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The Advance Feb 28, 1895

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 THE ADVANCE.
tow
Vol II, No. 18.
MIDWAY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1895.
$2.00 per Year.
W.T.SHATFORD&CO.
Fairview and Vernon,
General Merchants.
We  always  have  on hand a well
selected stock of the following goods:
Groceries,     Clothing,     Dry Goods,
Gents' Furnishings,
Boots and Shoes,    Hardware, Etc.
ALL AT THE LOWEST CASH PRICES.
SKATES! SKATES!! SKATES!!!
Jusl received; all numbers in stock; Send io your orders at once.
•
PENTICTON
HOTEL
J. THURBER, Prop
Situated at the Foot of Okuup Lake.
•
Stage Connection with SS. Aberdeen
to Fairview, Osoyoos and all points in
Washington.
AH arrangements made for providing
Guides and Outfits for Hunting Parties.
and Fishing.   Bow Boats and Sail Yachts for
LEQTUir.IE   BROS.   <SC   CO.
IBLOWHA.
Dry Goods, Groceries',leady-Made Clothing, Hardware, Etc., Etc,
Orders from the Lower Okanagan will receive prompt attention.
Prices Reasonable.
VERNON SAWMILL
SMITH 4 CLERIN, Props.
SASHES, DOORS, MOULDINGS,
TURNINGS, Etc.
All kinds of Factory work kept in Stock
and made to order.
Coast  cedar worked into  furnishings
a specialty.
All kinds of lumber, laths and shingles
kept in stock.
The Best of Material Always Used.
WRITE FOR PRICES AND DISCOUNTS.
Sawmill on Okanagan Lake, handy to shipment.
Sash and Door Factory en C. P. R., Vernon.
MIDWAY SAW MILL
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Constantly on hand at Reasonable Prices.
LEQUIME   <fc   PO W E R3,  Proprietors.
m. c. CABaiLLAN°co.
ARMSTRONG, B. C.
GENERAL  MERCHANTS.
Dealers in Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware,
Clothing, and Supplies of all kinds.   A specialty
made of Home Cured
HAMS   AND   BACONS.
Write for prices.
A LARGE LIST OF  FARMS FOR SALE,
J3*   O.   0AHO4XX.X.   dc   OO., ABM8THONO.
P^ MACDONALD,
BARRISTER,
OmOI, BARMAim AVUNUS.
VKHNON, B. C.
CRANK McGOWAN,
SOUCITOB, NOTARY PUBLIC, Etc.
Office, Pound Block, Barnard Avenue,
Vernon, B. C.
COCHRANE k BILLINGS,
* BAItlllSTKItS, SOLICITOUS AND
NOTAIIIKS PUBLIC.
Ofilcc: OUtnore's Block, Barnard Avenue,
VKHNON,     .     II. C.
W, M. CuriiitAN'ia        .       Kasu. Biixinob
DW. JAKES, M.D., CM.
BY APPOINTMENT
RESIDENT PHYSICIAN TO KETTLE RIVER
DISTRICT,
OFFICE     :     :     I     BOUNDARY FALLS.
T  E. CROWELL,
THO.VSUX ST., VEItNON,
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
Office and Store Fittings a Specialty,
C H. LATIMER,
VERNON, 11. C,
DOMINION AND PROVINCIAL
Xass*n.«3. Surveytaa*.
Mem. Alner. Soc. Irrlg. Hugs.
JOHN A. CORYELL, A. M„ B. C A.
Civil Engineer,
PROVINCIAL   LAND   SURVEYOR
AND DRAUGHTSMAN.
Irrigation Projects, Engineering and Survey Work, with Plans and Estimates,
In Any Portion of the Province, Immediately Attended to.
Maps and Plans of any Portion of
Osoyoos District,
VERNON,    MIDWAY.   KETTLE   RIVER.
C. De B. GREEN,
Assoc. Mem. Can. Soc. C. E,
PROVINCIAL LAND  SURVEYOR
AND DRAUGHTSMAN.
Surveys of Every Description In the Lower
Country from the Simllkameen to Grand
Prairie Immediately Attended to.
Payment will be received either In Cash,
Stock, Produce or Labor,
J. O. HAAS, B. B„ E. M,
MINING ENGINEER AND ASSAYER,
MIDWAY, B. C.
Samples for Assay From a Distance Will
Receive Prompt Attention.
Analytical   Chemist   and   Aiiayer,
GEO. A. G-TJHSS, M.A,
Honor Graduate In Chemistry and Mineralogy, Queen's University, Kingston.
All Kinds of Assays and Analysos Carefully
mid Accurately Performed.
AmiRESS
Care of Strathyre Mining Co.,
Knlrvlow, 11. C.
TEllMS-Gold, Silver or Lead, each 91.50; Gold
and Silver, 82; Nickel, 35; Copper, i'i;
Copper, Gold and Silver, $3. Other prices
on application.	
C. F. COSTERTON
VKHNON, Ii. C.
—A.m;maa.1t J-"oi**—
The Anglo-Columblsn Co., L'td., Whclsale
Importers of Wines and Spirits,
Nlcholles k Renouf, Agricultural Machinery.
—A-eroaa-t  Por—
FOR
The Royal Insurance,
The London k Lancashire,
The Insurance Co. of North America,
Ths London k Canadian Fire Ins. Co.
The Sun Life Assurance Co., of Canada.
The Canadian Permanent Loan k Investment Co,
The Dominion Building k Loan Association.
NOTARY PUBLIC.
CANN & CO.,
BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
And Dealers In
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
SEWING  MACHINES,
WALLPAPER,
TOBACCOS, Etc, Etc
Noedles for All Makes of Sewing
Machines Kept In Stock.
Mail orders from the Lower Country
will receive prompt attention.
CANN & CO.,
VBmvoir,   b.   o.
A. D. WORGAN.
VKHNON, B. C.
VIEWS OP  THE DISTRICT FOR SALE,
GOM dust
riioxru.
§ $ $
MADE FROM SELECTED NO. 1 WHEAT
$   $   %
I have been appointed agent
by Messrs. Eitel Bros., Bridgeport, Wash., for the sale of their
celebrated brand of Gold Dust
Flour, and shall sell the same
on arrival at
PER
BBL,
$6.35
% ^ *
CASH.
Every Sack Guaranteed
Strictly First Quality.
a,    a,    a,
-ft   'ft   T'S
McNICOL
MIDWAY, B, C.
SuliH,iiliiliili^liH.iiliiliH.iH.iili
Tininsft^i&i&.&.^ftTsisisiS
4 Si.
R. N. TAYLOR,
1 THE MfiGIST 1
... f
St.                 IBy Exam,) at
4,1 4,1
As.       _* iii,
VI*.             Vornon *JW
ft A Full Lino of English, Caiiailliin i'S
•JjJ               and Aniorlciui *•>£
$}$ PATENT MEDICINES, $j$
$6               DRUGS AND CHEMICALS, •}•$
HJ FANCY AND MEDICINAL SOAPS, £!£
At                 PERFUMERY, BRUSHES, \\t
4,1 Tit
Si And all Requisites for tlm Toilet and Hi,
if                  Sick lloom if,
... ...
4,1 4 , W
at                    + Kit
ft Orders by Mall receive careful Attcn- ft
*?£         tion and Quick Dispatch. *JIJ
*t                 AOENT roa Si
iii
B. LAURENCE'S
9
9
9 Spectacles and Eyeglasses §
ili£ii£{$tji{£iiii.si£i!£in.i£iiAit,
TSTSiSisTSiSft 4.iftTS7STSiS
G. Arthur Rendell,
General Merchant
BOUNDARY FALLS, B.C.
A Full Stock of
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
MINERS' SUPPLIES,
ALL  AT  THE   LOWE8T   PRIOES.
J. W. I^EED,
WATCHMAKER and JEWELLER
MIDWAY, B. C.
Fine Watch Repairing a Specialty.
All Work Warranted.     o*-2lll
J. Kerr. R, D. Kerr.
KEKr-> BI~<OS„
BUTCHERS,
MIDWAY and BOUNDARY FALLS
Meat dcllvorod nt Hock Crook nnd nil the
Mining Cnmps.
J^airxtort's JMusic Store
-OLD   POST   OFFIOE-
409 Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Pianos and Organs-Easy Terms
Sheet Music, &c. Special attention given to
Mall Orders.
HAY FOR SALE
—A2T—
ROCK CREEK
The Property of the Haynes Estate.
A Large Quantity of Superior
Quality.
Offers for the whole or not less
than five tons to b» made to
J. H, STEWART,
Mor. Haynes Estate, Osoyoos, B, C.
W, DALRYMPLE,
Grunoi*al    Blaokisinltli
FAIRVIEW, B. C,
All Kinds of Repairing.   Horseshoeing a
Specialty.
A (iOOI) JilEASLRE.
An Act Relating to the Extermination
of Wild HoiKia,
The following hill iins been Intro*
ductal in tlie Provincial Legislature by
Mr. .'Vilnius, of Cariboo:
1. This Act may lie cited as the
" Wild Horses Extermination Act,
18115," nnd shall not come into force until one year from the passing of same,
2. This Act shall only apply to that
purl imt of British Columbia lying, uml
generally known as uml understood to
be, east of the Cascade range uf Mountains, in and fur the Districts nf tins-
siiir, Caribou, Lillooet, Yale, and
Kootenay,
II, It shall lie lawful, after the time
prescribed in clause 1 of this Act, to
kill any inibranded horse funning at
large in a wild state in tlie districts
aforesaid; and no person alleging to
lie the owner of any horse so killed
shall have any claim or action in law
against any person killing such animals whicli are luibrantleil or running
at large in n slate of wildness.
