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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Jun 16, 1923

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ALICE ARM AND ANYOX, BRITISH COLUMBIA
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B. C. Coast
«.|i.|.|i|HiiIH '""
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77ie Herald Brings Results to Advertisers
$2.25 a Year
Alice Arm and {
Anyox. $275 to
all other points.
VQL. 2,   NO. 51
Alice Arm, B. C, Satubdat, June 16, 1923
5 cents eaoh.
PLAY BALL!
Says the Anyox Ladies
And they Did
Anyox has had its place on the
map as an athletic centre, but on
Wednesday night we were treated
to a baseball game whioh surpasses
anything heretofore attempted.
Two teams of Ladies, representing,
the married and single of the fair
sex turned out and put up a seven
inning game whioh would do credit
to a oity several times larger than
Anyox.
A large crowd turned out to see
the game, | which the ladies were
playing udder the auspiceB of the
Union Churoh. A generous crowd
we will add if the receipts are any
criterion, the collection amounting
to $70.00. A very substantial figure. There were other figures also,
amongst these were the figures on
the soore board, but the most interesting weije the figures on the field.
The batteries were for married:
Mrs Dwyer and Mrs. Wenerstorm
Singles Miss Deane and Miss 6.
Bashleigh. Those four put up a
good brfmd of ball, working hard
all the time. Sis Deane making a
record for the grounds, of two
home runs in one game. The
fielders of both sides were on their
toes, and some whom we noticed
picking off flies just like oherrieSj
were: Mrs. Henderson, Miss Moffatt
and Miss Champion.
The players all did well and deserve credit for the class of ball
displayed, with such short practice.
Jimmy Varnes was there also with
an 18-piece band, which rendered
excellent music throughout the
evening, whioh gave the real festive
touch to the occasion.
The teams were:
Married Single
P. V. Deane
0. G. Rashleigh
1B. P. McMillan
2B. R, Moffatt
S. S. K. Vissattl
3 B. V Rashleigh
L. F. E. Russ
O.F. M. McDonald
R. P. R. Champion
Anyox Baseball
Mine Baseball Team Win by
One Run on Monday
The Mine and Elks baseball
teams played an exciting game on
Monday evening. Both teams used
two pitohers, and Mr. Fred Hale
of Prince Rupert, who started off
as base umpire, resigned the ,un-
honoured office in the fourth inning.
The Anyox ten^perment being too
much for Frederick, who, turned
the job of base umpire over to Art.
Sinclair, who seems to be acquir-
an aptitude for administering the
law of the game.
The Mine were the first to bat,
and the Elks, started with Pete
Draudson pitching, and 'Stonewall*
Cody behind the bat. Pete pitched
his best game of the season, but
that did not suit, and he was relieved in the sixth, when he was
ahead with two runs the better of
the Mine, Fitzpatrick then took
the: mound, and the Mine scored
Continued on page 8.
I O.K. Dwyer
' Wenerstorm
I p. Mattix
0. Salmon
A. Crone
W. Henderson
J. Smith
H. Shelton
O. Ferguson
Score
3   4   6   6   7   Total
0   14   0   0-—12
2   0   10/5   1 0
Umpires   Messrs Mathewson   and
McKeowan..
1 2
Single 6 1
Married 0
Local Men Awarded
Contract at Stewart
Mine Team Beats Smelter
9 to 2 on Thursday
The Mine Baseball team -are.
certainly hitting their stride and
making a bold bid for the cup. On
Thursday evening they1 defeated
the Smelter by the soore of 9 to 2.
McKeowan, who was pitching for
the Smelter, and J. Ferguson for
the Mine were both freely hit.
The batters on both sides being in
fine form. J. McKeowan for the
Smelter made a nice 2-base
which was the longest hit -of
game.   Olsen was the referee.
Word was reoeived in town yesterday that the contract for the
government road from the town of
Stewart to the wharf has been
awarded to the O. M;, Watson Co.
The majority of those forming the
company are well kn6wn in Alice
Arm, being residents of Alice Arm
two years ago when they were
awarded the contract to build the'
wagon road from Alice Arm to the
government wharf.
This piece of work is considered
to be one of the best built roads
ever done by contractors • for the
government, and it is gratifying to
learn that they now have another
chance to prove their ability/as
good road builders-
Among those forming the, company are' 0- M- Watson and Niel
Forbes, who "are now ai< Anyox.
Wm. McFarlane, Alios Arm, and
Hughie McDonald of Stewart.
