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Herald Jun 18, 1921

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Full Text

 i
All the Mining
News of the
Northern
B.t C. Coast
THE HERALD
ALICE   ARM   &   ANYOX,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
»■»—"■"«"«"■"» f* f* f— i,
Published at
Alice Arm
$2.50
Per Year
I      VOL. 1,   NO. 3
Alice Arm, B. C, Saturday, June 18, lifel
$2.50 a Year.     5 cents each.
The North Branch of
Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy
THE  ANYOX MEETING
The Anyox meeting of the North
Coast Branch Canadian Institute
oil Mining and Metallurgy, was
hold on Thursday evening, Juno
9th. Chairman E. J. Conway
presided, and Mr. G. C. Mackenzie,
visiting secretary-treasurer, was
asked to address the meeting.
Mr. Mackenzie explained that
the policy of the Institute is to send
its secretary over the country that
he might come in contact with
members, cast new light on Institute matters, create new interest,
secure new mambers, and to bring
the east a little closer to the west.
The Institute aims to represent the
mming industry, and its membership is not of any one class or profession, but it embraces everyone,
who is interested in the science and
art of winning ore from the ground
and recovering from it materials
for the use and convenience of mankind. The North Coast Branch
exists for the purpose of bringing
into contact, all classes of men
eagaged in the •mining industry in
this district. Its programme for
the approaching year includes monthly meetings; at which talks and
discussion on a broad range of
mining and metallurgical subjects
will be held. Arrangements are
being made to secure material from
other mines, such as the Hollinger,
and the Sudbury and Cobalt camps.
ALICE ARM MEETING
Saturday afternoon, the Anyox
members visited Alice Arm. They
were accorded a right royal welcome by C. B. Major North, coun.
cilor for British Columbia, at "The
House on the Hillside." Here the
Major's famous concoction "A bird
in the hand" was discussed with
the unanimous approval of all.
At eight o'clock the visitors were
guests of the citizens of Alice Arm
at a sumptuous dinner in the Alice
Arm Hotel. Following this, a
public meeting was held which was
presided over by Major North, in
the unavoidable absence of chairman, E. J. Conway. The policy
and work of the Institute was outlined by Mr. Mackenzie. He said
the Canadian Institute of Mining
and Metallurgy was a national
institution that has, no politics and.
no religion except Canada. ■ Its aim
is to benefit the mining industry
and what benefits mining, benefits
Canada. The idea of its meetings
is to create«good fellowship among
the members, to bring the prospector in contact with the engineer
and capitalist, and to provide an
opportunity for discussion and the
exchange of information among its
members.
Bert Kergin the popular member
of the legislature for Atlirt, was
present, and discussed the relation
of the Institute to legislation. He
pointed out that the Institute
could be an important factor in
suggesting legislation and in giving
advice on political questions that
have a bearing on the mining industry.
Mr. Biel asked to have some
additional light on the qualifications and duties of members, who
are eligible. Mr. Mackenzie replied
that all are eligiblo, every man in
the industry; prospector, engineer,
miner, doctor, mine' operator, and
metallurgist, they all have a plaoe
in the membership, and their duties
are to attend meetings and to take
part in the discussions.
John Stark, the pioneer prospector of the Arm, followed with
an interesting description of the
country, when cariboo fed on the
flats at Alice Arm, and bears roamed over the outcrop of the Hidden
Creek Mine, He approved the
steps the government is taking in
aiding the prospector in establishing roads and trails and in providing explosives at cost to prospectors
Referring to the perennial subject
of a government plant for testing
ores, he claimed the logical location
was at tidewater, and suggested
the Institute influence the government in some action along this line.
4-»4.»4"**4*<'+.«*+.•■♦.•' 4'*'4'*'4'*'4'*'4'M
ALICE ARM NOTES
t ♦•**♦•» 4 «' ♦*»+■•'+■••+•••♦—+»»>'»+«»"4»»' f
ELK'S HOLD A
SUCCESSFUL SMOKER
On Friday night, June 10th, the
Elks held a very successful smoker
in the Recreation Hall. Mr. Chas.
Wing was the chairman and everyone had a good time. The Elk's
orchestra augmented by the presence of Mr. J. Stephens, of Prince
Rupert, at the piano, furnished the
music. The programme consisted
of boxing bouts by F. Schliehe vs.
H. Downs; Al LaFortune vs. Fred
Johnson; Joe Fitzpatrick vs. Jack
Sherman; Ed. Wall vs. Jim Ferguson; Jim Gibson vs. Bil Gibson.
Humorous stories were given by
Sam Downs and George Burrell.
