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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald May 10, 1924

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 v.A
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B. C. Coast
ALICE ARM AND ANYOX,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
THE HERALD
—».■ i ■ ■ i ■ i ■ ■ ■"■"«
The Herald Brings Results to Advertisers
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. $2.75 to
all other points.
■■■■<nl"«.HiH..t.it, f-«.f-«.y*<
VOL. 3,   NO. 46
Alice Abm, B. 0., Saturday, May 10, 1924
5 cents each.
Christ Church  Scouts
Spend an Entertaining
Evening
There was a good turnout of the
Boy Soouts Patrol and Wolf Cub
Paok connected with Christ
Church,.Anyox, on Friday evening
of last week.
Tlie entire programme was in
the hands of the boys and needless
to say they oarried it out in a
"Soouty" manner. It included
sleight-of-hand tricks, Headings,
and several snappy bouts with the
gloves, even the Cubs stepping up
smartly to the call of ''Time."
Refreshments were by no means
an unimportant feature of the
evening's entertainment, and the
Scout orderlies and Cooks had a
busy time shooting Hot-Dogs and
dispensing cocoa and ice cream.
The principal event of the
evening was the distribution of
prizes in connection with the
First Aid Class so ably conducted
during the winter months by Mr.
Edgar Ashton, of the Smelter
First Aid Staff.
Fifteen Lectures and demonstrations were given and the
ground covered was more extensive
than that which the Scout Regulations oall for.
The examination was conducted
by Mr. Fred Graham and so great
was the efficiency displayed, a real
difficulty was found in determining the merits of the various
contestants.
Tbe following is a list of the
committees responsible for the
night's fun and also a list of those
taking part.
Refreshment Committee:
Charlie Bright and Murdo Morrison. Programme Committee:
Arthur Teabo, Tom Gray, Billie
Cooper, and Stanley Sawrey.
Boxing bouts were staged by—
Charlie Bright vs. Murdo
Morrison.
Stephen Dillon vs. Jimmie
Foxley.
Glen Owen vs. Willie Watson.
Wrestling:   Arthur    Teabo   and
Tommy Cloke.
Billie Cooper and Willie Cloke
gave\ demonstrations of sleight-of-
hand tricks.
The following are tlie prize
winners in the  First Aid Tests:
Charlie Bright—scout axe and
sheath.
Stanley Sawrey—Compass.
Tommy Cloke—Folding Camp
Stool.
Arthur Dwyer—Haversack.
Sidney Armstrong—water bottle
Bill Cooper—Folding   Fry Pan
Tom       Gray—Fishing      Rod
Earle     Gray—Fishing     ' Rod
Mr. H R Harris, assistant.
Scout-Master was iii charge of the
Scouts.
The best thanks of the boys are
accorded to Messrs. Ashton
Graham, |and Hayes, who were
responsible for the provision of the
Granby Co. Hauling
Logs to Tidewater
Other Camps Busy
The logging industry of Alice
Arm received a boost during the
week. On Tuesday afternoon the
Granby Co. brought down their
first load of logs over the Dolly
Varden railway, and since then
logs have been coming clown iu a
continual stream. About 50,000
feet b.m. per day is now being
hauled, but this quantity will be
considerably increased as soon as
more cars are available.
Construction work across the
Kitsault river at the No. 1 camp
is being carried forward, and it
will not be long before this oamp
is also throwing logs into the
water.
Mr. Eric Carlson, of the Abbotsford Logging Co. now has 4,000-
000 feet boomed and a tug from
Ocean Falls is expected to arrive
next Thursday and take them out.
Mr. E. J. Tremblay, has finished
logging until next winter, when
snow will again permit the hauling
of logs by horses. He now has one
ria'Ufm feet on the Hats, half of
which are already boomed. Some
of the logs will bo towed to Ocean
Falls this month and the balance
in June. Mr. Tremblay will log
about 700,000 feet next winter.
Alice Arm Athletic
Association Hold
Meeting
A meeting was held on Wednesday evening, at the Anglican
Church, for the purpose of reviving
the Alice Arm Athletic Club, and
organizing baseball teams.
Mr. Robt. Kay was elected
chairman.
The first business was election of
officers, and Mr. T. W. Falconer
was elected president, and Chas.
Drennan, secretary-treasurer.
An executive committee was also
formed to look after the ground
and round np prospective players;
Messrs. G. Bruggy, H. Fowler,
Al. Falconer, S. F. D. Roe, R.
Kay and H. Mann being elected.
Mr. J. A. Stephen was appointed
to lay out the diamond,
It was decided that a fee of $2
be charged for admission to membership, and it was hoped to have
$200 on hand by the end of the
week.
Practice will be held every Sunday and games played with Anyox
teams whenever they wish to try
conclusions with the local bat
slingers.
prizes.
The Busy Bees will hold a Sale
pf Work. Home Cooking, Plants
etc. in Christ Church this (Sat.)
afternoon at 2.30 o'clock.
Afternoon Tea will be served.
Shipping Busy In and
Out of Anyox
S. S. Mogul arrived from
Stewart during the week with
3000 tons of ore and conoentrates
for Tacoma and added some 600
tons of copper to her cargo for the
refining plant at the latter town.
S. S. Griffco arrived from the
south on Saturday with 1500 tons
cokeing coal and 1000 cases of
powder. After discharging her.
cargo she proceeded to Stewart
where she loaded 1600 tons of ore
and then coming to Anyox on her
return to the south and loaded 350
tons of copper, also took in tow the
barge Baroda with 1500 tons No. 1
ore.
The Riversdalej new 4200 ton
barge which was recently purchased by the Coastwise S. S. Co.,
arrived from southern California
and is now being overhauled at
the company's yard at Winslow.
The S. S. Plommer, also a
recent addition to the Coastwise
S. S. Company's fleet, and to
replace the S. S. Amur, is expected
to visit Anyox in the near future.
