlnel
With the Increase In the number
of unemployed throughout Western
Canada private'employment agencies
(human auction marts) are dally Increasing In number and doing a flourishing business. Even the dally press
at Calgary complains of the raw deals
some of these labor-skinning sharks
pull off. In Vancouver a free civic
labor bureau has been started, but
scores of private dumps are still per
mitted to ply their nefarious Bchemes
to take the last dollar from hungry
Job-seekers. In Portland the city is
serving soup to the unemployed; while
every city on the Pacific coast Is teeming with Idle men, and women too;
the utter, In many cases, worse than
Idle. The Jails- are overrun with
"criminals," aa a result of the necessity ot hungry slaves Beeking a master.
And this 'mid the "prosperity" one
reads so n.uch about in the dally
pressI
No stronger proof of the uncertainty
of employment prevailing in Western
Canada could be found than the federal statistics, showing a much larger
male population than female. Local
papera have been prone to Intimate
to the unweds of the Old Country,
that, as a consequence, this Is a land
of promise. The fact, however, that
some 40,000 of the male population In
British Columbia Is made up of Chinese,
Japanese and Hindus, not to mention
thousands of Italians and other "foreigners" Is carefully concealed. The
employing class ot Western Canada
for years has been setting up a hue
and cry for labor, cheap labor; free
labor, free of property or family ties.
This because, being "free," the slaves
can work the cheaper for the coupon-
clippers. That this province Is not
one of homes, the foundation of any
community or country, 1b no fault of
the workers of Canada.. Nor are the
Jobless and propertyless workers to
blame for the red light and saloon districts so prevalent throughout BritiBh
Columbia. Relatively the wage has
been reduced to a figure which almost
prohibits any but the reckless daring
to assume the responsibilities of home-
making. Instead, the filthy bunk-
home and cheap rooming-houses and
restaurants thrive. Yet there are
press apologists and hypocritical reformers who bray about workers who
"will destroy the home!" If the latter
are figuring on the Job they'll have
to hurry, or old capitalism will beat
them to It.
DO YOU KNOW.
THAT the way to win respect Is to
win out
THAT the labor movement is no
place for old maids or men who are
easily peeved.
THAT Nelson, B. C, has a civic
13.20 minimum wage, with an eight-
hour day.
THAT if your union Is not already
affiliated with the B. C. Federation of
Labor you are likely to be lonesome
about the 32nd Inst. The convention
will be a pea-warmer.
THAT no number or kind of employment bureaus can create more
Jobs than there are Jobless.
THAT all evils spring from working men allowing themselves to be
classified as a "labor market."
THAT a demand for the Union
Label gets one Into the habit of remembering the advantages obtained
from a union card. '
THAT union dues are the best
"policies" one can pay. They return
"benefits" In the sweet now and now.
It lengthens the meal ticket and shortens the hours of labor for the boss.
THAT too many men only think
they think; getting most of their opinions from what the press or some
other fellow said.
THAT there Is more than likely to
be a general election in this.province
this year; after a redistribution measure has been enacted.
THAT every wage-worker in Vancouver should cast a vote for H. C.
Benson for school trustee on Jan 12.
THAT political unity is drawing
nearer every day In British Columbia,
among the members of organized
labor.
THAT it Is a pretty safe rule to find
out what the employers legislatively
want, thr" vote against It.
THAT "nee tins demonstrated
that unions thrive the best where
fought the bitterest. Los Angeles, for
Instance.
THAT the sudden-rich and other up
starts of the snobocracy of Vancou
ver are the worst enemies of organized labor.
THAT with the advent of the occupancy of the new Labor Temple next
month a new era In the local labor
movement Is assured.
THAT the Civic Employees are going to get a (3 a day minimum wage
this year, with a 44-hour week; thanks
to the efforts of the central labor body.
THAT the success of "single tax"
Is now assured; F. C. Wade has de-
rlarcd himself opposed to It.
THAT It makes little difference to
wage-workers who pays the taxes in
at the city hall; the workers in the
first Instance pay It all.
■UM.OINED PARAGRAPH*,
God moves 1» a mysterious way
Hla wonders- to perform;  '
He plants His footsteps In the sea,
And rides upon the storm.
His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.
—Cowper.
When you desire to make a purchase go to a merchant who Is the
friend ot organized labor. It costB
you no more than at the labor-hating
stores. Read the advertisements In
The British Columbia Federatlonist,
and tell the merchant you saw his advertisement In this newspaper.
Uttle do parents think of the consequences that follow a practice that
has become quite common—that of
permitting their glrlB to work for
pocket money. They do not think ot
the many poor girls who are. com.
pelled to work to live, and that the
other girl who works merely to "have
something to do" and to "have something to spend" sets the wage scale-
sets a scale of wageB that will not
permit the other girl—the girt who
must work—to secure a proper wage.
In many occupations there are many
young ladles working who are not
compelled to do bo—girls who are
willing to work for a very low wage.
By their side are other girls, working
for the same wage, compelled to do
so. What'the results at* Is too well
known to require attention here.
"A social system that breeds millionaires, that conceives monopolies
and hatches trusts. A system, that
spawns paupers, degrades manhood,
and debauches womanhood. A. system
that puts a premium upon bribery;
graft and cruelty. 'This Is, a coldblooded business proposition' Is. a
common expression among business
men. It Is the warning hlsa of the
viper—the rattle of the snake. This
system Is unscientific—It la based
upon the old assumption that there Is
not enough to go around, not enough
for all."
"Find out what the coal operators
want you to do and then don't do It,"
Is the slogan of the Coal Digger, a
new weekly published In Wllkeson,
Wash., 'tor tue coal miners of the
State of Washington.' The fact that
It Is published for miners makes It
almost unnecessary to comment upon
Its up-to-date, progressive policy;
papers without those qualities usually
not lasting long with members of the
United Mine Workers. Welcome, Coal
Digger. May your message to the
workers always be from the shoulder
and your life long and vigorous In the
interests of the one useful class In
human society.
"The results of the work and labor
of the millions of men and women
who have lived during the past fifty
years are today accumulated and entirely owned by a select Bet of men-
men without titles of royalty, men who
are not owners by 'divine right,' men
without 'blue blood,' men who have
merely taken possession of the political and Industrial powers, men with
the special animal characteristics ot
the fox, the tiger and the hog, men
who have captured all the things
which every human being requires In
order to live. This accumulation of
all this twentieth century wealth and
capital by a few Is a natural outcome
of an age of machines and machinery,
an age of corporate ownership of the
vast and varied products of these
machines."
UNIONISTS 8HOULD USE
THEIR PURCHASING POWER.
The demand for the union label Is,
of course, growing every day, but the
growth Is far too slow. It Is so easy,
by this means, to put union men to
work that it Is nothing short of criminal for a union man to buy goods
without the label. Merchants kn iw
of1 this Inconsistency on the part of
trade unionists and laugh at the fellow who attempts to have them buy
goods that' bear the label by using
the argument that It will attract union
custom to them. This condition of af
fairs should be changed, and will be
if you demand the label.—'Frisco
Labor Clarion.
I
RUSSIAN ARTIST
PICTURES HORRORS
OF "0XOBY OF WAR"
"Death at the best ot times gives
us all some fear. Fate may ordain
that we are able to pass away quietly
In a comfortable room, surrounded by
sorrowing relatives, attentive nurses
and skilled physicians. Even then It
In terrorizing. This Is the terror of
the Unknown, the agony which generally precedes the final struggle between the powers of this .world and
of the next—and, taking all In all, It
Is the greatest, as It Is the final ordeal
any mortal Is called upon to perform.
"Intensify this a million times. Add
the terrors of unintentional mutilation, caused, maybe, by the passing of
a gun-carriage or the galloping of a
riderlesB horse over the prostrate body
of a wounded man. Add the long
hours of drawn-out agony, Increased by
the pangs of tormenting and unas-
suaged thirst. Add to that, again, the
thoughts passing through the mind of
the sorely-stricken victim, the thought
of home, maybe of wife and children,
maybe of remorse tor sins committed
and unconfessed.
"And this, please, Is the 'Glory of
War.' This Is the end for which
crowds cheer, bands play, and countries lose their heads and their conscience. Call It by another name and
one comes nearer to the mark.
"Call It 'Hell,' and It has been cop
rectly desl gnated."
SATURDAY.......JANUARY t, 1912
MNsJLE TAX SYSTEM
ADOPTED IN ALBIRTA
The new Municipalities Bill, Introduced by Attorney-General Mitchell,
In the Alberta legislature, now In session at Edmonton, Alta., provides for
the single tax on land values.
All persons on the assessment roll,
men or women, married or unmarried,
will have the right to vote.
