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Herald Apr 1, 1922

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Full Text

 A
■8
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B. C. Coast
ALICE ARM AND ANYOX, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE HERALD
IfQi
m
The Herald Brings Results to Advertisers
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. $3.00 to
all other points.
If   VOL. 1,   NO. 41
AiJoe Arm, B. C, Saturday, April 1, 1922
5 cents each.
| Anyox Elks Attend
Church Parade
'Large Number of Members
Attend Impressive Service
The B. P. 0. Elks of Anyox,
!• held a Church Parade, last Sunday
;evening, Maroh 26 and between
jsixty and seventy of the members
i were present. They assembled at
;the Elk's building at 7.15 p.m. and
paraded to Christ Church, headed
by Worthy. Exalted Ruler; H. B.
i Chapman, who was supported by
Ijthe following officers: Esteemed
| leading knight, W. X. McDonald.
Esteemed   loyal   knight,    Sid
! Armstrong.
Esquires, STBarr and A. J. LaFortune.
Secretary, Chas. Grey.
Tyler, J. J. Miller.
Trustees, J. Smith, M. Cranley
I and A. Morton.
The Servicexwas conducted by
I Chaplain Rev. J. B. Gibson, who
preached an excellent sermon on
J "Personal Influence." Scripture
Lessons were read by Worthy
Exalted Ruler H. B. Chapman and
Esteemed Leading Knight W, X.
McDonald. Solos were sung by
Mrs. J. Conway, "One Sweetly
Solemn Thought," and Mrs. S.
Herrin, "Abide With Me." Both
ladies sang very nicely.
The offertory was taken up by
Esteemed Loyal Knight, Sid Arm-
[ strong and Esquire, Al. LaFortune.
Chaplain Rev. J. B. Gibson, took
I as his text, Proverbs, Chap. 27,
j verses 17 and 19: "Iron sharpeneth
J iron: so a man sharpeneth the
I "countenance of his friend." "As in
water face answereth face, so the
I heart of man to man."
We are bound together in numberless ways and it is out of this
' close relationship that influence
comes. Our very existence exercises an influence far beyond our
knowledge and calculation.
Influence is of two kinds, direct
and indirect, or conscious and
unconscious. In Prov. 27, verses
17 and 19, both kinds are illustrated, "Iron Sharpeneth Iron, so a
man sharpeneth the countenance
of his friend." "As in water, face
answereth to face: so the heart of
man to man." Direct influence is
that which we deliberately put
forth; indirect influence is that
which radiates from us whether we
will it or not.
- In regard to direct influence eaoh
one must choose his own line of
action, there are, however, certain
lines that may be indioated and
whioh lie open to all.
(a)^ Keeping others in the right
path.
(b)   Speaking out against evil.
(o) Taking part in Christain
and benevolent work.
Indirect influence is the "invisible belt of megnetism" a man bears
Daring Robbery at
Anyox
Forty-three Bottles of Liquor
Stolen from Govt. Store
A daring robbery was committed
at Anyox on the night of March 28
when the government liquor store
was broken into and 43 bottles of
liquoi-j valued at $225.25 was
stolen. The thieves gained entrance to the store by cutting out
the putty from a window pane and
removing the glass. One light
is always left burning in the store
and this had been turned out. No
money was taken the safe being
untouched. The thieves were evidently after liquor and lifted 43
battles from the shelves.
The first idea that a robbery had
been committed was when Paddy
Crone, wharf foreman, on his way
to work at 8 a.m., noticed that a
window had been removed. He
immediately phoned Fred Brown,
the vendor, who notified Constable
Dryden. ^They proceeded to the
store and found the window glass
on the floor by the window, no
IjOTss were" broken; but dn; cheeking up the stook list the number
missing was ascertained. No cases
were taken, only loose bottles. It
is supposed that the thieves operated in the dark for the reason
that some brandy at $4 a bottle
was taken while the thief could
have reached brandy at $8.50 a
bottle without moving.
The police are busy working on
the case, but so far the liquor has
not yet ljeen found.
It takes lots of little drops of
water to make a flood, and it takes
lots of little boosts to make a
town.
with him wherever he goes. It
invests him, and others are quiok
to detect its presence.
