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Herald Oct 22, 1921

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Full Text

 pPiBiippfciJiitt^
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B. G. Coast
ALICE ARM AND ANYOX, BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE HERALD
VI
The Herald Brings Results to Advertisers
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. $3.00 to
all other points.
VOL. 1,   NO. 21
Alice Arm, B. C, Saturday, October 22, 1921
5 cents each.
Inauguration of the
Granby Polytechnic
Great Interest Taken in Movement
by the People of Anyox
The inauguration of the Granby
ijBay Polytechnic, Anyox, B. C.
kvas held at the Recreation, Hall,
>n Friday evening the 14th inst.
The meeting was held under the
auspices of the Anyox Community
J League and the School Board, and
President Robert Armour was in
the chaif.
After the. chairman's opening
remarks, he called upon Mr. H. S.
■ Munroe^ General Manager-, of the
I Granby Consolidated Mining,
'Smelting & Power Co., Ltd.,, who
(said iii part: "This is taking an
iunfair advantage of me as I do not
..know what it is all about. I was
lunder the impression that Mr.
Pinder-Mpss \yas going to outline
the whole scheme, and I would tell
jyou aU what a good thing>it was."
You have all seen the curriculum
and the Granby Company is most
.anxious to oo-operate in every
possible way to niake thesev schools
ja success, and I hope they will be
[received with enthusiasm and that
[this enthusiasm will last throughout
[the whole term."
Mr. H. R. King, chairman of the
Anyox School Board, gave a brief
review on the work of the Technical Classes in Anyox.   He stated
• that two years ago we had our
first class of forty students, who
took up Minerolgy, Smelting, etc.
This class was very successful and
the students were thoroughly
satisfied. The second year we had
many more classes and students, so
the School Board engaged Mr.
Lambert to'find a Director for the
f Technical work when he was out
on his vacation this summer. Mr.
Lambert obtained the services of
Mr. John Pinder-Moss who has had
wide  experience   in    Polytechnic
I classes, and his work is proving
very satisfactory.
Mr. W. H. Lambert, Principal of
the Anyox Schools, spoke on the
co-relation of technical and theo-
I retical work.   Ho contended that
I although theoretical worlds largely
a failure, yet the facilities of this
town (tho Coke Plant, Hospital,
etc.) depended upon the theoretical
m .work done in the schools. He
pointed out that 44 per cent' of the
pupils graduating from Grammer
Schools do not reach the High
Schools and University graduates
are forced to work for very small
salaries, owing to lack of technical
knowledge. He stated that
Classics, Mathmatics, Modern Languages and Technical. Training
should be incorporated in every
ideal school, and the night schools
as outlined by Mr. Pinder-Moss are
based on the best system in the
world—the system now used in
England. ,     ,
Mr. Pinder-Moss stated that 2.1
per cent of the population is all
that reaches the universities of
Canada and the United States.
Mr. Lambert.had stated that 44
per cent, of the pupils never reach
High School, but from figures
received from Washington, Mr.
Pinder-Moss shows that 63 per
cent, do not reach the High School.
Mr. Pinder-Moss further pointed
out that although 6000 were unemployed in Vancouver, and 10,000
in Montreal were clamouring for
100 jobs in the Harvest Fields on
the Prairies, yet from statistics,
there is no unemployment to any
appreciable extent in Germany.
Germany for the past fifty years
has been leading the education of
the world. The indemnity which
France paid in 1870 was used for
the rejuvenation of the educational
system.
In Leipsig there are forty Technical Schools and and one High
School. In Winnipeg and Toronto
there are about five or six High
Schools and two Technical Schools.
In Edmonton there are five High
Schools and one Technical School.
Anyox now has one High Sohool
and one Technical School, a properly balanced ration of education.
In closing the meeting, Mr.
Armour, President of the Anyox
Community League, speaking for
himself and the Council stated that
they were anxious to co-operate in
every way possible to make the
Polytechnic a success.
The League, orchestra rendered
several much-appreciated selections
throughout the evening.
Ladies Tennis Championship of Anyox
Won by Miss A. McMillan
Mining News of
Alice Arm District
On Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. D.
