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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Jul 2, 1921

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 m1 ■■ ..'■■■■■■■ --i$^i!!m,9-l~p~~-'l^^^^^^^m^^m!^^^^^m^mmmmmm
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B. C. Coast
i »»>>«♦*»•»»♦»#«•* <■» ■***•■ '*****
THE HERALD
ALICE   ARM   &   ANYOX,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Published at
Alice Arm
$2.50
Per Year
4
VOL. 1,   NO. 5
Alice Aem, B. C, Saturday, July 2, 1921
$2.50 a Year.     5 cents each.
Alice Arm Sunday
School Picnic
The annual picnic of the Sunday
school children of the Anglican
Church, was held at Perry Bay,
on Friday, June 24th., with the
llev. Rushbrook in charge. The
North Coast Mission boat, the
Northern Cross, ,and the Awake,
which was kindly loaned by Bert
Kergin and' Harry Fowler, left the
Arm at 9.30 am., and arrived at
. their destination at 10.30.
Preparations were at once made
by the ladies for luncheon, tables
were laid out on the sand and
everyone enjoyed a splendid meal.
After the meal was over, skipping,
jumping, throwing the stone and
other sports were indulged in by
both young and old. Perry Bay
is an ideal spot for bathing and the
water and sandy beach proved a
great attraction to the children,
and all were soon paddling in the
water. Some of the adults were
quick to follow their example, Mrs.
F. D. Rice and Miss Anderson, the
school teacher were at home in the
water, while George Bruggy delighted everyone with his diving
and acrobatic stunts. A feature of
the day's sports was guessing the
number of seeds in a bottle. Nearly everyone guessed, and nearly
everyone was too low. Jimmy
Ness was tfie winner, guessing 800,
the bottle containing 808 seeds.
Tea was served at 5.30 and the
journey was then made for Home.
Everyone spent a very enjoyable
time and it will be a day long
remembered by the children. All
the parents of the children went
along, and Alice Arm was a very
quiet place that day, for the few
remaining bachelors who were not
out in the hills.
Government Road
Camps Closed Down
Like a thunder bolt from a blue
sky, the news was received in Alice
Arm, on Thursday, that all work
on government roads and trails
was to stop. Mr. George Young,
road superintendent for the district
received a telegram to that effect,
and no cause was given for the
close down. He stated that it was
universal all over Northern B. C.
and probably over the whole province Word was at once sent to
the camps on the Kitsault and
Illiance Rivers to close down the
camps. The road being built from
the town to the wharf by the local
contractors is not effected. Such a
thing as closing down work on
' roads and trails once the camps are
established is a thing un-heard of,
and the government is making a
bad break if it persists in keeping
them closed all summer.
THE MAN AROUND TOWN
Our General Manager, Mr. H
S. Munroe, came in on Thursday's
boat.
Jimmy Murdock and family are
also back again from their to Vancouver. The trip lias evidently
done Jimmy good, for he was
behind the grocery counter before
noon, stepping around like a two-
year old. He reports conditions on
the outside very unfavorable, and
Anyox still looks good to him.
Several, of the teaching staff
went south on their annual vacation. We wish them the fairest of
weather whilst rusticating.
The campers from Anyox are on
the move these; days to their old
fishing grounds.
The second edition of the Granby
News is in our hands. It is worthy
of close perusal. The remarks of
the safety first' engineer should be
inwardly digested. It will probably draw the attention of parents
to the grave danger around the
docks.
; Mr Munroe'js.and.Mr. Tuttle'.s
notes are also worthy of consideration,
We are living in a state of unrest
brought about as an aftermath of
the war, and it behooves each and
everyone of us to study conditions,
not only from our own stand-point,
but also to face conditions without
prejudice, from the stand-point of
the other fellow. The crisis is not
yet, and until the European question is brought to a working basis,
we must not expect too much. Let
us all put our shoulder to the
wheel,eand before long, conditions
will gradually get to normal; but
it is impossible to even expect and
compare conditions as they were
previous to the war. Such a thing
can never be.
