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The Midway Dispatch C. M. Crouse Dec 12, 1903

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 mmm*
Legislative Library  July 1
Vol. 2, No. 24.
MIDWAY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,  DECEMBER, J 2,  1908.
$2.00 per Year.
•AILWAYS FOR MlDWAYpC^r
fork on Coast-Kootenay Will  Certainly Be Commenced Early in the Spring.
tO     tllr
UDWAY-VERNON WILL   BUILD
j Addition to these Railways an Electric line to Connect Chesaw,
A thriving little Town on the American Side, with
Midway is Spoken of.—People of
Similkameen not Satisfied With Short
Line.
[t now looks as if something
mid bo doing in tlie rail-
iy building around Midway in
spring. . Tho Coast to
>ot enay rail way'will doubtless
started. There can be little
uiit but that the recent visit
the premier and Hon. R. F.
in to Seattle, a few months
had something to do with
|s project, and that from that
erview with Mr. Parrel, eon-
ential representative of J. J.
II, a series of Negotiations has
in carried on for the purpose
securing satisfactory condi-
iis upon whicli the Coast-
otenay road would be built
iliwith.
then   there is the Midway-
■noii, reference to wliieh is
i as follows:
Inlesssome unforseen hitch
uM oucurr in   the negotia-
is with the English capital-
i who are backing the onter-
fa, construction work will be
tod next spring on the line
lio Midway    and   Vernon
plway, au interior lino prowl for some time,   says  the
Incouver Province.
'his was tho announcement
|du to  The Province yester-
by Mr Robert  Wood, the
I nder of the town of Green-
od. Mr. Wood came down
in the Interior and went on
Victoria to interview the
rbvincial Government regard-
; road and bridge matters,
In an interview with a Pro-
ce   representative on   the
inner Charmer beforo sail-
Mr.   Wood, wbo is   the
|janizer and a provisional di-
itor of tho projected line, said
pitoverything looks promising
r the commencement of actual
uk ou the line  next spring.
o Vernon and Midway Bail-
y is between  135 and 146
les in   length,  and   passes
rough a   district    rich    in
nerals and timber, with small
Hoys of fertile  agricultural
M.   The lino   has   already
surveyed    twice.    Two
Utes are available, one slight-
longer than  the other but
Hi only ii one per cent, grade,
lile the other route, although
">lve miles   shorter,   would
ive a 2 1-2 per cent, grade,
Tho details and route of this
ejected line were discussed at
ngth many years  ago, whon
0 Provincial ahd   Dominion
oveniments both passed sub-
ftutiul grants  to aid in tho
"wtruetion   of -tlie line.   Mr.
^'0(1 exhibited a copy of tho
|t passed by the Legislature in
I''1- granting $2000 per milo to
3 'ino.   The following year,
"'■ Wood continued, represents of the Midway and Vor-
|n and Midway Railway Com-
m visited Ottawa and  suc-
|«dod in securing a grant of
10 Per mile from tho Domin-
I»> Government. From the
^miiteg secured from the sur-
°y°rs and engineers who had
been over the proposed route,
Mr. Wood stated that the
average cost would be $24,000 a
mile
Mr. H. B. Smith, general
business manager of the company, is now in London Eng.,
and from word which Mr. Wood
had received from him a few
days ago, he thought sufficient
capital would be available in
the spring to commence construction.
Mr. Wood is one of the picturesque pioneers who caiuo to
the province in the days of the
Fraser River gold excitement,
and has remained ever since.
Mr. Wood cloared the first
street and erected the first cabin in Greenwood in 1885. He
has large mining interests in
the vicinity, and states that the
town has now pussed the boom
stage aud lias settled down to a
steady growth.
The immediate object of Mr.
Wood's visit to Victoria is to
interview the Government regarding certain improvements
to portions of the West Fork
wagon road lately constructed.
Tho greater part of the road has
been finished, but tliere aro gaps
uncompleted, aud several
bridges require repairing, while
a number of small bridges are
needed over certain creeks.
The residents of that Section realize that the Government has
no great cash surplus to spend
on road improvements. A subscription list was accordingly
started soino time ago aud
merchants of Greenwood and
vicinity subscribed nearly $300
for thoso improvements. This
subscription list Mr, Wood is
is taking down to the capital,
as well as a largely signed petition from tho residents of the
locality, praying that the Governnient grant an appropriation
which together with thatal ready
subscribed, will lio sufficient to
effect the needed repairs.
Last but not least comes the
information that an electric lino
will be built from Chesaw to
Midway, in reference to which
tho Chesaw News says:
Mr. W. C. Peay writes that
pjans are about completed,
and the company organized,
who will push the electric railway connecting Chesaw either
at Rock Creek or Midway.
Mr, Peay stated in his letter that
he would be in Chesaw about-
Dee, 10, and will look up the
different routes of right of way
and that the line will be pushed
to completion as rapidly as possible,
So convinced are they that
Princeton is not gotting a square
deal that two petitions, one to
the. Dominion Government and
the other to tho Provincial Government, praying that aid be extended for the construction of
tho line from Princeton to tbe
coast via Hope, are now in circulation.
Mr. A. F. Gwin, one of largest
stockholders iu tho Yroka mine
on Quatsino .Sound, and now a
resident of Princeton, is authority for the information as to the
petitions. Mr. Gwin arrived
trom Princeton yesterday. He
states that while the people of
Princeton are not in any manner opposing the granting of
assistance to the N-icolo, Kamloops & Similkameen Coal &
Railway Company by the Provincial Government, they do
not believe that tho transportation requirements of the Siniilkameen Valley will bo met by
the short forty-mile line of roud
from Spenees Bridge to Nicola,
Therefore they intend to use
what influence they may have
to secure the grunting of assistance to a line from Princeton to Vancouver via the Hope
Mountains. To that end the
two petitions are being circulated.
Mr. Gwin stated this morning that both would be brought
to Vancouver and circulated
among the merchants for signature, They will then be presented to the respective Governments, Mr. Gwin lias in his
possession copies of the petitions, which very tersely sot
forth the claims of the Similkameen Valley to transportation
facilities, and direct connection
with the coast. The better to
prosecute the campaign for a
railroad a Board of Trade has
been formed at Princeton.
AT THE
CAPITAL
Government is Not Very
Strong.
JOHN HOUSTON
Votes With the Opposition—Macdonald   Proves  a   Strong
Man - Assessment   BUI
|     is not Popular.
Similkameen People Do Not Favor Short Line.
no of railway
The projected u
IVom Spenees Bridge to Nicola is
n]] very well as far as-it goer
according to the opinion £
—*"**—        Hedley
Fruit Marks Act Has Been
Success.
Testimony by Prominent English Dealer in Canadian Apples—Work done   by Inspectors—They have very
Difficult   Task But
Good Has Come
From  Their
Labors.
the
people of Princeton anil
but thoy  complain   that|th(J
truction of that linoNwill
City,
the cons
Under the above headlines
the Montreal Daily Star of Nov,
10th, had the following report
of'an interview with Mr. Frank
Hamilton of the firm of Hamilton & Co., one of tho largest receivers of Canadian apples in
Liverpool, who has been in
Montreal during the shipping
season, looking after his consignments, as well as those of
Mr. Thos Russell, Glasgow.
"Whon the Fruit Marks Act
first became law", says Mr,
Hamilton, "I had my doubts as
to whether it could be worked
successfully on account of the
many conditions surrounding
the fruit trade, but it has proved
a success beyond all question
Speaking for tho dealers on the
other side, I may say, that owing to the fact of uniformity
in the large number of grade
marks used, and the irregular
packing of Canadian apples, we
were never sure of what we
might expect to find in a package, It was possible to get a
good barrel of fruit under a
certain grade mark, It was
also possible to get. a barrel of
"trash" under the brand, so that
marks   on    the  package
Cviilliiuuil mi 1'nue I
Victoria, Dec. 8—There is
nothing now in the way of thc
government effecting its loan
the loan bill having passed its
third  reading this afternoon.
Tlie amendment to the reven
ue bill abolishing the power of
the.governor-in-council to raise
the poll tax to $5 was also put
through. It is generally believed
that this is the price of the support of the two Socialist memb*
ers!
The attempt of Brown, of
Greenwood, to eliminate tho
clause raising the fee for a coal
prospector's license to $100 was
defeated on a close division.
The assessment bill was considered both at the afternoou
and at tho night session. A
number of clauses were stood
over at the request of the government, the ministers being
plainly embarrassed by the
sharp criticisms of the opposition. It is in committee work
that Leader Macdopald displays
those qualities which demonstrate his fitness for the post.
His cataehism of Finance
Minister Tatlow today.as to the
effect of the uew ta* on banks,
was one of tho most amusing
of the session. Tatlow, although
aided hy Assessment Commissioner McKilligan, was utterly
unable to meet Macdonald's
quiet criticisms, and was forced
to acknowledge that he wasquite
ignorant of the effect of the bill.
