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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Feb 12, 1927

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 .....mis susiisms l l is I
A little paper  |
with all the
news and a big
circulation
■
i ■«...»»#■■»>■■■■■■■ »■•■ •"»■•■■•■■*■•'
THE HERALD
Published in the interests of Alice Arm and Anyox, B. C.
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. $2.75 to ]
all other points, t
l/v/
VOL. 6,   NO. 32
Alioe Arm, B. C, Saturday, February 12, 1927
5 cents each.
Alice Arm Puck Chasers
Battle (or League
Supremecy
Wildcats Still Well In The
Lead
High Grade Encountered
On LeRoy Property
Five games were played in the
Alice Arm Hockey League during
the week. Games were played on
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, and rain on
Thursday brought games to a close.
The biggest surprise of the week
was when the Wildcats, who have
easily vanquished their opponents,
lost two straight games. They lost
to the Timber Wolves on Tuesday
4-3, and the following night the
Tigers slipped a halter on them to
the tune of 5-0.
The games produced some excellent exhibitions of hockey. Some of
the younger players are rapidly
approaching the semi-professional
stage, and now that the rules are
being more closely followed the finer
points of the game are in evidence.
The return of Al. Falconer from
the south has given considerable
strength to the Tigers, who formerly were the weak team. The teams
are now more evenly matched and
some fast exciting games will result
V future.
Unusual interest has been taken J
in the games, and every night the
gallery and sides are packed with
enthusiastic fans who cheer their
favorites to victory or vent their
sarcasm on the opponents.
On Saturday evening the Wildcats and Timber Wolves, mixed
things at a merry pace and for three
hectic periods the result hung in the
balance. The loggers were tireless
in their efforts to down their opponents, but the Wildcats were not to
be denied the fruits of victory and
they added another win to their string
to the tune of 8-4.
On Sunday the Wildcats and
Tigers mauled each other, and again
• the former emerged victorious. The
game was fairly even, but the Tigers
did not seem to possess the art of
placing the puck between the posts
and the Wildcats again climbed
another rung on the ladder of local
hockey fame by the score of 8-2.
The Timber Wolves deserved
both wins for they played aggressive games, and drove the puck for
goal at every opportunity.
Monday evening's game was one
that will go down in local history.
It was a hard bitter struggle for
three periods between the Timber
Wolves and Tigers, at the close of
which the score was 7-7. Fifteen
minutes overtime was played and
the Tigers emerged victorious and
battle scarred by the score 8-7. The
game see-sawed throughout its
entire length, first one team obtaining the lead and then the other.
. Every player threw himself whole
i heartedly into the game, with no
one sidestepping anything. It was
a thrilling game to watch, and still
more thrilling to play. A game
which satisfies everyone.
Continued on page 4
A nice vein of high grade silver-
lead-zinc ore was enoountered in
the tunnel at the Le Roy mine
during the last week-end. It came
in at the width of six inches, but
soon widened to over a foot. ' It is
massive ore and samples were at
once sent out for assaying.
The whole face of the tuuuel is
iu ore of a secondary grade. The
latest find wns unexpected, and
adds considerably to the average
value of the ore.
The Le Roy is a promising property and the latest find will undoubtedly stimulate development.
In addition to lead silver and zinc
values the ore carries $4.00 gold
per ton.
The tunnel has been driven a
distance of 145 feet and work is
still being carried on.
Anyox Divide Honors
With the Indian
Basketballers
Work at Toric Tunnel
Enlarges Ore Reserves
The Sons of Kincolith Indian
teams got an even break in their
series of basketball games with
Anyox senior teams last Monday
and Tuesday. On Monday night
they beat the Celtics 31-17, but lost
to the Concentrator 23-21. On
Tuesday a combined Concentrator-
Celtic team won the first gamel7-15,
and the Elks dropped the last one
32-21.
-The Indians have a strong aggregation of basketball players,
well-trained and in good condition
their husky centre Jack Johnson
being particularly effective.
In the first game against the
Celtics they got away to a good
start and outplayed the students all
the way. _At half time the score
was 23-13. J. Johnson and A. Robinson starred for Kincolith. Les
Lane refereed.
Kincolith: C. Barten-2, A. Rob-
insen-3, J. Johnso.n-14, T. Stewart,
P. Allen, M. Stewart, C. Robinson-
2.
■ Celtics'.     Asimus-6,    Lindgren,
Lazoreck-7.    Clay,     McDonald-4,
Barclay, Barclay.