Songs and piano selection by Geo.
Thomas. Song by J. Thomson.
Violin Solo by Joe Parker. Recitation by Jack Hughes, and ten
minutes torture by Jim Esplin.
The feature of the boxing was
the event of Jack Sherman and
Joe Fitzpatrick, Sherman being
knocked out in the middle of, the
fourth round, and did not regain
conscienseriess until 15 minutes
afterwards.
A skilful exhibition of wrestling
was staged by A LaFortune and
C. Collins, resulting in a draw,
both boys securing a fall.
George Jessop was in charge of
the refreshments. The Bouts were
refereed by Pat Ryan and Art.
Andrews.
Joe Wheatley arrived home on
Thursday, from a trip to Prince
Rupert.
Louis Izzo of the Silver Star
came up from a trip to Anyox, or
Thursday.
See Al. Falconer for Wood or Coal,
Mr. and Mrs. George Morrow, of
Anyox and Tom Gillispie, came in
on Thursday. Mr. Morrow and
Mr. Gillispie are -going to work on
their claims on the Illiance River,
Don Cameron came down from
the Moose on Thursday.
The "Awake" left for Stewart,
Thursday evening, Mrs., H. F.
Kergin and her daughter Alice, are
making the round trip.
The Anyox General Store are
running a picnic to Alice Arm, on
Sunday.
Mrs. D. S. Cameron and family
left on Thursday, to spend the .summer at her home in Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Rice arrived
at Alice Arm on Monday's boat.
Gus Strombeck is busy doing
development on the Toric.
See Al. Falconer for pack and
freight horses.
E. Hardy was fined $15.00 and
costs before T. W. Falconer, J. P.,
on Wednesday, for being drunk
and disorderly.
Mr. G. Hanson & Mr. T. Buckle
arrived ill Alice Arm on Thursday,
Mr. Hanson will be in charge of
the party of geologists of the Canadian Geological Survey. Mr. R.
W. Goronson and Mr. W. Riley
arrived last week; and are camped
at Trout Creek. Mr. G. Hanson
will make a geological map of the
upper Kitsault, and will be here
until September.
Mr. George Clothier, mining
engineer for the district, arrived in
town on Thursday. George is well
known in the Arm and was busy
renewing acquaintances. He will
be here a week, and will examine
the Dolly Varden, North Star and
Ruby Mines. Also Roundy Creek,
Lime Creek and the Illiance River,
to see what trails are needed to
gain access to the different mining
properties.
Mr. P. Philip, Public. Works
Engineer; Mr. T. Kilpatrick, Inspector of Bridges; and Mr. A. L.
Carruthers, District Engineer, arrive^ in Alice Arm on Thursday,
from Prince Rupert. They were
in Alice Arm about five hours, and
left for Stewart the same evening.
From Stewart they go to Rupert
and up the Skeena to the Omineca.
14.««4,»,4'*'4|>'4'>'4'*'4'*'4'*'4'»4,*'4'»4«H
ANYOX NOTES
h4'»'4'*t4»,4'*'4'»4'*'4'*'4'*'4'»4'»'4','4'** f
Are you sure you are on the
voter's list.? Remember, Monday
is the last day.
Mrs. C. J. Lowry entertained at
bridge, Tuesday afternoon, in honor
of Mrs. D. C. Roy and Mrs. Victor
Bengston, who left on Thursday's
boat to spend the summer months
in Vancouver and Spokane.
Carelessness and neglect on the
part of picnic parties to abide by
the law in regard to extinguishing
camp fires before leaving their
camps, has'resulted in a big forest
tire at the head of Granby Bay.
It seems a pity after waiting through a long winter for this beautiful weather, that the atmosphere
must be polluted with smoke and
ashes, when this condition could
easily be prevented with just a
little effort and forethought on the
part of careless people.
In this connection it might be
well to state that on two occasions
the town and plant at Anyox was
only saved by favorable winds from
being- wiped out' as a result of-fireSi-
A severe fire at this time would
probably throw us all out of' a job
and work hardship on many others'.'
A big percentage of these fires
would be prevented if everyone
would refrain from throwing away
burning matches, cigarette and
cigar stubs and pipe heels. ^
Mrs H. S. Munroe was the
charming hostess, at a delightful
tea, on Saturday afternoon, June
11th. The occasion being a farewell linen shower for Miss Milligan,
who is shortly to leave for the
south. The afternoon was very
pleasantly spent in playing bridge.
After partaking of the daintily
served refreshments, \ the happy
task began of opening and admiring the many handsome and beau-
gifts showered upon her.