The government abandoned its
pro-pre-emption to lands within
or without a municipality and
to give the Comissioner of
lands and works the powers formerly held by the governor-
in-council relating to disposal
of coal lands.
Among the amendments to the
assessment billwasone reducing
tlie personal property which is
exempt from $1000 to $500, as
provided in the bill. Finally
the bill was amended to exempt pre-empted lands for two
years from taxation, and to ex
enipt muuicipul lands whether
within municipal limits or not.
Provision was made to exept a
merchant's bad debts, up to a
certain proportion of his stock,
and also exempting timber under
lease or license in some instances,
Mclnnes pressed for exemptions
for farm improvements up to
$200. Agricultural members of
the opposition clamored for some
concession, saying if they could
not get exemptions for $2,500.
they would be satisfied even with
$1,500. The government asked
that the matter stand over.
Coming to exemptions for agricultural societies, the attorney-,
general proposed to exempt
these lands up to 20 acres.
Mr. Oliver wanted the limit
raised. The wild land tax was
raised from 3 to 5 per cent.
Price Ellison strongly opposed
the increase in personal property
tax, declaring that if the farmers
know that there rate was being
doubled lho city wonld be full of
them for the purpose of protesting. He said the effect would
be to encourage the formation
of municipalities: in which event
the governmeut would get no
revenue from this source.
J. A. Macdonald, the leader
of theopposition.questioned the
minister of finance closely regarding taxation of the income
of banks.instoad of on personal
property, but Tatlow was unable
to give him any definite information as to whether the charge
would cause an increase or decrease.
This .enabled Macdonald to
moralize on the lack of care
manifested iii preparing the bill.
The clause was passed oyer.
The clause relating to the tax-1
atior   of  insurance   and  loan
com; anies stood over.
On thesuggestionofMr.Oliver
the tax on cattle driven in from
another province was increased
from 25 cents to 72 cents, and
on sheep from 5 cents to 20
cents per head.
. During the afternoon the premier, in reply to Mclnnes! said
that the government had received nocorumunieation from the
federal government relating to
theactpassed by the legislature,
and had no reason tobeleive the
statute will be disallowed.
The premier announced tonight
that tho government bad under
consideration a chauge in tho
two per cent tax, and probably
would be able to announce it before recess.
Victoria. December, 9—Tin
Assessment bill is now
regarded as a monument to
the incapacity of the ministers
who theniseTves-ariT quite -njn-
able to give a lucid explanation of its provisions, much less
undertake to outline any general principle upon which it is
framed.
Mr. Macdonald, leader of the
opposition, is in a class by himself when effective committee
work is to be done. In the few.|
days in which he has been in
the house he has sprung to the
front with a rapidity which
would scarcely be credited
among those who know his na-
tpye modesty and reserve. Gifted with an -analytical mind ho
scrutinizes  each   section as it
ster-Ladner wagon road. Ho
expressed the opinion that this
road was costing more than it
should.
Oliver's motion for a return
of tho correspondence ro ox-
tension of the wagon road from
the south end of the Nov/
Westminster bridge also carried
Tiie chief commissioner submitted a return of licenses
granted for blocks 459:1 and
4594.
On the report of the Coal
Mines bill Brown and MeNiven
again attempted to secure a reduction of coal prospectors'
license fees from $100 to $59.
In doing so Brown dwelt on the
disparity between this license
and that for ordinary miners
and also mentioned that tho
annual rental for 640 acres was
$96 less than the government
proposed to impose as a fee.
Prospecting for oil, lie
added, was very expensive owing to the necessity of boring,
and li felt that the effect, of
this bill would be to disuourago
real prospectors and encourage
speculators. The chief commissioner defended tho proposed
increase on tho well-worn
grounds that the revenue must
be obtained from some source.
Hawthorn thwaite defended
the-government's action, claiming thai, tlie present fee of $50
was rarely put up by prospectors,
but by some company for which
lie worked.
John Houston vigorously opposed the government's proposal, nnd pointed out that for
$50 a quartz prospector could
tako up*6on claims of probably
much gri-,v|-.rti._ viaIu*.   llulli coal
or oil prospectors' cla-ins
He added that the prospector
was a very necessary man in
British Columbia, and he benefited by his work every one in
the province, excepting, perhaps, the fishermen of the
Eraser, wiio in turn were of
little benfit to any one but
themselves, a.s stated before in
this speech.'
The premier in his brief ■ remarks hinted that tho fee was
designated to extract revenue
from those who lmd our coal
lands under a blanket.
^^^___ Mr. Brown's proposal to strike
comes hefore the committee and j out the offending clause was
has pertinents-inquiries of ' tho defe-itcd on motion by a vote of
ministers habitually set those 20 to 13.
worthies in a state of agitation [ a hurried consultation with
which affords huge amusement| Davidson, the labor member
tothe galleries. The premier Lj, Hawthomthwaite, perhaps
rarely measures swords with aocsoiuit for the fact that this
him, but  the attorney-general J 0lell,b91.  opposed   the   motion
though he voted for the same
has more temerity, if loss discretion, aud he is so repeatedly
unhorsed that he evidently has
come to regard it as part of the
day's work. The administration is rapidly acquiring a reputation us weak vessels.
The two socialist members
also are steering a course which
will not strengthen them in the
country. It commenced with a
declaration of Hawthornwaito
that he did uot care what taxes were imposed as long as they
were not increased on the class |cutby a licensee or lessee
of people whom he seems to
think he alone represents.
Then followed his vote in favor
of increasing the coal prospector's licence fees, and his absence from the chain ber when
the proposal to exempt agricultural lands tothe extent of $2,-
500 was under consideration. It
is an open secret now that the
government's renunciation of
its power to increase tho poll
tax was a direct concession to
the socialists, and was probably
the price of their support.
The business proper opened
with tho inquiry from Oliver
in tho form of a motion, as to
the cost of the New Westmin
in committee the previous day.
Houston supported lhe
motion, as well as the solid opposition,   The bill was defeated.
The Assessment bill was then
recommitted.
The exemption of 20 acres
for tho agricultural societies'
use was passed.
Clause 25 of the exemptions
was sharply attacked by tho opposition. This exempts personal
property reported by timber
upon
which lie has paid royalty, but
excludes from its benefits such
property after it hus passed into
the bauds of another. The
clause passed.
Clause 26 also passed, after
a decision resulting in the government's favor by a vote of
15 to 14,
Mclnnes again pressed his
motion for the exemption of
coal lands up to $2,500. He
reminded the house that the
increase revenue of $3,300 from
the wild lauds justified tliis concession to tho farmers. The
motion was rejected on the
casting    vote     of    chairman
Contintiutl uu Vase ■), ... MIDWAY 18 ON THE
^
I
li wiil be the mist iiiriirt-
ant Railway Centre in tho
Interior of British Columbia.
It is in the centre of a
ricli Mining, Stock-Raisins,
Bundling, Gardening, Mm-
factoring, Coal Producing,
and Railway District.
Midway property   will
• nuke yon rich.   II s iiot
a speculation, it is an investment.
t    8    I
1
way, commercial, whole-
centre of the Kettle Biver
and Boundary Creek Districts, is situated at the
confluence of Boundary
Creek and Kettle Biver.
The leading osis nee
town in the eountry, with
an excellent climate, pyre
water supply, and sur
rounded by rich agricultural land-
Business,  residence and garden lots at low prices and on easy terms.      Send for maps, prices, and full particulars to
A. M. WOVK.NDKM. Soo
:«> Sl, .Inlin .Street,
Al.j.Iltlc,ll, I'. Q
The MIDWAY COMPANY, Ltd.
V. M. CIIOUSR,
Agent fnr Ilritish ^oliimliin
Midwuy, 11. V.
am IktUIM* ■Ittklac PeA
If owy property owner would pro-
ride a hitching port and evory driver
would uso It riniriwnys would gro»
scarce, but hitching poet mo the exception In tho city stiooU, no doubt
tx-cuutw of thoir unnifrhtllnma on thf
curb. Thli neud not be the ca*o It
tho hitching device preewiited by tM
Now   Orlewii   Tiniee-Dwnoerat   wei»
uMiim mtomnq urviok.
put In common um, u it is ncarcoly
visible from tlie .vnlk or roiidwny •*•
copt whun In »ouml n-irvico.
Vs nil: lie toen from the accom-
piuiyliiK illustration, the dovlco con*
lists of'a Hat plain lying (lush with
tho siin'ai-o ol the siilewalk ami
provided with tn elongalwl slot in
tho centra. At one end/ of this slot
tho plum ie indented slightly to support a circular button attached t.t
thn strap which supports tlie weight.
Tho opposite end of the slot ts out
away to permit the psssage of this
button, whicli slips through tho opening into the well to allow the strap
to bc loWurod full length when nol
in uso, but supports the weight whon
tho strap Is pulled up out o( tho well
to hitch tho horse. Thus ths ont.
ninl is not obliged to support the
hitching weight until It starts to pull
away, as the strap hangs loose and
the weight is suspended from th*
pin to.