In.Introducing the bill, Attorney-
General Mitchell said that the government believed that the day of the
local Improvement district was over,
and the day of a better organized
municipality had arrived. The new
bill proposed the creation of rural
municipalities composed of nine townships each. Its operation was not to
be made obligatory, but would be put
Into force upon a petition of the residents affected when the vote would
be authorised. If the vote was favorable, then an election would be held
for reeve and councillors. The population fixed as requisite for any district becoming a rural municipality
is. one person for each square mile.
Tola proposition would be open to
discussion, and might be changed.
WBm RATI ACTORS'
UNION OT AMERICA
To Organized Labor-
Greeting: As you are aware that
The White Rata Actors.' Union and
The Associated Actresses of America
are part of the American Federation
of Labor through direct affiliation,
and we have In our membership of
over 12,000 Actors and Actresses all
of the best and desirable/ acts In
Vaudeville, we wool! respectfully ask
your consideration of the foUowlng
resolution adopted by our Organization which Is of material benefit to
you and our general membership.
It has been a custom with booking
agents to enter Into contracts furnishing entertainments for a stated sum
of money, thereby giving them the
right to pay Individual acts an amount
of money which would allow the booking agent to deduct for his share in
many Instances considerable of the
appropriation, we would ask that In
your business relations with any
booking agent there shall be two con
dltlons embodied Into the contract,
Int. All acts and members thereof
phall produce on the night of the entertainment a paid up card In full
benefit of the White Rats Actors'
Union or the Associated Actresses of
America; failure to do so being sufficient cause for the prevention of said
act making its professional appear
ance.
2d. That the said booking agent
shall furnish to the entertainment
committee a list of the acts engatred
to appear on the night of the entertainment with salaries attached thereto which salaries shall be paid direct
to the acts who shall appear.
You will realize by these two requests that we desire to have none
hut UNION Acts nppear and secondly
to protect you In such a way that It
will be an assured tact that you will
receive FULL VALUE for your ap
proprlatlon.
With the hope that yon will Insist
In the enforcement of these two provisions in your contract, we are,
White Rats Actors' Union
Associated Actresses of America.
NOT SUFFICIENT PUBLICITY
8AY8 PRES. JAMES M. LYNCH
James M. Lynch, president of the
International Typographical Union
Bays that the public at large Is not
familiar with trade unions as they
are conducted. Few, If any, trade
unions avail themselves of the avenues
of publicity that are open to them to
place their benefits before the people,
and thus the public Is left to absorb
such unfavorable Impressions of the
trade unions as are printed in the
daily newspapers, and in other publications that are friendly to capital,
and, generally speaking, that are either
openly or secretly opposed to the Interests of labor.
WHAT WORKINQMEN WANT; AS
8EEN BY REV. PERCY S. GRANT
"Industrial conditions do not reproduce a brotherly relationship. The
employer and employee do not acknowledge identity ot Interest. They
treat each other on the whole as enemies. Labor Is a 'commodity' to be
purchased by employers. How can
you expect loyalty from a commodity?
If one listens for any length of time
to worklngmen discussing these matters he discovers that the way out of
the difficulty Is not an 'Insoluble conundrum,' but Is a simple and logical
step. It Is nothing less than an application of self-government to Industry."
B. C. Has One Lone Eleglble.
The International Association of
Factory Inspectors will hold Its next
annual convention In Washington, D.
C, according to Information given out
In that city by the chamber of commerce. No date has been selected as
yet.
PERTURBATIVE PHILOSOPHY.
(By William D. Haywood.)
A shorter day means bigger pav.
An officer of the law is a walking
delegate of Capitalism.
The pick, the shovel and the hammer are mightier than the pen, the
sword and the cross.
The dear "Public" is a mysterious
element in society, neither fish, flesh
nor fowl, laborers nor capitalists.
Every demand of the workers In the
Bhop Is an effort to twist the owner
ship of the tool out of the hands of
tie boss.
Reciprocity: A contract wherein
the capitalists of two nations shake
hands and agree upon a mutual system for robbing.the producers.
Rags make paper. Paper makes
money; money makes banks; banks
make loans; loans make Interest; Interest makes poverty and poverty
makes rags.
The workers being Interdependent,
they should organize aa the capitalists have assembled them in the Industries. Today the workers are
divided according to position, name or
shape of the machinery they use.
When you face an injunction and
do not know how to win—take out
the J, that stands for Jails and Judges;
the c that means courts and cruelty;
the t that stands for trials and tragedies, and the answer will be found
In the letters that remain—IN UNION.
JAPANESE AND TELEPHONES.
The report of the Imperial Japanese
government on telephone business
shows that In 1910 It had 2233 stations
and offices, with 126,720 subscribers,
compared with tour years ago, when
they had 334 stations and 42,266 subscribers.
Material Determination.
Little Tommle had been sent to
church. His mother gave him a penny
to put In the plate and a penny to buy
sweets With.
As he was looking at the sweets In
a window he accidentally dropped one
of the pennies down the grating.
"There goes the penny for the collection," he said.
Telephone Rate Comparisons.
Winnipeg rates for telephone service are 14 for business phones; $1.60
per month for residential phones. Government ownership system. Vancouver: Business phones, $5 per month
(less population); residence phones,
from $2.50 to $3.50 per month; and
$1 more if hot paid in advance by the
18th of each month. Corporate ownership.
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT
Mulcahy's
Cafeteria
THE BEST Of
EVERYTHING
Moderate Prices
137 Cordova Street W.
Basement Hotel Cordova
Opp. Labor Hall
BUSTING THE
TRUSTS
—is no concern of the union man. How he can use
the Trust is muoh more to the point, f The advantages that accrue to the big concern come freely in
the natural course of business. The same advantages
can express themselves only in two ways—lower prices
or higher profits and competition decides on low prices.
11 Low prices rule at Spencer s. You can buy almost
any article here, and buy it at a lower price than you
can elsewhere —Groceries, Meat, Drygoods, Wearing
Apparel, Furniture—everything wanted in everyday
life—You can save money here. II On one principle
and one alone you should buy your commodities here,
IT'S TO YOUR INTEREST
David Spencer. Ltd.
vixoouvn, b. o.
TRADES UNION DIRECTORY
11 Secretaries are requested to notify manager of ohange of officers,
UNION   CARDS    INSERTED    FOR   60c    PER   ISSUE.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL FED-
e.atlon of Labor—Meeti In annua! convention in January of each year, Biecutlve
officer.,, 1911-12; President, J. C. Waiters,
6B7 Rithet street, Victoria; first Vice-
president, J. Wm. Wilkinson, Box 119b,
Vancouver; second vice-president, B, A.
titonuy. Bos 965, New Westminster; third
vice-president, Christian Siverti, 1276 Den-
man street, 'Victoria: fourth vice-president,
Jas, H. McVety, 1744 Broadway west, Vancouver; general secretary, R, Parm Pettl-
p-iece, 2349 St, Catherines street, Vancouver; secretary-treasurer. Victor R. Mldgley,
Box 1195 Vancouver; delegate to Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada, J. C.
Waiter*; fraternal delegate to Washington
State Federation of Labor, R, Parm Pettlplece,
\rANCOUVBR TRAD£3 AND LABOR
Council—Meet! first and third Thursday, Labor hall, 112 Cordova street west,
(Upstairs.) President, J. W. Wilkinson;
vice-president,' & Kernlghan: general secretary R. Parm, Pettipiece. 8349 St. Catherines] street; phone Fairmont 426; secretary-treasurer, Jas. Campbell, 1994 Fourth
avenue west, phone Bayvlew 953R; statistician, Mrs, Rom L, Gardiner; sergeant-at-
arins, Fred A. Hoover; trustees, John McMillan. James H. McVety, Victor R. Mldgley.
BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL— MEETS
every Friday In Labor Hall, 112 Cordova street west. Preildant, Jas, H, McVety; vice-president. J. Kavanagh; record-
ing secretary, John McMillan, Labor
Hall; financial secretary and treasurer,
\V. M. Herforth, 2138 Main street; business
aueiu, John McMNan, Labor Hall. Phone
deymour 1380; office hours, 8 to 9, 12 to
1, and 4:30 to 5:30.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
of Vancouver—Meet* second Monday in
the month In Labor Hall. President, B.
Jarman, Pressmen's Union, 923 Hornby
street; vice-president, George Mowat, Bookbinders' Union, 515 Dunlevy avenue; gecre-
Ifiry, A, H. England, Typographical Union,
567 Hornby street,  P.  O.  Box 66.
U .SITED   BROTHERHOOD   OF  CARPEN-
tera   and    Joiners,   Local   No.    617.—
Moots every Wednesday evening in Labor
Has:, 112 Cordova street welt at 7:30 p.m.
lixet'iitive committee meets every Tuesday
evening 8 p.m. President, Murdo McKen-
ile; recording secretary, Geo. C. Lesley;
liiianiisl secretary, l. H. Burnham; treasurer. J. W. Schurman; business agent,
  Phone   Seymour  1380,
Meets In Labor Hall second and fourth
Thursdays at 7:15 p.m, President, Robert
Thomson; vice-president, John Hamilton;
recording secretary, John A, Mclver; financial secretary, Jaa H, McVety, 1744 Broad-
way  west.   Phono Seymour 1146L.