4. All such animals as are described
in section 3 of this Act may be shot, or
otherwise put expeditiously to death,
and any person sn killing nu animal according to the provisions of this Act
shall be entitled to the carcass of the
same, and may skin, carry away, or
otherwise dispose of itas he may think
fit: Provided, always, that nothing
under this Act shall be done to injure
the health ol the community, or that
shall constitute a nuisance,
This measure is one that deserves to
become law, as it is a measure that
should have been in force for some
years past. Those acquainted with
the districts that this is intended to
benefit can easily look buck and picture to themselves the luxiirlent hunch
grass covered hills that were once the
pride of the pioneer cattle men, hut
which to-day are stripped of their verdure, making them blend and barren
and unprofitable. In some Instances
overstocking liy cattle has been the
main cause of the change, and in others It may be directly attributed to Ihe
large hands of wild horses that have
been. allowed to roam at large uver
these public lands of the Province.
They are not only a curse iu that they
destroy the ranges, lhey work another
hardship upon settlers, by enticing valuable animals to join their bands, and
in this connection some provision
should he made, by an amendment, exempting parties from responsibility
who, unwittingly, and without any intention of doing so, should be unfortunate enough to destroy any of such
animals constituting for the time lining a member of said wild bands, and
yet at the same time being branded,
Seldom is it possible to come within
range of these wild horses close enough
to distinguish a branded from nn un-
liriiuded one, so that it would seem the
only alternative left to those who
would engage in their extermination is
to run chances of their lieing inibranded and consequently without owners.
 *-♦-.	
OUE SORTING.
Tlie following article by, W. A. Bray,
mining engineer, is clipped froi.il the
Victor News:
Ore sorting In a large percentage of
mining operations is one uf the must
important departments of the work.
As the ore and the rock comes oul of
the mine it is dumped in the sorting
house for that purpose.
Each person has a heavy iron rusting, usually a worn stamp shoe, on
which he breaks the ore. The sorting
hammer is shaped something like a
hammer used by stonecutters, nnd is
iiinde especially for the wurk. The op
crnling of sorting consists of scpnriit
ing the ore which is rich enough to
pay from the waste, or low grade ore,
which is too poor to pay to ship to the
smelters ur reduction works for treatment.
Tlie guild ore is separated from the
waste by chipping olf pour put-lions of
tlie rocks from the good, or vice versa.
It leipiires a good deal of skill in
most cases to break tlie pieces of ore
ami rui'k in such u way thai they can
be easily separated without wasting
guod ore. Sorting is a trade It is
uinl ii dillicull according to Ihe character of the ore. Ill some cases it occurs
in such compact streaks Unit it is easily separated from the wusle, one inan
being able to sort several tons per day.
In these eases tlie ore after sorting will
be in pieces ranging in weight fnnn
two ur three ounces to soveral pounds.
In other cases the ore may be in thin
streaks iu a great deal of waste, and
requires great care in sorting. In
these, after Stirling, it will be in pieces
as large as a walnut. Iu some coses
one ore sorter can sort im much ore as
ten miners can break in the mine and
send to the surface; in other cases it
may requite a half-dozen snorters to
dispose of what one miner can break.
The question of sorting is tine that
ills a very Important llgure in the
profit and loss account uu many a
mine, It is quite evident that the expense of preparing the ure for llle
market will be u great deal inure per
ton in the mine where six sorters are
required for each miner, than where
it will if there is only one sorter
fui every ten miners, This is one of
the items in mining accounts whicli
tlie great majority of Olir eastern
friends pay very dearly for learning,
It is very seldom that a mine produces ore so free fruln waste ruck, and
iii such quantities that it can In*
broken or mined separate from the
waste, sn that it will uut he required to
lie sorted, .Mines of this character are
generally those carrying large bodies
nf low grade ores. Iticli ore generally
ncciirs In Stuilll quantities, scattered
through a great ileal uf giiugue.
Higlit bersjls suggested a needed reform iii giving a description of mines,
It is quite common fur the overreaching mining newspaper reporter or the
writer nf mining news, to write aboul
a foot-foot vein of ore which averages
$100 per ton, or any value he niny
place thereon, In the first place ho
does not mean what he says. What
he means Is the vein carries some ore
that will run a certain average per toll.
It makes a great deal of difference
and distinction which a great many
people do not make, and a few, more
or less, don't want to make, ll inquires n great deal nf experience In
both mining and sorting ure coupled
wilh great judgment, to look at a vein
and make a close estimate nf the number of tons of ore it will yield per cubic
yard, fathom or running foot,
 4-t-i	
A   DIVIDEND  OK  SNOOD,
A Property Thut Has Paid for llmir
nnd Development and Returned s
Huii'lHomu Profit.
A dividend of $8,000 has lieen declared
hy tbe directors of the Cariboo Mining
Company of Spokane, operating the
Cariboo gold mine at Camp McKinney,
British Columbia.
The property was acquired by its
present owners leas than two years
ago and active operations have been
conducted since April 1, 1894. Within
that time the machinery for mining
and the milling plant have lieen paid
for out of the prollls, as well as the expense for labor aud supplies, leaving
a surplus for continuing tlie work, in
addition to the dividend declared,
which was paid tu the stockholders
February 18. In round llgures the mine
has produced between $00,000 and $70,-
000 in the process of development during a period of ahout ten months. It.
has turned out, in bullion from $5,000
to $0,000 a month, with a force of 30
to 10 men.
The ledge is eight feet wide, with
pay mineral all the way across. It is
a white quartz, much of whicli is decomposed. Samples that indicate no
value to the naked eye yield handsomely, nnd the vein is free milling.
The ledge is constantly widening and
increasing in strength, at a deptli of
175 feet in the shaft.   A tunnel  taps
1 he ledge at 80 feet deep and with the
other improvements nnd developments
the property is iu a fair way to yield a
handsome reward for tbe enterprise
and energy of Its owners.
Tames Monughati is president and
manager, and among the other principal stockholders are 0, B, King, George
B. McAuley, William O'Brien, James
N. Glover and Jules L. Priekett.
The entire output of the Cariboo
comes to Spokane, in the form of bullion, and all supplies are procured here.
It is situated something over 100 milca
from Marcus, nnd is across the international boundary line, and was the
first ipinrtz properly developed in the
Hock creek districl. Mining men pro*
nuitncc it one of the greatest discoveries in the North-West.--Chronicle.
 4+4	
The following will give au idea of
what is meant when the terms puro
gold, good gold and low grade gold are
used: Twenty-four karat gold is nil
gold; twenty-two karat gold has
twenty-two parts of gold, one of silver and one of copper | eighteen karat
gold has eighteen parts of pure gold
and three parts each of copper und silver iu its Composition ; twelve karat
gold is half gold, the remainder being
Hindi' up of three and otie-hnlf parts of
silver and sight and one-half parts of
copper, The placer gnld of this ooun*
try averages from $15 to $18 per ounce
nnd lead gold seldom averages Ilium
than $17.50 per uiince.
The consumption of gold in the arts
and in dentistry throughout the world
is estimated at from $66,000,000 to $»!,-
000,000 a year. Fur thuse purpusi's
ahoul $22,01)0,000 worth of this metal
was used in the United Stales during
1802. It has been reckoned that within ten years this country will eniylny
the whole of its gold producl of $33,-
ooo.ixio annually for trinkets gilding
and teeth, the increase in that direction being nl Ihe rule of 101,000,000 per
nullum,—Ex, inn auvainuh.
STUART k NORMS I'BOI'RIETOIIS.
Published   weekly  at Midway,  B. C.
Subscription Price, 81.00 per aiinuiu. payable
in advance, cither yearly or half-yearly at the
lition uf the subscriber.
Advertising Rates sent on application.
Thoui*h ilie columns of Tiie Advance arc
nl ways open fnr the discussion of mutters of
public Interest ami Importance, wo itu not ncc-
ccssarily endorse any uf the opinions exnreSBod,
('urrcsponilcnce of a persona] nature will not be
published.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28,1805,
THE WAGES BILL.
The Bill Introduced, and now before
the Legislature, by the member for
West Kootenay, Mr. Kellie, entitled
"An Act lu regulate the payment of
wages," is une having fur its object the
putting nn end to the practice prevalent in those parts of the Province contiguous tu (lie States, nf paying miners
and others in time checks, and
bills, ami checks on American
banks, by companies doing liusiness in
British Columbia and having llieir
headquarters and banking accounts ou
the other side of the line, lu the past
a guild ileal uf inconvenience has been
occasioned those receiving this paper,
nnd ut the same time a certain amount
uf loss, owing to the fuct that it has
been llie custuniary practice, in some
localities nt least, for merchants and
small capitalists to resort to the shaving system, whenever a needy wage
earner has been forced lo the necessity
uf speedily converting this paper into
cash.   Section 2 of the bill strikes at
I he root of the evil and reads as follows :
" No payment of wages (except goods
or merchandise, agreed upon between
the employe aiid employer) shall be
made or (ilfercd by any person for
labor performed within the Province of
British Columbia liy any cheque, order,
time check, I.O.U.. bill of exchange,
promissory note, ur other undertaking
ul her than gold or silver currency, or
bunk notes, or bills drawn upon or payable nt or within any place or locality
not within tlie Province of British Columbia."