Deane and Miss A. McMillan,
played off the finals for the Ladies
championship of Anyox.
Jupiter Pluvius was kind and
turned off the rain for half a day.
Both ladies were in fine form and
played a keenly contested game,
which created quite a little enthusiasm amongst the spectators, the
score running close all the way
through. Mrs. Deane taking the
lead in the first game. Miss McMillan taking the second. Not
until the last minute could anyone
say who was to be the winner, the
contestants having equal share of
the honours. The final score was
7 to 5 in favor of Miss McMillan.
Both ladies were recipients of
congratulations of the crowd at the
close of the game. Miss McMillan
for winning and Mrs. Deane for the
excellent fight she put up.
1/ Col. C. W. Peck, V.C„! ex-M.P.
for the Federal riding of Skeena,
will be an independent candidate
in the election oampaign now in
progress,
V '
"I want to go back, to Ottawa
with my hands free to deal with
any situation that may come up,
concerning the north country irrespective of party," he stated.
Alice Arm School
Is Completed
The public School which was
finished on Friday, is now ready
for occupation and it is expected
that school will be held there on
Monday.
The main room is 23ft. by 29ft.
inside, and an ante room in front,
10ft. by 14ft. Toilets, wood-shed
and coal bin are situated at the
rear of the school room, and a
closet has been built in the school
room for the storage of school
supplies.
The inside of the building downstairs has been V-jointed and
varnished throughout, and " big
windows, give lots of light.
The living quarters for the
teacher is upstairs and this has
been' beaver-boarded and tinted
and makes a very pleasant room
indeed. The public library of Alice
Arm will be Ideated in the New
School, under the supervision of
Miss Boa.
The school, now it is completed,
is a great improvement over the
old quarters in the Anglican
Church and is a credit to any town
the size of Alice Arm. Great
credit is due to the public spirited
citizens of Alice Arm for the energetic manner in which they carried
the project out.
The School cost in the neighbourhood of $2500. '
A play platform, 20ft. by 24ft.
will be built in front of the school
as soon as possible, for the use of
the children.
Moose Mine to Work
Throughout Winter
Work at the Moose Mine at
present consists of outside work.
Ore bunkers are being built, so
that ore taken out of the mine
during development work will not
be wasted A winter supply of
fuel is being cut and all outside
Work is being finished up before
the heavy show falls.
According to present plans, a
small crew will be worked on the
property doing development work
throughput the winter. Work on
cross-cutting the ledge in the lower
tunnel will be resumed as soon as
outside work is completed. ThisJ
cross-cut, at present shows the
lead to be 18 feet wide.
feet of stripping has been done at
one point on the lead and shows
the ore body to be about 70 feet in
width. An open cut of 45 feet has
also been made about 1000 feet
distant from where the stripping
was done and the cut is not yet
across the ore.
The Last Chance joins the Moose
mine, and it is believed that it is
the same ore body on which development work at the Moose proved
so successful this summer.
Tunnel on Last Chance
In About 55 Feet
The tunnel being driven oil the
Last Chance by Archie McPhail
and Pat Morley, is in about 55 feet
and- it is expected that ore will be
encountered at a distance of 200
feet, and the depth obtained will be
about 175 feet. The tunnel will
cross-cut the ore body, which has
been traced on the surface for
about  1000 feet. , Three hundred
A tunnel is being driven by Mr.
Pete Anderson on the Vanderhopf
and Columbia claims situated on
Clearwater Creek and he intends
to work there throughout the coming winter. All* supplies are on
the ground, and Pete "Expects to
show up a big body of ore before
next spring.
Mr. Louis Reynolds, accompanied
by Dan Kennedy, spent several
days this week doing work on the
Dixie No. 1, which is situated on
McGrath mountain. Louis brought
down some fine specimens of ore
which he is haying assayed.
There are some first-class showings
on the property, one lead being
40 feet wide and has been traced
on the surface for a distance of
over 300 feet. It is ideally situated,
being only a few miles from town
and at a low. elevation.
Well-known Residents
of Alice Arm Leave
the District
Mr. and Mrs. George Pratt, who
were two of the oldest residents in
Alice Arm, left town this week to
reside on their ranch in Oregon.