A MALQAMATED ASSOCIATION OF
■*lStreet and Electric Railway Employees
of America, Pioneer Division No. 101—Meet!
in Oddfellows' Hall, Mt. Pleasant, second
and fourth Wednesdays at 2:45 p.m. and
first 'and third Wednesdays at 8 p.m. President James Fletcher; vice-president, H.
Hanklns; recording secretary, A, W. Lofting. Box 178, City Heights p. O. Financial
secretary Fred A. Hoover, 2409 Clark drive.
tUOAIt MAKERS' INTERNATIONAL
> Union of America, Local No. 357—
Moots In Labor Hal] on the first Tuesday
In each month at 8 p.m. President Jos
Tailllfer; vice-president, D. A. McMillan;
•ecretary, J. C. Peuser, Mainland Cigar
Factory, 112 Cordova street west; lab*.
custodian and treasurer, a. W. Johnson;
delegates to Trades and Labor Council, J,
0. Peltier,  George Wood, Jas. Tallifer.
BARTENDERS' 1 N T BLR N A TIONAL
League, No. 676—Meets Bartendei„
Hall, 34 Cordova street west (upstairs),
tint and third Sundays of each month at
2:30 p.m. President, Geo. W. Curnock;
vice-president, Andrew McDonald; financial
secretary, John A, Fraser. Box 424, Tel.
Seymour 9156.
JOURNEYMEN BARBERS' UNION OF
America Vancouver Local No. 120—
Meats first and third Wednesdays In Labor
Hal! at 8:30 p.m. President, C, H, Herrltt;
vice-president, J. W. Green; recording secretary, Geo. W. Isaacs; secretary-business
"Rent. C. F. Burkhart, 439 Abbott streot.
Phone  Seymour  2170.
JOURNEYMEN   BAKERS   AND  CONFEC-
tioners'   International  Union of America. Local No. 46.—Meets in Room 4, Labor
Hall,  every second and fourth Saturday at
7:30 p.m.   President,   MeCurrach;  vice-president J. Hendricks; treasurer H. Leaworthy;
secretary and business isr-*   "   ..........—
Phone 1380, Labor Hall.
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF
Electrical Workers Local Union No.
621 (Inside Men)—Meets In Bartenders'
Uai:, 34 Cordova street west, second and
fourth Wednesdays at 8 p.m, President J,
Montgomery; vice-president F. Duff; recording sec.etary, J. H. Carney, Empress
Hotel; financial secretary, F. Woods;
Treasurer, W. Jarvls; business agent, F
Esflnghausen,
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF
Electrical Workers, Local No. 813—
Meets every Monday evening at 8 p.m. In
uartehders' Hall, 34 Cordova atreet west
President. B, T. Fenton; vice-president, H.
E. Dura nt; recording secretary, D. V. Baker.
Van Deoar Hotel; financial secretary and
uiiBiiiuus agent, G, H, Hessel, 244 Hast
It gs street  east.
JOURN E YMBN STONECUTTERS OF
No.tli America, Vancouver .Branch-
Meets in Labor Hall second and fourth
TutSi.aya at 8 p.m. Preildant, .Fred
Humble: vice-president, Henry Hague; corresponding secretary, James Rayburn; financial secretary, Win. Jardine; treasurer,
P.  Talnah,
A MALQAMATED SOCIETY OP CAR-
^»- pentera and Joiners; Vancouver District— Business agents, j. w. Wilkinson and
J. A. Key; office houra at Labor Hall. 8
to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.; phone Seymour
1380.
BRANCH NO. 1.—MEETS ALTERNATE
Tuesdays at 8 p.m. In Labor Hall.
President, Mr. Wright; secretary, H. Carter,
Box 991. '
BRANCH NO. 2—MBETs SECOND AND
fourth Wednesdayi In Orange Hall,
Hastings and Gore avenue at 8 p.m. President, W. Hanson; secretary, D. Mitchell,
South   Hill,   B.   C.
BRANCH NO. 3—MEETS ALTERNATE
Mondays at 8 p.m. In lodge room,
2233 Granville street south, at 8 p.m. President; J. Tlt:ey; secretary, J. Fowler, 833
Pacific  street.
BRANOH NO. 4—MEETS FIRST AND
third Thursdays In Room 4, Labor
Hall st 8 p,m. President a, Lambirton
(Factory Workers); secretary, J. Thomp/
■on.  149 Tenth avenue aait.
BRANCH NO. 6.—MEETS ALTERNATE
Mondayi In Orange HaU at 8 p.m,
President Wm. A. Wast; secretary, A. Me-
l>aren, 1033 Richards street.
pBNTRAL PARK BRANCH MBETS AL-
\J ternate Fridays dn Arglcuttural Hall,
Central Park at B p.m. President, G. Man-
son; secretary, J. Anderson, Jr. Box 223
Central  Park, B,  C
SOUTH VANCOUVER BRANCH MEETS
In South Hill school house. South Vancouver, second and fourth Fridays <at B
p.m. President, H. Rayner; secretary R.
W,  Jackson,  South Vancouver,  B.  C
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS' INTER-
national Union, No. 1—Meets . every
Tuesday, 8 p.m„ O'Brien's Hall, comer
Homer and Hastings streets. President
John O. Smith; vlce-pr«lldent, J. J. Welsh;
corresponding secretary, W. S. Dagnall,
Box 53; financial secretary, F. R. Brown.
Business agent, W. S. Dagnall, 108 Hasting!
street  east;   phone  Seymour 8799.
WOOD. WIRE AND METAL LATHERS'
International Union Local No. 207—
Meets In Bartenders' Hall, every Friday
evening at 8 p.m. President T. Anderson;
secretary and business agent, Victor R,
Mldgley. P. o. Box 1195, or Labor Hall.
Phone Seymour 1380.,
VANCOUVER TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION
No. 226—Meets In Labor Hall last
Sunday of each month at 2:30 p.m, President, H. c. Benson; vice-president W. R>
Trotter; lecretary-treaiurer, R. H. Neelands, P, o. Box 66; lergeant-at-arms, N.
Williams; executive committee, president,
vice-president, secretary-treasurer, T, Harold, w. Taylor. B, H. Gough, T. Kean. Delegates to A'lled Trades Council, Burns,
Neelands, England, Delegate! to Trades
and Labor Council: H, C. Benson, R. P.
Pettipiece. w. R. Trotter. A. H. England,
Lionel Ward.  A.  R. Burns, 	
B
HAVER   LODGE    NO,   182,   INTERNA-
tlonal    Association      of    Machinists—
AMALGAMATED SHEET METAL
Metal Workers' International Alliance.
Local No. 280.—Meets every Thursday 7:30
p.m. at 112 Cordova street west, Room 4.
President, A. J. Crawford; vlce-preildent,
H. Spear; recording and corresponding secretary, Jas, Jamieson. 921 Drake street
Financial secretary, * E. A. Bdworthy, 112
Cordova straet west. James Muds, treasurer; business agent, J. Peters, Labor Hall.
PAINTERS, PAPERHANGBRS AND
Decorators' Union, Local No, 138—
Meets In Bartenders' Hall, 34 Cordova
street west, every Thursday evening 7:30
p.m. President, Duncan Campbell; vice-
president, J. Bradley; recording secretary,
W. H. Lawrence, 1310 Seymour street;- financial secretary, F. J. Harris, 1328 Pender
street west; treasurer. B. Staples; Agent,
R,   Matheson.  Phone Seymour 9106,
INTERNATIONAL HOD CARRIERS' AND
Building Laborers' Local No. 230.—
Meets alternate Tuesdays at 8 p.m. In Labor
Hall. President, Sid, Fern; vice-president,
J. Hatmltt; recording-secretary J, Phillips;
business agent, G. Morrison, Labor Hall.
Phone Seymour 1380.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS' UNION OF
America, Vancouver Branch No. 178—
Meetings held on the first Friday In each
month at O'Brien's HaU, corner Hastings
and Homer streets, 8 p.m. President H.