If this measure becomeslalv.'nitd nu
doubt it. will, it will have the effect of
hampering capitalists in the free exercise of their business for the, time being, but will nut, we believe, work a
hardship upon'thein in the long run.
As far as this Province is concerned,
il will he to its benefit, as
foyelgn companies will he obliged to
patronize tlie banking and other institutions of the country, which is only
done to a certain extent, at the present,
time. There is one feature of the hill,
however, that should receive attention.
In the parts of tlie Province nhove referred to, the American greenback is
placed nn nn etpial fooling with the
currency of uur country, nnd, at the
option of the wage earner, the employer should be nHmved to make use
of the same. In all other respects the
bill is a good one,
 ny,——
JUMPED THE TRACK AGAIN,
'7he mail service has again jumped
the track, and, as a consequence,.our
lenders will not receive their papers on
the regulation day. The change was
one sought, nii'd'fightly so, hy the people of Grand Prairie, Kettle river, .so
that, they might lie allowed time to
answer correspondence by return mail,
which they were tiiinble before' to do,
The Inconvenience consequent to the
change is that no more mails will arrive from the north for the next ten
II n vs. Again, on the first of April,
ano her ch nge is intended, which will
reverse the service entirely, the start
to be made from Grand Forks on Tuesdays, instead of from Penticton, as at
present, For the month of March the
mail leaves Grand Forks on Mondnys
and returns Saturdays. In the meantime we lire floundering around, hoping against hope that some day, when
Inspector .Fletcher has passed to
warmer climes, order may possibly be
brought opt of chaos.
'a.*7**ri 1* • *- '—'
Wu SOTS with pleasure that men are
being put on the roads to look after
I bein and keep thein in repair during
llie time of the thaw. This is as it
should he, nnd if tiie plaU had been
lldopled years ago, much money would
have been saved to Ihe Province. By
pnylng attention lo roads just at this
lime, when the water that is rushing
down fiotn the hills has such a tendency (if not diverted into its proper
channels) to destroy them, shows that
those having the management of these
affairs are inclined to adopt a different
method I linn thnl hitherto pursued In
these matters, and one Ihnt might he
imitated with benefit iu other partn of
llie province. A penny spent now
mean* ll pound saved later in the sea-
At a cabinet ineeling held at Ottawa
un the 21st, an order ip council wus
passed making Premier Davie Chief
.lusti (the Province of British Co-
liiiiibin. II. is confidently expected the
lion. J. 11. Turner, Finance Minister,
will tie offered Ihe appointment as
leaden of the Government! ns successor to Hon. Then. Davie.
The Cozy Shaving Parlor
VEIINON, a I'.
The Gilmore Block, nm
Opposite the Post Office.
/Wljullcs' nnil Children's IniirciiltliiK and
ihtuiipoolngi! specialty. 	
K,(!0(l!I.Mnil'IIY.I'rn|i.
AI-CltNl   AH1   ANU   C-UltNUt.
B.C. 1700. M.islllo wire msde by some
nnkoi'wn process, -
H.C. 2110. The great brawn itsttH of
Rhodes l.nilt by Chares
EC, 202. Art of printing said lo hare
be,n invented iu China.
H.C. 721. The first recorded eclipse of
the mniiii observed; in Babylon.
H.C. 219. First mention : tbesrtof
buiaa-iv; amputations performed.
B.C. 001. The, first calculation, snd
prediction nf a solar eclipse; by Ttiales
B.C. '.'234. The firm refflird made uf as*
Iriiiiiiuiical observations;at Babylon.
B.C. 3130. The arts of spinning snd
weaving invented by Noomah, ft woman.
B.C. 1490. The fin! pottery vessels
mad**; simultaneously lu Greeoe snd
Egypt. ■
B.C. 2100. The first known senlptures
and piiliitiitgs were made; in Kaypt.
B.C. 2005. Surveying used iu Euypt In
layini; nut canals   The Pyramids begun.
B.C. 040. The Tiisliaa theory of tbe
eartti. ...orrica) fora. tauitlit; iu Greece.
B.C. t ti. Atliuics, ss Egyptian king,
said to liavc invented liieri's-lypliics.
B.C. 1127. A mummy nf about thii
dale wus found to have teeth filled with
amal/iiin.
B.C. 2247. The first reeordrd nse of
bricks and uiortar. Tower of Holm buill
al Babylon.
B.C. 198. Hooks with leaves like those
nf tilinlerii times introduced in I'ergamui
instead uf the rolled parchments, which
were easily dnuiuusil,
GATHERED fROM NATURE.
The smallest bin' ii an East Indian
liiiiuniiagbiril. It is a little larger than
the Clillllnoll house, lly.
Sun sputa were first discovered In 1611,
and were then tinted by several aetrono*
mem nt about the same time.
Seveisnl species of nuts keep sows, the
aphis answering tlie purpo.ii, mil milk
them at re(jnliir intervals
Micmsci-'ihiats say that the strongest
micriiH opes do not, probably, reveal ths
lowest stupes of animal life.
Man ia scientifically defined ss forty*
five pntuiijs uf carbon and nitrogen diffused through five buckets of water.
N, iiln-r chemists nor naturalists have
yi I been aloe to solve the question why a
lobster turns red when boiled.
Over nni, hundred instances are on record where liiunitii bodies, after burial,
remained uiiciirrupteil far many years.
The w tlest place iu North America is
Nmli lin , iu Washington; over one him*
iir.il and twenty-three iuohes of rain fall
mere every year.
PROGRESS OF THE TELEGRAPH.
1857. Atlantic oable laid, bul, proved a
failure.
,1872, Ocean cables laid from India to
AiiHirillft.
1837. The Moree patents for an eleetrU
telegraph taken out   *      ...
1801. Cables laid'almost the whole
lelic.tli of the Mediterranean. .
1N''6. j'ul-wspli line opened from New
York to St. J„-.oi, Nfld.
IBM, Cat:' lines laid across the English
channel; at f..->l a failure.
18110. All ntic cables successful 1'er-
lect ciilntiiunlciitioli established,
'lOiHt, lu.jsirtant discoveries made In
electricity by Gilbert and ethers;
lo'ill. Te,li*irnplt linen from England to
InjtH'ljl nearl'v ell'lta route overland.
1874. Cables laid between Europe and
Brazil, and telegraphic communication
opened.
1879. A seventh oable across the Atlantic; the last from Cape Cod to Brest, in
Erance.
1032. The electric telegraph foretold by
Galileo, who told how conversations could
be held by magnetic needles.
LITTLE GRINS.
Woman leads the world. She used
smokeless powder for ages before men
ever tluitlgln of adopting it.—Tid-Bit*.
Pot—Say, Mike, why don't yon buys
bicu-le? ilike—Beoanse if I wsnt to
walk I'll walk standing np.—Boston
Urrald,
T(««lles—Could yon let me have five dollars lor a few days! "No; I have more
il.irs than I know what to do, with now."
—Inter Ocean.
Mr. Ilnlley—Miss Flypp, why do yoa
suppose it is that there is no marrying nor
airing in marriage in heaven? Miss Flypp
(prl'!Ui*y)*—Nu men there.—Judge.
He—T*.«o 1 uiaUratand that you eontend
for au e-'.-uuy cf the seies. She—Not sl
all. I don't expect men ever will be
quite equal lo women.—Boston Transcript.
Humane Officer—Why do yon pile all
your Iiiul ou tbe front of -the ourtt Laiy
Man—Sn lh' ho* won't have so far t' poll
il. liv eoarse. Tn*.! I ain't got no fselin't
—Cleveland Plain Dealer,
PROVERBS OF THE DAY.
A prodigal picks his own pocket
Empty thrusts make lying children,
Don's go lo the wrong shop to get
shaved.
A stinted wife ssn And a vest pocket In
the dark.
If we had eternal sunshine we would
have no crops.
Ths d.ngnrous Md oil  rattlesnake
makes uo anise.
The crnh when living near the ocean',
siirliice lias well developed eym 111 ilec|ici
n ai er only cyeatalks are present—no eyea-
tvliili' in specimens from still deeper ivati'i
Ihe cyeatalks have joined, lormiug a point
ed beak.
In Norway the horses alwavs have a
hucket nl water placed beside each nni
uial - allowance of hay. After each mom a
fill ol hay they lake a sip of waier. Ilis
.nud this modi) of feeding Is beneficial, ana
mil tlie fact is attributed tli.it a broken
winded horse Is raruly seen in Norway.
Tlie paragon ol fabulous creatures, the
basilisk perhaps excepted, was the Am
'iiiiii phienix, a bird which, according to
mythical lure, lived WK)years, then nuiileii
nest uf spices and aromatic ivuisls, fiiuneil
' hciii llltu a blaze with its wing, burned it
sell to ashes and came forth to live another
WO years.   ...
UAKliiUK KJblNUZLL
BOUNDARY FALLS, B.C.
Headquarters  for  Miners'   Supplies.
A GOOD STOCK OF
Qroceries, GtathirAg. Boots arvd Shoes,
foWder, Etc,
ALWAYS   ON   HAND.
JUST RECEIVED A GOOD LINE OF
Men's Underclothing and Soeks
Orders Taken for All Kinds of
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
G. ARTHUR RENDELL.
MANLEY BROS,
Qirarvd Forks, B, C,
in.
BOOTS and SHOES
DRY GOODS
CLOTHING
HARDWARE
and
groceries.
Gold Drop Flour
$5.5q
l.JbLLiur,
General Merchant,
FAIRVIEW, B. C.