Itl-ll'ir.*  Illltl   II.«  I.i ..ll.iri,.l|iiU*r.
A I'alliei- mousing expert ive In con*
lecilmi wiih lioi'nltilon rSiipei-iDUn-
denl. of I'lirestiy Stownrl's loecnt
io.i|. in tlio f:n* noi th Wus a hull-
l.iieii conceit In lino of\ihe IimIIiu*
settlcilipiiCs ai'or nil tho va-ner (lieat
rSlnvo hake, The bnliiuui there «re
' rathol' iip-to-Hlnte, know Uu. topical
songs of ihe Any, and can >',lii|f, On
this pin11 iilin- occasion Mr. Ktoivail
was onU'itiiliii'il with "OoO-god
K.vou" nm' siniilar inelmllps, and
v.hm ho. nsl.oil a half-brood where he
hull, leui'neil the tuni* he lei'i-lved the
Verjj,. reply, "Oriiphaphouc."
Ilo n (  wn.'jte lime in useless
■jivls over Ihsmw.
rii-
A poet of Bl(|iost heroic build is
Arthur Stringor. There are six leet
and an Inch uf him. Also ho is mora
or less good to looh at. An Knglish
recruiting sergeant would -sun him
With longing eyes. Swing him In •
crowd you might plelt him out for
champion athkitt or, by his smooth
lace, for a nwtlnue Idol. There's
nothing about him te suggest tbs
poet—save his poetry. Neither doe*
ho seem to have the poetic temperament. He Is no dreamer, no idler.
Bis mental peine seems to bo aa
sound and as well balanced as hia
physical carriage, which Is saying a
good deal.
Canada ll rather proud of having
produced such a pool., and with good
cnuso. London, Ontario, Is his hlrth-
placu. Ills years are about thirty.
lie come* from a line old English
family in which there's an earldom
or something of the sort, but Ur.
Stringer carefully keeps this fact la
the background, lie stands on hia
own feet. You may see by glancing
at him that he needs no coat-o
arms background to proclulm his nobility.
He studied and played football a,t
Toronto IJnlveisity and at Oxford,
If they gavo him any degrSoa he has
forgotten It. Before he was twenty-
five he had published two volumes of
verse In Canada. They were slim
llttlo volumes which brought him
small fame and loss money. Yet it
was poetry, good poetry. The Canadians, however, prefer to wait until
"Tho Slates" discover thoir geniuses
beforo showing their own appreciation. Ho Ur. Stringer sailed down
Into New York, prepared to starve
In a hull bedroom. Hut he didn't.
Tho New York magazine editors—
who are much maligned, vou know-
promptly discovered that his poetry
was good and paid him well for hia
versee. Since then, both by short
storios and verse, he has been winning wide recognition and the rewards which accompany tho samo.
Just now, while his new book of
poems Is belnir praised by tho London critics, while the publishers aro
Issuing his lirst novel, "Tho Silver
Poppy," Mr. Stringer In up In Ontario, on thc shores of Lako Erie,
looking after his fi uit farm, working
In blue ihlrt and overalls and enjoying himself hugely. Next, fall, when
his melons and pours nnd grapes
hnva nil been gathered nnd Sold, ho
will pack his trunks and typewriting
machine and start either for New
York or London, where ho will Bcttlo
down for a winter's hard work.
Mr. Stringer's novel Is likely to ro-
celvo an extraordinary amount of attention In the newspapers on no-
count of the Identity of tho well-
known writer who liguros In the book
os Cordelia Vnughn. Mr. Stringer
first lent the ladv In the manner described in tho book, and his expeil-
Miens nf this "yellow vampire" art
faithfully described. Everv writer ln
New York wjjl tjiow the original ot
Mr, Sirluger's heroine, nnd few .will
dispute the truth of his portrayal.
It Is more than llkelv thnt Cordelia
Vaughn's real name will soon bo suggested In II" i*.."*-;:ipers.—Thc Header.
BICYCLE AND
MACHINE REPAIRS
PAINTING
AND
SIGN
WORK
MIDWAYAND
GREENWOOD.
SKATES
SHARPENED
Maynard
THE NORTHWESTERN
BUSINESS COLLEGE
809 Second Ave., Spokane, Wash.
The school where thorough:work is done; where the reason
is always given; where confidence is developed ; where Bookkeeping is taught exactly a.s book;; are being kept in business;
where Shorthand is scientific; where penmanship i.s at «.
Best; where merit is the standard ; where the training in Oi-
11. Service, Telegraphy, English and Cartooning wakes i|
students, develops their powers and teaches diem     howto $
successful.    No argument is so eloquent as   the  record .rf
things well done.    No mortgage can  corrupt,   no thief can |
break through and steal the knowledge of How to Do.   When
you know what a school can do for you by what it has done for
others is it better to trust to luck?   Is it wiser to guess?
For detailed information call, telephone or write
THE NORTHWESTERN BUSINESS COLLEGE,
809 Secocd Ave., Spokane Wash,
The Pioneer
Limited
There is no train in service on
any railway in the world that
equals in equipment The
Pioneer Limited train from St.
Paul to Chicago via the
Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul Railway
The railway, company owns
and operates the sleeping and
dining cars on its .trains, and
gives to its patrons an excellence of service not obtainable
elsewhere. The buffet cars,
compartment cars, standard
sleeping cars and dining cars
of The Pioneer are the handsomest ever built,
*S8?J   i 134 Third Street, Portland w& &wwm mmm
Legislative Library  July 12 ijft
Vol. 2,  NO. 24
MIDWAY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY,  DECEMBER, 12,  1903.
$2.00 per Year.
RAILWAYS FOR MIDWAY
Work on Coast-Kootenay Will Certainly Be Commenced Early in the Spring.
MIDWAY-VERNON WILL   BUSLD
Government is Not Very
Strong.
In Addition to these Railways an Electric line to Connect Chesaw,
A thriving little Town on the American Side, with
Midway is Spoken of.—People of
Similkameen not Satis-
lied With Short
Line.
JOHN HOUSTON
Votes With the Opposition—Macdonald   Proves  a   Strong
Man -- Assessment   BUI
is not Popular.
It now looks as if something
would he doing ia the railway building around Midway iu
the spring. , The Coast to
Kootenay railway'will doubtless
be started. There can be little
doubt but that the recent visit
of the premier and Hon. R. F.
Green to Seattle, a few months
ago, had something to do with
this project, and that from that
interview with. Mr. Farrel, confidential representative of J. J.
Hill, a series of negotiations has
been carried on for the purpose
ol' securing satisfactory conditions upon which the Coast-
Kootenay road would be built
forthwith.
Then there is the Midway-
Vernon, reference to which is
made as follows:
Unless some unforseen hitch
should oucurr in the negotiations with the English capitalists who are backing the enterprise, construction work will be
started next spring on the line
of the Midway and Vernon
Railway, an interior line projected for some time, says the
Vancouver Province.
This was tho announcement
made to The Province yesterday by Mr Robert Wood, the
founder of the town of Greenwood. Mr. Wood came down
from the Interior and went on
to Victoria to interview the
provincial Government regarding road and bridge matters.
In an interview with a Pro-
| vince representative on the
I steamer Charmer before sailing, Mr. Wood, who is the
organizer and a provisional di-
! vector of the projected lino, said
i that everything looks promising
fcr tho commencement of actual
work on the line next spring.
The Vernon and Midway Bail-
way is botween 135 and 115
miles in length, and passes
tlirough a district rich in
■ninerals and timber, with small
valleys of fertile agricultural
land, The line has already
boen surveyed twice. Two
routes are available, one slightly longer than the other but
with only a one per cent, grade,
while the othoii route, although
twelve miles shorter, would
have a 21-2 per cent, grade.
The details and route of this
projected line were discussed at
length many years ago, when
the Provincial and Dominion
Governments both passed substantial grants to aid in the
construction of -the lino. Mr.
Wood exhibited a copy of the
art passed by the Legislature in
1891. granting $2000 per mile to
'iis line. The following year,
Mr. Wood continued, representatives of tho Midway and Vernon and Midway Railway Con
pany visited Ottawa and succeeded in securing a grant of
*(|'t00 per mile from the Doiniu-
io'i Government. From the
°*timiites secured from the sur
voyorsand engineers who had
been over the proposed route,
Mr. Wood stated that tlie
average cost would be $24000 a
mile
Mr. H. B. Smith, general
business manager of the company, is now in London Eng.,
and from word which Mr. Wood
had received from him a few
daysago.be thought sufficient
capital would be available in
the spring to commence construction.
Mr. Wood is one of the picturesque-pioneers who came to
the province in the days of the
Fraser River gold excitement,
and has remained ever since.
Mr. Wood cleared the first
street and erected the first cabin in Greenwood in 18S5. He
has large mining interests in
the vicinity, and states that the
town has now passed the boom
stage and has settled down to a
steady growth.
The immediate'object of Mr.
Wood's visit to Victoria is to
interview the Government regarding certain improvements
to portions of the West Fork-
wagon road lately constructed.