Some of the simplest phases are:
The influence of a look. The influence of a smile. The influence
of sympathy. The life of example,
the simple doing of what is right
though we may know nothing
about it. v
The whole subject teaches us:
1. Our responsibility. If we
are ready to ask "Am I my brother's keeper,"? the answer is you
cannotiielp being so. It is as easy
to evade the law of gravitation as
the law of responsibility.
2. The power all have to do
good.
3. The seoret of good influence
is to be influenced for good ourselves. Our lamp must first be lit
if it is to shine, and we ourselves must be personally influenced
by coming to the great source of
spiritual power.
Logging Operations
At Alice Arm
Mr. Chris. Dickson, representing
the Big Bay Lumber Co., whose
mills are ajt' Georgetown, arrived
in town on Monday, in order to
grade the boom of logs of the Alice
Arm Freighting Co., who are
operating a logging camp at Silver j
City, across the bay. Mr. Dickson
was agreeably surprised at the
quantity of No. 1 logs in the water.
There is nearly 400,000 feet of
lumber in the water and the boom
which will contain approximately
500,000 feet will be ready for shipment this month. Twenty per
cent, of the logs are spruce and the
balance hemlock. Mr. Dickson
while here, also made an examination of the standing timber in the
neighbourhood.
The Alice Arm Freighting Co.
are contemplating to log throughout the summer and are making
arrangements accordingly. A
heavy team of horses for hauling
logs was purchased last week,
they are young horses and weigh
1700 lbs. each. "
i O. M. Watson''is in'charge 6f
the logging camp, with Paddy
Williamson boss teamster, while
Bob Lyons occupies the position of
chief ohef.
The Alice Arm Freighting Co.
besides operating pack trains,
general freighting and logging
camps, are also general contractors
in construction work of all kinds.
Dance and Concert
Given at Alice Arm
A very enjoyable dance was held
on Friday evening, March 24, at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. O. Grey.
Dancing commenced at 9 pan. and
was continued until until 11
o'clock when a dainty supper was
served by Mrs. Grey. Solos were
rendered by Mrs. L. Fosbnrg, Mrs.
O. M. Watson and Mr. J. Fiva,
and a reoitation was given by Mrs.
J. Wheatley.
Dancing was then resumed until
1.30 when the party broke up and
concluded one of the most pleasan
evenings spent by the visitors this
winter.
Those present were:
Mr. and Mrs. G. Anderson, Mr.
and Mrs. B. W. Barrett, Mr. and
Mrs. W. Cummings, Mrs. H.
Nucich, and Miss Helen Nucich,
Mrs. H. H. Carney and Master
Henry Carney, Miss B. Crawford,
Miss Nettie Hogberg, Mrs. R. F.
McGinnis, Miss M. Smith, Messrs.
M. D. Ross, M. Peterson, O. Flint,
H. Fowler. L. Paulcer, S. Miller.
Patronize our Advertisers
An Appeal for Famine
Stricken Russia
Anyox, B. C.
k       March 30th, 1922
The Editor, *
The Herald,
Alice Arm, B. C.
Dear Sir:
At a meeting of those interested in the Russian Famine Relief
Fund, held in the Recreation Hall,
on Tuesday afternoon, it was
deoided to hold a Tag Day on
Tuesday, April 11th.
The committee in charge are
anxious to make this a gigantic
success and with that aim in view
solicits the assistance of your valuable paper, to bring before the
public of this district the urgent
need of the people in the famine
stricken district of Russia.
All money collected on that day
will be forwarded to the "Canadian
Committee Save the Children
Fund." , That committee is made
up of the following gentlemen:
Honorary President, Hon. W. L.
McKenzie King; President, Col.
Herbert J. Mackie; Honorary
Viee-Presidents, Rt; Hon. AMhiir
Meighen; Hon. T. A. Crear; Hon.
Rodolphe Lemieux; Hon. Secretary,1 Sir Louis Davis; Hon. Treasurer, Hon. W. S. Fielding;
Treasurer, Sir George Burn.
These names will remove any
doubt as to the desirability of
sending relief to Russia. The
heart-rending cry that goes up
from the millions of starving
Russian children should produce a
ready response. In the Volga
provinces of Russia there are over
thirty millions of people who are
victims of a terrible famine.
Millions of these must die, the task
of saving them all being too great.
The "Save the Children Fund" is
concentrating its efforts on saving
the children, being urged by
mothers who dispairing of relief
for themselves implore that the
wants of their offsprings be relieved.