Keeps the Largest and Best Assorted Stock of
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots & Shoes, &c.
any place south of Vernon, and sells on terms to Buit the times,
Cheapest Place to buy' for Cash in the Okanagnn Country.
FULL WEIGHT AND  MEASURE ASSURED.
A.J.
OOIWO   BOUTH
■   : ...        '        i
■   i     . •.' .    .'■      1*1   '' •      ',   I  ■ ■
will leave Penticton  7 a.m..every Tuesday,, Thursday, and; ,,,
Saturday, arriving at Fairview 1 p.m., and Oro, Washington;'- ' " '
the same evening. '..".•,".j
Croxnro north ,,.*'
will leave Oro, Washington, 7 a. in., Mohdays, 'Wednesdays
and Fridays, reaching Fairview at n a. m.,.c6nne.cting with
SS. Aberdeen and S. & O. and C. P, Railways.;
A. J. Sprole, Prop.
:■.-■:-
.na      11
CONKLE & DONALD
General Teamsters and Freighters,
ROCK CREEK, B. C. .*'. -iZ.
Hates from Penticton to Camp McKinney, Rock Creek," Midway and
Boundary Falls, two cents per pound for two tons or under. Marcus to Midway, the same rule.   Marcus to Grand Prairie one cent per pound!'      :i'
Special Rates for Large Orders and Ore Contracts.
PER BBL
PER BBL.
mmmmmmmmwMmmmm
BOUNDARY FALLS HOTEL.
Centrally Located in the Boundary Creek
Mining Camps.
hest ok i.njcons and ciaAitS.   •
i|    ,   ..   CHARGES M011K11ATF).
jllniiil! Men Personally Conducted lo Any of
llio Camps, or llurscs Furnished.
THOMAS. J. HARDY, PROP.
FAIRVIEW HOTEL
GEORGE J. SHEEHAN, PROP.
EXCELLENT BOARD
GOOD STABLING
Horses and Buggies for Hire.
Veraoii Irivate Klep.
VERNON, B.C.
F, AllRIEN  MEYER, PlUiNCII'AL.
SEND FOR I'llOHI'KCTUS,
County Court Notice,
SITTINGS of tho County Court ot I'alo will
lie hidden as follows:
At Osoynoson Wednesday, lllth Aprl|, 1895;
At Midway on Saturday, ttlli April, im,
at the liuilr of eleven n'eluek lu the fureluiiiii.
lly Command'
C. A, It. LAMBIlY,    ■
11. C. C.
GOVKIINMEST OlTK.'l', OSOVOOS,
23id April Hill.
GRAND FORKS
HOTEL   ' ;
KETTLE  R1YEI>£, B.C.
Stages to Marcus, Wusli,, nild
Midway, B. 0.
Every Attention Given to Guests.
J. L. WISEMAN, Prop.
BOCK CREEK HOTEL . . .
MOUTH OV ROCK CHEEK. ..
XX.   "&i.-t-toax€Lar±gfika,   KCfx**.
KlItST-Cl.ASS   ACCOJUIOniTIQN   KOU  GCEST8.
GOOD STABLING
itarExcellolit Ftshini* on Kettlo Hiver..ffi» ;
Gilbert's Resort.
OKANAQAN LANBING.
HUNTING, FliSHINe, BOATING.
'    TilOKOUOlfLY COMFOllTABM.
TFirnt-oInBfl—
LIQUORS and CIGARS.
GOLD COMMISSIONER'S NOTICE.
ENDERBY HOTEL
(1. W. WRIGHT, I'ltoi*.
:-:   ENDERBY, B. C.   :-:
Livery In Connection,
First-class acciiiniiiiiilulioa for Coinniiirclul
Travellers.
Hunting and Fialilin; In iihiinilnnco lhrough
this district.
l'ack Horses and Guides furnished lo Spurts-
men on shortest notice,
ARMSTRONQ   HOTEL
H. KEYES, Prop,
Osoyoos Division of Yule Dis-1 Good Aicoiniiiodiition
trict.
All placer claims and lease llnlils In this district Icn'illly held may be laid over frnm llielsl
of November, 18111, to tho 1h1 of June, IKOii.
0, A. R. LAMIILY,
OsOVOOB, P. 0„ Gold Commissioner.
'lilli October, 181)1.
Best Liquors and Cigars,
First-Class Stabling,
GENOWAYS & McAVINEY-
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in and Growers oi
'.;.,:     CHOICE NURSERY STOCK.   :;:;
All Stock Grown Without Irrigation. , ,   ' """'   ;,''  '
All Trees Inspected Before Leaving the Nursery
SPOKANE   FALLS,' ' ';,,'
P. O. Box 582. Wnsh'irigton'
Okanagan Saw Mill-"'
Kelowna,, EX-
• ,1 a.: Ii'li' h
A Large Stock of All Kinds of Rough and Dres^d L'urpb'er,.  , '
of Superior Quality, Thoroughly Seasoned; .Con**'."-i..'1   •'
stantly on Hand, '".'""'"'
I    ■      ■ ■■':.■..!      ii aa   a
Bill  mt.aa.te a.  Specialty. '<"'   '-'   ''' •'
Ox*t3.sn*>*ts Promptly FlUatL
('il  le
; Lath, Shingles, Sash and Doors.;;
Goods Delivered at Okanagan, 'Falls at Reasonable  Rates! '   ",T
LEON LEQUIME, Proprietor. ' ly
WULFFSOHN l& BEWICK£~L^     ;
BANKERS
Financial, Real Estate, Insurance and  '
,. ' % .;,;       ' -   i . .lift ■■ ■ i ..it   Jm:?
General Agents.      , ;
**(.-■■■
.> :.r.
Dock House, Billiter SmEET, London, England, .
VANCOUVER, B.C. i  and VERNON, R'C."     ''
JOHANN WULFFSOHN, Managing Director. ,..,«"    ..    ■„,..
Varhcn Branch, G. A. Kankey, Hanager.ft ,«,
THE CANADIAN iWDl)RILL;CQ.,    ;;;:'!
SHBRBBOOKE, QUEBEC.   ,....■''."     .    i'•
IKanufaeturefg o,f .:■'...
ROCK BRILLS AN&'lAIl?C0KIKESSORS. "' '''"""' '',",
In Al! l-i.-tuuii.rq tfcu.Cert" .'■. -..i
i .ir.;'-.. "..■■■   ilf mail j(n.
SjlMlal Comprei-"*' !"""'
wrs driven ,hy.'r„r_,... ,
PELTOK , WATBB,, v„..i ....
WHtll '• ;'' ri*.'-*-
mounted tllriebt up-: ',,v '
on orank-shaft, ss- "'
peclallya(lni-.adfor„ ,',,,..,.
ullllilni,-ths powwv ,*mV ,,-.,
if mountain steams ' < "(•• '
.is shown In lllus-" ''
iratlon.
H. P. PALMERSTON,    \
Agent for Midway and District.
VICTORIA HOTEL
VERNON, B. C.
MURPHY & FAULKNER, Props.
ARMSTRONG, B. C,
No Trouble or Expense Spared to Make Guests Comfortable.
Strictly First-Class and Charges Moderate.
Best Brands Liquers and Cigars. <      ->      ■•■      Good Stabling. Mr. J. A. Coryell returned to Midway on last week's stage.
The Grand Prairie saw mill has got
in 100,000 feet of logs and will start lip
sawing very shortly.
McLaren Bros, intend putting up
an addition to their hotel, and a new
saloon building in the spring.
Last week's stage from Penticton
brought in six passengers. People are
commencing to. move around.
The material for the Boundary Falls
post office arrived on the lost stage,
and the office will he opened ut'ouce.
Representatives of large companies
are coming in from all directions,
' wh'fh shows that the importance of
this districl, as a Held for profitable investment of capital is rapidly being
appreciated pn the outside,
A petition is being circulated between Grand Prairie and Penticton
calling on the Dominion authorities to
furnish us with three mails a week,
Whether or not the request is granted,
it is what the country needs and also
what we are entitled to.   ,
The work on the Ingram bridge progresses favorably, both piors being
now completed, This work was undertaken none, too sunn, as in a few
days, if the thaw continues, the Ice
will be out of tbe Kettie river, and
without the ice to work on it would
have been a difficult job to get the
piers set in position. • ■ a
The contract for the recorder's office
aud lock-up lo lie erected here has
been given to Mr. T. E. dwell of Vernon, who was the successful tenderer,
The work wlHTiecou'ime^ced as soon
as the material can be got upon the
ground, The contract price for the
work is $1,670, and the buildings to he
finished before the first of June.
On or about tlie 22nd of March a
concert social will be given at Grand
Prairie, the oroceeds from which will
be devoted to defraying the expense of
providing a, fence aiid" fencing the
church and also tlie. ceinoterj* grounds.
No pains will be spared; to' provide an
enjoyable' entertainment, and each
and all should contribute what they
■can to so worthy an object.
A petition is being very numerously
•signed in Grand Prairie, asking the
Dominion Government to change the
■days of the Kellle river mail service
jsii that the carrier can stay at least
oue day in the valley. The present
service, as arranged to suit the autocratic ideas of Inspector Fletcher, is of
little value to thy people of the eastern
section of tlm valley, as -lhey have no
time given thein to answercorrespond-
•eiiM! until the week after it js fecejved.