The greater part of the road has
been finished, but there are gaps
uncompleted, aud several
bridges require repairing, while
a number of small bridges are
needed over certain creeks.
The residents of that section realize that the Government has
no great cash surplus to spend
on road improvements. A subscription list was accordingly
started some time ago and
merchants of Greenwood and
vicinity subscribed nearly $300
for these improvements. This
subscription list Mr. Wood is
is taking down to the capita!,
as well as a largely signed petition from the residents of the
locality, praying that tlie Government grant an appropriation
which together with tliatalrendy
subscribed, will be sufficient to
effect the needed repairs.
Last but not least comes the
information that an electric line
will be built from Chesaw to
Midway, in reference to which
tho Chesaw News says:
Mr. W. C. Peay writes that
plans are about completed,
aud the company organized,
who will push the electric railway connecting Chesaw either
at Rock Creek or Midway,
Mr, Peay stated in his letter that
he would be in Chesaw about-
Dee. 10, and will look up the
different routes of right of way
nnd that the line will bc pushed
to completion as rapidly as possible,
.—*—
Similkameen People Do Not Favor Short Line.
The projected lino of railway
from Spenees Bridge to Nicola is
all very well as far as-it goes,
according to the opinion of the
people of Princeton and Hedley
City, Imt they complain that
the construction of that liiie',\vill
not materially   add   to  their 1  a np ry*i wjp
worldly prosperity.  » AI    1 MC
So convinced are they that
Princeton is not getting a square
deal that two petitions, one to
tlie Dominion Governnient nnd
the other to the Provincial Government, praying that aid be extended for the construction of
the line from Princeton to the
j coast via Hope, are now in circulation.
Mr. A. F. Gwin, one of largest
stockholders in the Yreka mine
on Quatsino Sound, and now a
resident of Princeton, is authority for the information as to the
petitions. Mr. Gwin arrived
from Princeton yesterday. He
states that while the people of
Princeton are not in any manner opposing the granting of
assistance to the Nicolo, Kamloops & Siniilkameen Coal &
Railway Conipany by the Provincial Government, thej' do
not believe that tho transportation requirements of the Siinilkauieen Valley will be met by
the short forty-mile line of road
from Spenees Bridge to Nicola.
Therefore they intend to use
what influence they may have
to secure the grunting of assistance to a line from Princeton to Vancouver via the Hope
Mountains. To that end the
two petitions ure being circulated.
Mr. Gwin stated this morning that' both would be brought
to Vancouver and circulated
among the merchants for signature. They will then be presented to the respective Governments. Mr. Gwin has in his
possession copies of the petitions, which vory tersely set
forth the claims of the Similkameen Valley to transportation
facilities, and direct connection
with the coast. The better to
prosecute the campaign for a
railroad a Board of Trade has
been formed at Princeton.
CAPITAL
Fruit Marks Act Has Been
Success.
Testimony by Prominent English Dealer in Canadian Apples—Work done   by Inspectors—They have very
Difficult   Task But
Good Has Come
From  Their
Labors.
Under the above headlines
tlie Montreal Daily Star of Nov.
10th, bad the following report
of'an interview with Mr. Frank
Hamilton of the firm of Hamilton & Co., one of the largest receivers of Canadian apples in
Liverpool, who has been in
Montreal during the. shipping
season, looking after his consignments, as well as those of
Mr. Thos Russell, Glasgow.
"When tho Fruit Marks Act
lirst   became  law",   says   Mr
Hamilton, "I had my doubts as
to whether it could be worked
successfully on account of   the
many   conditions   surrounding
the fruit trade, but it has proved
a success beyond   all question
Speaking for the dealers on the
other side, I may say, that owing to the fact  of uniformity
in the large  number  of  grade
marks used, and the irregular
packing of Canadian apples, wel
were never  sure  of what  we
might expect to find in a package.   It was possible to get  a
.good barrel   of  fruit  under a
I certain   grade   mark,    It was
i nlso possible to get. a barrel of
j "trash" under the brand, so that
.the   marks   on    the  package
! Cuiiiiimui] mi i'iwoi.
Victoria, Dec. 8.—There is
nothing now in the way of tho
governnient effecting its loan
the loan bill having passed its
third  reading this afternoon.
The amendment to the revenue bill abolishing the powor of
the governor-in-council to raise
the poll tax to $5 was also put
through. It is generally believed
that this is the price of the support of the two Socialist memb*
ers:
The attempt of Brown, of
Greenwootl, to eliminate the
clause raising the fee for a coni
prospector's license to $100 was
defeated on a close division.
The assessment bill was considered both at the afternoon
aud at (bo night session. A
number of clauses wore stood
over at the request of the government, the ministers being
plainly einbarrci.«»erl hy the
sharp criticisms of the opposition. It is in committee work
that Leader Macdonald displays
those qualities whicli demonstrate his fitness for the post.
His cataclysm of Finance
Minister Tatlow today,as to the
effect of the uew ta* on banks,
was one of tho most amusing
of the session. Tatlow, although
aided by Assessment Commissioner McKilligan, was utterly
unable to meet Macdonakl's
quiet criticisms, and was forced
to acknowledge that he wasquite
ignorant of tho effect of the bill.
The government abandoned its
pro-pro-emption to lands within
or without a municipality and
to give the Comissioner of
lands and works the powers formerly held by the governor-
in-council relating to disposal
of coal lands.
Among the amendments tothe
assessment hill was one reducing
the personal proporty which is
exempt from $1000 to $500, as
provided iu the bill, Finally
the bill was amended to exempt pre-empted lands for two
years from taxation, and to ex
empt municipal lands whether
within municipal limits or not.
Provision was made to exept a
merchant's had debts, up to a
certain proportion of his stock,
and also exempting timber undor
lease or license insoine instances,
Mclnnes pressed for exemptions
for farm improvements up to
$200. Agricultural members of
the opposition clamoredforsonie
concession, saying if thoy could
not get exemptions for $2,500.
thoy wo'tildbo satisfiedovenwith
$1,500. The government asked
that the matter stand over.
Coining to exemptions for agricultural societies, the attorney-
genoral proposed to oxempt
these lands up to 20 acres.
Mr. Oliver wanted the limit
raised. The wild land tax was
raised from 3 to 5 per cent.
Price Ellison strongly opposed
the jncreasoinpersoniil property
tax.declaringthatiP the farmers
know that there rate was lieing
doubled tbe city would he full of
them for the purpose of protesting. Ho said the effect would
be to encourage the formation
of municipalities; in which event
the goverumeut would .got no
revenue from this source.
J. A. Macdonald, the leader
of thooppositioii,questioned the
minister of finance closely regarding taxation of the income
of banks.instoad of on personal
property, hut Tatlow was unable
to give him any definite information as to whethor the charge
would cause an increase or decrease.
This • enabled Macdonald to
moralize on the lack of care
manifested in preparing the bill.
The clause was passed oyer.
The clause relating to the taxation of insurance and loan
com; anies stood over.
On thosuggestion ofMr.Oliver
the tax on cattle driven in from
another province was increased
from 25 cents to 72 cents, and
on sheep from 5 cents to 20
cents per head.
, During the afternoon the premier, in reply to Mclnnes, said
that the government hail received nocomnitinication from tbe
federal government relating to
thoactpassed by the legislature,
and had no reason tobeleive the
statute will be disallowed.
The premier announced tonight
that the governnient had umler
consideration a ehaugo in the
two per cent tax, and probably
would he able to announce il before recess,
Victoria. December, 9—The
Assessment hill is now
regarded us a monument to
the incapacity of the ministers
who themselves are tjulfcc. im
able to give a lucid explanation of its provisions, in uch loss
undertake to outline any general principle upon which it is
framed.
Mr. Macdonald, leader of the
opposition, is in a class hy himself when offoetivo committee
work is to be dono. In the few
days in which he has been in
the house he has sprung to lbe
front with a rapidity whicli
would scarcely be credited
among those who know his na-
tpyo modesty and reserve. G i I't-
ed with an .analytical "mind he
scrutinizes each section as it
comes before the committee and
has pertinent*"inquiries of the
ministers habitually sot those
worthies in a state of agitation
which affords huge amusement
to the galleries. The premier
rarely measures swords with
him, but the attorney-general
has more temerity, if less discretion, and he is so repeatedly
unhorsed that he evidently has
come to regard it as part of tbe
day's work. The administration is rapidly acquiring a reputation as weak vessels,
The two socialist member's
also are steering a course which
will not strengthen them in the
country, It commenced with a
declaration of Hawthoriiwaite
that he did not care what tuxes were imposed as long as thoy
ster-Liidner wagon road. Ho
expressed the opinion that this
rond was costing more than it
should.
Oliver's motion for a return
of the correspondence re extension of the wagon road from
the south end of the Nov/
Westminster bridge also carried
Tho chief commissioner submitted a return of licenses
grunted for blocks 4593 antl
1591.
On the report of the Coal
Mines liill Brown and McNiveu
again attempted to secure a reduction of coal prospectors'
license fees from $100 to $59.