One mother writes:
"We Russian mothers who are destined to die this winter from starvation and disease, implore the people of
the whole world to take our children
[rom us, that those who are innocent
may not share our horrible fate. We
implore the whole world to do this
because, even at the cost of a voluntary and eternal seperation, we long
to repair the wrong we have committed
in giving them a life that is worse
than death. All of you who have
children, or who have lost children,
all of you who have children and fear
to lose them, in remembrance of the
children who are dead, and in the
name of those who are still living, we
beseech you! Do not think of us: we
cannot be helped! We have lost all
hope, but we shall be happy with the
only happiness that a mother knows
in the knowledge that her child is
safe."
Surely, as we sit down to at
least three good meals daily and
know   not want, will not turn a
deaf ear to such an appeal.
$1 will feed one child for one
month.
$10 will feed forty children for
one week.
$500 will establish a kitchen to
feed 100 children until -next
harvest.
Thanking you,
1 remain, Yours truly,
J. Herdman
^T'^T'*1 T'*' T'*' ?'•' Y'•'? '•' Y '•' Y ■•'♦'•■ ♦'•■♦'•* f
ALICE ARM NOTES   j
I.-.-.-.-     .-.-.-.-A-A-A-A-I
Mrs. H. Oarney is now agent for the
Amateur Finishing Oo.,' of Vancouver
for Developing, Printing and Enlarging all kinds of Photographs. Prices
on Application.
Mr. H. -M. Meehan, timber
cruiser for th&.Granby Co. was a
visitor in town this week.
George Tuttle went aoross the
bay this week and will drive a
team in the logging camp of the
Alibe Arm Freighting Co.
Walter McDonald, Fred Miller
and Chris Christenson arrived in
town on Thursday, having com-_
pleted their Contract for mining
stulls with the Granby Co.
See Al Falconer for Wood or
Coal
A fire occured last Sunday morning at the home of Mrs. N. Sutilovich. The fire was caused by a
spark settling on the shingle roof.
It was extinguished by Mr. T. W.
Falconer with a pyrene tank before
much damage was done.
Rev. Rushbrook paid a surprise
visit to the Arm last Sunday, on
board the Anglican Church Mission
boat, Northern Cross. Service
was held on Sunday evening and a
large congregation was present.
Robt. Kay is a frequent visitor
to town these days from his hunting lodge near Flounder Flats.
Bob reports s that fish are now
plentiful on the banks.
' Miss Jean Matheson entertained
a number of her little girl friends
to a birthday party, on Thursday,
Mrs. R. F. McGinnis and Mrs. T.
W. Falconer assisted Mrs. Matheson in entertaining the little guests
and a very happy afternoon was
spent by the children.
Gus Anderson the popular proprietor of the Kitsault Cafe will
open the Cafe again for business
next week. It has been closed for
repairs for the past month and
during that time the restaurant
has been partly floored and varnished throughout, the kitchen has
been re-floored and kalsomined and
the whole presents a very smart
and attractive appearance.
Miss M, Smith entertained a
number of friends to cards on
Thursday evening and a very
pleasant time was spent by those
present.
See Al. Falconer for Freight
and Pack Horses. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice  Arm,   Saturday,  April 1st., 1922
The Alice Arm and Anyox Herald
Published al Alice Arm
E.  MOSS
Editor and Publisher
SUBSCRIPTION   RATE:   $2.50   A   YEAR
Transient Display Advertising, 80 cents per inch per issue.
Local Readers 10 cents per line per issue.
Classified Advertising, per insertion, 2 cents per word.
Special Position Display or Reading, 25 per cent above ordinary Rates.
Certificate of Improvement, $10.00 (if more than one claim mentioned, $1.00
for each additional claim mentioned.)
Lano Notices, $10.00      Coal Notices, $7.00
Contract Display Advertising Rates on Application
No Advertising accepted for First Page.
History of the Premier
Mine at Stewart
The following article was published in the Northwest Mining
Truth, of Spokane, on March IV,
and is a continuation from our
last week's issue.
"The history of the property is
among the most interesting romances that ever adorned the records
of the west and throws particular
credit upon a Spokane man, formerly identified with remarkable
success with some of the greatest
mines developed in this immediate
section. After combing the western
country from Mexico to Alaska, R.