The change should lie made at once,
The advisability of building a Presbyterian church hurl is,.licing' discussed,
and is likely to Ihi carried into effect nt
once. There should be no difficulty in
doing I his if the same line of action is
taken as at Grand 'Prairie,1 where the
Bev. Mr. Paten was successful in providing a place of worship for his congregation, and that without running
them into debt to lbe extent of one
dollar. TliK,c(iiiiiiioiiililnY trait in the
reverend gentleman's character is that
be does not believe io building churches
on .borrowed money or jaw bono, hut
would rather have the structures built
according as means are available, and
liiluir contributed will count at even ii
higher figure- -than cash, By this
means an interest, in the undertaking
will be awakened that could he produced in no other way., and if the
same policy had been followed
in other communities there would be
at the present'-) time fewer churches
with heavy mortgages upon them in
the province, and people would have
much more respect for religion.
 4*4—.	
MINING, NQTEiS.
Colonel Doyle, a mining man from
Butte, Mont.; passed through Midway
one day 1astr«eek"bbund'forCamp
McKinney, where lie was the guest of
the Cariboo Co. lie returned by yes
terday's stage on his way out, taking
with him a number of fine saiirnpies of
ore.
The Spokafle Clirdnk-le says: Judging from the reports that are coming in
from the Slocan, .Trail creek, Boundary creek, aiid other mining camps,
Spokane's tritiu'Ury mining country is
getting ready Tor one of the liveliest
years it has ever known, even if the
silver hill did.gu to the calendar,
Messrs, Bartholomew and Meyers
have given up work on their claim, the
Master Mason, for the time being, und
are going Uf lake a jaunt as far as Spokane to interview parties there who
•are interested with them in the property. They expect, to return and renew their attack ou the lend with fresh
vigor in about three weeks.
Mr. Byron N. White, of the Slocan
country, is at. present, iu our midst,
having come in from Spokane in company with Mr. C, 0 Sands. Mr.
White is part owner and manager of
the Slocan Star in Kootenay, His
present visit is one of interest to the
Boundary creek mine owners, as
there are few better able to
form an opinion of our resources
as regards mineral wealth, and
to secure this gentleman's favorable judgment and good opinion
no pains should be spared by mine
owners and owners of prospects to
give an opportunity to this practical
man to examine, their properties, and
j »«.«••   .. »>-i» »>■>. ii ' i'""  llllil   Ul
what does really exist in mines and
minerals in the Boundary camps, In
conversation he expressed himself as
having never seen a country so favorable to prospect in, every requisite to
be found here in the shape of timber,
water, bunch grass, game and minerals, iu fact, a regular prospector's
paradise. On Tuesday he proceeded
to White's camp to take a look at the
City of Paris and Lincoln claims.
Dennis & Bradley to-day let the contract for the extension of tunnel No. 1
in the Old Dominion mine, near Colville to J. A. Clarke, the well known
contractor, The contract calls for an
extension of 1,600 feet, the work to be
commenced at once. Other extensive
improvements will he made in the
Old Dominion this summer, and a large
force of men will be put to work.—Ex.
Mr. J. Taylor has commenced sinking on the Oro (formerly the Wellington) in the Wellington camp. The
vein on this claim was struck in the
tunnel at a depth of 150 feet from the
surface, after going SO feet, and shows
up three nnd one-half feet between
walls, The ore is gold quartz, Mr,
Taylor is now sinking a shaft in the
tunnel. The last assay of tlie rock
gave three ounces in gold.
Mr. Bennerman recently located a
claim three miles east of Midway,
close to the boundary line, naming It
the Climax. Already considerable
work bus been done, un open cut of
thirty feet having been run in the side
hill on the vein, upon which a shaft
has been sunk some nine feet. The
ledge is live feet wide, carrying a little
native silver and some galena, and
bids fair to turn out a good prospect.
Messrs, Sullivan and Covert will run
a 59 foot tunnel on their claim, the
Spotted Horse, this summer, that is
if the bond which is upon the property
at the present time should not be taken
up. This claim, owing to the character of its ore and its location, will,
when smellers are established in the
country, lie of great importance, the
position of the lead making it one very
easily worked. It will at all times
commend itself to capitalist*.
Work will be resumed on the Keno
hy Mr. John Meyer as soon as the season nermits, with a view to making a
shipment (if ore during the summer,
The wagon road over Boundary mountain runs lhrough this claim, which
lies between tlie Skylark and Wellington camps, Though this is a new property it is a vety promising one.
Where work has been done so fur no
walls hove yet. been found, and the
shaft (15 feet deep) is in solid ore. The
intention is to sink fifty feet and crosscut lit that depth, Average assays of
the ore give $50 in silver and $10 in
gold.
The Silver Bluff mines, near Tonasket, Wash,, have been sold to an
Eastern company, who, according to
agreement, propose to expend some
$59,000 this summer in developing the
property. They have men at work
putting things into shape preparatory
to putting on a force of some 80 or 40
men. The sale of this property has
cheered the heart of many a miner,
who, for so long a time, has been waiting and watchipg for Ihe rift in the
cloud that has hung over the mining
interests of this section for some years
past, the mining interests of Okanagan
County, Wash., have not looked so
bright for many a day. None will begrudge the good fortune that has fallen to the lot of Messrs. Moore and
Cbilson, who, deserve the reward they
have so wtiently worked for.
Mr. Parke, a representative of eastern capitalists and owner of the Queen
Bee mine, Arizona, has just arrived in
Midway from Okanagan county,
Wash., where he hod heen to examine
some mining property. From the
Queen Bee was taken some of the
richest and choicest native silver specimens e.ver found in any mjjje in the
south-west, and some exhibited by this
gentleman , here would verify the
statement, as nothing so beautiful was
ever seen in this section before. Mr,
Parke is attracted by some of the pro
percies in Camp McKinney, which
means that in all likelihood the water
will be taken out of the Eureka and
Maple Leaf, both of which claims he
wishes to examine. It should be un
easy matter to place properties with
this gentleman, as it is understood he
is looking for free gold propositions
that will run on an averuge from $8
per tou upwards, and many such are
to he found in some of our camps.
The new railroad front Kaslo into
the Slocan hills will be built this year
So thinks N. J. Wilson of Three Forks,
a well known mine owner who has
been spending a few days In Spokane,
" The company has only a short time
to get to liusiness," said Mr. Wilson,
"and the charter is far too 'valuable to
be forfeited. The Kaslo Townsite coin*
pany of Vancouver is anxious to have
il. built, and so is President Corbin of
the S. F. k N. and President Hill of
the Great Northern! We have good
reasons for believing that work will
begin this spring." Mr. Wilson brings
news of a good sti ike on the Antelope
—four Inches of iintiiiioniul silver,
assaying ns high as 2,800 ounces to the
Ion. Another good strike bus been
made on the Yakima—not so high a
grade, but a twelve-foot vein of good
pay ore. The owners of the Idaho are
reported to have bought out the Cumberland Mining company, tlie terms
being $15,000 cash and $10,000 payable
in six monts.—Chronicle.
anonmuflu nArrjsmAIUS.
(From our own correflpondeiit.1
Armstrong, Feb. 25.—We are enjoying warm weather, and the snow is
nearly all gone.
On Monday last, the Armstrong
Town Hall Companygavea very interesting concert in the Town Hall, the
object of which was to raise funds to
liquidate the debt upon the aforesaid
building. There was a large attendance and each and all enjoyed the entertainment immensely. The second
part of the entertainment was rendered by the Armstrong Amateur Minstrel Troupe, whose choruses, songs and
musical selections from their silver"
plaled band brought down the house.
It is to be hoped that this is not the
last time that this troupe will delight
the puhlic.
Nearly all the teams returned from
Kootenay hy special train on Wednesday, where they had heen hauling ore.
Mr. D. Graham arrived home from
Victoria on Friday last, and wns met
at the depot by a lot of his old friends,
who were glad to see him looking so
well after his arduous duties in the
legislative session just closed.
Friday las* was a gala day here, the
children, parents and friends of the
seven schuols in the neighborhood
gathered at the Town Hall at 10 o. in.,
and during the day a very enjoyable
programme was rendered by the scholars. Both old and young were pleased
with tlie refreshments and games provided for them, and look forward with
eagerness to the next gathering,
Mrs. Barrett is holding a series of
evangelistic meetings at Enderby, and
making a lot of converts. She preached here yesterday.
The saw mill is running once more
full swing.
The regular meeting of the Spallum-
cheen council was held on Saturday
last, at which quite a lot of business
was transacted. Mr. R. S, Pelly has
received the appointment of clerk and
assessor, in place of Mr. H. Sydul, who
has resigned.
Councillor dimming, who hns lieen
indisposed lately, wis able to be around
on Saturday last,
The 1,0. G, T, intend giving an open
meeting shortly.
A MEXICAN FETE.
CELEBRATING THE FEAST OF SAN LORENZO IN NEW MEXICO.
FOREIGN  NEWS.
The Rosebery Government very narrowly escaped defeat, on the 18th,
when a vote was taken in the House
of Commons on Sir William Hnrcourt's
mo| ion to close the debate on the address in reply to the Queen's speech.
The vote was'279 to 271.
London advices of the 20th statethat
the amount of gold iu transit between
England and America on thut date is
very close to $6,000,000,
The United States naval appropriations bill has passed the. house by a
vote of 199 to (17, and Bayer's motion to
strike oiit the provision for three new
battle ships was lost by a vote of 111 lo
121.
The portion of the new United States
loan allotted to Europe and placed on
the market,by.N. St., Rothschilds k
Son, was subscribed for several times,
over, which shows the amount nf confidence moneyed men have in the financial stability of the United States.
: 4*4	
LOCAL NOTICES.