Miss Milligan has been associated
with the teaching staff in Anyox
for three years, and has been a
most efticeint and painstaking
teacher, and it will be with sincere
regret that her many friends will
see her. leave their midst.
The wild roses are in bloom at
the Arm.
Mr. and Mrs. Stephens arrived
home from Vancouver on Thursday
with their new baby.
Miss Smythe and Miss Wilson
who have been on the Hotel' Staff
for the past year, have left for
Victoria.
Mr. J. J. Trumbull, the popular
Spanish teacher is leaving for
Seattle, and jsvill enter the state of
Washington university in the fall.
Mondayis the last'day to get on
the Voter's List.   Get busy.
-   Mr. and Mrs Ben Selfe of Prince
Rupert, returned home on Thursday
Jimmy Ferguson, formerly of the
Goldheish mine it now working at
the big mine.
Mrs, Percy Davis arrived home
on Thursday
There is for rent i)t Alice Arm,
by campers, one 2-rooined house,
containing 2 double beds, 2 stoves,
wood shed with wood, garden and
good water, also 2 tents with
stoves and beds, for further information regarding dates, etc., write
to the Herald, Alice Ann, B. C.
ANYOX BASEBALL
The Elk's Baseball team ride
serenely on top of the table, much
to the satisfaction of the bell-
ringers. That "Hieland Tench
Tamson" the bell weather of the
herd, with a bell in each hand and
a whistle in-his mouth, is great
encouragement to the younger velvet horns.
Played
VV.
L.
Pta
Elks           0
1
•j
666
Smelter     0
8
8
501)
Mine          0
2
4
333
FOOTBALL
Pld.    W.
L.    Dm.    Pts
Smelter   5         H
0       2          8
Mine       5         1
3        1          3
Elks        i         1
2       1          H
Dillon's "Gas
Eater's" footbal
team are the only undefeated aggregation in town to date. Gas
does not seem to hurt footballers.
ALICE ARM BASEBALL
A team composed of players from
camp eight, journeyed'to town last
Sunday, and defeated the home
team by the score of 8 to 7.
The,town team was minus the
services of their pitching ace, •falconer, who was slightly indisposed.
George Bruggy had a narrow
escape from serious injury. When
trying to score, he was struck over
the temple by a hard thrown ball
and rendered unconscious, he revived and gamely continued .through
the game.
A bet was recorded at the Arm,
by one of the locals, that Dempsey '
will knock Carpentier out in five
rounds, the odds were 20 to 100.
Two New Ball Parks
Two northern coast cities are
sporting new ball parks this season.
Ocean Falls and Ketchikan, and
Prince Rupert have the honor of
being asked to send a team to both
places to celebrate the opening. A-r^\;vStVrV.-f!ill|l(i.,;tri.,
^3f
;./"'.'■
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Arm,   Saturday, June 18th., 1921
The Alice Arm and Anyox Herald
Published al Alice Arm
E.   MOSS
Editor and Publisher
SUBSCRIPTION   BATE:   $2.50   A   YEAR
Transient Display Advertising, (HI cents per inch per issue.
Local Readers 20 cents per line per issue.
Classified Advertising, pur insertion, 2 cents per word.
Special Position Display or Rending, 25 per cent above ordinary Rates.
Certificate of Improvement, $12.00 (if more than one claim mentioned, $2,00
for each additional claim mentioned.)
Land Notices, $10.00     Coal Notices, $7.00
Contract Display Advertising Rates on Application
No Advertising accepted for First Page.
ALICE ARM MEETING
OF THE CANADIAN
MINING INSTITUTE
The North Coast Branch of the
Canadian .Institute of Mining and
Metallurgy, held a very successful
meeting at the Alice Arm Hotel on
Saturday, June 11th. Fourteen
members from Anyox, and Mr. G.
C. Mackenzie, newly appointed
secretary-treasurer for the Dbmin-
1 ion of Canada, made the trip on
the Awake, Saturday evening.
Major Morth, superintendent of
the Dolly Varden Mine, was on
hand to welcome the visitors, and
under his supervision everyone was
soon feeling at home.
A dinner was served at the Alice
Arm Hotel, at 8 o'clock, for the
visitors, and was attended by some
ol! the citizens of Alice Arm.
The   Meeting   was called at 9
■ o'clock in the Hotel Dining Roomg
and in a few minutes it was crowded to the doors.
Major North was chairman of
the meeting, he gave a short
address, and introduced to the
audience, Mr. G. C. Mackenzie.
Mr. G. C. Mackenzie, gave a
very lucid address on the aims of
the Canadian Mining Institute.