Bluebirds Win Ladies'
Championship by One
Point
High-Rigger Tops Tree
• Those who are not familiar with
the work of a high-rigger in the
woods, had a treat ou Tuesday
morning, when Mr. Ole . Aker
topped a big tree on the hill-side
directly above the town of Alice
Arm." The tree stood in the vicinity of the residence of Mr. Steve
Dumas, aiid was a menauce to the
building. Ole climbed the tree,
limbing as he went, and after a
short time the top came crashing
to the ground, and then to show
his contempt for high altitudes
calmly seated himself on the top
and surveyed the town below.
Quartz Mine to Operate
Granby Point will soon be a
scene of activity when the Granby
Company will start to erect buildings to replace those destroyed by
last summer's fire, preparatory to
operating the Quartz Mine that
has been held in reserve for the
past few years.
Reported Provincial Election
on June 23rd.
Among the news items received
from Vancouver by radiophone, on
Wednesday evening, by Mr. A. D.
Yorke, was one to the effect that
the date for the provincial election
had been fixed for June 23rd. Up
to the time of going to press, this
report could not be verified by
those connected with the government.
Mother's Day will be observed
throughout the Dominion by all
Churches and Lodges on Sunday
May 11.
- Friday evening saw the final
basketball game of the season,
at the local' Gymnasium. This
game brought together the Bluebirds and Pats, in the deciding
contest of a two out of three game
series. The game was one of the
best put on by the ladies this
season and was won by the Bluebirds by the narrow margin of one
point,  the score being 11  to 10.
The Bluebirds, as champions of
the Anyox. Ladies s league will
receive each a handsome silver bon
bon    dish     suitably     engraved.
The teams lined  up as follows:
Bluebirds, Mesdames: Smith,
Cody, McTaggart, Roy and Mo
Quarrie.
Pats: Misses Dean, Moffat,
Champion, Calderone and Mrs,
Chapman   and Mrs.   Wenistrom.
Fred Brown   was   the referee.
Alice Arm Conservatives
Hold Meeting
A well attended meeting of the
conservatives of Alice Arm' was
held in the Anglican Church, on
Wednesday evening. Mr. T. W.
Falconer occupied the chair.
The first business to come before
the meeting was the election of
officers, Mr. T. W. Falconer was
elected president and, Mr. J. A.
Anderson secretary - treasurer.
The executive committee are: A.
McDonald, J. M. Morrison, S.
Wickwire, J. Wheatley.
The election of delegates to
attend the Anyox convention of
May 16 was the next business,
and T. W. Falconer and J. A.
Anderson were elected to attend.
It was decided to hold a weekly
meeting every Wednesday evening.
It was also resolved that should
the conservative candidate be
elected that the association cease
to exist, and that all business
coming up for the welfare' of the
town be taken oare of by the Alice
Arm Citizens' Association.
Third  Party  Convention
on May 13th.
The date of the convention of
the Provincial Party for. the Atlin
district, has been fixed for Tuesday
May 13th, and will be held in
Anyox.
Chinaman Found Dead
Wong Kaing, employee of the
Anyox Steam Laundry was found
dead in his room on Monday
morning. Funeral took place at
the Anyox Cemetery on Thursday.
BIRTH   AT ANYOX
Born to Mr. and Mrs. j. McGuire, at the Anyox hospital on
Friday, May 2, a daughter.
Anyox Moose Hold their
Memorial Day Service
On Sunday evening, flay ., at
the headquarters of Anyox Lodge
1412 Loyal Order of Moose, a
large attendance of members of
the above Order and Legionaires
took part in a very interesting and
impressive service in memory of
departed Brothers   of  the order.
The ceremony was conducted by
Brother Dictator J. G. Ellis and
an able address delivered by the
Prelate of the Order, Brother Rev.
J. Herdman.
At the close of the evening a
duet was acceptably rendered by
Mrs. Lawes and Mr. Murdock,
accompanied   by   Brother Dresser
X
ALICE ARM NOTES
++*.+.» 4 n.+■■■ 4 .t. +■»■ *, it. +.t.+.»4.t.|i»+■«..
See Al. Falconer for Wood, Coal
and Lumber.
Mr. Oscar Gray arrived on
Monday from Seattle, where he
has spent tlie past winter. Mr.
Gray states that the Keystone
Mining Co. of Seattle, are ready ,to
go ahead with developiri'eht work
on the Sunset property al soon as
the snow is off the ground.
Rev. Father J. Fleck of Anyox,
will arrive in town on Thursday
evening, May 15th, and will hold
Services at the residence of Mr. S.
Dumas, ou Friday and Saturday,
May 16th. and 17th. All Catholics
are requested to attend.
Hand Laundry Work. Moderate
Prices—Miss B. Crawford, Alice
Arm.
Constable Martin, of the provincial police, arrived from Prince
Rupert, on Monday, in order to
relieve Constable Gillis, who has
retired from the force.
Mr. P. Austin, auditor of the
government liquor board, was a
visitor in town on business during
the week.
Mrs. Clanahan arrived on Monday from Vancouver to meet her
husband, Mr. Dan Clanahan.
Mrs. Gait arrived on Monday
from Vancouver, to join her husband, and will reside here during
the summer.
Mr. B. W. Barrett left on Mou-
day for the south.
Men's washing done, first-class
work and reasonable prices—Mrs..
J. Johnson.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Wilson left ou
Monday for Vancouver.
Mr. Nels Olsen, left on Monday
for his ranch iu the Naas Valley,
where he will engage in farming
during the summer. He took with
him a stump puller and also a pure
bred pedigree mare which he purchased from the Alice Arm Freight-
Continued on page 6. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HEltALD,   Alioe  Abm,   Saturday, May 10,* 16_4
The Alice Arm and Anyox Herald
Published al Alice Arm
E. MOSS; Editor and Publisher
SUBSCRIPTION RATES PER YEAR:   Alice Ann and Anyox $2.80;
Other parts of Canada $2.75;  United States $3.00
Transient Display Advertising, 50 cents per inch per issue.