K. Neill, for many years indentified
with the Finch-Campbell interests
of Spokane, arrived in 1916 at the
Premier mine, then known as the
Bush mine and which had been
abandoned the same year by
Salmon-Bear River Gold Mining
Co., promoted by 'Col. W. B.
Thompson, operating under the
management of H. R. Plate, mining
engineer. It is said that about
$80,000 was lost in development.
The luck of mining is no better
exemplified than in the subsequent
history of this most remarkable
property. The deal for a bond was
closed1 by Mr. Neill on March 7,
1917, with the owner, Bush, at
Chula Vista, Cal., and on April 7
work was commenced. The first
development was done under the
direction as foreman, of Dan Lin-
denberg, who snowshoed his horses
and packed in enough supplies to
run live men until July. After
that month the trails were opened
and pack horses put into commission.
In tunnel No. 1, about 80 feet
from the surface, a crosscut was
started 80 feet in from the portal
to the right. After four feet had
been driven the heading broke into
a great body of ore, running $65
per ton, gold and silver.
The next work was at a point
184 feet from portal in an old
crosscut driven 16 feet by the old
management. The first round of
holes opened up the ore-body,
carrying around $60 per ton
aoross 8 or 9 feet. Another crosscut was then run at the face of the
tunnel, then in 250 feet and about
175 feet vertically from the surface.
Here a three-foot crosscut again
tapped the ore, the first six feet
averaging $300 per ton and the
whole mass, 65 feet wide, running
an average of $55 por ton.
Shipments were commenced in
the winter of 1917-18, the trail
having been made serviceable during the summer.   Ore to the value
of $75,000 was hauled out on
double-end bobsleds and rawhides
and shipped to Tacoma, under an
$18 freight and treatment charge.
In the summer of 1918 the trail
was made wide enough for double
bobsleds and hauling was carried
on during the winter of 1918"19
with six 4-horse teams. Over
$200,000 worth of ore was shipped
and the property then became the
talk of the mining world.
In the summer of 1920 a standard wagon road was completed,'
reaching the mine in October.
Meanwhile all improvements had
been paid for out of ore receipts,
although the four original partners
—Neill, Wilson, Trites and Wood-
had contributed $50,000 apiece to
initial expense and had borrowed
the sum of $60,000.
In September, 1919, two sets of
mining engineers arrived for New
York parties—one headed by H. A.
Guess, mining director of the company, representing the American
Smelting & Refining Co. and the
other representing Sam I. Silverman, formerly of Spokane, identified with the Minor Keith-Unter-
meyer interests. It might be
mentioned that Sam Silverman
was one day ahead of the Guggenheim party, a fact which will be
appreciated by his many old
Spokane friends.
Both parties sought options upon
the property, at least for sufficient
time to enable them to report to
their principals, but all such
requests were politely declinod and
no purchase price could be obtained.
Both parties then left, with the
result that Neill, Trites and Wood
were called to New York and
arrived there in October, 1919.
Upon arrival it was found that
both interests represented in the
recent examinations were wild to
obtain the property and eventually
a two-party deal was arranged,
with ownership as mentioned
above. Originally the company
set aside some treasury shares, but
they were later distributed as a
bonus among the present owners.
The property was then placed
under the management of the
Guggenheim interests, with Dale
Pitt in charge and its subsequent
history is well known to the mining
world. The mine when taken over
by the present management was
developed by four levels, as follows:
No. 1 in 250 feet with a vertical
depth of 175 feet; No. 2, 200 ft.,
depth 500 ft.; No. 3,100 ft., depth
650 ft., and No. 4, 570 ft., depth
1000 feet, Ore is now coming
from No. 1, No. 2 and No. 4,
although the latter is not yet in to
the main bonanza ore-body.   The
ore zone is over 100 feet wide, with
the high grade anywhere from one
to 30 feet wide. A combination
concentrating, flotation and cyanide mill, with capacity of 150 tonB,
has been placed in operation, run
by hydro-electric power most of the
year and by auxiliary Diesel
engines during the dry seasons.
The plant is said to have cost
around $300,000. The last important addition to equipment was the
11-mile tramway completed by the
Riblet Tramway Co. of this city in
December and which has the distinction of using the longest moving cable in the world. The new
tram was fully covered in an
illustrated article which appeared
in the last anniversary Number of
Mining Truth. The total cost was
about $250,000.