The second   game against • the
The contract for tunnel work at
the Toric mine was completed
this week. The work Was accomplished in 53 shifts and during
that time 230 feet of tunnel was
driven. I
The work was done on the east ^Concentrator v^s the roughest seen
side of the fault, where the foot
wall of the big ore body was
picked up, and along which most
of the work was done.
Good ore was encountered the
whole distance, and valuable reserves have been added to the big
tonnage already blocked out.
Mine  Club  Providing
Entertainment
The Anyox Mine Club are again
becoming an active organization
and several forms of entertainment
are being prepared by the officers
for the benefit of the residents up
on the hill. During last month
two card parties were held, and
whioh were very successful.
It has been planned to hold a
big smoker at the Mine Gymnasium on Monday, February 28th. at
which the best available talent in
the camp will take part.
A big Masquerade Dance will
also be held in the near future,
when several new features will be
introduced and whioh promises to
be one of the outstanding events
of the season.
l 4... ^...^...4)■»♦'•■ ^■.■4'.'♦'.'♦■.'♦■•■ ♦'■■♦■»■
AUCE ARM NOTES
J. Calvin arrived back on Monday from an extended visit to
Prince Rupert. He left again on
Thursday but expects to return in
about ten days.
Al. Falooner returned on Monday, after spending a month in
Vancouver.
Mike Sandul returned on Monday from Prince Rupert where he
spent the past week.
in these parts for some time. The
hard going didn't seem to bother
the lighter Anyox team and they
held a small lead all the way. It
was a very poor exhibition of
basketball. J. Stewart and D.
McLeod for the Concentrator were
most effective. Holdan for the
Indians was high point man with 11
to his credit. E. Craggs handled
the whistle.
Kincolith: Robihson-6, Dangali-
4, McKay, G. Stewart, Sutten, Cecil,
Allen, M. Stewart, Holdan-11.
Concentrator: Thompson, Beaulieu. J. Stewart-10, Moffatt, Hill-3,
Peters-3, Macleod-7, Smith.
The second night produced the
best game of the series when they
tangled with the combined Concentrator-Celtic team, Fast clever
basketball was displayed by both
teams. The Indians led at half time
but Anyox started a strong offensive in the second half to pull up
even. For the last ten minutes only
one basket separated the teams.
In the dying moments Anyox gained
a two-point lead and held it. Anyox
played a steady, close checking
game. J. Johnson starred for Kin
eolith.
Concentrator-Celtic: J. Stewart-5,
J. Lazoreck-2, G, Moffatt-4, D.
McLeod-4, S. Peters-2, T. Asimus,
E. Clay.
Kincolith: C. Robinsen-4, H.
Dangeli, A. Robinson, J. Johnsen-10,
T. Stewart, M. Stewart, J. Bansen-
1.
In the final game the Elks were
unable to hold the visitors, losing
32-21. Dangeli, Robinsen and
Johnsen for the Indians scored many
points. Buntain was most effective
for the Elks, at half time the score
was 20-8.    F. Brown refereed the
J     ANYOX NOTES      !
+4-..4...4...4......4...4 .»♦>»♦ •»♦'••♦ ■»♦•*'♦ t
W. Payne and J. A. Bray arrived from Vancouver on Monday.
8. Varing, W. Lainge and A. G,
Young were arrivals from Prince
Rupert on Monday.
Chas. Bocking left on Thursday
on a business trip to the south.
Mrs. J, Carr arrived back on
Monday from Port Simpson, where
she has been on an extended visit.
8. Down was a passenger to
Prince Rupert ou Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Ellison left on
Monday for Vancouver.
Father Godfrey was a passenger
to Prince Rupert on Monday.
W. A. Talbot was a southbound
passenger on Monday to Prince
Rupert.
C. Bower left on Monday for
Maple Bay.
C. V. Evitt, secretary for the
Caledonia Diocese was a visitor in
town on business on Thursday.
A. C. R. Yuill arrived on Thursday from Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. G. Buchanan were
southbound passengers to Vancouver on Thursday.
Mrs. W. Ballentyne, accompanied by her daughter, Alice,
arrived on Monday from Vancouver, and will take up their residence here. They were former
residents of the camp, and a number of friends are glad to see them
return.
Helen Walker arrived from
Prince Rupert on Thursday, with
pack sack and strong hiking boots.