The wagon road to be. built at
Stewart., will connect the town
with the old wharf and will traverse the foot of the mountain along
the shore line. The distance is
approximately one mile in length,
and is practically all- took work,
consisting of side cutting. The
work will commence sd once and
will be completed this fall.       -.
hit,
the
Baseball Players Batting over 200.
Up to and including June 11th.
A. B.
Naas Valley Notes
Miss Mabel Winston left on
Thursday to spend the summer
holidays at her home in Manitoba.
Charlie Gordon is foreman of a
orew of six men putting in the
Cranberry river bridge. The work
is progressing nicely.
, Constable Jfawham, who is
stationed at Arrandale paid a fly-
I ing visit to Aiyansh last week.
J. J. Haahti who has been in the
; Valley on business for the past three
weeks, left on Thursday for Stew-
A Campbell
22
Downs .
0
Brown
14
Mealey
19
Draudson
6
Anderson
18
Macintyre
-13
Matheson
17
Cbrckle
12
Pynne
6
Cole
15
G. Greenwell
13
C Greenwell
23
Sinclair
^y
22
Olsen.
10
Stewart
12
O. McKeown
Fitzpatrick
14
Watson
5
Hits
10
4
6
8
2
7
6
6
4
2
5
4
7
6
4
3
8
1
P.O.
454
444
428
420
400
389
384
353
308
304
278
278
214
200
'Anyox Football
Elks'Footballers Defeat
Mine Team on Tuesday
In one of the best games of the
season, the Elks defeated the Mine
eleven by five goals to three. The
feature of the game, was the play,
of Robertson, the Elk forward.
He starred all the way through,
scoring all the goals for the Elks.
ALICE ARM NOTES
See Al. Falconer for Wood or
Coal
Cleaning and Pressing—Mrs. P.
Nordi.
The copious rain which fell
during the early part of the week
was welcomed by everyone, aiid it
proved very beneficial to the local
gardens.
Practically everyone around
town is now working either at the
different logging camps, Or , on
government road work, or doing
the yearly assessment work on their
mining claims.
Hand Laundry Work. Moderate
Prices—Miss B. Crawford, Alice
Arm.
Mr. A. J. Taylor arrived on
Thursday from Vancouver, on a
business trip to the Abbotsford
Logging Co.
Continued on page 4.
Alice Arm Has
Bright Future
•■
Steady   Ore   Production by
Consolidating Properties says
Eminent Geologist
It is natural that the people of
Alice Arm, and also those who are
the owners of > mining properties
in the district are becoming impatient, now that the summer is
getting well advanced and no word
has yet been received that 'mining
operations on a big scale will be
carried out in the Kitsault Valley
this ryear. We must, however,
remember that the shmmer is yet
young, and there is still plenty of
time for a resumption" of mining
aotivity on a large scale.
It is only ,two Yind a half years
since the Dolly Varden ceased ao
tivities, and a good many camps
have been dormant much longer
before renewing mining operations.
That the present inactivity is
due to the damnable litigation
and mismanagement of the Dolly
Varden is well known. The operation of, the property has been
bungled all the way through. ....and
the whole of the camp has in consequence suffered.
That the mining camp of Alice
Arm has a bright aud glorious
future is the prediction of all those
who have examined the ore depos-
ites of the district, and if activities
are not.commenced this year, it is
safe to say that-they will be in the
near future,
Dr. Geo. Hanson, the eminent
Dominion, geologist, who spent the
summer of 1921 and part of 1922 in
the distriot is quoted by a Rupert
paper as saying that he believes
that there is a bright future in store
for the mining industry in the Alice
Arm district, and that many good
opportunities present themselves
whioh sooner or later will be reali
zed 'and taken up resulting in the
oarrying on of operations on
permanent, healthy and profitable
art via Prince Rupert.
Mrs. O. Thome returned last
Saturday from Prinoe Rupert,
where she had been having dental
treatment,
Dr. Hanson and party of the
government geological survey are
in the valley. At present they
are working between Aiyansh and
Terrace. George Wolsohegel is
packing for them. >:
"Dr. Hanson was of the opinion
that the shipping of concentrates
would be the only successful
method of operating the Dolly
Varden consolidation, but that it
would be a good business* It
would mean a profitable and permanent proposition on a large scale
whioh, after all, would be of more
value to the distriot through providing an industry that would be
permanent, would operate. steadily
and would employ a large number
of men.
A consolidation of suoh a nature.
Dr. Hanson predicted, would, aflbrd
the operation of a transportation
system into the Kitsault Valley
which would be of great value to
a}l other properties in the district
allowing them to get their ores to
the outside whioh, under present conditions was impossible."