Nordland; vice-president, A Larsen; secretary, W. W. Hocken, 1582 Thirteenth
avenue east. P. O. Box 503; financial secretary, L. Wakley, Box 503.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE COM-
pany, Ltd.—Directors, Fred A. Hoover,
Chaa. stowe, s. Thompson, jas. H. McVety, James Brown, BJward Lothian, James
Campbell. J. W. Wilkinson, R. p. pettlplece, John McMillan and Murdock Mc-
Kenzie. Officers: President, Jas. Brown;
vice-president, John McMillan; secretary
and managing director, Jas. H, McVety.
Labor' Hall, phone Seymour 1380, residence
1744 Broadway west, phone Bayvlew 114L;
treasurer, Jan. Campbell, residence 1994
Fourth avenue  west.  Phono Bayvlew 953R.
GROCERIES
The high oast of living is reduced to the minimum if you
buy your groceries from
SCOTT BROS.
Cor. Burns and Broadway E.
Free Delivery     Phone Fair. 420
PRINTING
THATS OUR BUSINESS
COWAN flc BROOKHOUSE
Phone Seymour 4490 420 Hastings W
BOYS' DEPARTMENT
CJTTTTQ We are proud of our boys' clothing business, and proud
O U 1 1 O ^ ^jdet that we have built it up by selling boyi' clothing as it ought to be to gain the favor of our customers, who consider the
quality of material and workmanship, where you can and cannot see it.
Union Label Overalls, Hats, Etc
CLUBB 8l STEWART
PHONB SEYMOUR 702
309-816 HASTINGS ST. W. I)v ■."■■>
'!;u...>n".im..ipiyigjii,sy|i
SATURDAY, JANUARV 6th, 1012.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDEBATIONIB1
PAQETHSEt
ftntban Bsgrial*. Ettnttri.
575 Gamrffc Sfreef
WonienT5 & Children's Knit Underwear
AT LESS THAN USUAL PRICES
35c GARMENTS 25c—Women's white fleece-lined cotton vesta,
in high neck and long sleeve styles, with drawers to match,
50c'GARMENTS 35c—Women's wool and cotton vests, made
with high neck and long sleeves, drawers ankle length to match.
$1.00 VESTS SOc^Women's wool, and cotton vests in high neck
and long sleeve stylet; fine quality and well finished.
$1.75 GARMENTS 85c-Women s Silk and wool vests in high
neck and long-sleeve styles, with drawers ankle length to match
CHILDREN'S VESTS of fleece lined cotton, in high neck and
long-ileeve style; open or dosed fronts; drawers in ankle length
to match; regular 35c and 40c values for 25c a garment.
tenon flrpimfc, Himifro
Vancouver, B. C.
#rnlmtttt
THEATRE
The Home of High-Class
VAUDEVILLE
Where Everybody Goes
Fred Petty
MERCHANT
TAILOR
UAS moved from
" 835 Pender St
10,518 Hornby St.
a few doors from
Pender, Before you
order a suit come in
and look over our
stock. Use the label
REMEMBER THE ADDRESS
518 HORNBY STREET
VANCOUVER UNIONISTS
New Labor
TEMPLE
Njw^jean^_G»nnjenon
For   Shares . or   Meeting
Rooms,   Write or Phone
Jas. H. McVety
Managing Director
112 Cordova Street West
Phone Sey. 1380 Res. Sey. 1146L
We Invite You to attend our
Clean Sweep
Sale
Bargains in Every
Department
The DesBrisay Wardrobe
IK Granville It
A GOOD PLACE TO EAT
Butte Grill
•'HOUSE OF QUALITY"
131  HASTINGS STREET.W.
QQ WITH
THE
BUNCH
TO THE
BRUNSWICK
POOL ROOMS
President
Suspenders
are the most comfortable suspenders because the principle
at their back adjusts itself to
every bend of the body. Every
pair guaranteed. Look for
"President" ou the buckles. Trimming* cannot ru*t. Made heavy or
light, wide or narrow.
Pric* 50c.
•MOKI
TUCKETT'S T. & B.
CIGARETTES
UNION MADE
MINERS'
MAGAZINE
Official Organ of the Western
Federation of Miners
Subscription $1 Per Year
Miners' Magazine SOS Railros#»
Bldg., Denver, Colorado
Padmore's Big Cigar Store, 642 Granville Street
Macdonald, Marpole Company, Ltd.
COAL
HEAD OFFICE:   427 SEYMOUR STREET
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE:  SEYMOUR 210
TWBNTY-FIVE YEARS
OF B. 0. MOVEMENT
The Struggles of B. C. Workers
In Various Forms for Past
Quarter of a Century.
(With thlilsaue The Federation!* continues the publication of a eeriee of artiolef complied by an old-timer In the orsanlaed labor
movement from authoritative aourcei, covering the hletorr of the local labor movement for the pait twenty-five yaara. That
the- review will be appreciated by even
thoae who are buay "making hietory" lb
these etlrrlng day"—daya worth living—!■
certain).—Ed.   Federatlonllt.
ARTICLE III.
The Chinese Camp Aattacked.
On arriving at the Chinese Camp
(night of February 24, 1887), which
was about a mile weBt of Granville
Btreet, past the C. P. R. grade, the
crowd Immediately surrounded the
shanties, and, amidst howls and yells,
commenced the work of seising the
Chinamen.
A number of the Celestials, however, got away In spite of their efforts
to surround them. Those who were
caught were ordered to pack up and
leave, In which task they were assisted in no gentle manner.
Immediately afterwards, when the
the work of demolishing their camp
began, the shanties were pulled to the
ground, their boxes and outfits smashed, and their bedding thrown Into the
8. Shortly after the main part of
the work was over, and the raiders
were about to escort the Chinamen
from the scene Of their Intended
labors, the whistle of Chief of Police
Stewart, and he and Supt. Roycroft
arrived and ordered the Chinamen
back to a roofless shed, under which
a few of them had been encamped.
They at first demurred, but on the
assurance of the chief that no harm
would reach them, they- complied.
Chief Stewart then Commanded all
present In the Queen's name to return
peacefully to their homes, but no attention was paid to the order.
Supt. Roycroft and Chief Stewart
then took up their positions, beside the
fire, standing in front of the terror-
stricken Chinamen, facing the crowd
in a defiant and determined manner.
By the gallant front and unwavering
pluck shown by them they held the
whole at bay.
On seeing the new turn affairs had
taken, and that now It would be the
law they had to face, the crowd decided to climb up from beneath the
bluff, when a short meeting was held.
After a good deal ot talking someone
In the gathering called at In a loud
voice: "Who says the Chinks must
go?" "All In favor say 'Aye!'" cried
another. From over 300 throats the
answer came as one voice, and tremendous "Aye" rent the air, the
echoes of which reached the mountains across the Inlet and reverberated back again.
A hush fell on the midnight bivouac
tor a few moments, and again a voice
rang out: "Who says the police must
go?" Again "Aye" was shouted, but
this time the response was not quite
so strong: "Come oh and drive them
but." A general move was made down
the bluff again but the people on getting close to the shed, gradually weakened and finally came to a stop, evidently not wishing to attack the law
in person, but the spirit and temper
Inclined that way. A leader was lacking. Had there been one at this Juncture valuable lives would have been
sacrificed.
Nothing more was done by the
crowd further than to throw snow in
the fire or at the Chinamen, and every
now and then giving vent to a cheer.
Eventually the people left the spot
in groups of half a dozen or bo, and
returned to the city during the wee
sma' 'oors. During the first part of
the scare the majority of the Chinese
made their escape to the bush, but a
few took to the water, where they remained for some time, and when
taken out were almost dead from exposure to the frosty air and chilling
water. Of the twenty-four Chinamen
who had arrived, only sixteen turned
up after the affair was over.
Water and Cordova streets were in
a state of excitement till daylight,
the few bar-rooms being well patronized by workmen as well as business
men, who were deeply concerned In
the anti-Chinese movement.
A Memorable Night.
An eye witness of that night's memorable proceedings furnished the following to the writer:
"It was a weird scene to those
standing on the bluff and looking
down at the shed, Inside of which were
burning the bundles of clothing and
bedding which' were thrown down the
hill from time to time whenever the
fire grew dim and appeared to require
replenishing. Round the blaze were
standing the Chinese, chattering
away In their strange lingo, and engaged the while in drying their
clothes and blankets, which In their
hurry to escape, they had carried off
over the snow to the water's edge. At
Intervals no sound was heard but the
crackling of burning wood, the flames
from which were quite brilliant and
the smoke from the surrounding fires
dense, the whole making a spectacle
not to be forgotten In the annals of
the province."
Another Outbreak,
About midnight, when things were
lively down near Coal Harbor, two
other Incendiary outbreaks occurred.
One was at the southern end of Car-
rail street, near the Royal City MHIb—
a "shack," occupied by some Chinese.
This was quickly put out, however,
by the bucket brigade from the mill,
which was In grave danger of catching fire.