In doing so Brown dwelt, on lbe
disparity 'between this license
and that for ordinary miners
and also mentioned that the
annual rental for 040 acres wns
$!)(! less (bun the governnient
proposed to impose an a fee.
Prospecting for oil, be
added, was very expensive owing to the necessity of boring,
and b felt Unit the effect of
this bill would bo to discourage
real prospectors and encourage
speculators. The (thief commissioner defended the proposed
increase on tho well-worn
grounds that tlio revenue must
be obtained from some source.
Hawfhoi'nl.hwaite defended
tlie government's action, claiming that. Llio present fee of $50
wixn rarely pntuphy prospectors,
but. by some company for wbich
CGI
John Houston vigorously opposed lbe government's proposal, and pointed oul that for
$50 a quaruz prospector could
tako up ten claims of probably
Ulllrh £rrnl'M>    vuluti   tl.UU.-l   COal
or oil prospectors' clnim:;
He added that the prospector
was a vory necessary man in
British Columbia, and be benefited by his work every one in
the province, excepting, perhaps, the fishermen of the
Prasor, who in turn were of
little ben fit;, to any one but
themselves, as stated before in
this speech;
'i'he premier in his brief remarks hinted that the foe was
designated to extract revenue
from tlu.se who had our coal
lands under a blanket.
Mr. Brown's proposal to strike
out the offending clause was
defeated on motion by a vote of
20 to 13,
A hurried consultation wilh
Davidson, the labor uieuibeiv
hy Hawthornthwuite, perhaps
account for the fact that this
member opposed the motion
though he voted I'or tbe same
in committee th" previous day,
Houston supported the
motion, as well as the solid opposition,   The bill was defeated,
The Assessment bill was then
recommitted.
The exemption o f 20 acres
for the agricultural societies'
use was passed.
Clause 25 of the exemptions
was sharply attacked by tho opposition. This exempts personal
property   reported   by   timber
were not increased on the ulnss I cut.by a liconiseo br lessee upon
of people whom he seems to, whioll lw hiw paid royalty, but,
think he alone represents. oxc1uiJom from its benefits such
Then followed his vote in favor
of increasing tho coal prospector's licence foes, and his absence from tho chamber when
the proposal to exempt agricultural lands tothe extent of $2,-
500 was under consideration, It
is an open secret now that the
government's renunciation of
its power to increase tho poll
tax was a direct concession to
the socialists, and was proba
tho price of their suppoi
The business proper opened
with tho inquiry from Oliver
in the form of a motion, us io
the cost of the New Westniin
property after it has passed into
the hands of another. The
clause passed.
Clause 2li also passed, after
a decision resulting in the gov-'
ernnient's favor by a vote of
15 to 11.
Mclnnes again pressed    his
motion   for the exemption of
coal lands up to  $2,500.     Ho
..]■ |reminded the house  that the
v-1 increase revenue of $3,300 from
the wild lands justified this concession to   the   fanners.    The
was   rejected   on   the
vote    of    chairman
OiHiliiiiiial uu I'ngo •,
motion
casting four druggist has a mie® steely of them
Dressing Combs
Pocket    Combs
Gentlemens Combs
Fine    Combs
Razors
Razor Strops
Curling Tongs, etc.
Hair Brushes
Tooth Brushes
Nail Brushes
Lather Brushes
Bath Brushes
Manicure Files
Manicure Scissors, etc.
-*m*mWM9**~-  -
A.F.Thomas     -.■-.■.-'•-    Druggist.
C. M. OROUSR Hditor anil Proprietor
PublUhwl wookly nt Midwuy, 11.0,
Subscription prlco, $2.00 por annum, paytibb
In ndvanco, oltlior yorirly or ball ycnrly ut Llui
option of tlio mlbficribur.
Advertising ratow nont on application.
A French statesman expresses the hope that the United
States will join France and
England in an arbitration
treaty. If it does there will be
no Canada left.
SATURDAY, DEOBMBGR 12, lSIOil.
No, Miss Washington, your
Panama was not put on
straight.
You may not get all that is
coming to you in this world,
but look ont for the next.
From now until  Chris'mas
are
th
e she
ortest davs of the
year—financially
wise.
and   other-
It is precisely on the nights
that cold comes in at the window that the furnace goes out
in any old way.
We cannot understand why
the reported illness of the Sul-
jan of Turkey should "give
rise to alarm."
The man who is a close
reader of newspaper advertisements isn't found at the tail of
the procession.
The king of Greece has
been appointed an honorary
admiral of the British fleet
Will not some other great naval power make the too long
overlooked president of the
high-up republic of Switzerland an admiral too?
Once there was a man who
went into politics and didu't
lose his reputation, ' but he
didn't have any when he went
in.
The Toronto Daughters of
the Empire are going to name
themselves after Chamberlain,
thus taking rank with a brand
of cigars.
One ol" the freaks of the
prosperity wave is found in
the announcement by a Kansas editor that he lias money
to loan.
Americans got their Thanksgiving turkeys from Canada.
They get most of the things
they are thankful for from Canada - even islands.
Lord Rosebery credits Mr.
Chamderlain with having "discovered a disease which has
no existence, and proposed a
remedy which will make it
worse."
These aae the dark days
when husbands begin to won-
tbr if they will be able to afford the the Christmas presents their wives are going to
give them.
JOHN CHARLTON, M. P. AND
RECIPROCITY.
John Charton, M. P., of
North Norfolk, Ont., a prominent supporter of Sir Wilfred
Laurier, is a many-sided politician. At a banquet of the
Illinois Manufacturers' Association, held last month at Chicago, he was the principal
speaker, advocating reciprocal
free trade in natural products
between the United States and
Canada.   This is the same old
SOIIit ihat a certain    school   of
politicians in Canada have been
singing for about 37 years.
Sometimes it is called reciprocity, sometimes commercial
union and sometimes unrestricted reciprocity. Everybody, who is acquainted with
Canadian history, knows that
there was a reciprocity treaty
in force between the United
States and the older provinces of what is now Canada be
ween 1854 and 1866. This, of
course, was before confederation, when there was very little communication between
the different provinces; before
the Intercolonial was built; before the great Dominion with
its national policy and national
sentiment of the present day
was even thought of.
During the last five years of
this period from 1854 to 1866,
the American civil war took
place. The provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick,
Prince Edward Island and the
Canadas enjoyed great prosperity There was a demand for
everything they could produce
at very remunerative prices.
As we said before, the provinces had very little communication with one another. Their
trade was with the neighboring states, and their hearts and
sympathies were to a large extent with the people from
whom they received cheques
in payment for what they had
to sell, mostly the natural products of the different provinces. Now the United States
put a stop to this trade in natural products, for what reason
we do not know, but it is ce|       ^^^^
tain that the part  that  Greatjattempted to bring about
came confederation, brought
about by the leading Liberals
and Conservatives of the different provinces, most prominent among whom was Sir John
A. MacDonald for many years
the distinguished leader of the
Liberal-Conservative party.
The' Canadian governments,
both Liberal and Conservative,
were always willing to negotiate a reciprocity treaty with
the United States, but the latter would have none of it. Instead they kept raising the tariff higher and higher, so much
so that the McKinley and
Dingley bills were almost pro-
hibitary.
The completion   of the Intercolonial and Canadian Pacific railroads and the  national
policy were the great   factors
in developing  interprovincial
trade.   Some of the people began to look east and west, instead of to the south as before
confederation; but others still
gazed Washingtonward  They
wanted something they could
not get, reciprocity,   commercial   union,   unrestricted reciprocity with the United States.
The latter was the battle cry of
the    Liberals  in 1891,  when
many of the farmers of Canada
were   almost   ruined    by the
turning of the tariff screws in
the United States, in the form
of the McKinley bill,    They
could not sell their barley, horses and other products to  their
neighbors in the states.    This
touched their pockets, and they
were consequently very sore.
They looked for relief from almost any source,   and  though
they   did not  know what   it
meant—no one could define 'it
exactly—they grasped it like a
drowning man  grasps   at   a
straw.   This unrestricted  rec-
iprosity cry nearly carried   the
country; and since it meant, if
it   meant  anything,  the surrender of the control of the
Canadian tariff  to  our  commercial   enemies, the   people
of Canada should   be forever
grateful to Sir John A.   MacDonald if, as the Liberals say,
he  gerrymandered Ontario in
1882, and thus saved Canada's
commercial independence. The
people of Canada at last convinced that they had lest, to a
great  extent,   the   American
market, with the assistance of
both the  Conservative    and
Liberal governments, began to
study the needs and requirements of the  British market.
This required a considerable
time, but to-day they are sending large quantities of  Canadian products to   the  British
and other markets;and though,
of course, the American  market is an important one,  it is
not essential to their prosperity.
Sir Wilfred  Laurier,   when
in opposition, accused the Conservative government of   insincerity in this matter of reciprocity with the United States.
He said the reason we did not
have it was because the Conservatives were wedded to the
national   policy.    They  were
what   were     known    during
the      campaign    of      1891
as old flag men, opposed to
freer commercial relations with
the United States in any form.