She olaims the reputation of going
through life by hiking from place
to place and gaining a living by
selling books. She is slated to
appear at the Reoreation Hall
this evening at show time.
Anyox C. C. I. T. Held
United Church
Service
Sunday was Canadian Girl In
Training day in the Anyox United
Church.
The local group was organized
under the leadership of Miss Andrews and has been meeting twice a
week, iu class on Sunday and .
Wednesday afternoon. At the
service on Sunday at the United
Church, the girls displayed ' the
training which they have already
received. The president of the
group, Jean McDonald announced
tlie Hymns and read the Scripture
Lesson; Barbara Lee recited the
Travellers Psalm; Dorothy Dodd
made the announcements; Netta
Robertson and Nann Dunn took up
the offering;' Lillian and Mildred
Dresser rendered a duet.
In explanation of the ideals of
the Canadian Girls In Training
programme the girls gave part of
their initiation ceremony. As a
choir, the girls sang two choruses.
Miss Andrews was the pianist for
the service.
This service was the first of its
kind to be held in Auyox. Of the
325 groups of C. G. I. T in the
province the local group, called
Tlie Excelsior has the distinction
of being the most northern.
During the service the pastor
expressed the appreciation of the
Sunday School and Church for the
service which Miss Andrews is
rendering in connection with the
girls' work.
BIRTH  AT ANYOX
„ Born to Mr. and Mrs. Garton
Crow, at the Anyox Hospital, on
Sunday, February 6th. a son.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. D. Sorrenti, at the Anyox Hospital, on
Monday, February 7th. a son.
Log Carrying Barges Busy
Loading
Two log carrying barges, Basuto
and Bingamon, arrived at Alice
Arm last week, and are loading
logs from the camp of F. L. Hous-
ley. They will load about 1,500,
000 feet b.m. and expect to leave
next week for Powell River.
last two games.
Kincolith: Dangeli-2, A. Robinson, T, Stewart, P. Allen, J. Johnsen-10, M. Stewart.
Elks: Buntain-10, Gordon-4,
Bruce, Dodd-4, Craggs, Groves,
S. Stewart, C. McDonald-3.
Kincolith Indians Visit
Anyox With Band
& Basketballers
On Sunday and Monday some 45
visitors arrived from  Kincolith in
their own launches.     The parties
consisted of the players of the Indian
Basketball Team, a 24 piece brass
band and visitors.    On Monday and
Tuesday evenings some very interesting basketball games were played
by the visitors and the Anyox teams.
These games were well attended.
On Tuesday evening,  after the
games were over a dance was put
on in the Beach Gymnasium.     The
music was provided by the  Indian
I band.    On Wednesday a band con-
I cert was put on in the Recreation
Hall.     Unfortunately due to   the
activities of  the numerous events
which have taken place during the
last ten days this concert was not
so well attended as in previous years.
The   visitors kindly extended   an
invitation to all those attending the
concert, where they offered   their
services gratis for   the   benefit  of
those who wish to dance.    The visitors returned  to   their   homes at
Kincolith on Thursday morning.
Subicribe to Your Local Paper
A large number of Anyox hockey
players, skaters and others will pay
a visit to Alice Arm this week-end,
if weather permits. A hockey
game will be played on Sunday and
a dance will be held in the Alice
Arm Hotel this evening. p
ALICE  ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Friday,   February   12   1927
Alice Arm & Anyox Herald
Issued every Saturday at Alice Arm
Alice Ann and Anyox $2.50 Yearly
Other Parts of Canada, $2.75
British Isles and United States, 88.00
Notices for Crown Grants  -   -   $15.00
Land Notices-       - ■•     -      -       $15.00
Transient Advertising, 50o. per inch
Contract Rates, on Application.
B. .MOSS, Editor and Publisher.
Good news to British Columbia
in recent reports that bar silver is
back to 60 cents an ounce at New
York. Continuation of the upward
movement, if the market should
lead that way, will have the
effect of stimulating production in
this province and of bringing stocks
of ore from the dumps, where they
have been held by several companies pending the return to higher
prices.
Action for a gold standard in
India early last year brought about
a very heavy slump which completely demoralized the industry, particularly at mines where silver was
the principal metal.
On January 8 of last year the
price of silver in New York was
quoted at 68 3-8 cents, and from
that date it gradually sank till on
October 2lst.it was down to
51 1-8 cents. At the latter price
the production of silver was unprofitable. Many of the B. C.
mines were affected and a few of
them ceased shipping ore. At the
same time the operators were satisfied that the prices would be revived
• and they kept on mining and simply
storing the ore. That ore is ready
for shipment any time.