In an adjoining Chinese cabin were
found two or three beds on fire.   Both
cabins were deserted, the occupants
having fled never to return.
Leaving Fast,
Had not the Dominion election returns attracted so much attention at
the time, the anti-Chinese movement
would undoubtedly have assumed
larger proportions, but nevertheless
It was the question of the hour.
Next day (February 25th, 1887) the
Chinese living on False Creek, some
86 all told, were notified to leave at
once. They packed up their traps and
left by the old Westminster road. The
whole of the Chinese on the Brig-
house estate, raided the previous
night, also left camp for New Westminster, where there was a thriving
Mongrel colony.
It may be here mentioned that the
Chinese were now leaving fast, and
everything became quiet again, when
it was announced that
Arrests of Rioters
would be made. On the 26th of February, John Frauley, logger; Thos.
Oreer, milkman, and Ole Charlton,
clerk, were placed behind the bars In
the old Powell street lockup, John
Clough being their guardian. But they
did not stay there very long. Excitement was rekindled and went high.
Messrs. Wm. Harklns and Ed. Cook APPRECIATION OF
went hall for Frauley.
Messrs. Wm. Harklns and M. A.
MacLean for Oreer.
. And Messrs. Harry Jonea and Geo.
Barnes for Charlton.
At the trial, H. O. Hall of-Victoria
prosecuted, who was appointed by the
government. And the Knights of
Labor engaged Messrs. J. J, Blake, E.
C. Gouldlng and A E. Beck, who appeared for the defendants. After several adjournments and -witnesses,
who were available by the score, were
heard from, the accused wore honorably dismissed,
(To be continued.)
A NEW LABOR PAPER
AT WJXKEBON, WASH.
The Coal Digger Will Champion Cause
of Miners in Neighboring State.
No. 1, Vol. I., St The Coal Digger,
a seven-column four-page weekly, published at Wllkeson, Wash., by Arthur
Jensen, Is the latest labor.paper exchange to reach The Federatlonist.
The salutatory, among other things,
pointedly says:
"A social problem 1b crying out' for
solution in our present age. It la
sometimes called the labor problem.
"A class struggle Is going on. A
struggle between the employed and
the employing classes. The struggle
Is over the division of the products of
Labor,
"The struggle will continue as long
as Labor permits anyone partaking in
the products of Labor's toll, except
Labor Itself.
"Labor tries to gain more and more
of Its own products. To accomplish
this organizations called labor unions
are formed,     -v
'Two methods are generally employ,
ed In getting more of the good things
of life, either by getting shorter hours
or more wages.
"• '• '• What Is It that Is working against us receiving a larger share
of our products? The answer Is: The
army of the unemployed.
"Unemployment was a new problem
that faced the world when the first
labor-saving machine was Invented,
displacing men who had been doing
the work by hand.
"Highly Improved machinery has aggravated this problem until It Is the
ever-present question today in every
civilized country.
"Movements for a shorter workday
have tried to remedy this condition.
Our friends, the employing class,
have always resisted any attempt to
gain Shorter hours. Shorter hours
would, as a rule, mean a tew more
men employed. That would mean a
smaller number In the unemployed
ranks. And the conditions of workmen in any given Industry are generally determined by the number of men
hunting Jobs.
'Then the solution of the Labor
problem appears to be the shortening
of the hours of labor sufficiently to
give places to all the unemployed In
the production of the things we want
In life."
STARVING INDIA KNEELS;
CROWNS KING GEORGE
Amid scenes of barbaric pomp and
magnificence, unequaled In the history ot India, In the great arena where
Queen Victoria was proclaimed empress by Viceroy Lord LyttOn in 1877,
and where King Edward was proclaimed by Viceroy Lord Curzon in
1903, King George the Fifth—the first
reigning English sovereign to visit
the far east—announced his own succession to the Imperial throne.
The fact that every week more than
6,000 natives are dying from plague,
that hundreds of thousands are on
the verge of starvation, and that the
spirit of sedition abroad in the land
Is repressed only by England's strong
display of force, was apparently forgotten for the moment
The Oriental setting, the glitter of
the royal crowns, the gorgeous robes
and Jewels of the Indian princes, the
thousands of brilliantly uniformed and
superbly disciplined troops, and the
varlclad host of people of hundreds of
races and creeds, combined to make a
series of tableaux of surpassing splendor.
King George *as forty-two automobiles with him In India. Many ot them
contain gold fittings.
The twenty-four silver trumpets
used to herald the king's proclamation cost the English people $2,400.
Sixty miles of railroads had to be
laid for the durbar, at a cost of 1500,-
000.   '
More than 200,000,000 native Indians heard the king's proclamation
read In all parts of the empire.
More than $250,000 worth of fireworks was burned In India in one
night.
Four thousand musicians furnished
the music for the durbar.
George and Mary were acclaimed
on the site of the bloodiest encounter
of the mutiny of 1857.
The priceless Kohlnoor diamond In
Mary's crown was worn by India's
rulers 5,000 years ago.
THE FEDERATIONIST
AMONG UNIONISTS
Bro. Haddon Makes • Few Obter-
vationi and Renders Good
Advice to Otheri.
By the establishment of a real, live
labor paper In Vancouver, the Trades
and Labor Council have filled a long-
felt need—the need of an Impartial
and sympathetic exponent ot the
news and views of Labor, and a medium through which mutual education
and enlightenment of the workers can
be carried on.
For the paat two years this need
has been met partially, by the Wage-
Earner, and by this no disparagement
of the former official organ of the
Council Is intended. The Wage-
Earner was conducted In an able manner from the start, and the articles
It contained from time to time did
much to educate the rank and file of
organised Labor. But the fact that it
was published only once a month detracted greatly from lta value as a
newspaper; and this, together with
the fact that It was published In booklet form, caused It to be viewed more
In the light of a trade Journal than
a paper.
The Federatlonist has changed matters. Labor now Is represented by a
full-sited paper, similar In all respects
but policy to the other local organs,
and a creditable addition to the local
press. True, it Is only published fortnightly as yet, but, Judging by the
splendid Initial Issue, and the Increased else of the second one, It will
not be long ere we shall have a
weekly, or better still, a dally, labor
paper In this city. Regarded either
from a Journalistic or a typographical
point of view, The Federatlonist is the
equal of either of lta local contemporaries, .
Several ot the articles which appeared In the latest Issue must have
struck the readers as being of more
than passing Interest to the workers.
Mr. McVety's remarks regarding
the Workmen's Compensation Act are
timely, and will be read to great advantage by many. Clarence Darrow's
article on the Closed Shop, while It
has appeared elsewhere previously. Is
given a prominence such as would not
be accorded It In the everyday papers,
and, as a result. It doubtless has been
read by thousands who otherwise
would not have seen It. Therein lies
the great value of a labor paper. The
very news Items that the ordinary
press forgets to publish, or, at best,
relegates to obscure pages, are what
Labor wants printed on front pages
with bold headlines.
The controversy between Mr. McVety and Secretary Draper, of the
Dominion. Trades Congress, Is another matter which probably attracted attention, but It is questionable whether It brought forth much
approval. The advantage to be gained
by airing these personal disputes Is
not at first apparent With auch a
stupendous fight already on lta hands,
the working class cannot afford to
encourage squabbling within lta own
ranks; and even If auch squabbling
is unavoidable, is ventilation In the
public press the best way of doing
away with it?
Let us sink such petty personalities
and aim for something higher. Let
us have the best efforts of the best
men in our ranks to make our paper
something for organized labor to be
proud of. Many of our strongest men
refuse us the benefit ot their knowledge! We have our Wilkinsons, our
Bensoos, and our Mldgleys, whom we
know, and we have others In the
local labor circle, not so well known,
though none the less able, who could,
by giving us the benefit of their experience and thought, make our paper
what It should be, a paper that will Interest and educate the workers, and
be a potent factor in a great and
worthy cause. Let us hear from these
men—J. L. H.
Suggestion for B. C. E, R. Co.
"Any person climbing the electric
lleht poles or damaging the Insulators
are liable to a fatal shock and a pen- Hon Is in many plans punished by
alty of £10." dismissal.
WHAT THE ABSENCE OF
UNION   LABOR   MEANS
TO HELPLESS WORKERS
The labor policy of the Steel Corporation—which has been extended to all
the big Independent mills—Is to Inflexibly exclude the men from any
voice In the conditions of their employment. To more securely rivet
this policy of absolute control over
the lives of the men, repressive and
coercive measures have been Introduced, a spy system Is maintained and
an unrelenting censorship exercised
which forbids free speech, curtails
civic rights and stunts the growth of
citizenship, especially among the underpaid foreign element, says the International Socialist Review.