Now, Sir Wilfred Laurier sincerely believeo he  could negotiate  a  treaty     with    the
United States,   and   honestly
ne*
er again would he make the
attefnpt; the United States
would have to come to Canada
seeking reciprocity; never
again would he look to Washington. In view of this declaration of his leader, in view
of Mr. Chamberlain's preferential tariff plans, in view of the
fact that Canada is to-day
probably the most prosperous
country in the world one would
think that Mr John Charlton
or any other Canadian in public life, would have self-respect
enough to stay at home and
discuss public questions on this
side of the line. But Mr.
John Charlton is, as we said,
a man of many parts. In the
session of 1902, if we mistake
not, he advocated a higher Canadian tariff. In the last session
of the House he was a strong
suqqorter of the Grand Trunk
Pacific scheme, which is in a
measure anti-American, since it
is designed to carry Canadian
products to .Canadian seaports
and away from American
ports. But Mr. Charlton has
the hominy instinct, as it were,
he is an American by birth,
and this perhaps accounts for
his vagaries. He could hardly
be expected tobe pro Canadian or pro-Chamberlain.
TICKETS
-TO ANU FKOM ALL-
Points   East
VIA
Northern
Railway
SHORT LINE
TO
Spokane, Seattle and Coast Points,
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Chicago
AND POINTS KAST
2Tpalna X>alljjr ft
fast   Tlmno   tC
New Equipment Throughout, Day Coaches,
Palace and Tourist Sleepers, Dllung and
Buffet Smoking Library C    .
For Tiokote' Rated, Folilors ami Full
Information, call on or lutdr xs
Any Agent of the Oreat   Northern   Railway
jr write
A. II. 0. DENNI8TON, 0. W. P. A.
812 First Avenue, 8eatti.ii, Wash.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE,
To Joseph E, Boss, formerly of the City of
Spokane In the State of Washington, and
now supposed to be In Mexico.
You aro hereby notified Hint I and James
Napier Paton havo expended $111(1 In labor and
iiiiprnvfiiiiuiitK upon the "Monte lloco" mineral
claim, sltuato in Uroonwood camp in the
Greenwood (forincr'y Ketlle Klvci-i Mining
liivlHinn of Yalo Dlstriet, an will appear by a
(lortilloate of Work recorded March 21x1.1 IM,
in the olllce of,ths Mining Recorder for .he
wiiil (Iroiriiwiiiil Mining division, in order in
hold nald    *     '' ..     --     -
23rd, 1902.
hold nald claim  for I
K IMVi
hu yel
mr ending March
Ahd you am furlher notified lhat I and wild
JameH Napier Paton havo expended a further
Hum of 91110, In labor and improvements upon
said mineral claim, n» will apiieitr by a Oor.
tlfluitc of Work recorded March 23rd lim,
in the ofllco of nald Milling Itecordor, In order
to hold nald claim for the year onding Marelt
28vd,1903:
And ynn aro further notlflod that your proportion of tho expenditures above mentloneil
was contributed aod paid by the subserlbor:
And If nl the expiration of ninety 1901 days of
publication of this notloe you fall or refuse to
contribiil.il your proportion of tho expenditure*
required under section 21 of the "Mlnoral Ael"
Ic hold said claim for the years above mentioned, together with all corU of advertising,
your interest. In said minora! claim shall become
vested in tho subscriber |a eo- iwnorl under
Suction 4 uf the "Mineral Aol Amendment Act
19011,"
Dated at, Greenwood, It.C„ tho 22nd day of
September, 1903.
RANDOLPH STUART.
Hallett. nnd Shaw, Solicitors.
WANTKD-FAITHFUL PERSON TO
cull on retail trade and ngents for manufacturing houHO having well established business; local territory; straight salary $20 pai<)
weekly and oxpenso money advanced ; preV
lotti experienec unnecessary; position permanent; buslneos successful. Enclose self-a'ddros-
k.kI chvolopp, Superintendent Traders, 90.1:
Motion llklg., Cliicigo.
•STAGE*
Carrying His Majesty's Hails
Will leave MIDWAY on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, at 8.30 a. m., arriving •••
CAMP McKINNEY at 5 p. m.
Returning will leave CAMP McKINNEY on
Sundays, Wednesdays and  Fridays at 9 a, ni
reaching MIDWAY at 1.30 p. m.,and making connection with the train going east at 2:05 o'clock.
The best of accommodation for
tho convenience of the
travelling public.
R. MEYERH0FF, PROPRIETOR.
jgHBBBBgggg^iigii
The Canadian Bank of Commerce
With Which is Incorporated
The Bank of British Columbia,
HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO.
CAPITAL, $8,700,000.   -   RESr, $3,000,000.
HON. GEO. A. COX, Pres.       B. E. WALKER, Gen. Mgr.
W. ALLISON,
Manager Greenwood Branch.
4 4
4 -.4
4 4
Wtt'%
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The
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In Midway
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H    Headquarters For   V
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and « i
Commercial Hen A
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Rigs
To any part of the
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For Quest's convenience*
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Advertise in
The Dispatch. MIMAS-IKIIDE
QHR1STMAS will soon be with us, and to enable you to deckle upon your
presents we give below a list of USEFUL CHRISTMAS GIFTS which are always
appreciated.
For Ladies
Dress Lengths, Waists, Belts, Chatelaine Bags, Purees, Silk Collars,
Silk Lace Handkerchiefs hand made, Beatrice Collars, Cushions,
Cushion Covers, Table Covers, Gloves, Slippers.
For Gentlemen
Sweaters, Shirts, Braces, Ties, Mufflers, Gloves, Initial Silk Handkerchiefs, Caps, Slippers.
Girls
DRESSES
GLOVES
MITTS
HANDKERCHIEFS
SLIPPERS
Boys
REEFER COATS
SWEATERS
SUITS
CAPS
GLOVES
,     FRUITS md NUTS
APPLES, ORANGES, FIGS, TABLE RAISINS,
WALNUTS,     ALMONDS,      FILBERTS,      PEANUTS.
CHRISTIE'S DELICIOUS PLUM PUDDING
FRUIT CAKES
ASSORTED COOKIES
T
I
u.
L
^gWWWPSTMWWWM
LOCAL AND DISTRICT.
_
Frank Donald, of Rock Creek,
was in Midway during the week.
H.    Strauss,    returned    on
Tuesday    from   Long    Lake
camp.
The recent cold weather has
made excellent skating at
Midway.
T. Hanson, merchant of Camp
Mc-Kinney was in Midway on
Tuesday.
Miss Josephine Leveque, of
Greenwood, spent a few days
in Midway this week.
S. T. Larsen, proprietor of the
Riverside Hotel, Rock Creek was
in town on Tuesday.
Jas. G. Goodyear, one of the
pioneer ranchers of Anarchist
Mountain was in Midway this
week.
Mrs. Spraggett, of Grand
Forks, who has been visiting
Mrs. Jas. McNicol, returned
home on Monday.
G. D. Cunningham and Jas.
Atwood are doing assessment
work on the Kingston mineral
claim at Boundary Falls.
Mrs. W. Garrison, (nee Miss
Christie Graham,) accompanied
hy her baby .boy: of Centrilia,
Wash,, is visiting Mrs. Crowell.
E. Steeves" is busy getting
out timber on the randies of
D.G.Mills and Frod Kroupa,
across tlie international line
from Midway, for Genelle & Co.
The logs wiil be sent down the
rirtsrto Cascade, where they
will be sawn into lumber.
The timber is some of the
finest in the district.
Yesterday forenoon the sawmill and factory, belonging to
W. Powers,' and situate near
the town, were destroyed by
fire. It is not known how the
blaze originated. There was
but little insurance on the buildings so Mr. Powers' loss will
be quite heavy. Several smaller and adjoining buildings
were also burned, including the
dry-kiln and blacksmith shop.
The Kamloops district Liberal
association has called, a nominating convention to take place
at Kamloops on Jan. 13 to se
lect a candidate to contest the
new constituency yale-Cariboo
in the forthcomingFederal elections in the Liberal interest, the
constituency includes the provincial election districts of Cariboo, Lillooet, Yale, Kamloops,
Okauagan, Similkameen, Grand
Forks and Greenwood.
A radical change from old
methods and prices was announced by the Toronto News this
week. The eyes of the newspaper world have been upon the
News for the past few months'
during which time several departures have been made which
have given that paper a widespread reputation for enterprise
and originality. This latest
move is to place the News at
the price of $1,00 a year by
mail Only a deep founded belief in the future success of the
News could lead the publishers
to make snch a reduction in
price. But just as the dollar
magazine has taken hold of
the people, so,'we venture to
predict, the News will secure a
vast and ever-increasing circulation, based not only on the
popular price at which it is sold
but mainly upon the intrinsic,
merits of the paper itself. We
have made arrangements which
enable us to club the News with
our own paper at $2.80 a year
in advance. Such a combination presents many unique
features, — our weekly giving
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
In the Goods of Alfred E. Horridge, late
of Midway, II.C, deeeaaed Intestate.