Dr.   Hanson   has studied   the
oountry pretty thoroughly and he
lias undoubtedly hit the hail on
the head. In his opinion' several
properties adjacent to the Dolly
Varden would not pay for the
erection of a mill, and the only
solution is v the consolidation of
these properties, which mean that
property owners can not demand
an exorbitant price for a single
property which would not pay for
the continued operation, of a concentrating mill. There-is, however,
always a chance of the properties
Dr- Hanson terms as ''small," de-
veloping into a big mine, for no
man can tell what quantity of ore
lays beneath the surface of an undeveloped property..'
There is one point we oan rest .
assured on, and that is, that if the
Dolly Varden ancl Wolf properties
are not operated, lither independently or by consolidating other
properties, within the next few
years, before the railway, power
plant etc. is rendered useless, then
chances of any. property being
operated in the upper Kitsault
oountry will be rather slim.
The Alice Arm camp has an
enviable reputation. The Dolly
Varden, with the exception of the
Esperanza, was the first mine to be
developed and it shipped 1,639,000
ozs, of silver in three summers. The
North Star, LaRose and Esperanza,
have also made ore shipments, and
it is a fact that no company has
yet proven a property in the Kit'
sault Valley to be worthless. It
is true that small companies have
done work on different properties,
and i abandoned them, but they
were shoe-string outfits, who hoped
to find a mountain of silver in six
weeks, or were stock companies
who did their mining in Vancouver
offices.
The future of Alice Arm does
not rest on the operations of these
stock companies, but upon the mining operation of good legitimate
companies, and there is no doubt
that the near future will see these
companies in the field and as Dr.
Hanson says providing an industry
that will be permanent and profitable.
Lady Athletes of
Anyox Hold Dance
The Anyox Baseball Ladies held,
a dance in tbe Elks Hall, on Wednesday night after the baseball
game. A large crowd were present to trip the light fantastio with
the athletic ladies. The hall being
just crowded enough not to spoil
dancing.       ' < •'
A five-piece orchestra under Mr.
Liddel rendered music with the
proper flavor The ball was most
artistically decorated for the occasion by Messrs. C. Gray, F. Whittaker and A. Nickerson. The wants
ofthe inner man being well catered
to by J. Thompson and W. Olsen.
Try a Herald Classified Ad.
I ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, June 16, 1923
Alice Arm & Anyox Herald
Issued every Saturday at,Alice Arm
Alice Arm and Anyox $2.25 Yearly
Other Parts of Canada, $2.75
Britisli Isles and United States, $3.00
Notices for Crown Grants -..-' $10.0
Land Notices - - -Av -' , $10.00
Coal Notices - - - ■ .' $6.00
Transient Advertising, 50c. per inch
Contract Rates on Application.
B. MOSS, Editor and Publisher.
Stop and Think
Bad news travels (aster than
good news. There is an old
saying, "No news is good news."
Let a man be converted at a church
service and there is not much of a
stir, but let a resident be convicted
of some crime and then news leaps
by word of mouth from ope end of
the community to the other.
How thoughtlessly unkind we
sometimes are when neighbors of
ours suffer misfortune! Troubles
are bound to come to us all in
some shape or form and what we
say about our friends and acquaintances today may apply to us
tomorrow. News is no respector
of persons.
We are prone to consider the
ways of others not our ways when
we should be watching our own
step. What folks say of one another
sometimes hurts more than anything
they could have done. News,
either good or bad, grows and'
becomes exaggerated and distorted
with peddling. When the news
is good it makes no material difference how it is exaggerated or distorted—it can never do anyone
positive harm. Bad news, given
wings, may bring sorrow and ruin
upon people who certainly are not
deserving of a punishment beyond
the penalty of their mistake.
More charity for others will
mean more charity for ourselves
and we will gradually come to take
a keener delight in reporting something good of a person than something bad. Good is constructive,'
bad is destructive. Just before
you are about to let out a bit of
"bad news," stop and think a
moment' See if you can't think
of something good to say in place
of it. The chances are ten to one
that you can and that you will.
Father's Day Tomorrow,
Popular imagination is demanding that some recognition be made
of father's share in the burden of
the work-a-day world. With no
thought in the world of robbing
mother of the cherished place she
occupies in the hearts " of every
daughter and son in the broad
universe, little children are beginning to ask, "Why there isn't any
Daddy's Day?" A number of
letters have appeared in the public
press lately—some little children,
somefromolder children of the fairer
sex who know that father had a
place in laying the foundation and
building the structure of the home—
asking why there shouldn't be a
Father's Day" and suggesting that
one day out of 365 be set aside for
him, and it has been decided that
Sunday June 17th. shall be the day
And why shouldn't there be a
Father's Day? Has he not endured
the heat and burden of the day too?