Mr. Pratt, who is over seventy
years of age has been troubled for
a considerable time with cancer in
the eye and his failing eyesight
made it impossible for him to
follow mining any longer. Mr.
and Mrs, Pratt have been residents
of Alice Arm since 1909 and formerly lived in a cabin where the
Hotel now stands. He sold this
property in 1916 to Mr. Ole Evindson, and moved across the bay,
where he has resided ever since.
He has sold all his mining interests
at Alice Arm, with .the exception
of the property above the Esperanza mine, in which Mr. Ralph
Ingraham has taken an half interest.
Patronize our Advertisers
Work on Government
Wharf Has Started
Mr. W. T. Muse, who arrived
from Prince Rupert last Friday,
has commenced work on the government wharf at Alice Ann. The
two outside bents of piles have
their footings under water, which
necessitates the use of a diver.
The diver arrived on Monday and
commenced operations the following day. The holes for blasting
the footings under water will be
drilled with a 30ft. steel, so that it
will be possible for the drillers to
work above water. Footings for
the piles above low water are
being blasted out. The Prince
Albert is bringing up piles, lumber,
etc. for the construction of the
wharf and is expected to arrive at
any time. x
If you've anything to sell, advertise it in the Herald and turn
it into money. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, October 22nd., 1921
Tlie Alice Arm and Anyox Herald
Published at Alice Arm
B.  MOSS
Editor and Publisher
SUBSCRIPTION   RATE:   $2,50   A   YEAR
Transient Display Advertising, 00 cents per inch per issue.
Local Readers 20 cents per line per issue.
Classified Advertising, per insertion, 2 cents per word.
Special Position Display or Reading, 25 per cent above ordinary Rates.
Certificate of Improvement, $12.00 (if more than one claim mentioned, $2.00
for each additional claim mentioned.)
Lanfi Notices, $10.00      Coal Notices, $7.00
Contract Display Advertising Rates on Application
No Advertising accepted for First Page,
TJie Granby Bay
Polytechnic
The Granby Bay Polytechnic
with Mr. J. Pinder-Moss, A.EI.C.
as organizer, has prepared an elaborate programme for the coming
winter, and it is hoped he will get
the whole-hearted support of the
citizens of Anyox, so that the
programme will be carried out
successfully. There are fourteen
different departments of learning.
Teachers have been appointed, and
the dates, meeting places, and time
have been settled for the various
classes. This is an age of learning.
Everyone is clamoring for knowledge that will enable them to
better their position in life, and
there will be no excuse for anyone
in Anyox if they fail to take
advantage of the splendid opportunity that is now open to them
and enroll in one of the several
classes of the Polytechnic. The
long winter evenings can be spent
in no better way than the acquiring of knowledge. It is always
the one that knows a little more
than the other fellow that gets
promotion and he is the one that
holds a job when times are slack
and the staff is being reduced.
There is no royal road to learning.
It is acquired by sheer hard work
and the person that thoroughly
studies and masters the subject he
undertakes this coming winter will
have acquired knowledge that will
benefit him all his life.
Granby Company
Investigating
Coal Fields
Engineers representing the
Granby Co. have recently been investigating coal and iron deposits
on the Copper River, which is a
tributary of the Skeena. It is
well-known that the Cassidy coal
does not make a good, coking coal
when used by itself and it has
been necessary to import coal from
Alberta to mix with it to produce
a coke suitable for smelting the
company's ores.
By building a railway" about
thirty miles in length the coal can
be delivered at navigable water on
the, Skeena River, so that from a
transportation point of view it is
particularly well located for a
supply of coal to the company's
by-product plant at Anyox.
Report  of Workmen's
Compensation Board
For 1920
The following is extracted from
the fourth annual report, recently
published by the King's Printer,
Victoria.
The operations of the Workmen's
Compensation Board in British
Columbia for the year 1920, covered 113,000 workmen with a pay
roll of $132,000,000.
During 192Q, 1417 new firms
were added to the list of employers,
while 869 were cancelled, leaving a
net increase of 548.
Of every $100 collected from the
employer, $95.92 goes directly to
the workmen or their dependents
without any expense whatever to
them.