NOTIOK In hereby given puramnl. to.tho Revised Statutes of Hritish Columbia, Ph-ip'-ei'
181, that all pot-sons having clninis ag linst thu
estate ot Hie Into Alfred K. Itorrldije, ore ro-
Hired on or botoro tlio lllth (lay of ilooomlior,
q9i)3, to send to tlio-undersigned their iiiimos
nddrossominii descriptions, together with full
particulars of their respective claims vurilte.1
hy statutory declaration—And all p. rsnns Indebted lo tho said ostoto aro require 1 lo pay
the amount of their Indebtedness to lho undor.
signed forth with.
And further tako notice that after lho sold
Wlh day of December IM. the administrator
will priicoi'd to distribute the afsots of lho deceased among tbe parties entitled thereto having regard only In the claims nf which ho shnll
Ihen have notice aim Hint tho said nilniln's re-
tor will nol. bo llablo for the raid assets o
mi)- pnrt thereof to any person or persons o
whose claims notice shall not have been received bv them at thc date of such distribution.
Dated this 1st day of December, IIKKI.
a. v. e:hiv,
Administrator
you all the home and district
news, and the big twelve-page
daily keeping you in touch with
events all over tlie world. Send
us your subscription to the
News, or if you would like to
see the paper first, write us and
we will secure a sample copy.
TO CONSUMPTIVES.
Tho undersigned having lieen venlorcil to
health hy simple mcittiK nfler suftV.ring for
Bovcml yonrs with a severe lung alfucMon, and
that dread disease Consumption, is anxious to
make known to his fellow sudors tliu means' of
cure. To ihoso who dwirn it, ho will cheerfully
send (froe of charge) a copy of the prescription
used, which thoy will (Iml a sure cure for Consumption, Asthma, Bronchitis nnd all throat
aud lung Maladies. He hopes all sufferers will
try his remedy, iwll. Is invaluahlc. Thoso desiring the prescription, which will cost them
nothing, and may prove a hissing, will please
address. Rev EDWARD A. WILSON, Hrooklyn,
New York,
NOTICE.
NOTICK IS HBllKBY GIVEN that application will bo mndu to the Legislative Assoui-
blyof the Province of Hritish Columbia ut Its
next session for nn Act to incorporate a Company to ciitislrtictiv rail way and I olograph and
telephone linos over tho following mute: Commencing nt a point at or near Spence's Hridge,
on tho Canadian I'liclflc Railway, Ihenco In tx
south-easterly direction lo Nicola, thence to
Aspen Grovo, thonce soufhorly lo Otlor Mat,
tbonoe south-easterly by way of Granite Crook
andl'rlncetiiii, following gnnernlly tho course
of tho Similkamcoii Itiver, lo n point at or
near the International Houndnry, either at Osoyoos Lake or Midway, with power to con
truot a branch frnm Princeton lo Copper
Mounlain.   Vancouver, ll.C. Octal erU, IM
...,.,.r,, (HIV.   <|TL1       ./UlllUn     P.IJlll.11.
See that your ticket reads via
the ILLINOIS CENTRAL li. K.
'Thoroughly modern trains
connect with all transcontinental lines at St. Paul and Omaha.
If your friends are coming
west let us know and we will
quote them direct the specially
low rates now in effect from
all eastern points. ,
Any information as to rates,
routes, etc., cheerfully given on
application.
B. H. TllUMBWI.T,,
Commercial Agent.
112 Third St.
Portland, Oregon
J. C, LlNDSEY,
T. F. & P. A„
142 Third St.,
Portland, Ore,
P. B, Thompson,
F. &P. A., .
Room 1, Column Bldg.,
Seattlo,  Washington.
McLEOD * BROWN,
Harmsibrs, Solicitors, Etc.
Orkenwood, D. 0.
Chas. A. Webster,
PROMOTER. INVENTOR, DESIGNER.
Spokane,Wa3h.. U.S.A.   Midway, B C.
C. J. LEGGATT,
BARRISTEli at l.\w, ^ii
SOLICITOR and _
NOTARY PUliLTc.
■*>    x
MIDWAY, B. C.
p  M.KERBY
A, M. Can. Son. C. E.*
PitoviNciAi, Land   Surveyor
AND
CIVIL   ENGINEER.
OiHojuI Gru.vi) r'umcs.
DR.   SIMMONS,
DKST1ST,
Rkndell Block, Greenwood.
Phone 00, V. * N.
J. S.  HARRISON.
NOTARY PUBLIC,
• REAL ESTATE,
APPLICATIONS MADE FOR CERTIFICATES OF IMPROVEMENTS
AND CROWN GRANTS OF PREEMPTIONS AND MINERAL CLAIMS
MIDWAY. B. C.
Zi'Z''**.'^*--'**tt^*['i!kt!i^'&i_%ll'Z
Rock Creek, B. C.
S. T LARSEN, Prop.
'^i^tti^TJ'iJii'Zfitli     Stopping pl»re furSliiRes to
ttZ'Mttzi,z~zJyitt TCMHM
nil  rum nil Boiiiitlnry
Greek points.
(rood Aeeommodation for the Traveling Publie.
THE SCENIC LINE
ThrmiBh Salt Uko Clly, Lendvllle, Puoblo, Colnmtlo Surinpts nnd Denvor  nnd
tho Famous Rocky Mountain Sconory by Dnylljvhl to all Points East.
3  FAST TRAINS DAILFbO WCt'N OG RFN AND~DEjWEfc 3
MODERN    EQUIPMENT,    THROUGH    PULLMAN    A"-'D    TOURIST
E 0   0   1.8   ^MJEUPERH    DINING   CAD   6IJHVI0E      :      !
or rates1'oldors nnl other
Information, address
STOPOVERS  ALLOWED
W.C. McBKIDH,   (len.   Aft.
IM th i:d .'.;.  PORTLAND, OFF.
On receipt of your
name and address we
will place before you
for selection the great-
est assortment of
Jewelry, Silverware,
Leather Goods, etc.,
in Canada,
In llila new edltloj of our
Calnlojuii, ready Nov. ij,
wc li.-tvc infide special effort
to display extra value article*
of very moderate coat,
In it are presented
hundreds of opportunities for selecting Xmas
gifts at money-saving
prices,
Wi pay ill Mpn* ctnriM.
BYBIE BROS.
JEWELERS
I IB, 120, 122 And 124
Yonae Sf., Toronto
Spokane Falls (Northern
Railway Co.
Nelson & Ft. Sheppard
Railway Co.
Red Mountain Railway Go,,
Washington & 6. N. By.,
Va;i., Vic&E.Hy Co.
The only nil mil route between
pnints pant, weat and south to Ross
Innil, Nelson, Grand Porks and Hepuli
lie. ('iiiiiiitis at .Spokane with tin-
Orent Northern, Northern Pacific and
0. ll. & N. On. for points east, west
mul smith ; connects at Itosiland and
Nelson with the Canadian Pacific Uy.
Comiootn at Nelson with Hie K. II. Ik N.
In. for liiisln and Slocan point h.
Connects nt  Curlew  with stage for
Greenwood uml Midway II. C.
Hufurt cum  ran  on  trains lietween
Spokane anil lluputillo.
EFFECTIVE JUNE 14, 1903:
tyo. Arrive.
i-uu  SPOKANK      (1.15p.m.
JO nm    UOSSLAND      4.3.111111.
>r> n.m  NBIjSON      7,20 p.m.
IAn.ni C1UANI) KORKS....   t.nop.in.
10ft.ni REPUBLIC       Il.liip.in
xx. a. frA.oxxMOxar,
Gonoml PassoiiKor Anont.
Spokane Wniili.
Reduced   Summer.
Rates.
Excursion
Commercial Job Printing
-AT
Tlte Dispatch
Tho Denver &  Rii\, Grande,
jopuliii'ly known as the "Scenic
rlneof the World,"hasamiounc.-
I greatly reduced round-trip
rites from Pacific Coast points
or the^bouolifc'of'toaehei'H '"win
will spend their vacation in iln
Bast, and of delegates to all the
irominent Conventions —ti.  '.'.
\., at Boston;   A. (I. tl, \V„ at
it. Paul;   B, P. 0. I'l, at Bal ti
nore;    Woodtnoy of America
tt    Indianapolis;     Katies,   ni
'ow York ;   Mystic Shrine, al
lariitoga Springs;   K. of P., al
jouisville, and T. I:1, A., at  Indi-
inapolis.
Tickets at tho red need rales
will he based upon oho ran1 for
tho round trip, hut will lie sold
only on certain days. These
tickets will carry stop-over privileges on the going trip, giving
passengers an opportunity to
visit Salt Lake City, Gloiiwoocl
Spring*,' Colorado Springs, and
Denver; and will bo good to return any time within ninety (00)
days. Passengers going via the
Denver & llio Grande aro giving tlio privilege of returning
viaa dill'ereutj'otite,
Forthe rate to the pnint yon
wish to go, and I'or date of sale
atld other purticiiiurs, as well a*-
t'ov illustrated pamphlets,
write,
W. C. MCBRIDE, (1i'iiim-hI Agont.
1.21 Third St. Portland, Or.
Notice of Forfeiture.