Organized labor has been entirely
driven out of every big steel mill In
the country. Not only are the men
forbidden to organize, but they are not
even permitted to appoint committees
to present any grievances they may
have. If a worker has anything to say
he Is allowed to state his case as an
Individual, but to serve on a committee of employees or to sign a poll
School Trustees Election
Your Vote and Influence Requested
for
W. E. Flumerfelt
for Re-Election for
Third Term
Chairman of School Board, 1910
President B. C. Trustees
Association
Buy Acreage Adjoining
Port Matin
Big Returns for Those Who
Get in Before Townsite
Sale
DAVID B. BOYD
6 Winch Bldg. Vancouver, B.C,
Button, Button, Who's Got the Button
If you mean the bine button, it is any Union
Bartender. Demand the BLUE BUTTON
when being served by a bartender.
Bartenders' International League 676
>A.    - Named Shoae Are rt-actuemtlr
^Si^uNiorv7 Do not buy any Shoe
no matter what its name, unless it bean a
plain and readable impression of this Stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
Do set swept say nciuelwabieaca cl Usiea Stsssp
BOOT <& SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
John F. Tobin, Pros. Chas. L. Baine, sec.-Treaa.
Get Your Money's Worth
r'tHU^O**-
ASK fOR THEM AND INSIST ON GETTING THEM
Many dealers will try to induce you to take some other brand
Why ?     For larger profits sake. .     Don't let them fool you.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LAND
FOR THE LANDLESS
MILLIONS OF ACRES OF
FERTILE SOIL OPEN TO
PRE-EMPTION
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying
Stock and Poultry
British Columbia Grants Pre-emptions of
i 60 Acres to Actual Settlers at
$t PER ACRE
TERMS: Residence on the land for at least
two yean; improvements to the extent of $2.50
per acre; payment of $40 at the end of two
years, and the balance of $160 (i.e. $120) in
3 annual instalments of $40, with interest at 6%
For Further Information Apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B. G.
e Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information
Victoria
.--
The Beer Without
a Peer
\
\
The Vancouver Breweries
Limited PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PEDERATIONIST
8ATUHDAY DECEMBER 23, 1911
SAVING
MONEY
IS LIKE FINDING IT
YOU'LL SAVE MONEY
AND  LOTS  OF IT BY
BUYING
"Ererytliing to
Eat" Here
THE   GREATEST
VALUE POSSIBLE
FOR YOUR MONEY
H.A. ED6FJT CO.
"The Store of Plenty"
ISLAND GOAL MINERS
AFFILIATE WITH B. 0.
FEDERATION OF LABOR
Delegates Will Be Present at the
Forthcoming Convention
in Victoria.
The coal miners of Vancouver Island
have not only organised, but have decided to take their place In the organized labor movement of the province.
Last week Secretary-Treasurer
Mldgley received the affiliation and per
capita tax of the Island miners to the
B. C. Federation ot Labor, along with
the advice that two delegates had been
elected to attend the second annual
convention at Victoria on the 22nd
Inst.
Never before have the Island miners
joined in a movement with the mainland unions.
The B. C. Federation of Labor Is
going to "stick."
It Is the closest federation of the
workers of this province ever accomplished.
In slightly less than two years the
officers of the Federation have sue
ceeded In securing the affiliation and
cooperation of practically every union
In British Columbia.
The B. C. P.fl F. of I,, will be heard
from.
THOUSANDS
of these books selling
Origin of species, Darwin... .20c
Eight Lectures, lngersoll....20c
Not  Guilty  Blatchford 25c
God and My Neighbor, Blatchford 20c
Man'a Place in Nature, Huxley
   20e
Education, pencer  20c
The Evolution of Man, Haeck-
gl   60c
The   Churches   and   Modern
Thought, Vivian   25c
The People's Bookstore
152 Cordova W.
MANY JOBLESS WORKERS
IN PACIFIC COAST CITIES
"Progpwrotti" Vancouver Filled
with Hundreds of Men With-
the Price of a Bed.
The "prosperity" howling fraternity
may be somewhat shocked to hear
what Dr. Underbill, Vancouver's medical health officer, bad to say last week
concerning one phase of result ot an
overstocked labor market.
Mr. Underbill said much more, but
here Is an' excerpt, as reported in the
dally press:
"There are fifty Chinamen sleeping
' In one basement not two blocks from
here. The same Is true with the Italians and the Russians and Indeed with
many white people. White men are
every night forced to go to basements
and boxcars and woodsheds to sleep,
because there Is no other place for
them (without the price). Even with
the relief officer's bed tickets they are
unable to find lodging. One man told
me today that he had held a bed ticket
nearly two weeks before he could get
a bed with It. . . ."
CROWS NEST COAL
MINERS SECURE $3.00
MINIMUM WAOE
• After Months of Strike and Priva,
tion Have Secured Nearly
All They Sought
The union miners of the Crows Nest
coal fields have succeeded In securing
a minimum wage scale of 13 per eight-
hour day, In addition to many other
working conditions asked for before
they went on strike some months ago.
The strike has been more than Justified and will result in inestimable advantage to the coal-diggers during the
life of the present agreement The operators might as well have conceded
. the demands of the men In the first
place. It would have saved a lot of
time and worry.
The minora have once more learned
that the workers get what the workers can take.   That helps some.
"Man moves In a mysterious way,
his blunders to perform."
Revolutions never do occur upon
the dates set for them.
TYPOS NOMINATE
OFFICERS AND WILL
ELECT ON JAN. 11
To Send Four Delegates to Attend
B. 0, Federation of Labor
Convention Jan. 22.
Vnncouver Typo. Union, at last Sunday's meeting, decided to send Its full
quota of delegates—four—to the com
Ing convention of the B. C. P. F. of L.,
at Victoria on the 22nd Inst. Nomination of officers and discussion of pending scale negotiations occupied the attention of the big attendance. The
membership Is now nearing the 300
mark. Election of officers will take
place by referendum on Wednesday,
Jan. 11. With Its increased membership the Typos, are now entitled to six
delegates In the central labor body.
DISTRICT NO. 28
OFFICERS IN CITY
Geo. Burt, president of the new District No. 28 of the United Mine Work
ers of America, recently organised on
Vancouver Island; Alex. Rowan, district secretary-treasurer; Geo. Pettigrew, national board member, and Paul
Consume, Italian general organiser of
the U. M. W. of A., were In Vancouver
on Thursday last.
During the day a oenference was
held with executive board members of
the B. C. Provincial Federation of Labor, for the purpose of perfecting the
affiliation of all the Vancouver Island
unions, so that delegates may be sent
to the convention at Victoria on the
22nd Inst.
Submit Demands.
A number of questions and legislative amendments to existing laws were
briefly discussed, all of which will be
placed In the hands of the executive
for consideration, along with the demands of many other unlonB throughout the province, at lta meeting commencing the 19th.
The Island miners will be well represented at the convention, which will
materially strengthen the Federation
and make possible the best exhibition
of Industrial unity ever witnessed in
British Columbia.
Big Delegations.
Advices from New Westminster, Interior mining oamps and locally make
It clear that the coming convention
will rival any other gathering of Its
kind ever held In the province.
Nearly all the local unions are electing their full quota of delegates.
Unions desiring any further information should at once get In touch
with Acting Sec.-Treas. Mldgley, who
Is lust now engaged In vlaltlng unions
on behalf of the Federation.
SE0-TREAS. SHTLLAND'S
REPORT TO CONVENTION
Recommendations Had Much to Do
with Prompt Affllation of Miners
with B. 0. P. F. of L.
". . .A matter that will require
your earnest consideration and on
which Buch locals as have been heard
from have voted almost unanimously
In the affirmative, is the question of
affiliation with the recently organised
B. C. Provincial Federation of Labor.
You have seen In the fourteen years
during which your district association
has existed, a good many striplings
jump into the arena of industrial politics, shine for a moment, and die.
Your own District, if you will remember, was originally organized almost exclusively for political purposes,
because at the time of the eight-hour
law agitation those in charge of the
fight complained bitterly about the
lack of cohesion amongst our forces,
and the great need for a central organisation that would sift and marshal
the demands and resources of the Individual locals.
I do not remember cue of these
movements that promised to fulfill Its
mission as effectively as the present
Federation of Labor does; and I think
with the large majority of our membership, but without In any way tea
turlng the personal equation, that our
affiliation wit hthe B. C. Provincial
Federation of Labor would be a benefit
not only to ourselves as metalliferous
miners, but to those of other crafts
who are as truly our brothers as If
they were members of a purely W. F.
of M. local.
If the Provincial Federation Is sue
cessful In the performance of those
functions for which it Is organised, it
will leave your Incoming district executive free to devote Its energies more
particularly to its greatly Increasing
work In the field of compensation cases, and the fight that sooner or later
will have to be undertaken for a minimum wage scale for smelter employes
and If you sanction It, a movement for
a more uniform rate of wages throughout your district jurisdiction, for men
employed In similar occupations connected with the extraction and reduction of the precious metals. ..."