British Columbia produces annually about 7,654,000 ounces of
silver.
If there was one thing which
Premier Bruce made quite clear
while he was in the British Columbia Legislature it was that if Canada
is to enjoy the advantages which
she is now enjoying under the provisions of the Canadian-Australian
trade treaty, she must buy more
goods than she at present is buying
from the southern Commonwealth.
The people of British Columbia,
incidentally, were reminded the
other day by The Vancouver
Province that the people of Australia buy from this Dominion goods
to the value of $3.60 per capita
compared with Canada's purchases
from the Commonwealth of only
fourteen cents per capita, that newspaper arguing quite reasonably that
the weakness of the treaty lies in
this country doing all the selling
and little of the buying. The Vancouver journal, of course, is fully
Building Trades Using
Much Larger Amount
of Copper
Perhaps of all the markets that
have shown a substantial increase
in the use of copper and brass,
none can compare with the building industry. Prior to 1921 the
consumption of brass pipe for
plumbing was negligible and the
use of brass or copper pipe for
underground water connection
was practically unknown. The
same was true of copper downspouts, eavestrongh and roof
flashings as well as copper and
bronze window screens and bronze
weather stripping. In 1922, with
a total building volume iu the
United States of $1920,000,000,
the building industry consumed
11)4,000,000 pounds of copper. In
1920, with an estimated building
volume of $5,500,000,000, copper
consumption will increase to at
least 275,000,000 a growth in five
years of 111,000,000 pounds, or 68
per cent.
The recent development of several typos of copper shingles has
materially increased the consumption-of copper in the small house
held. The average house roofed
with copper shingles and fitted
with oopper gutters, leaders and
roof flashings consumes about 600
pounds of copper. It is estimated
that the potential market of copper
shingles is 2,400,000 squares per
year, consuming 48,000,000 pounds
of copper.
That the public is now appreci
ating the merits of copper isshown
by the increased use of sheet copper in the washing machine industry. In 1921 less than 50 percent,
of the washing machines having
metal tubs used copper; in 1926,
probably 95 per cent, of the tubs
will be made of copper, and the
amount of metal used will be
15,000,000.
W. B. BOWER
Agent   -      -      -   Alice Arm
At the Service of Non-Residents and
Residents in the Transaction of any
Businesi in this Vicinity
INSURANCE,   ALL KINDS
Help boost the District you live
in, helping yourself at the same
time.   Advertise in the Herald.
Al. Falconer
Alice Arm
Baggage, Freighting, Pack
and Saddle Horses
COAL & FINISHED LUMBER
Slab Wood Cut any Length
Every Order Given
Immediate Attention
HE
Considering what most people are
willing to do for money it's a wonder there are not more millionaires.
appreciative of the value of the
arrangement to British Columbia
and, as The Victoria Times pointed
out the other day,, "is serving this
Province by doing anything it can
to create further interest in the
facilities which the provisions of
the pact contain."
Canadian public opinion is obviously aware that this country got
an excellent bargain when the treaty
was finally agreed to nearly two
years ago. Canadians, therefore
and particularly British Columbians
realize that they would be foolish
to attack it, This was emphasized
when Premier Bruce explained
how difficult it was for his government to get it through Parliament.
Alice Arm
The Bonanza Silver
—— _ Camp of B. C.
We invite you to investigate the mining shares now
being offered in Alice Arm properties and recommend
Kitsault-Eagle Silver Mines Ltd. (N.P.L.)
British Colonial Securities Ltd.
Suite 325, Standard Bank Building, Vancouver
Alice Arm Representative:   A. McGuire
3E30E
30
Live in Comfort
There  is  no reason why you should get wet or cold  when out
of doors.    We have on  hand everything suitable for winter
wear;  including Harvey's Hand Made Loggers'   Shoes, Goodrich Rubbers, Bonedry Pants and Jumpers, etc.
BRUGGY'S STORE
Alice Arm
QBE
3HE
30
STEAMSHIP AND TRAIN
SERVICE
S. S. Prince Rupert leaves   Anyox for   Prince
Rupert, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, each Thurs-
iday at 11.00 p.m.
S. S. Prince John leaves   Prince    Rupert,   for
Vancouver,    via     Queen    Charlotte    Islands,
fortnightly.
PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE FROM  PRINCE RUPERT
Trains leave Prince Rupert each Monday, Wednesday and Saturday
at 11.30 a.m., for Jasper, Edmonton, Winnipeg, direct connections for all points East and South. '
Use Canadian National Express for Money Orders, Foreign
Cheques, etc., also for your next shipment.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or further information, apply to any Canadian
National Agent, or to R. F. McNAUGHTON, District Passenger Agent
Prince Rupert, B. C.
rr
LAUNCH, "AWAKE"
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
st..»s.»..f s.»..»s.»s rM"!"!"! •<•»•»•'
SPECIAL  TRIPS   BY   ARRANGEMENT
^
-Ja
SYNOPSIS OF
UHAOTIEHNTS
PRE-EMPTION8
Vaoant, unreserved, surveyed
Jiown lands may be pre-empted by
British subject* over II years of age,
aid by alien* on declaring intention
to become British subjeots, conditional upon residence, oocupatlon,
md Improvement tor agricultural
imrpoiM,
full information concerning regu-
atlons regarding pre-emptions la
srlven In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
'How to Pre-empt Land," coptei ot
ivhich oan be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
•Lands, Viotoria, B.C, or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and whioh is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5.000 board
feet per aore west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feot per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
o be addressed to the Land Com-
nissloner of tho Land Recording Division, In whioh the land applied for
la situated, and are made on printed
I'orms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must bo occupied roi'
five years and Improvements made
.to value of J1U per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at loaat Ave
acres, before a Crown Grant can bo
received.
For more/detailed information see
tho Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land." "
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unroservert
Crown lands, not being timber-land,
tor agricultural purposes', minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is (6
-per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timher land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESITE LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exoeeding 20
aores, may be leased as homesltea,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the flrst year, title being
obtainable after residence and im-,,
provement conditions are fulfilled
and land' has been surveyed.
I LEA8E8
: For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by on* person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Aet the Provinoe U divided Into graslng districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially free,
permit! are available tor settlers,
camper* and traveller*, np to ten
head.
The Herald
$2.50 a Year
Anyox & Alice Arm
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
Has produced Minerals as follows: Placer Gold, $77,663,045; Lode Gold, $122,808,459; Silver, $74,-
111397- Lead $89 218,907; Copper, $197,642,647; Zinc, $39,925,947; Miscellaneous Minerals, $1,594,387
Coal and Coke! $273,048,953; Building Stone, Brick, Cement, etc., $44,905,886; making its mineral
production to the end of 1925, show an
Aggregate Value of $920,919,628
The sudstantial progress of the Mining/industry of this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
fiaures which show the value of production for successive five-year periods: For all years to 1895, inclusive $94 547 241- forfive years, 1896-1900, $57,607,967; for five years, 1901-1905, $96,507,968; for five years-
iq061910 $125 534 474; forfiveyears, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; for five years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725;
1921, $28,066,641; for the year 1922, $35,158,843; for 1923, $41,304,320; for 1924, $48,704,604, and for 1925,
Production Last Ten Years, $404,649,375
Lode mining has only been in progress for about 25 years, and only about one-half of the Province has
been even prospected; 200,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing" land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to disooverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, security of which is guaranteed by
Crown Grants.
Practically all British Columbia Mineral Properties upon whioh development work has been done-
are described in some one of the Annual Beports of the Minister of Mines. Those consider.^
mininp: investments should refer to suoh reports. They are available without charge on application
to the Department of Mines, Victoria; B. C. Beports oovering eaoh of the six mineral Survey
Districts are published separately, and are available on application. Beports of the Geological
Survey of Canada, Winch Building, Vancouver, are recommended as valuable sources of information.
Full information, together with Mining Beports jg^^g^pjjjjjj^ *gp ^IW®***™*
VICTORIA, British Columbia
iHUMBtsHB ALICE  ARM   AND  ANYOX  HEBALD,   Friday,   February  12  1927
P
Slashing Reduction Is
Made In Provincial
Taxes
Following are a few of the main
features in the budget which Hon.
J. D. MacLean, Minister of Finance
presented to the Legislature
recently, .   .
British Columbia's tax bill will
be cut by at least $525,000, making
a total tax reduction of $1,735,000
under the Oliver Government in
the last four years.
This reduotion, the Minister
announced, will be accomplished
by these far-reaching changes in
the Province's taxation system.