Local Readers 10 cents per line per issue.
Classified Advertising, per insertion, 2 cents per word.
Special Position Display or Reading, 25 per cent above ordinary Rates.
Certificate of Improvement, $10.00.
Land Notices, $10.00      Coal Notices, $0.00
Contract Display Advertiiing Ratei on Application
No Advertiiing accepted for First Page.
Promise of a Good
Sporting Season
Prospects of a good sporting
season at Alice Arm seems to be
real good. On Monday evening a
meeting of those interested in baseball was held, and plans made for
a season of activity. Baseball is
the greatest outdoor summer sport
in Canada and should be extensively encouraged.
On Wednesday evening a
political meeting was held, and the
sports programme given another
boost. Unlike baseball, the
political game can be played at
any season of the year, either indoors or out. There was a time
when only the highbreds were
allowed to play the game, but of
late years it has included all males,
and recently the women have been
allowed to take part.- The political game is the most exhilirating
in the world. It is played by
every race under the sun. There
is no limit, to the number of teams
entering a game.
Radio, a Household
Necessity
The time has passed when
Radio is looked upon as a plaything. It has passed through the
preliminary and experimental
stages.' It has come to point
where the public expects service
and amusement of high class. If
nearby stations do not furnish the
kind of program desired it is only a
matter of a few moments to turn
them out and tune in the distant
ones. Some stations broadcast
every half hour during the day and
night, giving the important news
and market reports, in a few
minutes. Radio is fast assuming
a household necessity, and is found
in millions of homes today for
service as well as amusement.
the most important item to the
newspaper publisher." Newspapers are growing better and
fewer. Consolidation has been
effective. Time has come to stop,
look and listen. Publishers are
responsible to their readers for
every picture and sentence that
appears in their paper. A
reader's confidence is worth more
than numbers. The dissemination
of news is today of vital importance
What this country needs most
is home chairs that don't become
uncomfortable ten minutes aftei
the family finishes the evening
meal.
Scientists claim that one fly
swatted now is equivelent to over
2,000,000, killed in the summer.
Kill the lonely fly.
Men go to the  movies to look.
Women to listen.
A grouch seldom locates in a
healthy body.
Directors of the Woolworth 5-
and-ten-cent stores now value the
company's ''good will" at 20
million dollars. "Good will" is an
invisible asset. It is, to a business,
what reputation is to the individual.
A business may lose its last dollar,
everything tangible that it owns.
But, as long as it retains its reputation for fair dealing and merit,
there is still a lot to salvage. So
with people, Reputation is the best
form of wealth.
Building Up the Small
Town
Citizens   Should   Support   the
Place They Call Home.
It is high time that all of us
paid more attention to the building up of the little town and less
to making the overgrown city
larger.  The little town is home
or should be. It needs our
support, and we are the people
who must give it life and power
if it is to have either. The big
city care nothing for us. It will
if it can pull our dollars away
and lure our boys and girls into
its whirlpool, but that is the
only use it has for us. The little
town needs us and we need it.
Hall's Corners may not make as
large a dent on the map as New
York, but it really means more
to us, and we ought to help
make it something to be proud
of. Why not get over the idea
that the bright future of Canada
lies in the great cities? It does
not. The future which lies in
the cities is shopworn, smoked,
dirty and unclean. The true
future lies in the country and in
the little towns. Back them up
and make them grow.
HUSKY NEW FARMERS ON CANADIAN NATIONAL
TWENTY-EIGHT of Canada's
new farmer citizens-in-the-
making as they arrived in Winnipeg a few days ago in charge of
the Salvation Army. This party
originally consisted of 58 boys and
12 girls, but those shown in the picture are the only ones who came on
to Western Canada to work on the
land, the others remaining in Ontario.   These boys are the advance
guard of a large group of 'teen age
lads who are coming to Canada this
spring under the auspices of the Salvation Army to work on farms in the
west, and never has a more promising looking group of settlers passed
through Winnipeg than the young
men shown above. They travelled
across Canada by Canadian National
Railways' special train for immigrants and the picture shows them
on their arrival at the Union Station,
Winnipeg, and the long train filled
with new settlers. Arrangements
have been made by the Salvation
Army authorities for special equipment to be provided by the Canadian
National to bring west the next
large party, which is scheduled to
sail from the Old Country the end of
March.
Orders   Taken   for  all
Kinds of
Finished Building Material
S. DUMAS, Alice Arm
!__
r"
Kitsault House
ALICE ARM
Rooms for Rent by Day,
Week or Month
ROOMS, 75c. AND UP
All Kinds of Soft Drinks
F. J. BISHOP, Prop.
"The Reader's   confidence is
Said the selfish old boozer,
As he bottled his wine:
Lips that touch liquor
Shall never touch mine."
Anyox Community
:: League ::
Council meets every Wednesday
Evening, at 7.30 p.m. Every
second Wednesday of month at
Mine Hall; every first, third and
fourth Wednesday at Recreation
Hall.
If you can suggest anything to
better conditions, tell it to us at
the meetings.
KITSAULT CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
BREAD   AND   PASTRY   ALWAYS   FOR   SALE
GUS.   ANDERSON,   Proprietor
.J
**  LAUNCH, "AWAKE"    I
•"• . ■:■::■.