After four years' operations of
the Act the reserves amount to
$,1,715,854.02. This amount includes an item of $15,000 per year
(now amounting to $60,000) which
has been set aside as a catastrophe
reserve to protect against a possible
catastrophe that may occur and
which may not be attributable to
or be a proper charge against any
single class of industry.
During the year 1920, 20,905
accidents were reported, of which
20,689 were non-fatal and 216 were
fatal. This number does not
include several thousand trivial
accidents in which first-aid service
only was rendered, and in which
there was no doctor required or
time lost and no claim made.
There were fewer fatal accidents
in 1920 than any year, since the
Act came into force. During 1919
there were 277 fatal accidents
reported; in 1918 there were 240
and in 1917 there were 217 fatalities, or an average of 237 for the
four years.
Since the present Act came into
effect on January 1st, 1917, a total
of 74,323 non-fatal claims have
been filed and 950 fatal accidents
reported, Arising out of the fatal
accidents, pensions have been granted in 440 cases to dependents.
There is now a total of 1,326
persons receiving monthly pension
cheques resulting from fatalities of
tho four years.
By reason of thirty-four widows
of deceased workmen having remarried and been paid the statutory
allowance of $480, further payments to them have ceased.
Pensions however, in respect to the
children of the first marriage
continue until such children reach
the age of 16 years,
During the year 11,166 workmen
received compensation in respect of
lost time. Of the non-fatal accidents, 7,844 were such as did not
necessitate a longer time" loss than
three days. Medical aid, however,
was paid in respect of same.
The total amount paid on claims
during the year was $1,711,637.29,
being 23 per cent, more than 1919.
This was due mainly to the increased volume of business and the
increase in widows' allowances of
75 per cent., children's allowances
of 50 per cent., and other dependents of 50 per cent.
A total of 40,276 cheques were
issued during the year to workmen,
dependents, and in respect of
medical aid.
p44444444444~444+4+4444444444444444-44444444444444444'
Reindeer Carcasses
Shipped from Nome
Three thousand reindeer carcasses
averaging 150 pounds each, are
awaiting shipment at Nome, to
Seattle. The Nome company producing reindeer on a commercial
scale, says it can ship the meat
2,500 miles by water to Seattle
and then, distribute to the Middle
West and also to the east so that
reindeer meat, now growing in
demand, can be sold as cheaply as
beef. Last year, 1,500 carcasses
were shipped to Seattle and
placed in public cold storage
terminals and then distributed
over the United States.
Send For It
The Birks' 1922 Catalogue, to be published shortly,
will be the best and most complete book of its kind
ever published. You could have no better aid to gift
shopping than this splendid book.
A simple request on a postal card means that you will
receive this book as soon as it is published.
^ TMmonS
Merchant*
^♦♦♦♦•M-4+<f4--K+-M--M--M-+
Vancouver, B. C.
FIRST CLASS ROOMS
For Rent, by Day, Week or Month.
Reasonable Rates.
CIGARS, TOBACCO & SOFT DRINKS
POOL ROOM IN CONNECTION
N. SUTILOVICH, Prop.
Try a Herald Classified Ad.
Anyox Community League
Council
Meet every Friday evening at 7 p.m.
Last Friday in the month Meeting held at Mine
Other Meetings held at Recreation Hall, Beach
B. P. O. Elks
( Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
Elk's Hall
FRANK D. RICE
B.  C.  LAND   SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Subdivisions. Underground Surveys
Etc.
ALICE ARM, B. C.
UNION  CHURCH
SUNDAY SCHOOL,   11 a.m.
EVENING  SERVICE, 7.45 a.m.
ALL WELCOME
Rev. J. HERDMAN, Pastor
SALVATION   ARMY
SUNDAY   SCHOOL 2 P.M.
(Mine School House)
SERVICE ON SUNDAY EVENING
AT 8 P.M.
Recreation Hall (Beach)
All Welcome
FIRE, LIFE,   ACCIDENT
AND   SICKNESS
INSURANCE
Chas. Wing     Anyox
K HKZZZZHO
"THE SHACK"   [
ICE CREAM STAND
Ice Cream, Cigars, Tobacco,
Cigarettes, Candy, Newspapers, Magazines, etc.