Judging from the lines the poet
wrote for the Granby News, in'his
"Epicures Lament," he must have
spoken from the depths of his heart.
The Junior baseball series was
won by the boys from the mine.
Those who missed seeing those
games don't 1mow what good sport
they overlooked. The games were
snappy and the friendly rivalry
was keenly enjoyed by the spectators. As a matter of fact they
needed no umpire. They were
superior to such persons as common
umpires when it came to making
decisions.
The Elk's football team beat the
smelter on Friday night by 3 goals
to nil. It was a good game and is
worthy of far mpre support than it
is getting at present.
On Sunday evening, the mine
and the smelter locked horns, again
in an effort to find out the strongest team in the present series, all
because the three teams tied at the
end of the first series. After Sunday's game it would appear that
the mine have it all their own way
for they trimmed the smelter badly;
but the Elk's feel confident that
they will do for the mine, what the
mine did for the smelter. . However
we shall see in about a week's
time. For the mine, Thomas /and
Mealy were the stars. They played great ball and their playing was
an eye-opener to those that came
out to see the game. One of the
fair ladies of our city is an ardent
supporter of the smelter. If there
were a few more like her probably
the smelter would ginger up a little.
However, on Sunday evening she
sat in camp of the enemy, and for
a while it looked as though there
might be a storm, but fortunately
all things turned out fine except
the smelter LOST.
Wade Wetmore umpired the
game in a very creditable manner.
Pete Draudson umpired the base
lines; but an umpire's job is not a
very happy one in this man's town.
Pete wishes now that he had
gpne td'Swamp Point to play ball,
that is, if he could have taken a
few of the players with him to
teach them the fine points of the
game.
All the short men at the Hotel
are jubilant over the way the
tennis court is fixed. They have
gained from one to three inches
trying to peek over the canvas at
the games going on inside.
Miss Margaret McColl has gone
to Edmonton on her vacation. She
left on Monday's boat.
Mrs. Archie Berry and children
left for Vancouver on a visit last
Thursday. Arohie is now contemplating a summer course in light
house-keeping, providing he can
get assistance from the A. C. L. to
carry out his scheme. He has
already enlisted the services of Ray
McTaggart in the good cause.
The Elks came from behind
again in Tuesday's football game,
and won out 2 goals to 1. The
mine however were short a man
the first half of the game, and the
score is really no indication of the
strength of the teams. The mine
should have won.
There is for rent by campers at
Silver City, a 2-roomed house with
stove, bed and some dishes. Rent
$20.00 per month. For information regarding dates, apply The
Herald, Alice Arm.
Have you Subscribed to
The Herald.?
ALICE ARM, NOTES
t,4***4'«*4','4'»'4','4'*'4'*'4'>'4'*4'»'4'*'4'»' i
See Al. Falconer for Wood <*• Coal.
Mrs. J. Laidlaw, arrived home
from Prince Rupert on Thursday.
Candy Carruthers is located at
the Moose Mine, where he holds
the position of chief flap-jack mixer
George Casey left on Monday's
bOat for Prince Rupert, where he
holds a position on the City Fire
Department.
Mr. J. Anderson, of the, office
staff at Vancouver, of the Taylor
Mining Co,, arrived in town' on
Thursday.
Mr. F. D. Rice came down from
the upper Kitsault on Thursday.
He has surveyed the Silver Dream
at Central Camp and also the Hill
Billy.
See Al. Falconer f6r Freight
and Pack Horses.
Mr. T. Black came in on the
boat on Thursday, from Prince
Rupert.
Mr. York and Norman McLeod
who was assisting Mr. Rice, also
came down on Thursday.
Mr. John Stark, our oldest inhabitant, came in frOm East Creek
on Wednesday, John, has done
considerable work since he went
up including cutting over a mile of
trail.
Bob McGinnis showed up in
town on Thursday, after several
weeks absence up the Kitsault
River.