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m. i
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
SPECIAL  TRIPS  BY  ARRANGEMENT
+«»+»»+'»'4**',+'*'4'*'+'*'+'*'4**'4,*'4**'+■♦■4'»,4'*'4'*'4'*",">'!"*"*• ♦***4**,f'*'ti>'4','4'*'4'**4'**
"Si
STEAMSHIP
TICKET AGENCY
VISIT THE BRITISH
EMPIRE EXHIBITION
Agent for all Steamship
Lines
Write for Ratei ud bformatioa—
R. F. MoNaughton.
District Passenger Agent,
Prince Rupert. B. O.
Canadian National Railways
k-
I AUCE ARM FREIGHTING Co.
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
BAGGAGE. FREIGHT. TEAMING. COAL AND
WOOD.   PACK TRAINS & SADDLE HORSES
Office: Next to Post Office       - J. M. Morrison, Manager
♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦ »+*f*H+»-+*f+*»-H*+*f*H"f*H -f+*H*+++*f+4-f*»*H+ »♦♦♦■»
SUBSCRIBE TO THE HERALD
r~
-~]
Groceries, Hardware
and Drygoods
A FULL LINE ALWAYS IN STOCK
T.W. FALCONER AHce a™
GENERAL MERCHANT
J $1
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HEBALD,   Aliub  Arm,   Saturday, May 10, 1924
London Policewoman
Commandant Mary S. Allen,
London's first and foremost
policewoman, has arrived in
Now York for an eight week's
study of American police
methods. She will aho lecture
on the work of the London
policewomen during her visit.
Boot and Shoe
Repairing
First Class Work
Highest Grade Material
Used
C. H. WALKER Alice Arm
Opposite Royal Bank
\   |l«_M>^aXM
MINERAL ACT
FORFEITURE  OF INTEREST OF
CO-OWNER
"Victoria'' and "Bbbtha Fraction"
Mineral Claims
To: Buford James Carpenter
TAKE NOTICE that I have for the
years A. D. 1921, 1922 and 1923 performed and paid for all assessment
work required by the Mineral Act, on
the "Victoria" and "Bertha Fraction"
Mineral Claims situated on the Kitsault River adjoining the Wolf Group
of Mineral Claims in the Naas River
Mining Division of the Province of
British Columbia: AND TAKE
NOTICE that if yon the said Carpet*
ter shall fail to contribute your p»
portion of the said expenditures
together with all costs of advertising
of this notice, on or before the 30th.
day of June, 1924, your interest in the
said Mineral Claims shall become
vested in me your co-owner as provided by Section ,28 of the Mineral Act.
Dated at Prince Rupert, B. 0. this
14th. day of March, 1924.
JULIAN B. ROBERTSON,
725 Second Avenue,
P. 0. Box 1583     Prince Rupert, B. 0,
NOTICE TO CO-OWNER
To: A. E. Garvby, Esq.
Vancouver, B.C.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jack Miller,
have done or have caused to be done,
and paid for the same, the assessment
work on Royal No. 1 Mineral Claim,
Royal No. 2 Mineral Claim, Royal No.
3 Mineral Claim, Royal No. 4 Mineral
Claim, Royal No. 5 Mineral Claim,
Royal No. 7 Mineral Claim, and Royal
No. 8 Mineral Claim, all of which said
Mineral Claims are situated about
sixteen and one-half miles from Alice
Arm, B. 0. on the Kitsault river and
adjacent to the Dolly Varden and
David Copperfleld Mineral Claims,
and known as the "Royal Group," as
required by the Mineral Act, Chapter
157 R. S. 'B.C., 1911 and Amending
Acts for the years 1921-22 and 1922-23,
and have recorded the same. As the
owner of an undivided one-quarter
interest in and to the above mineral
claims, your share, of the moneys paid
as above mentioned amounts to
$350.00. Unless you pay your share,
namely $350.00 within ninety (90) days
from the first publication of this
notice, I shall apply to the Mining
Recorder at Anyox, B.C. to have your
interest in the Mineral Claims vested
in me by Section 48 of the said Miner-
' Dated at Prince Rupert, B.C. this
4th. day of March, 1924.
JACK MILLER
Mothers' Pensions Act
is Responsible for Large
Distribution
The annual report of the
Mothers' Pensions Act operation
last year has also been issued by
the Workmen's Compensation
Board. It shows that in 1923,
$432,177.50 was distributed for
the benefit of 959 mothers and
2455 children. In the three and a
half year period since the act oame
into force, more than $1,660,000
has been expended under its
provisions.
. The benefits distributed wider
these two acts amounted last year
to $258,783.12 a inonth. This
assistance is divided among
approximately 1500 widows, 4500
children and 1000 workmen with
their families, so that at any given
time approximately 9000 people
are constantly receiving at least a
part of their maintenance through
the provisions of one or other of
these pieces of remedial legislation.
Bread from Yukon wheat
on Sale at Dawson
Bread made from wheat grown
within seven miles of Dawson is
for sale at all   restaurants here.
The latitude of Dawson is 64
and the grain is the furthest north
wheat in the Empire.
Its quality was rated by an
expert from Manitoba last summer
as No. 1 northern, equal .to the
best Manitoba product. The yield
is 30 bushels to the acre.
The wheat is the product of the
government experimental station
at Swede Creek, conducted by
James Fan*. He has a ready sale
at $10 a hundred pounds. Samples
of grains have been sent by the
frold commissioner, George Mac
Kenzie, to Ottawa, for exhibition.
Better to plant a yard in a
garden than a foot on a railing.
Too often a prayer is merely a
plea for special dispensation.
Some wiseacre told us that we'd
get out of anything just what we
put into it, so we put our money
into an oil well and got—salt
watpr.
Platinum is Most
Precious Metal
Worth $125 an ounce and far
more useful than gold, platinum
has qualities of worth and merit
never dreamed of for the yellow metal. The first large quantity was taken to England from
Jamaica in 1740 and studied by
English scientists.