MAUD STANLEY
PROPRIETRESS
3K        mc
3tt
Subscribe to Your Local Paper
SHOE REPAIRING
OF ALL KINDS
QUICK SERVICE
LEO PAULCER   Alice Arm
B. W. BARRETT
ALICE ARM
 , — — *
General
Merchandise
Kitsault Cigar Store
Cigars, Tobacco & Soft Drinks
Wholesale and Retail
ROBERTSON & DUMAS, Props.!
See    AL.   FALCONER     Alice Arm
FOR
Transfer, Baggage or Freight, Pack
Horses, Wood or Coal
-~i
Every Order Given Immediate Attention
L_
Lew Lun & Go.
General Merchants
West Side of Smelter Anyox, B. C.
Full Assortment of Gentlemen's Clothing.
Including:    Boots and   Shoes,   Raincoats,
Mackinaw Coats, Overalls, Rubber Goods,
Underwear, Shirts, Socks, Etc.
0 i
LADIES'   CLOTHING
Ladies' Silk Waists, and Skirts,   Poplin Skirts,   Silk
Underwear  and   Bloomers,   Cotton   Underwear   and
Bloomers, Sweaters and Jersey Goats, Shoes & Rubbers,
Silk Hose, etc.      ^
Full Width Silks and Pongee Silks in all Colors
Groceries, Jewellery, Alarm Clocks, Suit Cases, etc.
Our Prices are the Lowest in Northern B. C. R=5^
■•■>.:'■■    :•■.;■' ■-.'.■■'.-.::--..-.:,-i;s-:---
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, October 22nd., 1921
V
Anyox Trapshooting Scores, 1921
SEASON RECORD
Wetmore
Munroe
Beckett
Baker
Champion
Rollag
MoKen/Je
Conway
Hilbert, A. E
Round
Campbell
Roscoe
No. Days
Shooting
17
10
10
3
15
10
2
4
3
9
8
9
Baillion 3
MathowHon 2
Mrs. Munroe 9
Mann 13
Lewis 5
Targets
Hit
607
495
330
94
545
229
45
128
'37
170
133
187
72
29
193
222
82
Targets
Shot at
900
750
525
150
875
375
75
225
75
350
300
450
175
75
500
H00
225
Percentage
of Hits
674
660
629
627
623
610
600
569
493
485
443
415
,411
387
386
370
365
Holmes 4 *  67 200 335
Hilbert-, p.      3 14 75 1.87
Trap Record: Wetmore, 23 (twice)
Highest
Score
23
22
19
19
21
21
19
20
14
17
20
16
15
15
14
17
12
17
6
Position
1
2
3
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Ontario Mines Paying
Large Dividends
1 '   ;
October is a big month among
the dividend paying companies of
Northern Ontario.
The gold mining industry, represented by the Hollinger, and the
Dome, will pay $365,166.75, while
the silver mining industry will be
' represented by the Nipissing and
Kerr Lake, which two companies
will distribute §255,000, making an
aggregates of $620,166.75 for the
month. Following is summary:
Hollinger Consolidated $246,000;
Nipissing Mines $180,000; Dome
Mines $119,166.75; Kerr Lake
mines $75,000; total $620,166.75.
The month of December will
probably be a big month also, as
during the closing month of the
year it is the custom of the Hollinger to alone distribute $492,000.
A new coal Held has been discovered in Shantung province, China,
estimated to contain an immense
amount of smokeless coal.
t I
♦
♦
i
Alice Arm Freighting Co.