Mr. Gus Strombeck was down
for powder on Thursday, from the
Toric, where he is busy driving a
tunnel.
Miss Anderson and Miss Parsons
were passengers on the Northern
Cross on Tuesday, for Irondale
Cannery, at the Naas River, on a
sightseeing expedition, they may
visit Prince Rupert before returning home.
See Al Falconer for Wood or
Coal.
School closed on Friday last, and
life now is just one sweet dream
for the juveniles.
The fishing season has commenced, and some fine trout have been
taken from the Kitsault River.
Please mail this paper to your
friends and help advertise the camp.
The, beSt investment you can
make at the present time, is to buy
a subscription to The Herald.
Mr. and Mrs. N. Sutilovich and
Miss Zorka Sutilovich arrived home
from Prince Rupert on Thursday,
Miss Zorka has been to Prince
Rupert for school examinations.
Accompanying them was Miss
Nellie Gurvich of Prince Rupert,
who is here on holidays.
The Awake left on Friday morning for Anyox. with a load of
excursionists to take part in the
big celebration.
Provincial Constable D. S. Cameron, has left for the Naas River,
where he will hold the position of
Assistant Fishery Commissioner
during the fishing season. He will
make regular trips here during the
summer, as also will Constable
Dryden of Anyox.
Mr. O. C. Thomson, of the North
Star Mine, Kimberly, arrived in
town on Monday, and left on Tuesday for the upper Kitsault, to
inspect mining properties, Mr.
Thomson stated that his mine at
Kimberly had ceased shipping ore,
only a few men were working pitting ore on the clump, until the price
of silver and lead advances.
There are still a few buildings in
town on which a coat of paint
would do no harm,
Mr. J. A. McDermaid and Mr.
McGuire, who has been doing work
on the Bluebird and Cariboo at
Granite Creek, came down on
Sunday.
Mr. Robert Henderson arrived in
town on Monday.. He left here
last August, and is back to work
on his claims situate seven miles up
the Kitsault River.
ANYOX FOOTBALL
The gas-eaters put up a great
fight to hold their non-defeat
record.
We were sorry to see Johnny
Kirkland go south last Thursday.
He is a fine footballer and was a
tower of strength on the smelter
team.   -
Following are the standing of
the teams.
Pld. W.    L. Din. Pts.
Smelter  8 3       1       4 10
Elks        7 3       2       2 8
Mine       7 14       2 4
In the game of June 21st. the
smelter managed to scrape home
with a draw. Two old-timers,
Logan and Ferguson of the mine,
after several years absence at playing football, turned out with the
"Glad Rags" on, and gave a good
exhibition of what they know
about the game. The mine had
hard luck in not winning, and it
was only the good defence work of
the other team that saved Dillon's
gas eaters from losing a couple of
points.
Cheer up mine, what you want
is a little "Horse"Shoe." Can't
Hutchings get one made at the
blacksmith shop.?
Final Score, Smelter 0.   Mine 0.
Continued on page 4, i,    ,-,WfflPI.'
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, July 2nd., 1921
The Alice Arm and Anyox Herald
Published al Alice Arm
E.   MOSS
Editor and Publisher
ANYOX NOTES
SUBSCRIPTION   KATE:   $2.50   A   YEAR
Transient Display Advertising, (10 emits per inch per issue.
Local Readers 20 cents per line per issue.
Classified Advertising, per insertion, 2 cents per word.
Special Position Display or Reading, 25 per cent above ordinary Rates.
Certificate of Improvement, $12.00 (if more than one claim mentioned, $2.00
for each additional claim mentioned,) '
Lime Notices, $10.00      Coal Notices, $7.00
Contract Display Advertising Rates on Application
No Advertising accepted for First Page.
Since publishing our first issue
on June 4th. we have been congratulated many times op the style and
class of newspaper we are publishing. We naturally feel proud that
everyone is pleased with their local
paper, and we wish to thank our
advertisers and subscribers for the
splendid support they have given
us. We also wish to thank our
correspondents of Anyox who have
forwarded us news items. We are
always ready to publish any legitimate news items for anyone, provided they do not arrive too late or
that we have room for them in the
paper. We would like to take this
opportunity to impress on everyone
forwarding news items, the necessity of forwarding them as early in
the week as possible, to avoid
disappointment in not seeing them
appear in the paper.