It is widely but not abundantly distributed, and is found under the same conditions as gold,
the principal foreign deposits
being in Russia, Spain, the United States of Columbia, Australia and South Africa. In this
country at has been discovered
in Alaska, Nevada, California,
Colorado, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Utah, Wyoming and
Washington.
Russia produced 90 per cent
of all platinum thus far recovered, and Colombia 9 per cent
more, leaving only 1 per cent
from all other countries. Since
Russia adopted soviet government it has been necessary to
look elsewhere for this regal
metal, and Colombia is now
furnishing most of the world-
supply.
Today, most of the metal is
dredged from shallow Colombian rivers. There are probably
not more than 500,000 lbs. in
the world and the United States
has not more than a fifth of this.
Platinum does not melt until
the extreme high temperature
of 3,159 degrees Farenheit is
reached and is not appreciably
attacked by any single acid.
A wire so fine that it is invisible may be drawn from platinum. An ounce of it can be
drawn out into a wire that will
reach more than half way across
the United States. Precise telescopic instruments used to use
cross hairs of spiderwebs, one
5000th of an inch in diameter.
Today platinum wires only a
fourth as large as one-10,000th
of an inch in diameter are used.
—Exchange.
Aspiring Young. Man (to
Senator).—"How did yon become
such a wonderful orator?
Senator.—I began by addressing
envelopes.
fr
The Welcome Cafe
Alice Arm
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS
We carry a First-class Lot of Good Eats, with First-class
Bakery ia connection
Don't forget to drop in and try us out
J. TRINDER      ....      Proprietor
.V.-
r~
MEAT   MARKET
AUCE ARM
WHOLESALE  AND  RETAIL
Dealer in Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats,
Fish and Poultry
W.   A.   WILSON,   Proprietor
fr
^
BE
AUCE ARM HOTEL
DINING ROOM
THE LOGGERS' FRIEND
THREE □ D D A DAY
$40 PER MONTH
Try our Famous 50c. Meals.   Service Guaranteed
R.  W.  CLAYTON, Proprietor
3C30C
A Fresh Supply of Drugs, Candy
and Sundries arriving Weekly
W. M. ClimmingS,   Agent for all Vancouver Daily Papers
Post Office Building, Alice Ann
3C3DC
30E
Shoes & Rubbers
We have a Large Stock of Logger's Hand
Made Shoes, Miner's Shoes, and Dress Shoes,
also all kinds of Rubber Goods
BRUGGY'S STORE
Alice Am
-BE
=)_=!___=
AL.  FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Baggage, Freighting, Pack and Saddle Horses
COAL AND LUMBER
Slab Wood Cut Any Length
EVERY ORDER GIVEN IMMEDIATE ATTENTION
1
Ladies Dresses
In Silk <™d Poplin, in all the popular colors
New Line of Ladies Coats, in high
grade cloth, tweed, and velvet
LEW LUN & Co., General Merchants
West Side of Smelter
ANYOX, B.C
Advertising is the Big Business
Builder
..... _.	 ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD.   Alice  Aem,   Saturday,  May 10, 1924
Anyox ~==-
Community
League —-
RECREATION  HALL
Gel the Habit Three Nights a
Week
TUESDAY; THURSDAY,
::    :;    SATURDAY     ::    ::
0 0 0*
Be Sure & Keep These Nights
for the Pictures
Q 0
WE  SHOW   THE   BEST
- ON  THE  SCREEN -
STURDY NORSEMEN FOR CANADA
Anyox Community
League
If you are in need of a mental
tonic, take advantage of the
League Library. The digestion
of a good book is often the
cause of a different viewpoint
USE
GRANBY BENZOL
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR   SALE  BY   THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
FIRST CUSS ROOMS
For Rent, by Day, Week or Month.
Reasonable Rates.
Trouble in National
___!__ .
—Rw__
Poincaire with hi* stethoscope  listening to the labored
breathing of the French franc, which sunk very low.   On
April 21st. the franc reached a new  high for this, year
when it rallied to over 6.3b' cents.
THESE are some of a party of*
15 Norwegian fishermen who
passed through Winnipeg on
their way   to   Vancouver,   where
they expect to take up their haz-,
ardous vocation in Pacific waters. I
They were photographed as they
stood outside their special coach
attached to the Continental Limited
of the Canadian National Railways,
on which they travelled from
Montreal to Vancouver.
CIGARS, TOBACCO & SOFT DRINKS
. POOL ROOM IN CONNECTION
N. SUTILOVICH, Prop.
(r
Alice Arm
Hotel
Good  Single   Beds   for
Workingmen, 50c.
First Class Rooms, Hot and
Cold Water, Heated, and
Electric Light
Mrs. E. M. McCOY  Proprietoreii
"^
^.
Ja
Judge   (to   elderly    witness.)—
Your age, madam?
Witness—Thirty.
Judge—Thirty what?
Witness—Years, of course.
Judge— Thanks.   I     thougth   it
might he months.
Now, has he left me on the shelf.
And found some newer queen?
Or has his wave-length lost itself?
What does this silence mean?
i
Beach Cafe
ANYOX
BREAD, CAKES,   PASTRY
Meals at All Hours
T. GILLESPIE
A_—»„—„-,,._,„—.,_.„_„«_,,_.„._.,n
MEN WITH LARGE POKES
STAY IN THE ARCTIC
A dozen men are living within the Arctic Circle on the Koy-
likuk River, with fortunes ranging from §525,000 to $50,000 in
gold each, according to Captain
Webb, an pldtime prospector,
who, after striking pay came out
this winter on his annual vacation. He said these men had
married native women and set-
fed down t enjoy their modest
i'ortunes far from the vanities
of civilization.
They use the parcel post to
procure what luxuries their
tastes demand and they seem to
have no desire to leave their
polar wilderness.