Has he not been inspired by the
same high motives as mother iu
giving' his sons, his daughters a
better chance in the world than he
had? Has he not carried upon his
shoulders heavy burdens of
responsibility, endured anxieties,
fought his way through difficulties
making innumerable sacrifices for
those dependent upon him? There
is no one who realizesv this better
than mother, daughter or son.
That is why popular imagination
is demanding a Father's Day.
No General Election says
Premier Oliver
Continued rumors that a general
election was pending in British Columbia have been emphatically
denied by Premier Oliver and his
ministers. Persons familiar with
the political situation agree that
with the province in such splendid condition generally it would be poor
policy to hold an election and, furthermore, the government still has two
more years of life. During their seven
year's of office they have built up an
enviable record, despite opposition
criticism.
British Columbia Industries
Booming
A striking indication of the healthy
condition of industry in British Col
umbia was the incorporation of $11,
000,000 worth of new companies last
week. Hon. John Hart, minister of
finance, declares that in practically
every department of industrial devel
opment British Columbia is making.
great strides. Labor is at a premium
in some industries, and the govern
ment Labor bureau are filling positions
by the hundreds every week.
''The thing that goes the farthest
Towards making life worth while;
That costs the least and does the most,
Is just a pleasant smile.
Its full of worth and goodness, too,
With genial kindness blent;
It's worth a million dollars,
And doesn't cost a cent."
''Mr. Wombat, I understand you
started in life as a lawyer?"
No I started as a baby. I did however, argue with mother at an early
age. -
COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT OR PRINCE GEORGE will sail from Anyox
every Thursday at 1.00 p.m., for Prince Bupert, Swanson
Bay, Ocean Falls, Powell River, Vancouver,.Victoria, Seattle.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN will 'Sail from Prince Rupert, for Vancouver,
via Queen Charlotte Island Ports, June 18th, 27th, July 11th,
25th, August 8th, 22nd. ,    ,
'     PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE FROM PRINCE RUPERT
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY, at 8.00 p.m., for Smithers, Prince
George, Edmonton and Winnipeg, making direct connections for
all points Eas£ and South.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or farther information, apply to any Canadian National Agent, or to R. F. McNAUGHTON, District Passenger Agent,
Prince Rupert, B. C. v
BE A BOOSTER
If you like to live in the kind of a town,
In the kind of a town you like:
You need'nt slip your clothes in a grip,
And go on a long, long hike
You will only find what you left behind
For there's nothing that's really new;
It's a knock at yourself when yon
knock your, town.   .
It is'nt the town, it's you I
Real towns ar'nt made by men afraid,
Lest somebody else gets ah?ad;
When everyone works and nobody
shirks,
You can rinse a town from the dead;
And while you make your personal
stake,
Your neighbors can make one too;
Your town will be what you want to
see.
It is'nt the town, it's You! i
Alice Abm Booster
Three Hundred Forest Fires
. this Year
So far this season 300 forest fires
have been reported to the government
and while none has assumed alarming
proportions, still Hon. T. D. Patullo,
minister of lands, is sending out fresh
warnings all over. the province for
citizens and officials to be more careful.
If the magnificent forests of British
Columbia are to be conserved the
public must co-operate to the fullest
extent.
Colonel Donald McGugan O. B. E.
M. C. haB been appointed acting supervisor of enforcement by the Liquor
Oontroll Board, replacing George C.
McLeod, lately suspended because of
charges pending against him for alleged extortion in Vancouver.
"1
Kitsault House
ALICE ARM
Rooms for Rent by Day,
Week -or. Month
S. DUMAS, Manager
Bluebird Cafe
»'PO1*""
MEALS AT ALL HOURS
Pits, Cakes, Doughnuts,  Etc. lor Sale
Hone Cooking; Jut like Metkeri
Mrs. J. M. DAVIS
Proprietoreaa
ANYOX
B.C.
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED MINING;
SMELTING & POWER Co. Limited
Producers of Copper, Coal, Coke, Benzol and '"
Ammonium Sulphate
Purchasers of Ores of Copper and Siliceous Ores
of Gold and Silver
MAIN OFFICE: -Anyox, B. C.
LAUNCH, "AWAKE"    j
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m. |
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
•••••«•«•»•»«»•«•• •«•••*•»•••••••«••'••
^#.^.»4^.