To Thomni W. Stuck, formerly of the City of
Russian'1 In the Province of British Columbia, but whose prawn t address Is unknown to tho subscribers:
You are hereby notHIml Unit wo have ex*
jfcmlriliit S209 in Irilim- mill Iniprtivoinyiits upon
Iho "Great Lumi-v" ntnl "Twin Mine" mlnernl
ellilms, situate in Siiiiiinit i-.iiuip in the Greon*
wood Ifnrnitirly KotHo Itiver) \lliiln« IMrlsloii
of Vale District, ns will impujii-liy eoi-lIdeates
of Work recoi'dotl In llionitli-c ol llir' Miniuij
Uccoillor   for   l!i"   sili.       Jr nvmiil   Mililnic
Division on llm llli dny nl mikiisi 111(12, In
Oi'dei- to liol-l paid claims fur Uu- J'-jii- - mliiuj
BDulcimlidr SnI 1IKI3.
And -. r.i nj-ir t'ni-t,hi;r notidird tlinl wn Inivo
oxiiondoil llio furlher sum of ium. in Inlini-nnd
liiipi'ovi'inent.s upon said "tln-ju i,iui-y"iuid
"Twin Minn' inlniiml cltiiiiis, iir. will appear
bv Ocrlillciiti-iii," Work rocimlcil Aupitsl lllh,
IPOSj In llienllln: of snid Miniin; tloonriler. in
oi'dei-to Iml! ..mi rljiiuis fin- the yum- ondliiK
Sopli'inhei'Jli'rt, llhijl:
Ati.l Iriit. llir' expiration of niiii'ly llh)| dnj-.i
ot piililli'iillniiuf tliis iml irir ynn fail in- rofit«e
In u.iiilr-ihut- your proportion of tlur oxpoliill -
lures required under siwllnii 21 of ilm Mineral
Acl t.i liirlrl Mill olnliun fnr tlio yuiirs iilmvo
montionod, toitotlior wiiti all unsts of mlvi-i-
l.l-iiii.', yonr Inii-ri'-t in snid mlnoral olniins
..tiall liooumo rostiid in llio Hiilisoi-liiors lyour
oo-iiwiiursl undor Scol Ion I nt tho "Mlnoral Aot
AiiuuHlinuiit A'-i. Iimi."
iiiitud at ilivonwood, It. 0., Ihis Isl  dny of
Uotdior, l'.Wl.
AN'IMtlCW IIAMII.TON,
THOMAS KKUMKKN,
THOMAS eOllKII.I..
Hnllolt !• Slinw,Solleltara,
WANTED
A.    uinn   I."   rofii'i'dinil,   "(lANADA'H
Ghhatkst Ni'iisiiniKs" iii Um town uf
MIDWAY unit KiiiTiuiiuliug oiuinlry,
ami luld' orders for
OUE HABOY   SPECIALTIES
in Fruit Trees, Small Fruits,
Oi'namentals, Shrubs; Roses,
Viit-jr'-:, Seed Potatoes, &o.
Stuck ti-iu- In ti inn' -nui fi fi'iiin S.'in
■liio Seri...   A iH'i'iiiii'i. nt pn*ii ion for
llu- i-i;.;li    iniin uji  ritliur ttn lu ry   ut'
i-OlllllliNsi.lll.
Stone & We!lir,igton
FONTHILL NUKSERIES
over ftnii iK-rts
TORONTO
ONTARIO
—_
' IS ON THE MAP TO STAY.,.
•f
It wiil k tlie most important Bailway Centre in tiie
Interior of British Coliiniliia.
It is in tlie centre of a
rich Mining, Stock-Raising,
Rolling, Gardening, Manufacturing, Coal Producing,
and Railway District.
Miilway property   will
make yon rich.   It is not
, j speculation, it is an in-
vestment.
1
Midway, the coming railway, commercial, whole-
sale and manufacturing
centre of the Kettle Biver
and Boundary Creek Districts, is situated at the
confluence of Boundary
Creek and Kettle Biver.
The leading asie nee
town in the country, with
an excellent climate, pure
water supply, and sur
rounded by rieh agricultural land.
A. M. WOVJ5NDEN, Sec
!IO Sl, .John St.reet,
Montreal, V. Q
Business,  residence and garden lots at iow prices and on -easy terms.      Send for maps, prices, and full particulars to
The MIDWAY COMPANY, Ltd.
0. M. OHOUSE,
Agent for British Ooltimliin
Midway, 11. U.
*%hc jillisimtcJj
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1903.
Fruit Marks Act hasbaen Suscess
OOlllilllHKl   fl'OIll  PllgC 1.
counted for little. As it is now.
with the marks fixed by law,
"when wc purchase packages
hearing the "No. l."or "xxx"
brand, we are reasonably sure
that we are getting .-in honest
and fairly uniform "pack",
This has a tendency to inspire
great confidence in the Canadian apple trade,"
Spoaking'of the law from a
Canadian standpoint, Mr. Hamilton snid: "I have been a close
observer of lite work aud 1 cannot speak to highly of tho Montreal Fruit Inspectors. They
have had ou their hands whal,
1 consider a difficult tusk, owing
to the fact thai  tliev have had
spected and the defects pointed
out by the inspectors tlmt they
may remedy the si'ine by in
structirig their packers."
In conclusion Mr. Hamilton
said it is in the best interest of
all concerned that a good, honest package of fruit he placed
on the market.
W, A. demons.
., Publication Clerk.
At The Capital.
(Jimliniiojl from Page I.
Clifford,   the    two    socialists'
absenting themselves.
The finance minister added a!
rider to the clause affecting the'
taxation of  hanks,   exempting
from   taxation    personal pro-!
perty from which  the income,
which is also taxed, is derived.
This brought up the leader of,
the opposition witli a repetition
of Irt argument of tho day previously thai   the government'
proposed in case of banks to be
more    fender    (han   with   ___•
to pass judgement on (he work dividuals,   In  the,  hitter  cast
oPliiTudrodsof di liferent packers  they taxed both personal  pn
and pronouueo on  the varyin.
qualities of fruit from lhe different sections of the
country. Sound       judge
ment, coinmonsensc and prudence have eharacterissod iheir
actions from tlte beginning in
administering the law fairly between the growers and shippers
on one side and tha consumers
on the other. The inspectors,
while taking a firm stand, where
glaring violations were apparent, showed the greatest courtesy and consideration towards
the shippers by writing hundreds of letters on educational
lines. It is a well known fact
that there aro a number of good
.shippers who, while they   may
■ i    i       •        .
nave the liest  intentions, often
find thai their puckers have vio-|
kited th.-  law,  either through
ignorance of its  provisions, or
cadessness,    To   prove  this I
could shown numherof  letter.'
froni my Oniario shippers, who1
express thomselvos as only too!
anxious to have theii'  fruit in*''
perty from which income was
derived and the income itself
The motion carried.
i
i
■
m
i
nm
best quality ©r ^eaaoi
tin/ and oil w©rk sent ©ut
-1@0 i©
§S$3
i
ii
i
Ths
DISPATCH
,^Ms?M^^L^^^^Uh^^^a_y^
ir&*^k4&mi&ti®U&*^m^lz*2is_
W
'*^.'P"ti
BICYCLE AND
MACHINE REPAIRS
PAINTING
AND
SIGN
WORK
MI DWAY AND
&
SKATES
SHARPENED
io
REENWOOD.
Maynard
1111/17 CTlriMI
fl W La ILM
THE NORT
BUSINESS  COLLEGE.
809 Second Ave., Spokane, Wash.
The school where thorough'work is done; where the reason
is always given; where confidence is developed ; where Book-
keeping is taught exactly as books are being kept in Inisiness;
where .Shorthand is scientific ; where penmanship is at iis
best; where merit is the standard ; where the training in Chip. Service, Telegraphy, English and Cartooning wakes up
students, develops their powers and teaches them howto Lc
successful. No argument is so eloquent as the record d
things well done. No mortgage can corrupt, no thief cm
break through and steal the knowledge of How to Do When
you know what a school can do for you by what it has clone for
others is it better to trust to luck? Is it wiser to guess?
For detailed information call, telephone or write
THE NORTHWESTERN BUSINESS COLLEGE,
809 Secocd Ave., Spokane Wash.
The Pioneer
Limited
There is no train in service on
any railway in the world that
equals in equipment The
Pioneer Limited train from St.
Paul to Chicago via the
Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul Railway
The railway company owns
and operates the sleeping and
dining cars on its trains, and
gives to its patrons an excellence of service not obtainable
elsewhere. The buffet cars,
compartment cars, standard
sleeping cars and dining cars
of The Pioneer are the handsomest ever built.
h.s.rowe, 134 Third Street, Portland
General Agent.

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