Only when some prospector
makes a final clean-up and turns
his dust in at some b nk can an
estimate be made of the amount
of gold being taken from the
Arctic creeks. Captain Webb
was accompanied by a man who
carried four suitcases, each containing a portion of his cleanup, estimated to total $40,000.
SUNSET
Rooming House
ALICE ARM
First Class Rooms to Rent by Day,
Week or Month
Soft Drinki, Cigars, Cigarettei and Tobacco
R. ROMAN
PROPRIETOR
Subscribe to your Local Paper NOW.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
Has produced minerals valued as follows:. Placer Gold, $76,962,203; Lode Gold, $113,352 655* Silver
$63,532,655; Lead, $58,132,661; Copper, $179,046,508; Zinc, $27,904'756; Coal and Coke, $250,968143*
Building Stone, Brick, Cement, $39,415,234; Miscellaneous Minerals, $1,4*08,257! making its mineral
production to the end of 1.923 show
An Aggregate Value of $810,722,782
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry in this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures, which show the value of production for successive five-year periods: For all years to 1895 inclusive
$94,547,241; for five years, 1896-1900, $57,607,967; forfiveyears, 1901-1905, $96,507,968; forfiveyears 1906'
1910, $125,534,474; for five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; forfive years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725; for the
year 1921, $28,066,641, and for the year 1923, $41,304,320. -*: \~.
Production During last ten years, $350,288,892
Lode-mining has only been in progress for about 33 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospected; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, security of which is guaranteed by
Crown Grants.
Full information, together with Mfhing Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing'
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, British Columbia
est and Lowest
Points in the World
The maximum difference in
elevation of land in.the United
States is 14,777 feet, accoivmj
to the United States Geological
survey. Mount Whitney, ihe
highest point, is 14,501 f_,ct
above set level, and a poinl in
Death Valley is 27(5 feet below
sea level. These two poini:,
which are both in California,
are lees than 90 miles apart. The
difference is small, however, lu
compared with the figures for
Asia. Mount Everest rises 29,-
002 feet above sea level, whereas the shores of the Dead Sea
are 1,290 feet','below sea level,
a total difference in land heights
of 30,292 feet. Mount Everest
has never been climbed.
The greatest ocean depth yet
found.is 32,088 feet ut a point
about forty miles north of the
Island of Mindano, in the Phil-
lipine Islands. The ocean bottom at this point is therefore
more than 11% miles below the
summit of Mount Everest. The
difference in the land heights in
Europe is about 15,866 feet-
Exchange.
The strides made by the automotive industry during the last
decade have been remarkable.
The motor oar is no longer regarded
as a luxury. It has attained its
rightful place as a utility. The
first auto was sold in Canada in
1869. Today the total registration
runs close to 556,000. Official
statistics show that 996,329 autos
entered Canada during 1922 for
touring purposes, representing a
traffic value of $170,000,000.
Thus the auto took fourth place as
a revenue producer. ifO
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HEBALD,   Alice  Arm.   Saturday, May 10, 1924
B. P. 0. Elks
Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
Elk's Hall
Kitsault Jewelry
Store
ALICE ARM
Watches Repaired
A First Class Line of Jewelry
Always Carried in Stock
S. Wickwire Manager
Vb
Bluebird Cafe
Anyox
MEALS AT ALL HOURS
Home-made Pastry & Cakes
Soda Fountain
Mrs.   M.   BRYDEN
! Proprietoress
>1S OF
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
tind by aliens on declaring intention
to become", British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding pre-emptions Is
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charg-3
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per. acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
farms,, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions munt be occupied for
five years and Improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, .neluding
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
i For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
' Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; m.nlmum
price of first-class (arable) land is $6
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
■tumpage.
HOMESITE  LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
'and land has been surveyed.
j LEA8ES
I For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
{may be leased by one person or a
| company.
GRAZIN6
Under the Grating Act the Provinoe is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under »
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits art Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permlta are available for settlers,
campers and traveller!, up to ten
head.
Alice Arm Tennis Club
Hold Brilliant Dance
Large Crowd Enjoy Evening's
Entertainment
What was uonceeded to be the
best dance held in Alioe Arm for a
long time, was held on Tuesday
evening at the Alice Ann Hotel,
under the auspices of the Alice
Arm Tennis Club, and to this
organization, groat credit is due
for the evening's success. ■
Dancing commenced at 9 o'oloek
and was kept up with unusual
vigor until 1.30 a.m. The
"orchestra composed of Mrs. T. W.
Falconer, piano; Mrs. J. Laidlaw,
saxophone; Master Lome Falconer
violin; C. Hutchinson, clarinet;
and L. Johnson, accordian; were at
their best. Mrs. Laidlaw and
Lome Falconer are new members
of the orchestra and their presence
was  a   very    welcome   addition.
During the evening exhibition
dancing and vocal solos were given
as follows:
Butterfly dance by Misses
Kathleen and Irene Bruggy.
Chinese dance by Kathleen
Bruggy, accompanists in both
dances were: Miss Virginia Riel,
piano; and C. Hutchinson, clarinet.
Highland Fling, by Mrs. J.
Laidlaw and C. Drennen.
Exhibition of Scottish dancing
by Mis. Laidlaw. Both dances
were accompanied by Piper
Norman McLeod.
Vocal solo. "I love you truly."
Encore "Boy of Mine," Mr. H.
Btirmeister. Accompanist. Mrs.
T. W, Falconer.
The arrangements for the supper
were in the hands of Mr. R. W.Clayton, proprietor of* the Alice
Arm Hotel Dining Room, who
fully upheld his reputation as an
Al caterer.
A beautiful cake was donated
by Mrs. G. W. Bruggy. Tickets
were sold on the cake throughout
the evening, and the owner of the
winning ticket was Mr. L. Johnson
The Hall was prettily decorated
with red and white streamers and
toy . balloons, ii.terniingled with
greenery, and presented a charming appearance.