SPECIAL  TRIPS   BY  ARRANGEMENT
■f*» +»»+«>♦**'♦**'♦'*'♦'•'+.#.+■■> +.». +t*+*.4*o..e-» f»o..t.+.»4.«.-f.o.+.e..f.t.f.t.+.t.,fr,J. i
AUCE ARM FREIGHTING Co.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
BAGGAGE. FREIGHT. TEAMING. COAL AND
WOOD.   PACK TRAINS & SADDLE HORSES
Office: Next to Poit Office       - J. M. Morrison, Manager
+.♦■♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »♦♦♦♦.♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ I f»+4^4^++f+++-f++44-*4>4+4>+H4
G
et your Fresh Fruits
on Tuesday mornings
Radish, lettuce, Hot-House Tomatoes, Cucumbers Cauliflower.   Air kinds of fresh fruit in season.
T.W. FALCONER Alice Am.
GENERAL MERCHANT
-J
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
/
Has produced minerals valued as follows: Placer Gold, $76,542,203; Lode Gold, $109,647,661; Silver,
$59,814,266; Lead, $51,810,891; Copper, '$170,723,242; Zinc, $24,625,853; Coal and Coke, $238,289,565;
Building Stone, Briok, Cement, $36,605,942; Miscellaneous. Minerals, $1,358,839; making its mineral
production to the end of 1922 show f
An Aggregate Value of $769,418,462
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry in this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures, whioh show the value of production for successive five-year periods:  For all years to 1895, inclusive,
$94,547,241; for five years, 1896-1900, $57,607,967; for fiv.e years, 1901-1905, $96,507,968; for five^years, 1906
1910, $125,534,474; for five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; forfive years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725; for the
year 1921, $28,066,641, and for the year 1922, $35,158,843.
Production During last ten years, $339,280,940
Lode-mining has only been in progress for about 33 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospeoted; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire. •    ...
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal,fees,
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing suoh properties, security of which is guaranteed by
Crown Grants. ,
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, British Columbia
L ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alkie Arm,   Saturday, June 16, 1923
4\
Maple Bay Cafe
ANYOX
Under New Management
BREAD, CAKES,   PASTRY
Meals at All Hours r,
T. GILLESPIE
Hl«s>tMMs>l|  f
Shoe Repairing
OF ALL KINDS
QUICK SERVICE
LEO PAULCER   Alice Arm
B, P.O. Elks
Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
fclk's Hall
SYNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
.Minimum prke of first-class land
reduced to $6 an acre: second-fllass to
»?.G0 an acre
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering only
land Suitable for agricultural purposes
and which Is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
hut parties of not more than four may
arrange for adjacent' pre-emptions
nilh Joint residence, but each making
necessary improvements on respective
claims'.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims tor
five years and-make improvements to
value of $10 per acre, including clearing and cultivation of at least S    Jres.
before receiving Crown Grant.
\ ;Where pre-emptor in occupation not
'ess than 3 years, and .has made pro
portlonate Improvements,  he may, because of Ill-health, or other cause,  oe
granted Intermediate certificate of Im
provement and transfer his claim
Records without permanent rest-
donee may be Issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent oi
S36U per annum and records same each
year. Failure to make Improvements
or record same will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained in
i ies» than 6 years, and improvements
of $10.00 per acre, including 5 acres
Cleared and cultivated, and residence
of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown (Jrant
may record another, pre-emption, if he
lequires land In conjunction with his
farih.   without  actual occupation, pro-
■ vided statutory Improvements made
and residence maintained on.. Crown
granted land.
Unsurveyed areas/not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
| leased by one person or comDany.
Mill, factory or . industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions tnclude
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rebate of one-half of cost of
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, is made.
PRE-EMPTORS' FREE. GRANTS AOT.
The scope of this Act 1b enlarged '.o
Include all persons Joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees
of a deceased pre-emptor may apply
for title under the Act Is extended
from for one year from the death uf
such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions are
due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after .Tune 26, 1918.
Taxes are remitted for five years,
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August
.4, 1914, on account of payments, fees
or taxes on. soldiers' nre-emptlons.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or oity lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or indirect; remitted from enlistment to March 81, 1920.
SUB-PURCHASERS OF CROWN
LANDS
Provision made for issuance of
Crown Brants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to. complete
.purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, Interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original par-
pel, purchase price due and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
'whole area. Applications must be made
|py May 1, 1920.
GRAZING
, Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock Industry pro-
rides for grating districts and range
itdmlnlstration under Commissioner.
Annual grazing permits issued based
nil numbers ranged; priority for estab
'Ished owners, Stock-owners may
form Associations for range management. Free, or partially free, permits
'or settlers, campers or travellers^ up
:o ten head,
' •  ■	
Mine Baseball Team Win
From Elks on Monday
Continued from page 1.
four  runs  off him  during   this
inning.