The mine is now producing
between 5000 and 5500 tons
monthly, January consignments
reaching a value of $500,000 and
those of February about the same.
Continued on page 3.
RE
SPECIAL TIMBER
LICENCES
The attention of Timber Licence
holder* who are taking advantage of
the provisions of the 1921 Amendment to the Forest Act, whereby
arrears of licence fees accrued prior
to 31st December, 1920 have been
funded and made payable in annual
instalments, is specially directed to
the fact that any renewal fee which
became due in 1921 is not included
in the instalments above mentioned,
and such 1921 and all subsequent
renewal fees must be paid within
one year after the date of expiry of
the licence in order to maintain the
right of the holder to obtain a renewal of the Licence.
B. P. 0. Elks
Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
Elk's Hall
UNION CHURCH
SUNDAY  SOHOOL,  2.30 p.m.
EVENING  SERVICE, 7.45 a.m.
ALL WELCOME
Rev. J. HERDMAN, Pastor
FIRST CLASS ROOMS
For Rent, by Day, Week or Month.
Reasonable Rates.
CIGARS, TOBACCO ft SOFT DRINKS
POOL ROOM IN CONNECTION
N. SUTILOVICH, Prop.
Subscribe to the
HERALD
$2.50 a year
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED MINING,
SMELTING & POWER Co. Limited
Producers of Copper, Coal, Coke, Benzol and
Ammonium Sulphate
Purchasers of Ores of Copper and Siliceous Ores
of Gold and Silver
MAIN OFFICE:-Anyox, B. C.
'1
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
Steamers Sailing between Seattle, Victoria, Vancouver,
Powell River, Ocean Falls, Swanson Bay, Prince Rupert,
Anyox, Stewart, and Queen Charlotte Islands
SAILINGS FROM ANYOX
Thursdays at 1.00 p.m., for Prince Rupert, Swanson Bay, Ocean Falls,
Powell River, Vancouver", Victoria and Seattle
TRAIN SERVICE FROM PRINCE RUPERT
Passenger: Monday, Wednesday and Saturday,  at  11.15 a.m., (or
Smithers, Prince George,   Edmonton and Winnipeg, making direct
connections (or all points East and South.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or further information, apply to any Grand Trunk
Pacific Agent, or to G. A. McNICHOLL, Assistant General Freight and
Passenger Agent, Prince Rupert, B. C.
AL.  FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Baggage and Transfer.   Heavy Freighting
and Pack Horses
WELLINGTON LUMP COAL AND WOOD
FOR SALE
EVERY ORDER GIVEN IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
-J
"~1
LADIES AND GENT'S
CLOTHING
We have just received a large stock of Ladies Silk
Hose, all colors; also Ladies Underwear in Silk or
Cotton.   Men's Overalls, Jumpers, Shirts and Pants.
LADIES & GENTLEMEN'S BOOTS AND SHOES
LEW LUN & Co., General Merchants
West Side of Smelter
ANYOX, B. C.
-J
BUTCHER   SHOP
Beef, Pork and Mutton, Fresh Salmon and
Halibut, Ham and Bacon Always on Hand
J. A. MacDERMAID,   -   Alice Arm
For Results, Advertise in the Herald ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, April 1st., 1922
&
PREMIER MINE
Continued from page 2,
jligher grade  ore, running from
j>75 to $350 a ton, is shipped to
Tacjoma and the lower grade run-
hg  between   $40   and    $60,    to
iranby, at Hidden Creek.    The
average of the shipments has been
lilosely around $100 per ton with a
general average rates of about 40
per   cent,   gold and (10 per. cent
opper."
Naas Valley Notes
Wm. Stewart has had the mis-
ijfortune to lose his horse which he
('bought last summer, and George
fWohlsohlegel's horse is ailing.
The   rest  of the stock in   the
JjValley   have   come   through    the
winter in fine condition and are all
jjdoing well.
Prank Hoeft and  J.  Nick have
had   a   very   successful   trapping
': season this winter.
Large numbers of the Indians
j have moved to. Fishery Bay for the
i oolichan Ashing and a good many
! are still trapping.     ,
J. J. Phillips is on his way back
to the valley and is bringing in a
new settler.
Numerous enquiries are being
received by every mail from prospective settlers regarding transportation in the valley and there
I is no doubt that as soon as a
school is built and transportation
provided that the valley would
quickly develop into one of the
most prosperous communities in
the north.