We have a very satisfactory
circulation for a paper so young,
but we are going to do better; the
Herald is not going to be always
a 4-page paper, we are out for new
subscribers, and when we get them
the advertising will increase and
you will get a larger paper. We
would like the support of all our
readers in this endeavour, if you
are not a subscriber, subscribe at
once, and help boost your local
paper along. We have endeavoured to give the people of Anyox and
Alice Arm, straight, reliable news
and a clean, honest paper, and will
continue to do so in the future.
The more subscribers we get, the
bigger and better newspaper we
will be enabled to give you.
Subscribe at once to your own local
paper, THE   HERALD.
We fail to see where the Government of British Columbia is going
to save any money this year in
eliminating all work on roads and
trails. In the first place, work was
just commencing at several points,
supplies and tools were bought and
freighted in, camps were built, and
a few days work had been done,
when orders came to close down,
and all the money spent on starting
up is thrown away. Another
phase of the situation is that in
lots of small ranching and mining
districts, the inhabitants has this
year more than any other year,
depended on government road and
trail work for to carry them over
the coming winter, due to the close
down of so many mining and
logging camps. These men can
not get other work in the distriot,
and their only hope of obtaining a
living is to go to Vancouver or
Victoria and obtain relief work.
Either the government or the
municipality will have to give
them relief or they will die. How
much better would it be for the
government to give them work in
their own district in the summer,
so that they will not have to swell
the big army of unemployed in our
cities. There h no work that gives
better returns to the province than
building roads and trails. Farm
lands can not be cultivated until
transportation is provided for the
settler, and mines cannot ship ore
until roads and trails are built for
getting in supplies and machinery
during the development period.
We hope the government will reconsider their decision, and that
work will re-commence on the
roads and trails of the province.
ANYOX BASEBALL
Owing to the three teams in the
league each having won and lost
the same number of games, at the
conclusion of the first series, the
position of first place will be decided by the playing of two more
games. The mine defeated the
smelter on the 26th. and it. now
remains for the mine and Elks to
meet in the decisive game.
The game between the mine and
smelter, on the 26th., was really a
treat for the 500 or more fans who
had the good fortune to witness it.
Both teams played excellent ball.
Ben Fitzpatrick pitched a great
game for the gas^eaters, with
Greenwell behind the plate.
Paddy Crosby at first base, played
an air-tight game, and as the mine
batters say, he is some converter.
Ferguson, the mine slab artist,
pitched his usual excellent ball, and
with the balance of his team on tip
toe he held the smelter down to
one run.
The mine wrecking crew, viz.
Kirk. Mealy, Brown and Thomas,
augmented by Heidman, did some
great work with the willow, to the
tune of four runs, and it is no disgrace to the gas-eaters to have
been defeated by such a team as
the ground hogs fielded that day.
Score was Mine, 4.   Smelter 1.
Master Wm. Heidman, arrived
from Vancouver on Thursday last,
to spend his holidays with his
parents at the Galkeish mine.
Tom Sayer is back again at the
first aid station at the top of the
long stairway. He is looking fine,
The trip south did him lots of,good.
He says he can run up and down
the steps six times before breakfast.
Perhaps he can, but does he.?
There is for rent at Alice Arm,
by campers, one 2-roomed house,
containing 2 double beds, 2 stoves,
wood shed with wood, garden and
good water, also 2 tents with
stoves and beds, for further information regarding dates etc., write
to the Herald, Alice Arm, B. C.
WATER   NOTICE.