The Mine started with E. Green
pitching. He is a new man on the
Anyox diamond, hailing from the
Skeena River distriot. He pitched
a good game, having good oontrol,
but just to show that the Mine had
other pitchers, he was replaced by
C. Ferguson in the seventh.
The Elks made a rally in this
inning. Campbell gets to first,
and a 2-bagger by Cody brought
Campbell home; Greenwell struok
out; Cody gets home on a passed
ball, making the soore even, 1-1.
The Miners now had a turn at
bat, but failing to do anything, an
extra inning had to be played.
1 The Elks to bat Were: Fitzpatriok)
out; Whittaker, out; Thorley
walks to first; Down, out. The
Mine then went to bat, and G,
Greenwell on 2nd. comes home on
hit to right field by C, Ferguson,
winning a great game with a score
8-7.
A great game in., many ways,
having used three umpires, four
pitchers and three 3rd. basemen..
Umpires: W. Olsen, F. Hale and
AK Sinclair.
«    SOORE
Inning:   1   2  3  4  5  6  7   8   Total
Mine:     0  1. ft  1   1   4  0   1      8
Elks:      100220207
Anyox •'.  • ,
Community
Lzagw^=^
RECREATION HALL
Get the Habit Three Nights a
Week
TUESDAY; THURSDAY,
::   ::    SATURDAY    ::   ::
o ooo v
Be Sure & Keep These Nights
for the Pictures'
oo
-WE SHOW  THE-BEST
-ON THE.SCREEN -
BATHS
Turkish   Sweat   Shower
and Tub
ANYOX BARBER SHOP
SUNSET
Rooming House
ALICE ARM
First Class Room* to Rent by Day,
Week or Month
Soft Drinks, Cifir's, Ci|trettes ud Tobacco
lulichTthomas
PROPRIETORS
LA SALLE
EXTENSION
UNIVERSITY
The Largest Business Training Institution in the
World.   L. A. Dobbin and F. J. Doisey,
District Registrars for B. C.
818 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B. C.
The Copper
Market
Financial and Market News gathered
by private direct wires from the
.    world's market centres by
Burdick, Logan & Company, Limited
737, Granville Street,
Vancouver, B. C.
Copper
General feeling in trade is that bottom has about been struck, and some
of the usually more active sellers are
out of the market looking for upward
swing in price. Present prices are
more nearly nominal than actual
owing to small amount of copper
changing hands here or abroad so far
as actual consumptive buying is con^
cerried, Disconcerting feature has been
that larger producers have shown disposition (a follow the market down.
Information from consumers is quite
conflicting as to way orders are coming
in from ultimate consumers. Some
fabricators are getting good orders
recently while others report small
placing orders. European buying is
small while consumers are awaiting
developments in the Ruhr and reparations situation. Some encouragement
is taken from apparent progress made
in composing „, differences between
Turkey and Greece.
Berlin—Oopper Export Association
has made no sales to Germany in the
laSt six weeks because competition
from British dealers and independent
American companies broke the market
Further decline in price is expected;
Vienna market shows a slight improvement owing to Balkan orders. Principal demand comes from Italy,
reflecting seasonal ,' manufacture of
50,000 tons of copper sulphate.
German demand for American copper shows little prospect of exceeding
2,000 tons a month, a fourth as much
as last year. Government has stopped
buying and Siemens-Schuckers,
General Electric and - the electro-
technic industry are using a third as
much as a year ago, experts, however
think the minimum df Central European consumption has been reached.
Munroe Group at Stewart
is Bonded for $75,000
Word was received from Vancouver
this week, says the Portland Canal
News of Stewart, that the Munroe
group, situated on the west side of the
Salmon glacier.'has been bonded to an
English syndicate, the consideration
being given as $75,000, with $15,000,
cash payment. The property is owned
by A. N. McDonald, J. E. Munroe and
Pat McBride, who did a considerable
amount of preliminary development
last year, driving two prospect tunnels
for some distance on separate veins,
each of which shows a persistant' ore
shoot. It is claimed that from several
locations on the group ore can be taken
that will pay to sack and ship' hauling
over the Salmon glacier to the end of
the Texas pass trail, and packing from
there to the Salmon valley wagon road
Numerous assays have been taken, and
values running from $200 to $500 per
ton are common.
Play the game
Calmness in success is tine,
Grit when losing's finer;
If you can't a winner be,
Do "hot be a whiner.
FOB BENT—at Alice Arm two tents
12ft. by 14ft. with board sides and
floors; cook stove, beds, tables, chairs,
etc.      Ideal location for   campers.
i.OO per week for the two.—Apply
Herald Office.
f OUND-A scow/12 ft. by 26 ft.
with a depth of 42ins., floating
adrift in the inlet of Alice Arm.