Pack Trains, Saddle Horses, Heavy Teams |
Office:   Next to Post Office
♦ J.  M. MORRISON,  Manager
=1E
SHE
3BE
SB
BRUGGY'S.   STORE
Wholesale and Retail
Fresh Meats,  Groceries, Provisions,
Hardware,   and General  Outfitters
POWDER  -  CAPS  -  FUSE
ALICE   ARM   PIONEER   STORE
KC
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ALICE ARM HOTEL
FIRST  CLASS   ACCOMODATION
Dining Room  and
Club in Connection
Hot & Cold Water
Electric Light
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Special Rates for Families
«   '     ■	
E. McCOY, Proprietress .
aoooH m      ine
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USE
Granby Benzol
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR SALE BY THE
GRANBY STORE
■i    '-ANYOX
ANYOX BARBER SHOP
GIVE US A CALL
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDHENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class to
13.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering only
land suitable for agricultural purposes
and whloh is non-timber land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished,
but parties of not more than four may
arrange for adjacent pre-emptions
with Joint residence, but each making
necessary improvements on respective
claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims tor
five years and make improvements to
value of $10 per acre, Including clearing and cultivation of at least 6 ;res,
before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation not
less than 3 years, and has made proportionate Improvements, he may, because of ill-health, or other cause, be
granted Intermediate certificate of Improvement, and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent of
$860 per annum and records same each
year. Failure to make improvements
or record same will operate as forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained In
iess than B years, and Improvements
of $10.00 per acre, Including 5 acres
cleared and cultivated, and residence
of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if he
requires land In conjunction with his
farm, without actual occupation, provided statutory Improvements made
and residence maintained on Crown
granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased at homesltes;
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a road
to them. Rebate of one-half of cost of
road, not exceeding half of purchase
price, Is made.
PRE-EMPTORS' FREE GRANTS ACT.
The scope of this Act Is enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Foroes. The
time within which the heirs or devisees
of a deceased pre-emptor may apply
for title under the Act la extended
from for one year from the death of
such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege Is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions are
due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26, 1018.
Taxes are remitted for five years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August
4, 1914, on account of payments, Tees
or taxes on soldiers' nre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1020.
8UB-PURCHASERS OF CROWN
LANDS -
Provision made for issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and taxes may
be distributed proportionately over
whole area. Applications must be made
by May 1, 1020.
GRAZING
Grazing Act, 1910, for systematic
development of livestock industry provides for grazing districts and range
administration under Commissioner.
Annual grazing permits Issued based
on numbers ranged; priority for estab
llshed owners. Stock-owners may
form associations for range management, Free, or partially free, permits
for settlers, oampers or travellers, up
to ten head.
Subscriptions to the Herald
can be taken at the Book
Store on Wharf, or the
Mine Pool Room
Piano Class
In Order to have a First-class
Piano Teacher, we have to guarantee a certain number of pupils.
Those wishing to take Lessons,
kindly turn their names into
Mrs. W. F. Eve, or the Secretary
of the Anyox Community League.
Spring Chickens
And Hens for Sale; also some
Young Rabbits
Found
444
A nice quiet cozy place to
spend an afternoon or evening. A., C. L. Library and
Reading Room. Latest Periodicals and Magazines, as
well as a First-class Exchange
Library. Librarians hours, 2
till 5 in the afternoon, and 7
till 9 in the evening. Sunday
and Wednesday Afternoons
excluded.
Anyox
Community
League
H. H. CARNEY, Alice Arm
FOR SALE
One Thorough-bred black Minorca
Rooster for Sale, 2 years old.—
Apply H. H. Carney, Alice Arm.
Soft Drinks, Cigars, Tobacco
Rooms to Rent by Day,
Week or Month
GIVE US A CALL
John Lulich & Thomas
PROPS.
Support
Your Local
Newspaper
The Herald
Subscription: $2.50 a Year
Advertising Rates on Application
• ~»4+.+...4+.4+.++.+.„^ .,.4,, |.„ ^ ,„ ^ ,„ ^ ,„ ^ „, ^„,+,„ 4*4*4+,+*.,
LAUNCH, "AWAKE"
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m.
Tuesdays. Thursdays & Saturdays
ing Same Days at 3 p.m.