1. A cut in the income tax of
$125,000 a year through an increase in the rebate for a married
person from $1,500 to $1,800 and
for dependents from $200 to $300.
Widows aud widowers with dependent children also will be allowed the same rebate as a married
person.
2. The personal property tax
will be wiped out completely and
in -its place business will pay a
turnover tax oii gross income
which will be alternative to the
income tax and will make taxation
| generally more equjtable.
3. Succession duty taxes will
I be slashed to the extent of $400,-
! 000 by a reduction in rates and
general readjustment of the levy
on estates so that there will be no
discouragement to wealthy people
who want to come to British
Columbia.
JSqnally satisfactory was the
Minister's announcement that the
deductions above set out will be
followed by further similar cuts
next year.
By February 1928 the Province's
wartime financing will have been
completed and the whole of the
provincial debt will have been put
upon a permanent basis and oover-
ed by sinking funds.
The production from the primary industries of the province1
for the ten years ending 1926—
under the Liberal Administration
—was $1,100,000,000 more than in
the previous decade under a Conservative government.
The margin of provincial assets
over liabilities increased during the
last year by $35,921,099.
The minister pointed out that
the gross debt had been .reduced
by $5,130,000. He also hinted for
the comfort of the members and
the satisfaction of the people of the
Province that taxation in British
Columbia, in cities and rural districts, is far lower than in tlie state
of Washington.
Did You Ever Notice—
—How small the dollar seems
which we spend for entertainment?
—How large the dollar is which
we give to charity?
—How long the speech is when
someone else is talking?
—How fast the time noes when
you are talking?
-Tf~
FRANK D. RICE
B. C. LAND SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Olaims, Subdivisions, Underground Surveys,
Etc.
ALICE ARM, B. C.
No matter how great -« philosopher a man may be he can never
figure out how he caught that
cold.
Loyal Order
of Moose
Anyox Lodge No. 1412
Lodge Meets 2nd. and 4th. Wednesday
in each month, at 8 p.m. prompt
Heidqurters: Elks' Hall, Aayex
Dictator:
H. Ward
Secretary:
J. W. Webster,
P. O. Box 407
Phone 320
ANYOX
COMMUNITY
LEAGUE
Beach Recreation Hall:
Pictures: Tuesdays,
Thursdays, and Saturdays
Mine Recreation Hall:
Pictures:   Wednesdays and
Fridays
POOL, BILLIARDS, SMOKES, Etc
r-
-Tl
Everything For Work,  Sport
And Leisure
For work: Mackinaw Pants, and Shirts,  Heavy Underwear,
Socks, Goodrich Rubbers, etc.    For Sport:   Skates,  Hockey
Sticks and Pucks.    For   Leisure:    Seagrass Arm  Chairs for
fireside comfort on cold winter evenings.
T.W. FALCONER Alice Arm
GENERAL MERCHANT
Help the Organization
that Serves You
Worthy of your Support
THE
Anyox Community League
Reading Room and Library
A wide range of Newspapers,
Magazines and Periodicals on
file.   New books regularly
received.
Join Up!
Make the League better
through your influence
r"
WINTER CLOTHES
We are now carrying a large stock of Men's Winter
Clothes, suitable for both work or dress wear.
Men's Dress Suits all latest styles and patterns from
$15.00 to $35.00
LEW LUN & Co.. General Merchants
West Side of Smelter ANYOX, B. C.
OPEN   UNTIL   10   P.M.
THEY BASK IN MID-WINTER SUNSHINE
VT/'hy pick on me?" says the little fellow, "there
vv are many other things which can interest you
and hold your attention." And so there are, out
after all the native life of the "Isles of the Blest" is
worth a little study, ia it not? Take thia little Ja-
maician tor instance. If you took away his shirt
and his broom handle you would not leave him much
other than a full tummy, yet he is a British subject,
and as such has an opportunity of becoming—well—
of doing pretty well for himself and of gathering
enough of this world's substance to give him comfort
•t least in his later years. He will grow up in a
ramshackle old hut on the edge of the town maybe,
•nd learn to be jealous of his rights as a citizen; and
when he comes to the age of understanding he will
I be more English than the English. As a matter of
fact he will, in all probability, speak at least two
"English" languages. In one of these he might im-
slore you to buy his fruits or lace bark souvenirs or
Port •( Spain, Trinldtsr. Below, Light Much iflti •
41* la Iks open sir •wimnlns pool mi Ui« dock of Um
"MtalnrsL"   lasts, "You so war Toss lush."
direct you over the fine road that form a network over the island, and in the other he will
convene with his kind. This language sounds
as foreign as any you will meet with in your tour of
the West Indies, but if you listen intently enough you
will catch an "I" and an "an" or a "Yes»i then gradually your ear will be able to distinguish all the words
and you will wonder that you could not understand
the dialect.