[Announcements under this head iniule at a
charge of 20 cents por line each insert ion.]
I beg to call attention that the Gold
Dust Brand of flour has arrived, and
that I am selling same at, prices advertised by me elsewhere in this paper.
J. McNicol.
Tbe Early Bird Gets the Worm.
 4t	
Eitel Bros,, proprietors of the
Bridgeport (Washington) Flouring
Mills, have given Parry k McLbl-
lan, of Tonasket Store, Alma P. O.,
Okanagan Co., Wash., exclusive right
to sell the products of their mill in
B, C. for one year, commencing Feb. 12.
THE GOLD DUST BRAND
of flour, is made by this firm, which
seems to lie a wonderful favorite whenever it hus been introduced. Parry &
McLellan Guarantee this Flour First-
Class in every respect, and will give a
written contract to that effect to all
buyers of this brand.
 4*4	
Rand Brills.
We call the attention of your readers
to our advertisement of tne Canadian
Rand Drill Co., to be found in your advertising columns. Now that the mining industry is becoming such an important one in the district, thcru
should be room for the introduction ot
these drilling machines in some of your
mines. By their use the profits accruing fnnn son! mines maybe materially
incrensed, a matter not to he overlooked or lightly thought of, especially
where the ore worked is of low grade,
No opportunity should ho lost to introduce machinery where the introduction
of the some will lessen the cost of production, and ns a consequence give an
increased profit, enabling, in ninny
cases, properties lo he worked which
otherwise would lie idle.
A Weird Performance In Wlil.li Orot-u-
Que Dancers Pay Tribute to the Mint
— Linllcruo.   Vestures  of   tlie    Cere-
01011*1.
Shortly after sundown the fete of San
Lorenzo was Inaugurated. It waa an
opening performance, as weird as a
witches- dance! with a fiend from the Inferno fiddling out the accompaniment,
says a llcriinlilln dispatch to the New York
Advertiser. Fagot Urea were lighted in
every sipiare of the narrow, dusty streets,
and sunn the town was all ablaze with the
yellow glare unit cast funtastic shadows
upon the walls of the little cubes of mud,
the abode houses of a sun-kissed clime. A
shot was fired, and there emerged from
one of the low buildings a string of as
peculiarly-garla'd men as one might see in
a year's travel through foreign countries.
They came tripping out In single
file, iiliuut twenty In number, swaying their lissome talics lu rhythm with
a two-string fiddle and a guitar
that was sadly out of tune, the while executing a dance that was never seen upon
any stage. Tlio costume was really a wonderful atriiir, ilm headdress lieing markedly
striking iu design and* finish. In shape
something like the French chnpenu, It
served llie dunlin- purpose of a mask and
headgear, extending to the mouth and
enveloping tin- greater part of the hood.
It wns gnjiy tinseled and tnsseled and
fairly shnneVitli'beads and ail the ornamentation which the Mexican fancy can
suggest. The lowor part of the face waa
concealed by a silk handkerchief of brilliant color, leaving a small aperture for
breathing purposes. Down the back Hunted
vari-colored streamers, and capes of rich
material drooped gracefully from the
shoulders. Iu une hand tlioy carried Hcrnll
work that looked like the substantial side
of a paper rack, and. with the other they
rattled tholr prettily decorated castanets
in tune with the monotonous movements
of the dance. Some of the dancers were
distinguished lu an original nnd startling
way, whicli, to the American onlooker,
lent ridicule to the whole Inane proceeding.
Over their velvet trousers were drawn abbreviated bftUoon pantalettes of the style
so iiflVcti'itby the comic paper cartoonists
ill their sketches ot the aunties of colored
society,
Around the flaming fagot (Ires they
formed iiiul amid a silence as profound us
a graveyard nt night they circled these
tributes in tin* saint, never changing the
step, but varying the movements of the
laxly nl, ciiiuiniuid of the lender. Sometimes they would bow and scrape to the
flames, and then fall to the earth and
squirm and wriggle like so many horrid
snakes II was a weird scene. The glow
from the tires dreadfully accent tinted the
painted faces of the Indians, who stood
stoically silent, with no manitestation of
approval nr displeasure. They formed a
lurid background ton decidedly dramatic
rereinniiy. Tlio senorsthemselves, mantled
in their scrapes, were an interesting part
of tliestagu grimp, and the gaunt and sallow faces of the son'orai seemed to reflect
the spirit uf superstition that swayed the
scene. The..dancers never appeared to
grow tired. It was "Oh, on with the
dunce" all the time, until a diversion was
created liy She sudden appearance
evil spirit iu the makeup uf a lnill. This
felluw wore horns, and the greater part of
his body was incased In the hide of the
animal thai shows so much antipathy to
red.
FOR SALE
BEpQPiilf! jiOJEb
OKANAGAN MISSION, B. C.
This in a fljj.ciuU.Hy finished house Inside
and out, almost new. with good itablo nnd oat
buildings, in centrally located in the valley
and commands a good trade* It standi on its
own ground* of two Wid a half ncres to extent,
and iti a good investment.
ALSO A FIRST-CLASS
BLACKSMITH SHOP
WITH
COMPLETE OUTFIT CF TOOLS.
This building Is two storey* high nnd stands
nn it-s own ground of half an acre in extent, and
is In a commanding business position.
Foit Tki.mhAjti.yti>
i). nicholson,
Okanagan Mission,
BACON
and
PORK
FOR SALE CHEAP
In Large Quantities.
For Prices Write
J. BROWN,
fMm OKANAGAN MISSION.
D. KicOUFF,
General Blacksmith,
MIDWAY, B. 0.
All Kinds of Work touted to the Satis
faction of UiiHtomors,
luminal lllsliitectliin.
A practical unanimity of opinion may
bcsiiid liipi-etail at. present among physicians and chemists that the following
methods of disinfection have proved' tbe
most.effective and trustworthy: All fabrics which will not bo injured iu the process are to lie boiled in water for at least
four hours, and fabrics which will not
stand this treatment require to bo subjected to tlio action of dry heat for a much
longer time. Furniture, etc., may bo
treated with a four-tenths per cent, solution of carbolic acid. All articles which
have lieen in actual use by a patient nre to
.be burned, tile walls of the room must be
thoroughly rubbed down with bread, which
Is afterward to lie burned, nnd the sputa
and excrements of the patient treated nt
once with chloride of lime. German
authorities advocate the employment of
steam and heat, maintaining that these
are cheap and efficient agents, lieing also
highly penetrable mid at the same time are
dangerous to but few household articles.
Of the three chemical agents destructive
of disease germs viz.: carisilic acid, corrosive .sublimate and chloride of lime, ths
last is the least expensive and dangerous.
Ilie IJIirlltnins Hobby llutrnu,
Among the diversions of the season in
the olden time was the hobby horse. It Is
said to have originated in Cornwall,
where, according to tradition, the NJiich
unce effected u landing at a small cove on
the const, but seeing at a distance a number of women dressed In their red Cornish
clonks they mistook them for soldiers, and
fleeing to their ships put to sen. The buys
and young men thereupon disported themselves by prancing around In Imitation of
a horse, witli |KiIes between their logs. In
Kent the festivities of Christmas commenced, with a curious procession called
lindrniiig of young people, who had with
thein Ihe stuffed head of it dead horse,
which tlioy fixed on a polo covered with »
horse cloth. One of them got under this
cloth and walked alxiut, pulling a string
attached to the lower jaw of the skeleton,
thus making a loud snapping noise, which
was accompanied by the others, who were
grotesquely attired, with hand lulls In
their bauds. They went frum house
to house and were given beer, cake or
money.
I'aragriitilied Jnkei.
Irate   Lady—You're  the   seventeenth
ihiiii who has been here canvassing for pic-
' lures to-day, and— Hand Canvasser—Ah!
Tn i bink uf sixteen frauds calling In one
' day.   I h"|ic you fired them uut, ma'am.
j Plain Dealer.
Magistrate—Why did you marry two
wives:* Pat-—Well, sor, as lung as I BUp*
jiuiirtcd the both av tiiim widotit wan
kuiiwiu- about de othor, I fought as bow
I might Is: doln' humanity a blessiu' by
' dispensing wid wan mild maid.—lloston
, Courier!	
Tin- linage Couldn't See it.
!    Inn suii fnr separation, counsel fur the
i pluiiiiill |ilciideil, mining other reasons, In-
-jolllplltlbltltl' of tcinporiiiiii'iit.    He ile-
I plcted the character nf the hiisliuiiil us
' "brutal, violent ami passionate.  The bus-
1 baud's advocate rose lu bis turn and ilea-
( crlbed the wife as "spiteful,stiiiru.enipercd
and sulky."   "Pardon me," interrupted
the judge, addressing Ixilli limbs of the
law;   "I cannot see, gentlemen, where
the Incompatibility uf temperament coma,
iu.
Si.
*S
%
Every
Thing
In
The
Way of
Groceries, Hardware,
Dry Goods,
Boots & Shoes,  Hats & Caps,
Crockery,
Notions, Patent Medicines, &c.
Can be
Found
In
Our
Stock.
We are Adding to Our New Goods
CONSTANTLY
t
•
ion
n
P.  B.  NELSON, MGR.
THE
CYANIDE PBOCBSS
HAS BEEN A
GREAT SUCC SS
In Africa, Australia, Am ua, and
also in Canada, includi- tbe P/c-
vince of British Coluii'liia.