TAKE NOTICE that David Jeremi-
erson, whose address is 1205, Dominion
Building, Vancouver, B. C, will apply
for a licence to take and use 500 cubic
feet per second of water out of Falls
Creek, which flows easterly and drains
into the Kitsault River, about one half
mile from its mouth. The water will
be diverted from the stream at a point
about 1500 feet from the point where
the stream crosses the Dolly Varden
Railroad, and will be used for Power
purposes upon the mine described as
the Esperanza Mine. This notice was
posted on the ground on the 27th. day
of June, 1921. A copy of this notice
and an application pursuant thereto
and to the "Water Act," 1914, will be
filed in the office of the Water Recorder, at Prince Rupert, B. C.
Objections to the application, may
be filed with the said Water Recorder,
or with the Comptroller of Water
Rights, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C, within fifty days after the
first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper. The date of the first
publication of this notice, is July 2nd.,
1921.
David Jeremierson, Applicant.
By Edward Elge, Agent.
Anyox Community League
Council
Meet every Friday evening at 7 p.m.
Last Friday in the month Meeting held at Mine
Other Meetings held at Recreation Hall, Beach
B. P. O. Elks
Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
Catholic Hall
FRANK D. RICE
B. C.  LAND  SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Subdivisions. Underground Surveys
Etc.
ALICE ARM, B. 0,
UNION CHURCH
SUNDAY  SCHOOL,  11 a.m.
EVENING  SERVICE, 7,45 a.m.
ALL WELCOME
Rev. J. HERDMAN, Pastor
SALVATION   ARMY
SUNDAY   SCHOOL 2 P.M.
(Mine School House)
SERVICE ON SUNDAY EVENING
AT 8 P.M.
Recreation Hall (Beach)
1 All Welcome
Try a Herald Classified Add.
See    AL.   FALCONER     Alice Arm
FOR
Transfer, Baggage or Freight, Pack
Horses. Wood or Coal
Every Order Given Immediate Attention
L-
Dr. H. S. SIMMONS
D.D.S.,  L.D.S., D.D.C.
DENTIST
Anyox, B. C.
FIRE,  LIFE,   ACCIDENT
AND   SICKNESS
INSURANCE
Chas. Wing     Anyox
ANYOX BARBER SHOP
GIVE US A CALL
USE
Granby Benzol
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR  SALE BY  THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
ANYOX HOTEL
cafe in connection
Anyox, b. c.
American and European Plan
GEO.   ROUND,   Manager
l 4*** ♦••*♦•••♦••■♦••■♦•••♦•••♦•••♦••■♦••• ♦*••♦••* &
Alice Arm Cabaret \
!
{       SOFT DRINKS,      I
t CIGARS, J
I      AND TOBACCO      {
MAUD STANLEY     f
PROPRIETRESS ♦
Soft Drinks, Cigars, Tobacco
Rooms to Rent by Day,       •
Week or Month
GIVE US A CALL
John Lulich & Thomas
PROPS.
Lew Lun & Co.
General Merchants
West Side of Smelter Anyox, B. C.
HAS IN STOCK AT ALL TIMES A FULL LINE OF
MEN'S CLOTHING
Men's Dress Pants, Suits, Overalls, Underwear,
Shirts, Shoes, Socks, Raincoats, Hats and Caps,
Rubber Boots, etc.
LADIES'   CLOTHING
Ladies' Silk Waists, and Skirts,   Poplin Skirts,   Silk
Underwear  and   Bloomers,   Cotton   Underwear   and
Bloomers, Sweaters and Jersey Coats, Shoes & Rubbers,
Silk Hose, etc.
Full Width Silks and Pongee Silks in all Colors
Groceries, Jewellery, Alarm Clocks, Suit Cases, etc.
Our Prices are the Lowest in Northern B. C.
♦♦ ■H-f +♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+++++++++++^++++++++*>444+^^++44++++t
Alice Arm Freighting Co.