From every point of view the
dance was a great success, and the
committee iu charge bf arrangements, Mrs. H. F. Kergin, Mrs. R.
McGinnis, and Mr..C. Hutchinson
deserve great praise. That their
efforts were not in vain is evidenced
by the fact that after all expenses
were paid a surplus of $42.60 was
on hand. Fifteen dollars of which
was derived from the sale of
tickets on the cake.
The committee wish to take
this oppurtunity to thank all those
who helped in any way towards
the evening's success.
Buffaloes in Yukon
Are Prospering
Veterans from the Yukon territory who mushed into the Ketchikan district recently were optimistic about the importation of 24
buffaloes from Wainwright park,
Alberta, to a game preserve in
central Yukon. They predicted
that within a few years the raising
of these buffaloes would be as
profitable to the Yukon as the
reindeer industry has become to
northern Alaska.
HE
NATIONAL PARKS ARE GAME SANCTUARIES^
•■"l"' HE National Parks of Canada
I are a haven for wild life;
x where guns and hunting dogs
are forbidden and where the animals have come to look upon man
as their friend rather than as their
destroyer. As a result wild animals are increasing in the national
parks of Canada and the graceful
deer, the lordly bison and the always interesting bear live at peace
in their natural habitat without
molestation.
At Jasper National Park in Alberta, which is 4,400 square miles
in extent and the largest of Canada's
national parks, bears, deer, moose,
mountain sheep and goats abound,
and the visitor finds also great
numbers of smaller animals such as
beaver, squirrel and others which
are becoming quite tame since they
realize that they are protected.
At Wainwright, on the main line
of the Canadian National Railways,
east of Edmonton, there exists one
of the finest demonstrations of the
feasibility of game conservation,
for there, in the buffalo park are
some e 8,000 animals, the growth
from a herd of 716 which was purchased some sixteen years ago by
the Canadian Government' and al
lowed to multiply in peace. So
great has been the development of
the. herd that this fall 2,000 of the
surplus animals had to be slaughtered and in the spring another
2,000 young buffalo are to be
moved into the northern hinterland
and allowed to roam at will there
under conditions where they also
will be safe from ruthless hunters.
In addition to buffalo, the government has at Wainwright large
numbers of elk and yak, which are
fast becoming unknown animals
except to the adventurous hunter
who was prepared to go miles beyond the limits of civilization, and
these animals also are multiplying
in the conditions under which they
are being kept.
Visitors to Jasper Park at the
present time find cinnamon, brown
and black bears very numerous; if
they go far enough afield they may
reach the haunts of the grizzly,
still within the park limits. Deer
may be found browsing within a
stone's throw of Jasper Park
Lodge, the bungalow camp hotel
operated by the Canadian National
Railways and cariboo are reported
to be becoming more plentiful year
by year. The "bighorn" mountain sheep grazes peacefuly along
the lower slopes of the great
mountains which rise on every side,
while the more timorous mountain
goat may be seen on the higher
slopes, making his way over precarious footing and seeming to
challenge the camera enthusiast to
climb up and include his picture in
the collection.
By means of the sanctuaries
which have been given to various
animals, the younger Canadians
growing up today can now and in
the future see for themselves,
specimens of various big game animals which a few years ago were
threatened with destruction. And
since Canada was almost the last
native haunt of many of these, such
as the buffalo, the educational
value alone of the sanctuaries is
great. The experiments already
made have shown that such animals as the buffalo can readily b*
propagated in captivity and in their
case also, the revenue derived by
the government from the sale of
buffalo meats, hides and heads
from the animals which it has become necessary to kill, will, it is
estimated, go a long way towards
paying for the cost of the experiment and the upkeep of the National Parks.
30
Anyox
Barber Shops
MINE AND BEACH
PI IE
3E
30
Mine Cafe
ANYOX
MEALS at ALL HOURS
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pies
and Pastry
FISH & CHIP SUPPERS
J. FOXLEY,  Proprietor
r
'^\
SPRING STEAMSHIP
SERVICE
EFFECTIVE MAY 8th.
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT will leave Anyox for Prince Rupert, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle and intermediate points, each Thursday,
at 1.00 p.m.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN will leave Prince Rupert, for  Vancouver, via
Queen Charlotte Islands, May 10th, 24th.
PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE FROM PRINCE RUPERT
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY, at 6.45 p.m., for Smithers, Prince
George, Edmonton, and Winnipeg, making direct connections for
all points East and South.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or further information, apply to any Canadian National Agent, or to R.   F.   McNAUGHTON, DUtrict   Passenger   Agent,
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Advertise in the Herald and Get Results ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HEKALD,   Alioe  Arm,   Saturday, May 10, 1924
Alice Arm Notes
Continued from page 1.
ing Co. In order to get the mare
to the Naas Valley it is necessary
to take it round by the Terrace
route.
Capt. J. Chalk and Lieut. L.
Renas, Anyox officers of the Salvation Army wish to thank the
people of Alice Arm for their generous support to their Self Denial
Fund.
Mr, Fred Mattson arrived in
town on Saturday from Anyox,
and will spend the summer developing his mining properties in the
Kitsault Valley.
See Al. Falooner for Freight and
Pack Horses.
Mr. Danny Hume, who has been
running the donkey engine on tbe
Kitsault river bridge, left for his
old stamping gronnd at Stewart,
on Thursday.
A meeting of the Alice Arm
Liberals will be held at Mr. Steve
Dumas' Store, this evening, at 8
p.m. Ladies are cordially invited
to be present.
Arrangements are being made to
hold a smoker, with boxing bouts,
etc. on the evening of May 24tht
Mrs. H. Mann and family arrived
on Thursday from Vancouver and
Anyox to join Mr. Mann. They
will reside here indefinitely.
Constable A. Dryden of Anyox,
spent several days in town during
the week on business.