Liberal is Given Great
Majority at Nelson
Kenneth Campbell, Liberal, was
elected to the Provincial Legislature at Nelson on March 23. He
defeated the Conservative candidate, Mayor C. P. McHardy by a
majority of 559 votes. The final
figures stand: Campbell 1053, McHardy 494.
The election was made necessary
by the resignation last autumn of
Dr. W. O. Rose, Conservative, who
had represented Nelson in the
Legislature since 1916.
On and after the 1st. of April,
1922, the rate of postage on money
packets addressed to places within
Canada, the Empire, the United
States and Mexico will be five
cents an ounce or fraction of an
ounce.
As the prepayment required on
money packets posted for delivery
within Canada, the Empire, the
United States and Mexico includes
the war tax of one cent, money
packets weighing one ounce or less
should be prepaid six cents for the
first ounce and five cents for each
subsequent ounce or fraction of an
ounce. The registration fee of ten
cents is also to be prepaid.
A new species of bird, known as
the "snow bird" has made its
appearance in Prince Rupert this
spring. These "birds't are migrating from the south and are looking
for more congenial quarters.
++++++++++++++++++♦++♦++»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦++-H-+++++H
! ALICE ARM FREIGHTING Co.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
BAGGAGE. FREIGHT. TEAMING. COAL AND
WOOD.   PACK TRAINS & SADDLE HORSES
Office: Next to Post Office       • J. M. Morrison, Manager
^^♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦f^f-H-fH ♦♦♦♦♦♦
BE
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3E3E
BRUGGY'S   STORE
Wholesale and Retail
Fresh Meats,  Groceries, Provisions,
Hardware,   and General  Outfitters
POWDER  .  CAPS  -  FUSE
ALICE   ARM   PIONEER STORE
3E3E
KC
3JC
SIC
DOC
30001C
3NC
DflC
SIC
ALICE ARM HOTEL
FIRST  CLASS-ACCOMODATION
Dining Room and
Club in Connection
Hot & Cold Water
Electric Light
Special Rates for Families
me
anc
aic
E. McCOY, Proprietress
==3HC
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USE
GRANBY BENZOL
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR SALE BY THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
ANYOX BARBER SHOP
GIVE US A CALL
FIRE,  LIFE,   ACCIDENT
AND   SICKNESS
INSURANCE
Chas. Wing     Anyox
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to ?5 an acre: second-class to
KM an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering only
land suitable for agricultural purposes
and which is non-timber land. ^
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of not more than four may
arrange for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each making
necessary improvements on respective
claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims tor
five years and make improvements to
value of $10 per acre, Including clearing and cultivation of at least 5 ;res.
before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation not
less than 3 years,' and has made pro
portionate Improvements, he may, because of ill-health, or other cause, De
granted intermediate certificate of Im
provement and transfer his claim
Records without permanent resi'
dence may be issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent of
S360 per annum and records same eaoh
year. Failure to make improvements
or record same will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained In
less than 5 years, and improvements
of $10.00 per acre, including 5 acres
cleared and cultivated, and residence
of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if.he
requires land In conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory improvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20.
acres, may be leased as homesites;
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes,
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or comnany.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment of slumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaonessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rebate of one-half of cost of
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, is made.
PRE-EMPTORS' FREE GRANTS ACT.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
Include all persons Joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the helrs,or deviseeB
of a deceased pre-emptor may apply
for title under the Aot Is eextended
from for one year from the death of
such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege Is also made re-
trocative.
No fees relating to pre-emptions are
due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26, 1918.
Taxes aro remitted for five years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August
4, 1914, on account ot payments, fees
or taxes on soldiers' nre-emptlons.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or olty lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1920.
SUB-PURCHASERS OP CROWN
LANDS
Provision made for Issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers ot
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchas-
<sre do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
whole area. Applications must be made
by May 1, 1920.
GRAZING
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock industry provides for grazing districts and range
administration under Commissioner.
Annual grazing permits issued based
on numbers ranged; priority for estab
llshed owners. Stock-owners may
form issoclatlons for range manage-'
ment. Free, or partially free, permits
for settlors, campers or travellers, up
to ten head.
The
Anyox Community
League Council
Meet every Wednesday, at 7.30 p.m.