Pack Trains, Saddle Horses, Heavy Teams
Office:   Next to Post Office
J. M. MORRISON, Manager
^lt)HWW4WWHtt ♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦++♦♦♦♦♦< •
_■_
-"•""■"-
MMMl
■a* ^^^*w
■■■■'■ . ■ ■.:;•■ ■'.■."■:■■   ;    '■ ■■'-,   .'!■;■.'■. :■ '
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, July 2nd., 1921
I*
ANYOX GUN CLUB
The coming competition at the
Community League's Dominion Day
celebration has aroused the interest
of the Anyox Gun Club • members,
and last week scores averaged high-
r er than usual. Especially noteworthy was the record made by
one of the1" newer contestants,
Gerrard.
Following are the scores:
1 Wetmore   ..    ..23
Champion .. .. 21
Garrard .. .. 21
Rqscpe .. .. IS
Beckett .. .. 17
Holmes      ..    .'.   17
Bound    16
Mathewson .. 15
Mann ..    ..   18
Bullion       ..    ..   10
This shoot was the last in the
June Handicap Tournament for
the Munroe Trophy, and resulted
in a tie between Roscoe and Round.
Roscoe was the winner of the May
tournament.
Following is the Handicap score:
Contestant Handicap Targets
Score Shot at
Round                09 75
Roscoe               60 75
Wetmore          68 75
Champion          67 75
Campbell           67 75
Mann                  65 , 75
Beckett              64 75
Holmes              47 75
The remaining contestants did
not complete full complement of
shots.
Work has commenced at the
Homestake Mine
Work was commenced on the
Homestake mine this week by The
Consolidated Homestake Mining
& Development Co., Ltd., with
offices at 807, Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver, Capt. Gerhardi
who is in charge of operations,
arrived at Alice Arm on Monday,
with a party of eight men, among
whom were H. J. Reade, R. H.
Creighton and H. Boket. Capt.
Gerhardi stated that it is the intention of the company to start work
as soon as the camp is fixed up, on
a tunnel 300, feet in length to break
into two surface showings, which
have a V formation. A compressor plant will arrive here in about
two woeks and will be shipped at
once to the mine, as it is the intention of the company to push the
work as rapidly as possible during
the summer.
The Homestake mine is situate
at the Kitsault Glacier, and was
staked by Mr. A. Davidson, in
1913. Present work consists of
about 20 open euts. Assays taken
from the property has averaged 38
ozs. in silver, and copper ore has
assayed six per cent, copper, being
an average on a 30ft. cut. A lead
extending over 1100 feet has been
traced on the surf ace. by open cuts.
See Al. Falconer for Wood or Coal.
HE
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3E1E
ID
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BRUGGY'S   STORE
Wholesale and Retail
Fresh Meats,   Groceries,  Provisions,
Hardware,   and "General  Outfitters
POWDER  -  CAPS  -   FUSE
ALICE  ARM   PIONEER   STORE
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ALICE ARM HOTEL
FIRST   CLASS  ACCOMODATION
Dining Room  and
Club in Connection
Hot & Cold Water
Electric Light
Special Rates for Families
E. McCOY, Proprietress
 Mir-—
UHC
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3IM
FRESH EGGS FOR
SALE
H. H. Carney, Alice Arm
SHOE REPAIRING
OF ALL KINDS
QUICK SERVICE
LEO PAULCER   Alice Arm
mmmmmmmmn
B. W. BARRETT
ALICE ARM
General
Merchandise
4444444444444444444444444
BERT WHITE
A. F. O. M.
TEACHER OF VIOLIN
LEADER OF THE A. C.  L
ORCHESTRA
Those wishing to take Lessons, ring up
or see the Secretary, of the Anyox
Community League at Library.
PARENTS who have children
wanting to take Music Lessons
kindly phone Community League
Secretary at 150, as it is the
intention of the Anyox Community League to get a first class
Music Teacher from the outside.
THE Anyox Community League
is now over 500 strong, and is
still looking for new members.
Join folks and let's make the A.