•••••••*••»« •»••<•«•• »«■ 111 ■ >»»» t»#HO ■ ■ >l
SPECIAL  TRIPS   BY  ARRANGEMENT
i
♦
I
i
|
I
4
♦
4
I
+*■+♦♦«■+«•+•«■+«•+.«•+■«•+.«.♦«■+—4*"f — ♦ '■'+■»■ ♦ '!'.«-«■ ,-»—+■«•♦■«.■»■» + .». « m t.,. ♦... t!»,
•tCITSAULT  CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
MEAT, BREAD & PASTRY ALWAYS FOR SALE
Luncheons Supplied for Picnic Parties
GUS ANDERSON,  Proprietor
T.   W.  FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Shelf and Heavy Hardware, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Drygoods, Boots & Shoes
Dynamite Caps & Fuse
McClarys Stoves and Ranges
Brighten your House with Paint and Preserve the Wood ALICE   ABM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, October 22nd., 1921
./
/  The
National Crisis
"My appeal is to the 'whole people; to
every man and woman who •wants to do
right by this country; to everyone who
breathes the spirit of our fathers who
founded this British Dominion."
—ARTHUR MEIGHEN
THE Election to be held December 6th
will be the most momentous in
Canadian history; for as men and
women vote will depend the economic
stability, the political stability and,
indeed, the national stability of this
country.
Today we find group striving against group,
class against class, the industrial and financial
structure of the country assailed by false and
unsound doctrines and. theories, while our
great neighbour to the south. has adopted a
trade exclusion policy directed against Canada's
vast agricultural interests.
The currencies of nearly every country in the world
are depreciated.   The Canadian dollar in the United'
States is subject to a heavy discount causing a loss
of over one hundred million dollars in exchange
annually.
Europe is overwhelmed with war debts—unemployment is acute — and the restoration to pre-war
conditions is slow. ' ,
While Canada is in a.much more favorable condition
than many countries, yet there is evidence of stagnation, instability, unemployment and lack of confidence.
Taxes are heavy because of the country's efforts in
the Great War, but have become burdensome on
account of the misconceived policies and blunders
of Governments that directed Canada's affairs prior
to 1911.
These conditions are largely the direct aftermath of
the war, but they must be dealt with fearlessly and
constructively. This is no time to consider experimental changes, or the theories of visionaries.
This is no time for Crerar and his Free Trade policy.
This is no time for King and his wobbling "charted"
policies, varying with each provincial boundary.    -
It is the time to cling to orderly, stable Government  ,
in the interest of all the people; to be guided by the
experience of the past, proceeding upon lines that   '
have been proven sound.
It is the time to place the destinies of Canada again
in the hands of a Government led by a sane, courageous Canadian who has safely brought the country
through the trying years of reconstruction, and upon
whom we can rely to retain and initiate policies in
( the interest, not of a group or class but of all the
people.
*
It is the time to support Arthur Meighen and his
Candidates.
%tol\Ml T^&xdju WAfiud
The National Liberal and Conservative Party
61 Publicity Committee
The Herald Job Department is
Equipped for all kinds of Printing
►"+*»4,|**+'» +*♦■ +*•«+■••■♦ —■+**' 4 '•■+•*'♦'*'+•»• 4
ALICE ARM NOTES
t +'»+.••+.#. ♦ .». 4-'+«* ♦'•'^■■■♦■•■♦■■■♦'■'♦■•| j
Don't   Forget   To-morrow   is
Parson Rushbrook's Sunday at
Alice Arm
Children's Service, 10,30 a.m,
Evening Prayer, 7.30 p.m.
ALL   WELCOME
Mrs. H. Carney is now agent for the
Amateur Finishing Co., of Vancouver
for Developing, Printing and Enlarging all kinds of Photographs. Prices
on Application.
Mr. J. B. Robinson, of Prince
Rupert was aAJsitor in town for a
few days this week. Mr. Robinson
was one of the pioneer business
men of Alice Arm, being interested
in the celebrated Kitsault House.
Mr. George Young arrived back
on Monday from Stewart, where
he lias been inspecting • roads and
trails.
See Al Falconer for Wood or
Coal
Mr. J. G. Johnson left on Monday for Seattle. He has been,
working on his claims, the Nome
and Yukon, situated on Bluebird
Creek, and is well pleased with the
ore he has shown up this summer.
The School children were given
a half holiday on Tuesday in order
to see the man go under the waiter
and come up again without getting
wet, in other words the diver was
working on the new wharf.
Spud digging and strawberry
planting has been the chief recreation of the citizens for the past
week.