Urges Uniform Wage 8cale.
"Under the present system of a different wage scale for each different
camp, confusion and dissatisfaction are
Inevitable results."
Anticipates Mining Revival,
"Each year the hope that springs
eternal in the human breast, has led
us to look for a revival In the mining
Industry of the province, but at no
time, and this applies particularly to
the Slocan and adjoining lead belts,
was the promise so likely to be realised. Every Indication points to an
active operation of the lead mines during the coming year, and by such activity our membership, our locals, and
our hospitals will benefit. Through
the lean years we have struggled on
and let us hope that If the fat years
do come, we will, with renewed energy
and experience, be found successfully
fighting the good fight that can know
no cessation, until the man who does
the work gets all that his service Is
worth."
NEIGHBORING MINERS
ELECT 1912 OFFICERS
District 10 of the United Mine Workers of America (Washington State)
have elected the following officers for
the ensuing term: International board
member, Robert H. Harlln; president,
Thomas W. Russell; vice-president, J.
R. Montgomery; secretary-treasurer,
Davta Jones; auditors, James Nelson,
and Frank Brady; district board members, Harry Clarke, Wm. Larson, Evan W. Davis and A. C. Peralma.
If You Want
A
If You Have
A
HOUSE TO RENT
Wo Can Get It
For You
We Can Rent It
For You
PIERROT & ELLIOTT
Mala and Broadway
(over bank)
Telephone Fairmont
1243
"Boom All Onion Labels"
The Printers' Label
—should receive the support of trades unionists
above all labels. Every time it is used it means
a boom for all labels and unionism. Q Union
newspapers are more favorable to organized labor
than non-union sheets. fl That's support you
want when in trouble. (| By demanding their
label you not only help printers, but advance
labor's cause, and that HELPS HUMANITY.
Don't You Want to DoThat?
H. CHAS BENSON
President Typo. Union, Who Should
Be Elected as School Trustee on
Thursday Next.
AN AWFUL TOLL OF
"PEACEFUL"INDUSTRY
IN NEIGHBORING STATE
Statistics Received Through Operation of Workmen's Compensation Act Make Startling
Revelations.
Perhaps the most valuable function
of the Workmen's Compensation law
Is the gathering of statistics on industrial murder.
.The report for the first six weeks
of the commission for the State of
Washington has Just been made public. It showB that the Industries tit
the state murdered 40 persons and
more or less seriously Injured 895 olh
ers..
The coal mining Industry stands at
the top of the ladder when It comes to
killing off Its Blaves. In no other Industry in the state was there the same
propodrtlon of accidents, fatal and
otherwise.
The lumbering Industry had a larger
number of accidents and fatalities, but
the number of employes is much larger than that ot the coal mines.
Four of the 40 dead victims were
coal miners. Sixty-one of the sj5 nonfatal accidents were sustained by mine
workers.
Interesting statistics!
MINERS TO ENTER UPON
ORGANIZATION WORK
Vigorous Campaign to Be Waged
Throughout the Province for
the Coming Year.
Further particulars regarding the
fourteenth annual convention ot District 6 of the Western Federation of
Miners, closed last week at Ymlr, B. C.
after a three days' busy series of sessions, redound to the credit and militancy of the miners of this province.
In addition to the summary ot the
proceedings given last week, the convention dealt with the question of entering upon a vigorous organization
policy in the northern portion of British Columbia, and steps will be taken
to bring this about, under the direction
of President-elect Wm. Davidson, and
with the financial assistance of the International.
As haB been the usual custom for
some years the miners passed a resolution endorsing the Socialist Party of
Canada, and the legislative work of
Messrs. Hawthornthwalte and Williams In the provincial house at Victoria.
BREEZY NOTES FROM
THE LABOR WORLD
OF CAPITAL CITY
Central Labor Body Submits Questions to All Civic Candidates,
and Contest Few Beats.
The Victoria Trades and Labor
Council have decided to submit the
following questions to the candidates
for Mayor and Aldermen. They are
those kind of huts'that will require
some cracking. They have been forwarded to them with the Instructions
that they must reply to them'before
the 9th day of January, and have
moreover been sent In a registered
letter.   They'are aa follows;
1. "Are you In favor of an eight-
hour day for all civic work, the same
to be confined between the hours of 8
a. m. and 6 p. m.T
2. "Are you In favor of the day la
bor system on all civic workt
3. "Are you In favor of a minimum
wage of 13.00 per day for unskilled
laborers on all city work?
4. "Are you In favor of the local
union rate of wages and conditions for
all trades on civic work?
5. "Are you In favor of giving resident union men the preference of em
ployment on civic work?
0. "Are you In favor of a system of
promotion from among the civic employee consistent with ability and efficiency and In accordance with length
of service?
7. "Are you In favor of securing
civic supplies when possible manufactured under union or fair conditions?
8. "Are you In favor of the municipal council passing a by-law provld
ing. for the examination and reglstra
tlon of Journeymen plumbers?
9. "Are you in favor of public own
ershlp of sll public utilities?
10. "Are you In favor of having
all city work done by the craft to
which It belongs?
11. "Are you In favor of giving con
.tracts to local concerns?
12. "Are you In favor of purchasing
all civic clothing supplies from local
concerns employing union labor?"
. The workers of this city will have
the opportunity afforded them on the
11th of this month of voting for two
members of their class for aldermen.
Mr. George Oliver, who at the last
Provincial election contested this district as the Socialist candidate, and
Mr. Christian Slvertz, secretary of the
Victoria Trades and Labor Council,
and third vice-president of the Provincial Federation of Labor. These
candidates have molded for themselves
the respect of a large number of the
workers of this place and there Is no
doubt but that respect and esteem
will be expressed on the ballot next
Thursday. They have come out at an
opportune time for It is not at all too
soon for the workers to busy themselves In this way.
PAINTER8, PAPERHANGER. AND
DECORATORS, LOCAL 138.
We had a fairly good attendance ol
members at our meeting, held In the
Bartenders' Hall on Thursday, December 28th, 1911, this being the last time
we shall meet there, as arrangements
have been made for us at the temporary Labor hall, 112 Cordova street
west.
Our,meetings In future will be on
the first, second and fourth Thursdav
of each month, and the executive wlli
meet on the third Thursday, to trans
act the necessary business.
The election of officers for the ensuing term are as follows: President
W. J. Nagle; vice-president, J. Brad
ley; recording secretary, Skene Thomson; financial secretary, F. J. Harris;
treasurer, E. Staples; warden. H. H.
Whiteside; conductor, R. Stevenson:
trustees, Train, Freckleton, Stevenson;
business agent, R. Mathson; delegates
to the Trades and Labor council,
Freckleton, Anstey, McMillan, Rosen.
Jorgenson, Bishop; delegates to Building Trades Council, Matheson, Nagle
and McMillan.
Trade conditions are not too rotten,
and our members are fairly well employed. Our scale is 14.60 per day of
eight hours, forty-four hours per week.
We do not believe In long hours and
short wages, as we find, owing to the
number of men in the trade we have
to postpone the receiving of wagea for
a number of weeks, especially In the
winter season. However, If we can always get three square meals per week,
we consider ourselves lucky. "It's a
long lane that has no saloon at the
end," and there Is many a true word
spoken from the chest, at times. Incidentally, there are no George Wash-
lngtons that I know of round this burg,
so we will proceed to the next paragraph and tell you about our fellow
"artists" In Europe: Erope, Irope and
Syrup; the saying is not original, Mr.
Editor. The International Painters'
Congress convened at the "Volkhaus,"
Zurich, Switzerland, on September
10th, and adjourned on September
13th, 1911. Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Holland,
France, Italy and North America were
represented.
The following resolution was unanimously adopted:
The Congress deems It a duty of
International solidarity to support,
morally and financially, all brother organizations affiliated with the Secretariat of the Central Federations of
Painters and Related Trades whenever
they are engaged In great struggles.
A demand for financial support by a
central organisation must be addressed
to the International Secretary with a
complete and Intelligible report on the
situation; whereupon the secretary
may recommend the demand. Affiliated Federations declare that no assistance shall be granted without the
International Secretary's recommendation to that effect." Delegate Tobler
of Hamburg was unanimously elected
International Secretary. It was decided to select the place and date of
the next Congress by referendum.
J. McMILLAN, Correspondent.
AN EIGHT-HOUR DAY
AND $3.20 MINIMUM
WAGE IN NELSON, B. 0.
The city of Nefson has decided to
Initiate an eight-hour work day on all
civic work, In lieu of the nine-hour
day. The minimum wage has also
been fixed at 40 cents per hour; 20
cents more per day than the Civic
Employes of Vancouver are asking for.