C. L. a live issue.
Anyox Baseball League
SENIOR
ay  16th. '  Elks vs.  i   lie
"   18th. Smelter vs.   Elks
"   23rd. ine vs.   Smelter
" . 25th. Elks vs.   Smelter
"   30th. ine vs.   Elks
June 1st. Smelter   vs.    ine
"   6th. Elks vs.   Smelter
"   8th. ine vs.   Elks
"   13th. Smelter vs.      ine
"   15th. Smelter vs.   Elks
"    20th. Elks vs.      ine
"   22i id. ine vs.   Smelter
First half of series
Games played Mondays & Wednesdays
Anyox Intermediate Baseball
League
ay 7th. Beach vs.        ine
,"   12th. Mine vs.   Beach
"   14th. Beach vs.      ine
"   19th. Mine vs.   Beach
"   21st. Beach vs.      ine
"   26th. Mine vs.   Beach
"   28th, Beach vs.   Mine
June 2nd. Mine vs.   Beach
"   4th. Beach vs.   ine
"   9th. Mine vs.., Beach
"   11th. Beach vs.   i   ne
"   16th. Mine vs.   Beach
Games played on Thursdays and
Saturdays
Anyox Football League
May 10th. Mine vs. Smelter
"   17th. Elks vs. Mine
"   20th. Smelter vs. Elks   ,
"   27th. Smelter vs. Mine
"   31st. Mine vs. Elks
June 3rd. Elks vs. Smelter
"   7th. Mine vs. Smelter
"   10th. Elks vs. Mine
"   14th. < Smelter vs. Elks,
"   17th. Smelter vs. Mine
"   20th. Mine vs. Elks
"   24th. Elks vs. Smelter
First half of series
Games played on Tuesdays and
Fridays
Subscriptions to the Herald
can be taken at the Book
Store  on  Wharf,   or   the
Mine Pool Room
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
4*4* ♦'*♦"■♦ .»'♦<•♦* 4 ■"♦"■♦ ^ ♦"■ ♦ '»"4"«"fi«*f* ♦•«•♦♦+•«.♦•»♦•» y«..«.«..«.+«.-f«.+.»+-.
LAUNCH, "AWAKE"
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
I SPECIAL   TRIPS   BY   ARRANGEMENT        |
KITSAULT CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
MEAT, BREAD & PASTRY ALWAYS FOR SALE
Luncheons Supplied for Picnic Parties
GUS  ANDERSON,  Proprietor
T.   W. FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Shelf and Heavy Hardware, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Drygoods, Boots & Shoes
Dynamite Caps & Fuse
McCIarys Stoves and Ranges
Brighten your House with Paint and Preserve the Wood
C P. KIEL
ALICE ARM TOWNSITE AGENT
LUMBER FOR SALE
Summer Camping-out Cottages
Built to Order
Kitsault Cigar Store
Cigars, Tobacco & Soft Drinks
Wholesale and Retail
ROBERTSON & DUMAS, Props.
Subscribe to
The Herald.
$2.50 a year
XX XX XX
The Leading Weekly
.Newspaper of the
Northern B, C, Coast
xxxttxxxti "■■
..■::"..'";
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Alty,   Saturday, July ,2nd., 1921
ANYOX  THEATRE
SHOWS FOR WEEK OF JULY 4th
Tuesday, at 7 and 9.15 p.m.
Anita Stewart in "SOWING THE WIND"
This is a 9-reel Special Production, Starting at 7 p.m.
Thursday, at 7 p.m.
Gorawin presents "EARTHBOUND"
From the Story by Basil King. (7 Reels.)
And One Reel Pictograph.
Saturday,, Matinee at 1 p.m.   Evening at 7 and 9 p.m.
"HUMORESQUE."   7 Reels.   Featuring
Alma Rubens, Gaston Glace, Vera Gordon
And One Reel Magazine.
WILLIAM SLOAN
ASSAYER
Gold and Silver .. $2.00,
Copper      1.50
Lead          1.50
Zinc           2.50
Price Lilt of other Metals on Application.
Mail Orders Promptly Attended to.
Remit Money Order with Sample*.
OFFICE & LABORATORY
ALICE ARM, B. C.