ANYOX NOTES      I
When hiking to the Dam or
Mine, take a rest and dine at the
Mine Cafe. Ice Cream, Tea and
Soft Drinks.
Arrivals via Cardena on Monday
were Mr. and Mrs. Clancy, Mrs.
Campbell,   Mr. C.   Redhead and
Mr. W. C. Grober.
Sunday next will be observed as
"Mothers Day" at Christ Church.
Miss Winnifred Cameron, sister
of Capt. Cameron of Anyox,
arrived in town on Monday, last
week, from her home at Gourock,
Scotland. Miss Cameron, who is
a graduate nurse of Southern
General Hospital, Glasgow, has
been engaged by the Anyox
hospital having taken up her
duties on May 1.
The following passengers booked
for the south on the Cardena on
Monday Mr. and Mrs. Hodson,
Mrs. G. Brown and children, A. A.
Anderson, T. Allan, J. W. Hend-
rickson, C. W. Burt, A. Murchie,
E. Campbell, R. H. Crowe, T.
Garrett, C. Parmiter and A. P.
Williams.
Mr. P. Marron left on Monday
on   the   Cardena   for    Stewart.
Rev. J. Herdman, accompanied
by, his wife and children left for
Vancouver on Monday where they
intend spending a month's vacation.
Dr. P. Whelan arrived home on
Monday from Chicago, where he
has been taking a post graduate
coiiree.
Mr. L. J. Wrisberg, who for the
past eighteen months has been
office manager for the Granby Co.
left on Thursday's boat, aocompanied by his wife and family, bound
for California, where they intend
making their home.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gill and child
left on Thursday for the south.
Among the outgoing passengers
on Thursday's boat, were: Mrs.
Bengston, Miss Bengston, Miss
Henderson, Messrs. H. McLeod,
M. Mater, D. Scott. B. Myers, T.
Garrett, W. Woodland, A. Sinclair
Mrs. Thorsen arrived from the
south on Thursday's boat.
Cut Flowers,   Pot Plants, and
Bedding-out Plants of all kinds.
Mrs. McCarthy, Box 723,
Emade Block,
Prince Rupert, B. C.
FOR SALE—Edison Ambrola
Gramophone and records in first
class condition. A Bargain. For
particulars, apply Herald office.
Loyal Order
of Moose
Anyox Lodge No. 1412
Insist on
BeerwttkutaPeer
The better beer-
pure—palatable—
high in food
elements
At all Gov't Liquor Stores
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement Is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control   !l
Board or by the Government of British Columbia. < \:
Lodge Meeting
Every Friday
Catholic Hall
Dictator:
J. 6. Ellis.
Secretary:
S. Spragg
BLUE FRONT CIGAR
STORE
Ciguri, Cigtrettei ud Tobacco, Soft Drinki
Rooms (or rent by Day, Week or Month.
Geo. Beaudin
-   Prop.
The Welcome
Pool Room
Alice Arm
Tobacco aid Soft Drinks
Pool Tablet, Ciiari, Ciiarettei
A. BEAUDIN, Proprietor
r*»+*+*H-frm++++♦ ♦ ■»♦ ♦■»♦♦ ♦ »*j
Alice Arm Electric
LAUNDRY
Prince Rnpert Pioneer Prices
Downtown Agent: B. Turbitt's
Cigar Store
J. LAIDLAW    -    ■    PROP.
(7
When Hiking
To the Dam or Mine
TAKE A REST AND DINE AT THE
MINE CAFE
Ice Cream      Teas      Soft Drinks
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED MINING,
SMELTING & POWER Co. Limited
Producers of Copper, Coal, Coke, Benzol and
Ammonium Sulphate
Purchasers of Ores of Copper and Siliceous Ores
of Gold and Silver
MAIN OFFICE:-Anyox, B. C.
rr
Granby Stores
DRYGOODS
Gossard Corsets and Brassieres
Corsets ranging in price ... .$1.05 to $5.5o
Brassieres from 65c. to $2.50
Children's Waists 65c.
Gossard Combinations $2.50
MEN'S  WEAR
Good quality cotton work shirts
in khaki, blue chambray,
black sateen, and navy, all
sizes in stock for... .$1.50 or 2 for $2.75
Light weight khaki breeches....        2.75
DRUGS
Wampoles Health Preparations
Grape Salts  .50c. and $1.00
Cod Liver Oil...       1.00
Magnolax       1.00
Milk of Magnesia       50c.
Always Reliable
SHOES
Misses Black ('alf Strap Slippers
special this week, at       $2.25
Misses and Children's patent button white top shoes, good
wearers for        $1.95
Children's patent Roman sandals       1.75
See our Men's bargain table for small sizes
90c.
95c.
$1.15
BOYS
Athletic underwear, 2 to 10 years
Bulbriggan combinations22 to 20
Balbriggun combinations 28 to 32
Bulbriggan  shirts and drawers
22 to 26        50c,
Bulbriggan  shirts and drawers
28to32       60c.
Cotton jerseys, assorted, 22 to 32     55c.
HARDWARE
Complete line of Restmore Beds, Springs,
and Mattresses in Stock
We are also featuring 2ft. 6in. camp cots
with "felt roll-up" and folding
legs, complete    $11.00
MEATS GROCERY
Special For One Week, May 12th to 19th.
Pot Roast    12 l-2c.
Hamburg Steak         15c.
Frutlow Brand California peaches
halves, 2 l-21b. tins, each       35c.
Fels Naptha soap  3 for 25c.
PRODUCE
Winesap Apples, per box, $3.25.      Yellow Newtons, per box, $3.50.
Cooking Arples per box, $3.00
GRANBY  STORES
This advertisement will be changed each week
__-_-_-_-_■__-_-_-_-_-_-__•
_____--_-_-_-
1

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