The decision of the council was
reached after a deputation from the
local Industrial Workers of the World
had appeared before the civic lawmakers, being a concession of all the
men had asked for.
Org. Bruce In the East,
John. W. Bruce, organizer for the
Plumbers and Steam Fitters International union, well known In the Canadian West, Is now 'way down east.
Last week be put In a local In the I. C.
Railway shops at Moncton. N. I)., with
a charter membership of 30 men.
MUSINGS FROM THE
TANETOWN GAZETTE
Extracts from Stone Breakers and Those Who
Ought to Be.
J. W. B., Moncton, N. B. Your reference to the "Infernal" delegate was
all right. We notice In his address
the same mental mechanical Inelasticity as was in evidence in your
speeches here last summer.
Pursuing our constantly alert attention, we And that "Mr. McBride is satisfied with British Columbia as it is."
The people who voted for him and
his colleagues are the people that have
a kick coming.
From our special leased wire, via
the clothes line. St: Petersburg, Dec.
28, 1911.—The council of mlntsterb
have decided not to allow the Salvation Army to carry on their work In
Russia. The Greek Orthodox church
ss represented by the Holy Synod, are
determined to keep their own pot-a
bollln,! They do not beneve In "dividing up."
Col. Sam Hughes, Ottawa. A fovv
appropriate titles for the regiments In
course of formation: The Twentv-
tooth Tanktown Highlanders; the
Umpty-ump Shaughnessy Heights
Rangers; the Astor Grill Touts; the
Cordova Street East Deadshots. The
motto of the last named to be: "One
hit In nine, Is doing line."
Mr. Robert Hemphill of Hastings
Townsite in a recent speech said he
thought that "people had begun to find
that the men wanted in parliament
were the old timers." We are of the
opinion that the present parliamentarians are In their second childhood, It
the amount of ineffective legislation
that encumbers the statutes can be
taken as an expression of their lntelll
gence.
How they come! It Is announneil
that the C. P. R. has carried 150,000
settlers to Canada from the United
Kingdom during the year 1911. Is
there any of them here? Six hundred
bameless men were supplied with a
free dinner on Christmas day In the
basement of the Carnegie Library.
The Central Mission also fed between
six and seven hundred men.
"Down-on-the-Farm" Grant: "It It
remarkable the number of cases that
come up In this court because of business conducted on Sunday. Nine cases
out of ten that come before this court
Would seem to come up becauee ot
people trying to steal one day of the
week from the Lord." His honor did
not say anything about the (V P. K.
B. C. E. R„ or any ot the corporations
that steal Sunday from the Lord; also
the major portion of their workers'
wages every day In the week. Of
course the latter portion was not before the court.
NEELANDS FOR SCHOOL
TRUSTEE IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
At the solicitation of a number ot
ratepayers of the municipality of
South Vancouver, Mr. R. H. Neelands,
secretary-treasurer of Typographical
Union No. 226, has consented to his
name being placed in nomination for
R. H. NEELAND8
Secretary Typo. Union, Who Is School
Trustee Candidate In South
Vancouver.
election as school trustee. As evidence of the confidence placed In Mr.
Neelands by his fellow workers, he
has for the fourth consecutive term
been unanimously elected secretary-
treasurer of his local and also represented No. 226 as one of the delegates
to the I. T. U. convention held In San
Francisco last August. While Mr.
Neelands has never before occupied
any public office, hie record in connection with matters entrusted to his care
merits the vote and Influence of all
wage-earners of South Vancouver.
Walnuts In B. C. No, we are not
aware that walnuts can be cultivated
In this province, although there 1b at
all times a plentiful crop of chestnuts, some of which have appeared in
the musings. We have been informed
that walnuts have ofteif*assumed the
shape of walruses, In cases where
one's eyesight has been affected by an
overdose ot peruna, or something
stronger.
Mr. H. H. Stevens, M.P., brainstorm-
er, recently delivered a lecture on
"Some Reasons Why the Church Does
Not Appeal to the Masses." Perhaps
the masses have read the Western Call
at some period of their lives.
Going some—N. B.—This Is a Joke:
First Astronomer: I have Just located
a new comet, but I cannot figure out
Its orbit; all I know Is that It Is going
at tremendous speed, but seems to
have no logical destination.
Second Astronomer: "What are you
going to call It?"
F. A.: "I thought I would name it
H. H. Stevens."
His Goose is Cooked. Mr. R. S.
Pyke, at a recent meeting described
Mr. Flndlay as "a great, big-hearted
Scotchman—and a Scotchman has a
reputation for watching the dollars."
Bang went a nlgle; also Mr. Findlay's
ohance of being elected mayor.
Marry In haste r divorce at leisure.
To our wives and sweethearts: May
they never meet!
We don't know where we're going;
but we're on the way.—"I am In favor
of Single Tax," declared the speaker,
Mr. Flndlay, "as far aa It has gone up
to the present time. What Its ultimate
development would mean I do not
know."
Social and Personal.—Mr. J. W. Hog-
genhelmer, the Shantyvllle capitalist,
Is paying a visit to the city, but not
his poll-tax, and is staying at the Hotel
Del Sumptlous. Also Mr! Hell's Fire
Zeke, the business agent of the Belt
Buckle Polishers' union, Is located at
the "Crummleton Flop,"
It's an HI wind that blows nobody
good; or, YOU get two-bits, and WE
get six," Is the name of the latest
stunt pulled off by the B. C. Telephone
Company.
COME AND VISIT
"TOYLAND"
THERE'S a new department now in our store called "TOYLAND"
hill of things of more absorbing interest than the little Boys and Girls of
Vancouver have ever seen before.    We invite you to come now and look
over all the pretty toys and dolls-
LOWEST PRICES PREVAIL
Dressed Doll., from 25c to $10.00
Doll Houses, from 75c to $13.50
Doll's Furniture at all Prices.
Drums, from 35c to $2.50
Cart. (Steel) from $1.50 to $5.50
ENDLESS VARIETIES
Our stock is the greatest we
have ever shown; among it
you'll find a vast army of
Electrical and Mechanical
Toys, Animals, Games, Ac-
lion Toys, Dressed and Undressed Dolls, etc
FIFTH FLOOR
James Stark & Sons, Ltd.
Hastings Street West, between Abbott and Carrall
Hardware and Tools
Building Hardware, General Hardware, Tools for.
the Carpenter, Cement-worker, Plasterer, Machinist
Bricklayer, and all the other trades. Lawn Mowers,
Rakes, Spades, Hose and the other requisites to
make your home look neat and tidy.
Phone
684
McTaggart & Moscrop
HARDWARE MERCHANTS
7 Hastings
St. W.
LEST VOU FORGET, WE WOUIT, REMIND YOU THAT THE
8IMONDS SAW IS THE BEST SAW THAT CAN BE MADE.
If easy running, fast cutting and an absolute guarantee count for anything in a hand saw, then every mechanic should use this Simondi Saw.
It is certainly much different from other saws. Let us tell you why,
or better yet, let the Simondi tell its own story.
SOLE AGENTS FOR VANCOUVER
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
111 Hastings St W.
Phone 8symour 804
Jaeger for Holiday Presents
We would remind you there is no more acceptable gift than a
Jaeger Garment, whether it be a Dressing Gown, Lounging
Jacket, Sweater Coat, Traveling Rug, Motor Scarf, Slippers,
Fancy Vests, or any of the many useful artioles in our Jaeger
stock for men, women and children.
T. B. Cuthbertson & Co., Limited
345 Hastings W.
HATTERS AND HABERDASHERS
619 Hastings W.
MO Granville
UNION GOODS FOR UNION MEN
Ws Handle
Union
Mad*
Overalls, Hats
Gloves, Pants
Whnmr
•nd
Whsasvsr
Possible)
See Our Special Workingmen's Special
Suits from $15 to $25
WILLIAM DICK, JR.
"THE CLOTHING MAN"
43, 47, 49 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, B.C.
l^H^j
AND
Porter
Of America rQ>r
corrsiSHT ar.«oi Ha.mn.maio leoa
EVERY UNIONIST WHO
patronizes a Bar should not only
insist upon being served by Union
Mixologists, but demand
UNION MADE BEER
The Kegs Contain This Label
SEATTLE AND CALGARY
is Union Made Beer
Phone 2354
Dentistry that is Artistic and Honest
DR. W. J. CURRY
DENTIST
The one method that makes Sing and crowning of
sensitive teeth painless
301 DOMINION TRUST BLDG.
Office Open Evenings Hours 9 to 8
DR. BRETT ANDERSON
DENTIST
Bank if Ottawa Building
Cor. Seymour and Hastings

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