The 2nd. Wednesday in each month,
Meeting is held at the Mine Hall.
Other Meetings held in Recreation
Hall
i\.   Ks.   Li.
LIBRARY
// you have a suggestion for
the improvement of the Library,
such as New Books, Subject
for Lecture or Debate, enter
it in the Suggestion Book in the
Library. Librarians hours are
2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday Afternoons excepted.
Anyox
Community
League
CHICKENS
FOR SALE
Six Hens and a Rooster for $12.00
Several Young Pullets, $2.00 each
H. H. CARNEY, Alice Arm
Kitsault Cigar Store
Cigars, Tobacco & Soft Drinks
Wholesale and Retail
ROBERTSON & DUMAS, Props.
FRANK D. RICE
B. C. LAND SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Subdivisions. Underground Surveys
Etc.
ALIOE ARM, B. O.
B. W. BARRETT
ALICE ARM
General
Merchandise
nmmnumummm
Advertise in the Herald
♦■■■♦'■■■♦♦♦■►♦♦♦<.».«.|«^,i.^».4,<.4,1,4.t,if..f.t,^,i.4,t,^<.4<.4<.|.... 4 »+,. 4.41
*    LAUNCH, "AWAKE"   j
i
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m. I
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
1
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
SPECIAL  TRIPS  BY  ARRANGEMENT
4»4»4«H*H*H*H«4*f» 4 "■ ♦ ■■■ ♦ *** >-■•■-♦•«•■»*♦■■' t"' ♦ " ♦* 4 »■♦■*
KITSAULT  CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
MEAT, BREAD & PASTRY ALWAYS FOR SALE
Luncheons Supplied for Picnic Parties
GUS  ANDERSON,  Proprietor
T.   W. FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Shelf and Heavy Hardware, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Drygoods, Boots & Shoes
Dynamite - Caps - Fuse      McClarys Stoves and Ranges
- ALICE   ARM   AND ' ANYOX , HERALD,   Alice  Arm,   Saturday, April 1st., 1922
j     ANYOX NOTES      |
J.f.t.+-...-f...-f*.>.«.+...-f ••.+... ♦.•.♦.•.+-..■♦*. J
The B. P. 0. Elks held a very
successful dance at their Hull, on
Friday, March 24. A' large number of people were present and an
enjoyable evening \\as spent. The
Anyox orchestra supplied the
music.
Make Sunday different. Spend
an hour at the Union Church, 7.45
p.m.
Miss Kathleen Haslett arrived
home on Tuesday, from Spokane,
accompanied by her friend, Miss
Burnett.
Mr. J. M. Home, General Freight
Agent, Vancouver; Mr. Osborne
Scott, General Passenger Agent,
Vancouver, and Mr. G. A. Mc-
Nioholl, General Freight and
Passenger Agent, Prince Rupert,
for the Canadian National Railways, visited Anyox on Thursday,
on a tour of inspection.
Mr. and Mrs. Heidman, of the
Golkeish mine left on Thursday for
a few months holiday in Vancouver
Air. Dale Pitt, general manager
of the Premier mine, was a visitor
in town last week, accompanied by
his wife and daughter.
Mr. J. S. Holmes, superintendent of the coke plant, returned on
Monday from California.
George Thomas, the star player
of the mine baseball team left town
on Monday.
The spring salmon are now running and some line catches have
been made during the last week.
Tom McRostie has brought in two
weighing around 45 lbs. each and
several other fishers have had
good luck. *
Concert Held at the
Union Church, Anyox
Splendid Programme Given
to an Appreciative
Audience
A very enjoyable social evening
was spent at the  Union Church;
on Friday, March 24th. The admission fee was a silk bag whioh
contained one cent for each year of
one's age. The total receipts
amounted to $35, so the aggregate
ages of those present amounted to
3500 years.
Mr. Walter Corbett acted as
chairman and the following programme was rendered, after which
supper was served.
Mandolin Selection, Mr. Sid
Armstorong.
Solo, "Silver Threads among the
Gold," Mr. G. P. McColl.
Reading, '"The Game of Life,"
J. Pinder-Moss. Encore, "Father's
Bath."
Solo, "There's a Land," Rev. J.
Herdman.
Solo, "Take me home again
Kathleen," Mrs. E. Galloway.
Violin Solo. J. Parker; piano
accompanist, Miss Leitch.
Short Stories by J. W. Esplin.