See Al. Falconer for Freight or
Pack Horses
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
Has produced minerals valued as follows: Placer Gold, $75,944,203; Lode Gold, $102,753,823; Silver,
$53,668,284; Lead, $46,637,221; Copper, $161,513,864; Zinc; $19,896,466; Coal and Coke, $212,573,492;
Building Stone, Brick, Cement, etc., $32,168,217; Miscellaneous Minerals, $1,037,408; making its mineral
production to the end of 1920 show an t
Aggregate Value of $706,192,978
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry of this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures which show the value of production for successive five-year periods: For all years to 1895, inclusive,
$94,547,241 for five years, 1896-1900, $57,605,967; for five years, 1901-1905, $96-509,968; for five years, 1906-
1910; $125,534,474; for»five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; for the five years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725.
Production During last ten years, $331,995,328
Lode-mining has only been in progress for about 25 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospected; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, the security of which is guaranteed by
Crown Grants.- \
Full information, together with Mining Reports and-Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA British Columbia
Continued from Page 1.
That everything comes to those
who wait, was proven at the game
of June 24th. At last Dillon's
gas eaters are defeated for the
first time this season. It was a
strenuous game, and the Elks
finished victors with a win of three
goals to nothing.
The Elk's were the better team.
The smelter did not seem to settle
down to tlieir usual steady game.
Good boy, Walter, the sharp-shooter of the league. Six goals for six
games. By the way, is there any
truth of Johnston, the crack centre
of the Elks signing on for the
smelter.
Final Score, Elks 3.   Smelter 0.
It looks as though the Elks have
struck a winning streak at last,
when they defeated the mine by
two goals to one. This was one of
the best games of the season.
Owing to boat engine trouble in
getting George Wroe down from
the Bonanza, the mine played with
ten men until five minutes after
the second half had started. His
presence on the field made a different team, and the mine seemed to
brighten up and it looked as though
the Elks would only take one point.
Offside in the first half, spoiled
the Elk's several times when they
seemed in a good position to score.
The mine have a well balanced
team, and if they can manage to
hold it during the next series, they
will, be at the top instead of the
foot.      •
The last game of the series is to
be played between the Elks and
the mine, this ought to be a corker,
as the Elks require to win the
game to, tie with the smelter. If
they only draw they will have
second place. It is stated that the
smelter football fans are rooting
strong for the mine these days,
they have even got some of the
mine baseball stars, training for
the next half. Stay with it Jimmy
you will score some day.
Subscribe to the
HERALD
Dolly Varden
to Ship Ore
Work will commence the latter
part of next week shipping about
3000 toils of ore that is already
mined at the Dolly Varden, to the
beach. No work in the mine is
contemplated at present.
Freight Trains are
Busy on Kitsault River
The Alice Arm Freighting Co.
is busy taking in four tons of
supplies, tools, etc. to the Home-
stake Mine, at the Kitsault Glacier.
It is taken by flat car to camp
eight and then transferred to pack
horses.
BIRTHS AT ANYOX
Bom to Mr. and Mrs. J. M.
Hutchings, at the Hospital on June
29th. a fine boy.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. O. Crosby?
at the Hospital, on June 26th. a
daughter.
ELK NEWS
B. P. O. E. No. 47, initiated four
new members into its lodge on
Monday night. Refreshments
were afterwards served.
Kiddies, keep your eyes open for
the first week in August. It, is
flag day with the Elks on the 4th.
and you will be their guests. Nuff
Sed.
Jimmy Thomson and Paddy
Ryan don't speak these days.
Paddy says he can play the
bagpipes.
On July 4th., Anyox Lodge No.
47, will meet for the first time in
its new home. Starting in a little
over twelve months ago, it has a
membership today of over 300.
Although one of the baby lodges of
the order, it has a record second to
none for membership according to
the size of its population.
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS
MMMMMMMMMXMMKMM
The Herald is Circulated in the Towns of Anyox and
Alice Arm, which has a combined population of over
2,500, and an annual payroll of over $2,000,000

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