Mr. S. Dumas left on Thursday
for Vancouver. He may go east
before returning home. Louis
Reynolds is in charge of the cigar
store during his absence.
The logs for strengthening the
roof of the skating rink are cut and
will be floated up as far as possible
the next high tide. The work of
placing them will be done by vol-
teer labor.
Mr. Marshall Smith arrived from
Anyox on Thursday, to spend a
few days.
Mrs. Gray arrived home-from
Prince Rupert on Thursday.
John Skrl, brother-in-law of
Mrs. Helen Nucich, returned to his
old home in Lyublana, Jugo-Slo-
vakia. Mr. Skrl has resided here
for the past three years, and leaves
many friends who wish him the
best of good luck.
See Al. Falconer for Freight
and Pack Horses.
Constable E. W. Davis, of the
R. C. M. P., arrived in town on
Thursday. *
The duck hunters are busy these
days scaring the life out of the
ducks over by the Illiance River.
Mr. Gus. Anderson returned
home from Prince Rupert on
Monday.
Mrs. J. Esplin and baby, arrived
from Anyox on Thursday, and will
be the guests of Mrs,. H. F. Kergin
►+•••+<•+.►+.••+•••+••• ♦•••♦•*-f.*+'*-fr-*t»'
••••*•••♦
ANYOX NOTES
> +.."t>«>+<»>+..<+>.>+>..+**-t"«"V"*"f*-T-**-V"*' t
\
The Anglican Church are holding a Sale of Work and Home
Cooking on Saturday, October 29,
at 3 p.m. Afternoon tea will be
served.
Anyox people would like to see
copper take a notion to soar like
eggs, which made a 25 per cent increase in less than a month. If
copper did that these old partners
ham and eggs would be re-united
on the breakfast table.
Dr. Patterson arrived from Van-
couver last week, to take the place
vacated by Dr. Street, at the mine.
He comes from the Vancouver
General Hospital, and was overseas during the war. ,
Sign the petition now being circulated for a road into the Naas
Valley, and help develop the
district.
Mrs. J. M. Davis arrived home
on Thursday.
Mrs. D. Deane, the popular libri
rian, left oh Thursday, for holiday
in the south. Mrs. P. Clark wi
act"as librarian-during her absence
Messrs. W. F. Eve, D. S. Fyfi
and H. Selfe, returned from thei;
hunting trip on Thursday. The}
hunted Porcher and the adjaceni
islands and stopped over in Prince
Rupert for a few days. They
reports the islands around Rupert
full of game, but the dear little
deer are a wee bit shy when- you
want them to act as targets.
A meeting will be held on
Saturday, October 29th, at 3
p.m. of all Parents interested
in forming a Parents and
Teachers Association.
Home and School Section
of the A. C. L.
Work on Silverado
is Being Rushed
Work is being. rushed on the
Silverado, at Stewart in order to
have everything finished before the,
winter. Supplies-and equipment
is being rushed up the hill as fast
as the horses can be loaded and got
away. A part of the tram equipment is already on the ground
and the preliminary work of preparing for the erection of the
towers is well under way.
Subscribe to the
HERALD
$2.50 a year
PATRONIZE
OUR ADVERTISERS
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
Has produced minerals valued as follows: Placer Gold, #75,944,203; Lode Gold, $102,753,823; Silver,
$53,668,284; Lead, $46,637,221; Copper, $161,513,864; Zinc, $19,896,466; Coal and Coke, $212,573,492;
Building Stone, Brick, Cement, etc., $32,168,217; Miscellaneous Minerals, $1,037,408; making its mineral
production to the end of 1920 show an
Aggregate Value of $706,192,(978
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry of this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures which show the value of production for successive five-year periods:   For all years to 1895, inclusive, \
$94 547,241 for five years, 1896-1900, $57,605,967; for five years, 1901-1905, $96-509,968; for five years, 1906-
1910; $125,534,474; for five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; for the five years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725.
Production During last ten years, $331,995,328
.
Lode-mining has pnly been in progress for about 25 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospected; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, the security of winch is guaranteed by
Crown Grants.
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
v VICTORIA, British Columbia

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