He said the present membership
was 1700 and represented every
walk of life, the members including
mining engineers, superintendents,
shift bosses, miners and muckers;
also bank managers, business men
and others, who lived in mining
centres, and were dependent on
mining for their living. One of
the aims of the Canadian Mining
Institute was to see that sane laws
were passed in Ottawa and the
different provinces; in which mining got a fair show and was not
bound down by ironclad laws that
throttled the industry.
Mr. H. F. Kergin, M. L. A., was
the next speaker. He took his
audience back 15 years, when he
first came north, and said that at
that time there was'nt a mine shipping ore, except the placer gold of
the Atlin country, and a few other
scattered- points. At that time
there was no Anyox with its mines
and smelter, no Alice Arm with its
Dolly Varden and other mines, no
Stewart with its Premier, and no
Prince Rupert with its big fishing
industry railroad terminals and
drydock. Very few salmon were
packed in those days, and very few
white men was in the country.
He predicted that the next 15 years
would show far greater progress
than the past, because we have the
minerals, the timber, the fish and
also the cheapest transportation in
the world, that is, water. The
north will go ahead by leaps and
bounds. We have the commodities
the world needs most and no power
on earth can check the progress of
northern British Columbia.
Mr. John Stark in his address
said it was 2.1 years ago, when lie
landed at Alice Arm. and the only
white men here then was Mr.
Roundy, Mr. Smith and himself.
He gave a brief history of the
Hidden Creek Mine, at Anyox, and
strongly advocated a government
testing plant in British Columbia,
for testing ores, to aid prospectors.
C. P. Reel; Mr. H. Fowler; Mr.
Ross; Mi'. M. Peterson and Mir. H.
M. Roscoe, local secretary, spoke
on the different milling problems of
the district, and the meeting closed
with the singing of the national
anthem.
The rest of the evening was
given over to singing, and everyone
spent an enjoyable evening.
Great credit is flue to Major
North in making the visit of the
Anyox members as pleasant as
possible, and also to Mrs. E. McCoy
and staff of the Alice Arm Hotel,
in preparing such an excellent
banquet.
The convention of the North
Coast Branch will be held in Alice
Arm in the fall, and it is hoped
that everyone will try and make it
a success.
ANYOX GUN CLUB
Blue Rocks Escape
The bad weather conditions and
low visibility prevailing on Wednesday evening last, seriously
handicapped the local trapshooting
sharps, and low scores were the
universal rule. Much interest is
shown in the expected trip to
Hyder, for July Itli, and the
shooters are all getting their eyes
trued up, and the kinks taken out
of the gun barrels.
Following are the scores:
Wetmore .. '.. 10
Campbell .. .. 14
Roscoe .. ,. 14
Champion .. .. 12
Rollag .. .. 10
Holmes .. .. .10
Maun .. .. 0
Stewart Pioneer
Is Married
Mr, J. Conway, the provincial
government agent at Anyox, has
received a letter from Harry Shaw,
who was in Stewart in 1905, in
which he states that he is alive and
well. He arrived home from overseas April 1st, 1919, and that he
now married and living at Hart-
land, N. B. He wishes to be
remembered to all the boys that
were in Stewart in the early days.
He says New Brunswick looks
prejbty good to him after 20 years
wandering in the west. Harry
Shaw was a partner of Tom Wilson,
Both men were prospectors, and
were very popular members of the
community in the early Stewart
days.
Anyox Community League
Council
Meet every Friday evening at 7 p.m.
Lost Friday in the month Meeting held at Mine
Other Meetings held at Recreation Hall, Beach
New Government
Wharf for
Alice Arm
Plans and specifications for the
government wharf were received
last Monday, and are on view at
the Post Office. The wharf will
be 100 feet in length and 50 feet
wide. A derrick capable of lifting
two tons will be placed on the
wharf, and a warehouse 24 feet by
50 feet will also be built. Rock
will be blasted out to make footings for piles. The two outer
rows of piles to have their footings
below low water level.
The wharf will be supported by
creosoted piles, spaced 10 feet
centre to centre in two directions.
The superstructure will consist of
caps, stringers, joists, planking,
and guard rails, together with
fender piles, bracing and tie cables
anchored to the solid rock by
means of anchor bolts.
B. P. O. Elks
Dominion of Canada
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets Every Monday, 8 p.m.
Catholic Hall
FRANK D. RICE
B.  C.  LAND   SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Subdivisions. Underground Surveys
Etc.
ALICE  ARM, B. C.
UNION CHURCH
SUNDAY SCHOOL,  11 a.m.
EVENING  SERVICE, 7.45 a.m.