Owner can obtain possession of
same by applying to Mr. J. Wheat-
ley, Alice Arm, after paying for
cost of advertising and care of
scow. "I
Anyox Community
League
If you are in deed of a mental
tonic, take advantage of the
League Library. The digestion
of a good book is often the
cause of a different viewpoint
USE
GRANBY BENZOL
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR  SALE BY  THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
We handle all kinds of
INCLUDING THE FAMOUS
Paris Hand made
For Loggers, Miners,, and Prospectors
POWDER  -  CAPS  -  FUSE
BRUGGY'S STORE
Alice Arm
KITSAULT CAFE
ALICE ARM ' >
,    Meals Served at All Hours
BREAD  AND   PASTRY  ALWAYS  FOR  SALE
GUS.   ANDERSON,   Proprietor
- MEAT   MARKET -
AUCE Arm
WHOLESALE  AND  RETAIL
Dealer in Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats,
Fish and Poultry
W.   A.   WILSON,   Proprietor t
■*J
AL.  FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Baggage and Transfer.   Heavy Freighting
and Pack Horses
WELLINGTON LUMP COAL AND WOOD
FOR SALE
EVERY ORDER GIVEN IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
n
Ladies Undervvear
1 Ladies Silk and Cotton Underwear
I    2-piece Suits and Combinations.
Silk Nightgowns, embroidered;
all colors
LEW LUN & Co., General Merchants
West Side of Smelter ANYOX, B. C. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Auob  Arm,   Saturday, June 16, 1923
The Welcome
Pool Room
Alice Arm ■
Pool Tables, Cigars, Cigarettes
Tobacco and Soft Drinks
A. BEAUDIN, Proprietor
Boot and Shoe
Repairing
First Class Work
Highest Grade Material
Used
C.H. WALKER Alice Ann
Opposite Royal Bank
Anyox Community
:: League ::
, Council meets every Wednesday
Evening, at 7.30 p.m. Every
second Wednesday of month at
Mine Hall; every first, third and
fourth Wednesday at Recreation
Hall.
If you can suggest anything to
better conditions, tell it to us at
the meetings.
Atlin Electoral District
NOTICE IS HERESY GIVEN that
I shall, on MONDAY the 18th. day of
June, 1023, at the hour of ten o'clock
in the forenoon, at the Government
Office, Anyox B. 0. hold a Court of
Revision for the purpose of revising
the voters' list of the above named
electoral district, and of hearing and
determining any and all objections to
the retention of any name or names on
the register of voters for the said district.
Dated a't Anyox, B. 0. this 7th. day
of May, 1923.
JOHN CONWAy.
Registrar of Voters,
■ Atlin Electoral District.
Alice Arm Notes
Continued from page-1.
Improvement to the town buildings are steadily being, carried out.
Geo. Beaudiri has added a poroh to
his residence. He has also lined
the building on the outside, and
has commenced painting. Steve
Dumas is putting up siding qn his
building opposite the Kitsault
House. Geo. Bruggy has added a
commodious poroh to his residence-
Wm. Cummings is now 'busy improving the interior of the Post
office by lining it with v-joint.
Mrs. R. F. McGinnis arrived
home on Monday from Philadelphia
where she has been visiting her
parents for the past two and half
months.
Mrs. Tampkin and family arrived
frpm Anyox "on Saturday last, and
will spend several weeks in town.
.Mrs. J. Robertson and family
and Mrs. McLeod and family of
Anyox arrived on Saturday and
will spend a month's- holiday in
town.
See Al. Falconer* for Freight
and Pack Horses. i
Mr. and Mrs. 0. J. Hutchings
and family, of Anyox are spending
holidays at Silver City.
i
Mr. Geo. Young district   road
superintendent returned on Thursday from Stewart, where, he has
been making plans for road and
trail,work during the summer.
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Trethewey
FIRST CLASS ROOMS
For Rent, by Day, Week or Month.
Reasonable Rates.
CIGARS, TOBACCO & SOFT DRINKS
POOL ROOM IN CONNECTION
N. SUTILOVICH, Prop.
The secret of
good beer lies
in purity--*
That's why Cascade Beer has for 35 years
been British Columbia's favorite health
beverage. No expense has been spared to
ensure purity. It has cost a million dollars to build a plant to accomplish this.
But after testing Cascade Beer, you agree
that it has been worth it.
Insist Upon
CASCADE
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board, or by the Government of British Columbia.
L-
and family left on Thursday for
Vancouver.