They are interesting, these people. Watch them
as they swarm around your cruising vessel docked
in Kingston harbor, in their tub-like canoes, and dive
deep into the water for your coppers. They are a
different people in every sense of the word.
Participants in the cruises to the West Indiea by
the Canadian Pacific S.S. Montroyal in January and
February next will be afforded every opportunity to
study the various peoples with whom they come in
contact and will return with at least a few impressions and a better understanding of them. No matter how different they may be, they are never foreign. .This ia especially true of the British protectorates. If one would really get to the heart of these
people he dare not patronise them. If he doei this
be only finds the type that he expects to find.
I-"
KITSAULT: CAFE
AUCE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
BREAD  AND   PASTRY  ALWAYS  FOR  SALE
GUS.   ANDERSON,   Proprietor
L-
Dt
1DQC
30
Candies, Magazines, Stationery,
j  Proprietary Medicines. Toilet Articles, Etc
W. M. CummingS,   Agent for all Vancouver Daily Papers
Post Office Building, Alice Arm
DC
3C30C
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED MINING,
SMELTING & POWER Co. Limited
Producers of Copper, Coal, Coke, Benzol and
Ammonium Sulphate
Purchasers of Ores of Copper and Siliceous Ores
of Gold and Silver
MAIN OFFICEt-Anyox, B. C.
For Giving your Message Publicity the Herald Advertising
Columns Can Not be Beat ALICE  ARM  AND ANYOX  HERALD,  Friday,  February  12  1927
Alice Arm Puck Chasers
Battle for League
Supremecy
Wildcats Still Well In The
Lead
Continued from Page I
The following evening saw the
Wildcats and Timber Wolves facing
each other. The latter smarting
from their narrow margin defeat of
the previous evening were ready to
devour Wildcats or even Mountain
Lions. They commenced play like
a bolt of greased lightning and the
final whistle found them victorious
to the tune of 4-3. It was a closely
contested game, played at a dizzy
pace with both teams repeatedly
breaking up and down the ice, and
pouring a rain of shots on each goal.
The last game of the week on
Wednesday was instrumental in
throwing a monkey wrench into
the smooth running mechanism of
the Wildcat's machinery, when
the Tigers downed the high steppers to the tune of 5-0. It was a
nice gentlemanly game, each
player's first consideration being
the safety of Ins opponent. Tripping, slashing and other playful
pastimes had been tabooed by
the referee before commencing and
everyone was on their good behaviour.
It was really a good game, with
the Wildcats fighting like their
namesakes, and the Tigers doing
the killing stunt.
The score does not indicate the
play. The Wildcats come within
an ace of scoring a score of times,
but it was their unlucky night,
and the breaks went against them.
Except for a few changes the
following are the members of the
teams which took part in the
games:
Wildcats, P. Williamson, goal-
A. D. Yorke, defense; Gus. Anderson, J. Wilson, L. Foster, forwards.
Timber Wolves, J. Hanna, goal;
Smith, defense; J. Crompton, T.
Hutton, R.'Erickson forwards.
Tigers, E. De Gruchy, goal; T.
W. Falconer, defense; Al. Falconer,
H. Butler, E Moss, forwards.
Following is the standing of
teams up to and including Wednesday night.
Pld. Won Lost Goals Agst.
Wildcats 9 6 3 47 32
T. Wolves 8 4 4 45 44
Tigers     9 3 6 30 46
Badminton Tournament
Big Success
On Sunday, February 6th. a
very successful Badminton tournament, was held in the Beach
Gymnasium by members of the
club. Afternoon tea was served,
which was very much appreciated
after some of the strenuous sets
bad been played. The scores
made are as follows:
Mrs. Bryden and Mr. Brett,
82 and 14-96
Mrs. Fricker and Mr. McLellan, 90 and 15—105.
Mrs. Roy and Mr. E. G. Brown,
89 and 12-101.
Mrs. Selfe and Mr. Rudland, 84
and 10—94.
Mrs. Deane and Mr. F. Brown
—108.