Duet, "What are the wild waves
Saying," Miss Leitch and Rev. J.
Herdman. Encore, "Madam wfll
you walk with me."
Solo, "The River Shannon," G.
P. McColl.
Violin Solo, J. Parker.
Mrs. Wellwood acted as accompanist.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
Athos, Portes, Amies, D'Artagnon
and D'Artagnon No. 1 Mineral Claims,
situate in the Naas Biver Mining
Division of Oassiar District, about
twenty miles up the Kitsault River on
east side.
Lawful holders: J. D. Meenach,
Free Miner's Certificate No. -J0S76-C;
R. D. Brown, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 40877-O; John Holmgren, Free
Miner's Certificate No- 40878-C; Chas.
E. Frey, Free Miner's Certificate No.
40870-C.
Take notice, that I, William E.
Williams, Free Miner's Certificate No.
44370-C, agent for the above-named
lawful holders, intend at the end of
sixty days from the date thereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above mi neral claims.
And further take notice that action
under section 85 of the Mineral Act
must be commenced before the
issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 20th. day of March, 1922.
W. E. Williams,
Barrister-at-law
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Granby Stores
DRUG DEPARTMENT
-;- Jazz -;-
JAZZ   RECORDS   JAZZ
WE ARE FEATURING THIS MONTH
Paul Whiteman and His
Orchestra Dance Records
Have  You The Complete Set?
HEAR THEM ON OUR NEW
McLagan Machine
CASCADE BEER
The Beer without a Peer
Made in B. C. for thirty years from only
pure products
Canada Cream
■:- Stout ■:-
The Finest Stout Made in B. C.
the Government Vendor for CASCADE BEER
and CANADA CREAM STOUT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
For Sale at Vendor's Store, Anyox
_j
MINERAL ACT
Certificate! of Improvements
NOTICE
Red Bluff and Devil's Club Mineral
Claims, situate in the Naas River Mining Division of Oassiar District.
Where located: on Kitsault River,
Alice Arm.
Take notice that I, Thomas McRostie,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 40863O,
acting as agent for Joseph N. McPhee,
Free Miner's Certificate No. 40853C,
intend, sixty days from the date
thereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a (Ifcrtificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Cro'wn Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under sectidn 85, must be commenced
before the ispiiance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 17th. day of March, 1922.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
Swil'twater Mineral Claim, situate in
the Naas River Mining Division of
Oassiar District. Where located: on
Kitsault River.
Take notice, that I, George A.
Young, Free Miner's Certificate No.
'I1022C, intend, sixty days from the
date thereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 2nd. day of February,
1922.
See Al. Falconer for Freight or
Pack Horses I.
r~
Why Work for Others?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS. Save 22 cents a day and buy 10 acres
of good land in a decent climate, on Vancouver Island, close to
Parksville, Errington, or Coombs. We sell splendid land in this
delightful country in 10 to 40 acre tracts, at $40 per acre. Terms
$8.00 per cash and $8.00 per acre every year for four years. No
interest unless you forget to pay your installment promptly. You can
pay monthly if you desire. Write immediately for illustrated
literature. "-•• - ~^
G. J. FORBES, District Manager,
VANCOUVER ISLAND FRUiT LANDS, Ltd.
PARKSVILLE, B. C.
Ik
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
r
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
*'. *
' Has produced minerals valued as follows:  Placer G^ld, $75,944,203;  Lode Gold, $102,753,823;   Silver,
$53,668,284;   Lead, $46,637,221;  Copper, $161,513,864;  Zinc, $19,896,466;  Cdal and Qoke, $212,573,492;
Building Stone, Brick, Cement, etc., $32,168,217;' Miscellaneous Minerals, $1,037,408;   making its mineral
production to the end of 1920 show an 1
Aggregate Value of $706,192,978
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry of this Provinoe is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures which show the value of production for successive five-year periods: For all years to 1895, inclusive,
$94,547,241 for five years, 1896-1900, $57,605,967; for five years, 1901-1905, $96-509,968; for five years, 1906-
1910; $125,534,474; for five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603;- for the five years, 1916-192G, $189,922,725.
Production During last ten years, $331,995,328
Lode-mining has only been in progress for about 25 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospected; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
\ Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, the security of which is guaranteed by
Crown Grants. ,,
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
1 VICTORIA, British Columbia
wmm

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