Mr. Al. Falconer is acting agent
for the Pioneer Laundry, Prinoe
Rupert. Laundry in town oalled
for and delivered.
Mr. B. Jones one of the old-time
prospeotdrs of the oamp returned
on Thursday from Seattle where he
has spent the winter. Mr. Jones
is one of the old-timers who stays
with the camp through thick and
thin. He owns mining property
near the LaRose.
Mr. R. F. MoGinnis returned on
Thursday from Stewart: where he
has spent the past two months.
1     ANYOX NOTES
Union Church Services, Sunday,
June 17. Sunday School 11 a.m.
Evening Worship, 7.45 p.m. We
extend a welcome to you.
Miss Florence Swanson, who is
on the staff of the Prince Rupert
Hospital arrived home on Monday
on holidays, accompanied by Miss
Wyatt of Prinoe Rupert.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Dryden returned on Thursday from a two week's
trip to Vancouver and Victoria,,
Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Wilby returned on Thursday from a visit to
the south. They were accompanied
by Mr. Wilby's mother.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Dodd arrived on
Thursday, and will reside in Anyox
Mr. J. Conway and daughter
Sheila left on Thursday for a two
week's trip to Victoria.
The Elks have started working
for the 4th. of August celebration.
A strong committee is in charge
for this day. •
Miss Rose O'Neil and Miss Margery McDonald left on Thursday
for a month's vacation in the
south. They expect to visit Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
Mr. Dan Stewart, representing
the Great West Life Assurance is
in town for a week.
Fred Hale, of James Thomson,
wholesale  druggists, came in on
Monday's   boat  and. left for the
south on Thursday.
I.- '
Mr.   Yarborough,   of   diamond
drill fame, left for the south on
Thursday's boat on a vacation.
The sensation of the ladies baseball game on Wednesday evening,
was the home run hit by Victoria
Deane. Viotoria can make some
of the boys look like 15c. when it
comes to playing ball.
The playing of the Anyox Brass
Band on the Ball grounds, on
Wednesday evening was greatly
appreciated by the five-hundred
odd people present. It was* good.
Nuffsed.
The grounds around the Elks'
Hall have been cleaned up, and has
made quite an improvement to the
general appearance of the building.
"Papa, what do you call a man
who runs an automobile?"
It.   depends on how olose  he
comes to hitting me."
Premier Oliver to tour Province
Premier Oliver will shortly gO on
another speaking tour of the province
when he will address the electorate
upon the freight rates question. Next
month he and Mr. G. G. McGcer, counsel for the government, will go to
Qttawa, when the entire freight rates
matter will be fully considered, by
Premier Mackenzie King and his cabinet. Premier Oliver is optimistic
over the probable outcome and maintains that within a comparatively
short time this province, as well as
Alberta and Saskatchewan, will enjoy
as low rates as the eastern provinces.
Wouldn't it be terrible if an efficiency expert were compelled to
conduct a business of his own.
A city business man was very keen
on having proficient clerks in his
employ. Before a clerk could enter
his office he was required to pass a
written examination on his knowledge
of business. At one examination one
of the questions was: "Who formed
the first company?"
A certain bright youth was a trifle
puzzled at this, but was not to be
floored. He wrote: "Noah successfully floated the first company while
the rest of the world was in liquidation."
He passed.
FOR    RENT
At Alice Arm; Two Houses. One
Furnished, 3 rooms, wood-shed, etc.
with good view, $20.00 per month.
One unfurnished, size 14ft. by 30ft.
$10.00 per month.—Apply C. P.
Riel; P. O. Box 25, Alice Arm.
r
"1,
The change of season makes
necessary a change of clothing
For Summer Wear our
Stock of Shirts is
unexcelled
Men's Sport Shirts, low-neck, cream. $2.75
Men's Polo Shirts, cream          2.75
Men's Polo Shirts, cream, English Broadcloth.... 5.75
Tennis Shirts.    $2.25 and 3.00
Wool Taffeta Shirts .'■;.....     ... i.. .5.75
Wool Taffeta Shirts, Jaeger...     .     ...........7.75
English Broadcloth Shirts in white, grey sky, '
fawn, and fancy stripes, also Pongee and
fancy silks.   Prices ranging from $5.00 up.
Men's Wear Department
GRANBY  STORES
Did You Think
What the Smoke-filled valleys meant
to you last year?
What the timber charred, burned, and
blackened means to YOUR future?
That the wages paid last year for the
tie crop along the Grand Trunk
was approximately $383,000?
That the forest will remain a source of
revenue to you if kept green?
Then be careful with fires. Do not
destroy your own livelihood.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
IT PAYS
-J

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