Miss McGillivray and Mr. Ashton, 54 aud 24—78.
Mrs. Kirby and Mr. Porteans,
67 and 32—99.
Miss Champion and Mr. E.
Johnson, 74 and 40—114.
Mrs, Larson and Mr. Thortein-
sson, 50 and 40—90.
Mrs. Crone and Mr. Wilson, 103
and 6—109.
"OZARKA"
What is it? It is the name given
to the line of high grade Radio
sets manufactured by Ozarka Incorporated. These sets are built in
several different styles, with either
five or seven tubes. Ozarka sets
are sold in Anyox oompletely
equipped with the usual accessories
and also a BALKITE battery
charger, at prices ranging from
$135.00 upwards. The Ozarka
Hi-Power Loud Speaker uses the
famous English Amplion speaker
unit which is noted for quality reproduction. SEE IT! HEAR
IT! Operate the set yourself.
Call at my home, directly opposite
the Elks Hall, any evening for a
demonstration.
HARRY   KIRK
Licensed Radio Dealer
Factory   Agent For  Ozarka
Monroe & Vioking Sets
M. M. STEPHENS & Co. Ltd.
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
WRITTEN ANYWHERE
The oldest Financial Office in Northern B. C.
Office:  PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
B. P. O. ELKS
Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland
ANYOX LODGE' No. 47
Meets every second and fourth Monday of
the month
Hall for rent for dances, social functions, etc.
on application to club manager
Anyox Community
League
The Council of the League
meets on the Second and
Fourth Wednesday of each
month, in Recreation Hall,
at 7.30 p.m.
\—
Welcome Hotel
Alice Arm
Comfortable Rooms for Rent
Tobacco and Soft Drinks
Pool Tables, Cigars, Cigarettes
A. BEAUDIN, Proprietor
L_
H.   M.  SELFE
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
ANYOX
STOCKS & BONDS
We trade in all LISTED and
UNLISTED STOCKS. Your
orders promptly attended to
Buyers or SellerB.
ARTHUR  J.  BROWN
720 Hastings Street W.
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Soy. 6061
Member  Vancouver Stock
Exchange
USE
GRANBY BENZOL
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR SALE BY THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
□r=
3D
Anyox
Barber Shops
MINE AND  BEACH
HE
30
^■H»HMtH;t.'♦>♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦+♦+
■f
Alice Arm Electric I
LAUNDRY      I
OPPOSITE HERALD OFFICE  J
Clothes Cleaned and Pressed    I
J. LAIDLAW    -    -    PROP. |
•f+4"f4-*-fr4-f4-f>-f4+4-f4"f4"H-4-f>
Sunset Hotel
ALICE ARM
First-class Rooms for Rent,
by Day, Week or Month
CENTRALLY LOCATED
J. THOMAS   -   Prop.
r~
—i
PIONEER
HOTEL
Alice Ann
t
Comfortable Rooms for Rent
By Day, Week or Month at
Reasonable Rates
N. Sutilovich       Prop.
-J
BLUE FRONT CIGAR
STORE
Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobacco, Sort Drinks
Rooms for rent by Day Week or Month
Geo.  Beaudin
Prop.
rr
-N
Buy before the Boom
WHY   BUILD   ON   THE   INDIAN
RESERVE?
Don't you want to own your own back yard? If you do the
Alice Arm Mining & Development Co. will give you an
idea. Buy a lot from them. They have the choicest residential and business lots for sale.
BUSINESS    LOTS    FROM    $200    TO    $500
RESIDENTIAL   LOTS   FROM   $200  TO. $300
Terms made to suit buyers.     See Stephen  Dumas,   our
agent, and build where you don't have to move.
-   S.  DUMAS
Agent for the Alice Arm Mining & Development Co
^
Inspect   our   samples.
Big range of staple and
fancy patterns
FIT AND
WORKMAN-
SHIP
Guaranteed
eishman
Gothes
The Man on the Road
to Success
Don't put it
off, see us
now
Men of experience will
tell you that a,suit of
good clothes is the most
profitable equipment
with which to travel the
road to success. Good
appearance gives a man
faith inhimself and wins
the esteem of others.
Leishman Clothes—the
Best Tailored  Clothes
for Men—appeal to the
successful man because
their lines are dignified,
their style is correct,
their long service means
utmost economy, and
their workmanship
leaves nothing to be
desired.
Made to Measure or
Ready for Service.
GRANBY   STORES
^

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