It Will Not Cost You more the ii nor ion io
extract from 90 to 9G r . cent of il.e
assay valued your ore: <u: I laRtplej
to us and we will report ...   aa fre  of
cos., provided freight a pre aid.   Call
and see us or wrlto to
JKe Gassel Cjoid
Extracting Go., Ld.r
W, PELLEW H> ' VEV, F.C.S.,
Supt. Experii    ,,al Works.
srllt V 'NCOUVER, U. C.
il''  ...'-  -V--1 st
H. C. COOPER
MANUFACTURER OF
toss and Saddiepy
VERNON, S. 0.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY,
The   World's    Highway
from Atlmitic to Pacific
SPOKANE FALLS
ancl
NORTHERN RAILWAY
Ne!sou& Fort Sheppard Railway
ALL RAIL  TO NELSON, B. C.
Only through line to Nelson,
Kaslo, Kootenay Lake
and Slocan Points.
Through Trains Semi-Weekly.
Daily, except Sunday, between Spokane and Marcus.
7:00 a.m. Lv SPOKANE Ar. 5:30 p.m.
Ou Wednesdays and Saturdays trains will
run through tn Nelson, arriving at 5:41) p.m.,
making dose connect Ion witli tho steamer Nelson for Kaslo nnd all lake points, arriving at
Kaslo at 9:00 p.m. same days. Itoturnintf, passengers will leave lake point!) and Nelson on
Tuesdays aud Fridays, arriving at tiixikune
samo day.
Passengers for Kettle River and Uoundary
Crock connect at Marcus with stage on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.
■    angl'itf	
GRAND PRAIRIE SAW MILL.
Rough Lumber
From $10 to $12.
Dressed Lumber
From $16 to $18
Per Thousand.
GRAND PRAIRIE
HOTHi
GRAND 1'HAIliIK, KKTTI.K 111VKI1.
(illllll Sllll'k O
Liquors and Cigars
. Good Stabling.
I'llll'KS RKASONAULK,
McLAREN BROS., PROPRIETORS.
BLACKSMITH  SHOP  IN  CONNECTION
staifcs Leave ovory Monday and Wednesday
for Marcus. Wash.
STEAMER ABERDEEN
LEAVES PENTICTON
TUESDAYS. THURSDAYS and  SATURDAYS
at 8 a.m., Connecting at
OKANAGAN'LANDING
With Trains for Ihe East and West
Through Mrst-Cluss Sleeping; Curs
Dally Between Vancouver and Montreal and St. Puul.
Through Tickets on Sale to Eastern
and Paclflo Coast Points.
Bates Lower Than A&yOther Line
For Hates, Time &0,, Apply to
H. S. SCADDING,
Aoent, Pentioton
OR TO
G. Ml. BROWN,
DlST. PAS8. AQENT,
Vancouver, B. C,
MINEKAL ACT, 1801,
- -     -♦■
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICK.
This Empihe MiKRRAi Claim,
Situated In Camp Fairview, In the Osoyoos
Mining Division of Yale District.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank It. Kline,
Free Miners certificate -81,455, intend hy
my agont. Thomas Billot, of Camp Fairview,.
sixty days from the date herenf, to apply to tho
Uolu Coin in issionor for a eertltlcate of Improvements for the purpose of ohlalning a Crown
Grant of thcahove claim.
And further take notice, that ndvorse claims,
must bo sent to the Hold Commissioner and
notion commenced before tbo Issuance of such
certificate of improvements.
Dated this Uth day of January, 1895.
MARTIN BROS.
ieadino iiousk run    •
Hardware, Stove, Tinware, Faints, Oils
Verncn, B. O.
TAX'NOTICE.
Rock Creek  Division of Yale
District.
NOTICK Is hereby given that assessed end
Provincial revenue taxes for Iftti arc now
due and payable at my otllce, Osoyoos, at tho
following rates:—
If paid ou or before Uio 30th Junto—
One-half of ono per oent ou the Assessed ralut
of real estate:
One-third of one per rent on the amtemed
valuo of personal property;
One-half of oue por cent on the Income o
every person of fifteen hundred dollar*
and over;
Two per cent on the assessed ralue of Wild
Und.
If paid on or after tho 1st July-
Two-I birds of one per cent on the amoated
value of real estaie:
One-half of ono iter cent on the assessed ralue
■  of personal properly;
Three-quartorsnf one ncr eont on the Income
of every person of fifteen hundred dollars
apd over;
Two ami one-half |>or eont on tho assessed
value of WW Land,
All uersonk whotte tAxcnaro In arrears up to
the 3frtt December. IWM, aro requested to .nay
tho samo forthwith, or costs will be incurred nf
an early date,
C.A.U.LAMHIA'
Assessor and Collector for the
Honk Creek Division of Yale District.
overmneli tOffloo,
Osoyoos, Mil January, 1805, td The Crawford Mill.
(Continued from last week.)
To questions put lo the British Columbia agent of Ihe mill by n Boundary creek miner, re the adaptability of
the snid mill for the extinction of gold
from ore and concentrates uonilng from
this district, the following answers
were given;
The mill Is splendidly adapted
to the or» yon mentioned to
me, 1 mean the low grade free
milling, and also the higher grade,
and I dn not question tor the refractory ore containing copper, for if the
Cyanide process can handle that, this
mill will do it with ease nnd n great
deal cheaper than the cyanide. You
also mentioned concentrates, which
would be advantageously treated on
the spot by the Crawford. With
water power bandy the ores nf your
districl need not he transported a yard,
and if you hate not tho waterpower
yon have lots ol wood, so that steam
power can be laslly Introduced, and
tho saving hy tli* use of tho Crawford
mill will qltlcltly enable a much larger
output In warrant tho erection of a
larger plant W.th ihu now wearing
parts the 'enst if wear and tear will
pot exceed 20 ,('eits per ton, aud as I
havu suid before, .villi a larger plant. $1
per ton for iiiilllri* will cover llie wear
and tear, I will, hawever, hear from you
with particulars if ores, which, with
small samples of refractory ores, will
enable me I (j go inure fully into the
question, W.R.G.
——*.«-. ■
HI.HOOI,  Or*  .MINI'S.
The views of the Montana Mining
and Market Reporter on the question
of the establishment of a school of
mines may he gleaned from the following!
A number of western stales, including British Columbia, are calling for
state geologists and mining bureaus,
claiming that one or the other is a
very essential motor in the progress
and advancement of the mining industry. We cannot see it in that light.
The establishment of a school of mines
is all that is necessary to lill Ihis demand. We can see no reason why all
the work that would devolve upon a
elate geologist or mining bureau, cannot he better done by a state school of
mines. A hill is now in consideration
In the legislature nf this slate for the
establishment of astute school of mines
in Butte, and when that becomes a law
we will he satisfied in this respect, and
when the school is in operation let us
use it tu advantage and drop tlie ideas
of a geologist nnd a mining bureau,
— 4+4	
THE PROSPECTOR.
At all times and in all ages iu the
world's history man hns been lauded
for his achievements. Personal bravery, allied with privations iu the successful accomplishment of perilous undertakings hns always lneta responsive
thrill from the henrtsof the people and
crowned the performer with the halo
of heroism. Never in the history of
mankind has there heen anyone more
deserving of such a halo than the prospector of the West. Alone hn goes
forth on the bleak and rugged liiuiin-
tnin, liis only champion the indomitable will and energy that buoys him
up. Over the wild and desolate and
rugged wastes he plods his weary way,
scanning every rock and seam and
ledge for the vein, the float, the good
Indication.
Often hungry, often cold, always
weary, butever with a brave heart and
dauntless courage he scales the almost
I naccessilile mountain sides, where perchance human foot never trod before,
always following the ignis fatuiis of
his dream. His bed the bare and desolate hillside, his covering the cold blue
UHPopy of heaven, he never despairs of
yet uncovering the fortune that may
lie only a few feet beneath his faithful
but tired feet, His only thuiight of
Itinliness Is when he thinks of the dear
ones al home, hut this is more than offset with the thought of the happiness
in store for them when he strikes it
rich, fnr that he should fail never enters his mind,
(f accident ur misfortune conies to
him he meets it bravely, resignedly.
If fortune conies to him he is less elated
on his own personal account than he
Is proud of the good he can do to his
loved ones, his less fortunate fellow
inoil and his country. He it is who
|WlkeB the trails over which the countless millions flow, Ho it is who opens
up iiiiii gives lo llie world tho inagnitl-
ccut treasures which lie hidden in llie
rock-ribbed mountain fastnesses of the
greul Wesl, He il is who opens Ihe
gules of the unknown und heretofore
Untrodden wilderness to civilization,
wealth and greatness,
In order Ui give to mankind these
great gifls he faces perils the most imminent, suffeiB privations Ihu most severe and if unsuccessful llunlly meets
death with a fortitude the most heroic,
There is more true manhood in the
composition of one such man than in
nil tlie purse proud, arrogant, overhear-
ing and insolent money grabbers in
this wide world,
Of such stuff are heroes made. The
soldier on a bloody Held of battle, under a momentary excitement, rushes
on to death amid the cheering plaudits
of his thousands of admiring coin*
lumiims,   The sailor goes down to.
ut the masthead, Ihe ship's band play-
ing his country's national airs nnd his
comrades cheering for their country
honor.
Not so with the prospector, when he
is called to face the inevitable end,
alone he sinks to rest on the bleak
mountain side, with none to cheer,
none to sootli his dying hours. Alone,
iinhliinched he faces the dread destroyer with a heaoism worthy of Hannibal, with a stoicism worthy of Plato.
Yet, when liis blenched bones are
afterwards discovered, liis only monument is a pile of loose stone, his only
epitaph: "Some unknown prospector
perished here." Finally, in the opinion
of all true-hearted, fair-minded men,
the prospector of the mountains embodies all that is true, all that is brave
all that is noble aud enduring, and is
and always has been the very itnper*
sonifit'iition of the best trails of American manhood.—Cripple Creek Journal
-— 4.4 •
Working Capital Offered.
The Anglo-Canadian Gold Mining
Syndicate, who own 320 acres of rich
gold and platinum bearing lands on
Ihe Siinilkaineen river, adjoining the
well-known Anglo-American Co.'s properly, have received a favorable offer
from Chicago capitalists to provide all
money necessary to carry the water
on tn the gold bearing benches, purchase nil machinery and put the enterprise on a sound footing. This prnposi-
I Inn is now under consideration by *he
management, and it is expected that
the negotiations will be carried to a
successful termination. Several of
Westminster's most prominent citizens are interested in the Anglo-Can
ndian Co., nnd, if the development of
t he claims yield as rich as the prospects
indicate, they have a very valuable
property, second to none in tho Siniilkameen country.
 !-♦-<	
Silver and Gold Using Nations.
There are at present In the world some
thirty-eight different nations, using
either gold («' silver or both as their
standard money of value. Of this
number some fifteen use gold only, to
settle their interchanges, and of which
total no less than six have fallen hack
to a currency basis, with the United
Slates likely soon to become the seventh. Of the silver standard nations,
some thirteen in number, only four
have fallen line!.; to the currency basis.
Of the 321,882,000 population using
gold only in their internal exchanges,
no less than 80,302,000, or one-fourth,
have tin effective monetary system. Of
the 800,837,000 population of silver
using nations only 108,837,000, or only
ahout one-fifth, have no effective monetary system.
 ►-♦•<	
Primitive methods of gold mining,
according to an exchange, arc reported
front Sinitolii, Mexico, where the
natives only work in dry weather,
sinking rude shafts from eight to sixteen feet in bedrock, and panning gold
in the crudest method, though making
from $2 to $5 per day, The merchants
lliere who buy the gold, which is mostly coarse gold, are reported to place
the precious metal in one side of a pair
of scales, while the othor is tilled with
grain or corn until balanced, A calculation is then made which Is very much
against the poor Indian—one grain of
corn is equal to one grain of gold. In
this way the merchants get the gold at
less than $0 per ounce, and payment is
made therefor in Mexican silver, which
is there quoted at thirty cents per
ounce.—Ex.
The Kansas City Smelting nnd Refining Company, of Argentine, Kan.,
and Leiinville, Colo., nftei a l.herough
investigation of the Northwest, country, have decided that Butte is the
most central point fur the establishment of their general offices and headquarters. For several weeks we have
noted the arrival and departure of a
number of these gentlemen who were
then looking into the matter, It is
said they have decided to build smelting works somewhere in the Kootenay
oi Kettle river districts.—Denver Min"
ing Review.
E. P. Suydam left this morning for
Denver, where he has made negotiations
for the sale of two large copper properties in Boundary, B. C—Mining
and Market Reporter.
u
AJ,YirDCi-i-  DKUO.
Importers and Manufacturers
of AH Kinds of
PURWITURE,
d5-6m VERNON, B. C.
One Hundred Tons of First-Class
POTATOES FOR SALE.
EARLY ROSE, PEERLESS AND STRAY BEAUTY VARIETIES,
Will be laid down at Kelowna or Penticton in car-load lots if desired.
For Prices Write To
F. W. STERLING,
i7-2m KELOWNA, B, C.
Armstrong Sash and Door Factory.
ALI, KINDS OP
DOORS, SASHES, MOULDINGS,
HOUSE  FURNISHINGS, ETC., ETC.,
Manufactured on the Premises and Kept In Stock.
Write for Prices to
N. MCLEOD,
ARMSTRONG, B. C.
TV
MIDWAY
The    Future
Railway, Mining and Agricultural
Centre of the Kettle River
Country.
Lots on Easy Terms to Actual
Residents.
FOR PARTICULARS APPLY TO
H.P.
piw§
MIDWAY B.C.
•
liiii^fitiiiiiiliiiiiiiil«i»
The Vernon Livery      1
1     Feed and Sale Stalk
W, HENDERSON'S
STAGE  LINE
BETWEEN
MIDWAY AND GRAND PRAIRIE
PAllllVINH
Mail, Freight, Express 4 Passengers,
Connects With E. D. Morrison's Stage
to Marcus,
heaves Grand Prairio Hotel Wednesday nnil
Saturday; loaves Midway Thursday and Sun-
da)-.
Loiivch Miu'iiuh Mnniliiys und Fridays fur
Grand Prairie, and Grand I'ralrlo Wednesdays
and Saturdays (or Midway, dol2*8mo
P, B. JACQUES,
Watohes, Clocks and Jewelry,
Spectacles and
Silverware.
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY,
YEUNON.B.C
Having taken over the stables of Gallagher k Stevenson, and thoroughly over
hauled and refitted the premises, I am prepared to meet the demands
of the public,   I have on hand a complete stock of new rigs,
(double and single) for public use, and also a good lot
of well broken carriage and saddle horses.
Tourists desiring to see the country would do well to call.
 X	
Good Single Drivers,      Good Double Drivers,
Good Saddle Horses,
Ladies' gentle double and single drivers and saddle horses,
Horses boarded by the week or month (box stalls if desired).
Horses broken to harness, and horses and cattle sold on commission.
Dealer in hay and grain, wholesale and retail.
W.J.AKMMK.U1NU
TTUKHTOBT, JB.O. X*. O, Bojr,l{17.
HARDWARE, TIN AND STOVEMAN.
Stoves, Ranges and Heaters of all Kinds
General Jo'b'biiig- Slxop in.
-A.11 I-ts Branches.
W.J.ARMSTRONG.
NICHOLLES & RENOUF, L'td
Victoria,  33. O.
AfilMULTUUL MACHINERY.
SOLE AGENTS FOR
Brantford § Binders ® and § Mowers
THE HEST IN THE MARKET.
A Full Line of Waggons, Trucks, Ploughs, Harrows be., be.
WAREHOUSE AT VERNON.
C. F. Costerton, Ag-exvt.
BAN&MONTREAL
CAPITAL (all paid up) $12,000,000.
REST     6,000,000.
SIR DONALD A. SMITH, Pres.    HON. GEO. E. DRUMMOND, Vice-Pros
E. S. CLOUSTON, General Manager
SAVINGS   BRANCH.
RATE OF INTEREST AT PRESENT III PER CENT.
BULLION AND GOLD DUST HANDLED.
Branches in London, Eng., New York and Chicago, and in all tlie principal ci
in Canada.  Buy and Sell Sterling Exchange and Cable Transfer* Grant
commercial and travelling malil s,,ivnilnl>]ti in any partof the world.
Drafts Issued.        Collections Made to all Points.
cities
-ant
MUNCHES IN HUITl.au COI.UMIIIA I
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER.
NELSON
: G.A.
§
§
•
*
The GARDEN TOWN of B. C, and the natural
Shipping and Distributing point for the famous
§   9
This new town affords the best and safest investments to be found in British Columbia.
OkaiixaiSa-xi. "Valley.
Town Lots
The smallest size lieing 50x120 feet
with 100 feet avenues and 20 feet,
lanes. Acre blocks from 5 Acres upwards.
FOR PRICES. APPLY TO
DONALD & SUTHERLAND,
ly AGENTS, KELOWNA
BOUNDARY HOTEL
MIDWAY, KETTLE RIVER.
First Class Accommodation.   Good Stabling,  Terminus of Stage Line
from Marcus, Washington.
McAULEY & LUNDY, Proprietors.
Corner Of MClst-Hlon. nnd Tronso^ gtroetd
W. GARDNER, Proprietor.
Opposite Vi. R, MegaW'fl SUiro.
Pout Otllce Ilex 137
Notb.-TIiI» utablo will bo run Htrlctly first-class in every pnrtlculnr. My driven are all free
und Knit In disposition, nml tlio moat dimiblo stcck the market can produce. Special attention
in IraiiHlent I mile und to boarders.
■SL All kinds of heavy teaming promptly attended to.
COLDSTREAM
HOTEL
VERNON, B. C.
OPPOSITE TO RAILWAY DEPOT,
XX.   O.   WI XX X. X. U W,   Proprietor.
BEST OF WINES, LIQUORS AND (JIMS,
GOOD STABLING.
Terms ■ From ■ $1.00 - per - Day - Upwards.
Golden Gate Hotel.
PAIRVIEW, B. C.
THOMAS ELLIOT, Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION - - GOOD STABLING
Stopping Place for Stages to Penticton and Oro, Wash.
RAMS   HORN   HOTEL.
LUMBY, B. 0,
First-Clnss Accommodation for Gueste. Good Hunting and Fishinj-
Stages to Vernon and Blue Springs.
Iioixis Movand, Prop.
Midway Livery, Feed and Sale Stables.
GOOD DOUBLE AND SINGLE DRIVING HORSES.
9 to Rock Creek, Penticton, Grand Prairie, Marcus and all other points in
the Country.   Parties deBirous of seeing the mines should
Give us a Call.
Heavy Teaming Promptly Attended To,
RILEY  >fi  DONALD'S
Agricultural  Machinery  Kept in Stock.
CONKLE & DONALD,
MIDWAY,  B, G,

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