ALL WELCOME
Rev. J. R. HEWITT, B.A., Pastor
SALVATION   ARMY
SUNDAY   SCHOOL 2 P.M.
(Mine School House)
SERVICE ON SUNDAY EVENING
AT 8 P.M.
Recreation Hall (Beach)
All Welcome
Try a Herald Classified Add.
._
See    AL.   FALCONER     Alice Arm
FOR
Transfer, Baggage or Freight, Pack
Horses, Wood or Coal
Every Order Given Immediate Attention
L_
Dr. H. S. SIMMONS
D.D.S., L.D.S., D.D.C.
DENTIST
Anyox, B. C,
FIRE,  LIFE,   ACCIDENT
AND   SICKNESS
INSURANCE
Chas. Wing      Anyox
ANYOX BARBER SHOP
GIVE US A CALL
USE
Granby Benzol
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR  SALE BY  THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
ANYOX HOTEL
CAFE IN CONNECTION
ANYOX,  B. C.   '
American and European Plan
GEO.   ROUND,   Manager
♦ ♦*♦•••♦•••♦•••♦•••■♦••••♦•••♦•••♦•••♦•►*••••♦••
Alice Arm Cabaret
i       SOFT DRINKS,
t CIGARS^
I      AND TOBACCO
MAUD STANLEY
PROPRIETRESS
FOR SALE
A quarter size Burroughs "Billiard  and Pool Table, in good
condition, 4|ft. by lift., 17 Balls
and 4 cues.    $45.00
Anyox P. O. Box 349 '   Phone 207
Lew Lun & Co.
General Merchants
West Side of Smelter
Anyox, B. C
HAS IN STOCK AT ALL TIMES A FULL LINE OF
MEN'S CLOTHING
Men's Dress Pants, Suits, Overalls, Underwear,
Shirts, Shoes, Socks, Raincoats, Hats and Caps,
Rubber Boots, etc.
LADIES'   CLOTHING
Ladies' Silk Waists,  and Skirts,   Poplin Skirts,   Silk
Underwear   and   Bloomers,   Cotton   Underwear   and
Bloomers, Sweaters and Jersey Coats, Shoes & Rubbers,
Silk Hose, etc. <
Full Width Silks and Pongee Silks in all Colors
Groceries, Jewellery, Alarm Clocks, Suit Cases, etc.
Our Prices are the Lowest in Northern B. C.
++++++<,+imim+++mmm++++++++++++++++++++++
Alice Arm Freighting Co.
Pack Trains, Saddle Horses, Heavy Teams
Office:   Next to Post Office
J.  M. MORRISON,  Manager
^■f+++»HH«H»m»»*++-m+»mMHm-f+>++»*+m-H ■■
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Abm,   Saturday, June 18th., 1921
fo
ANYOX SCHOOLS
That the splendid summer weather is fraught with grave risk
of fire has been made plain to every
member of Anyox Schools,
The call for Deputy Fire Rangers
met with immediate and intelligent
response. It should afford satisfaction to know that each and every
Anyox School Student is alert to
the real danger of lire and has
undertaken to—
1. Wat'ch for even the smallest blaze
2. Extinguish it at once if possible.
H,   Report any outbreak to the nearest
adult with the utmost speed.
4. Prevent all playing with fire appar
atus.
5, Warn Other children of fire dangers
(I.   Keep   small  children  well  away
from any uonilugatioii.
The approaching departure of
two popular members of the stall',
Miss Milligan and Miss Olsen, is
causing much regret in town,
which has hold both ladies in deservedly high esteem. Miss Milligan's
forthcoming marriage is the subject
of hearty congratulations to the
lucky man and of a linen shower
given especially in her honor by
the ladies of the town.
Miss Olsen contemplates an extended visit to the Old Country
and has secured accommodation on
the palatial Aquitania one of the
largest and speediest vessels afloat.
She will be accompanied by the
best wishes of us all for a safe and
enjoyable journey.
That many a heart will break in
twa will not be allowed the journey
to mar.
Mr. Dow, the highly esteemed
teacher of Division II, who resumed work recently was hailed with
much elation by his class. This
week the mine school welcomed
back the numerous absentees who
were by no means loth to exchange
inactivity for the happy progress
of their studies under the efficient
management of Mr. Hartness.
Supplementary school reading
matter has now been authorised
and with existing loan and reference sections will furnish an attra
ctive and useful school library.
Mr. W. H, Lambert, the principal, was confined to his home
through sickness for two teaching
days last week. We are glad to
say that he was back at work on
the ?th.
Bridge Season Closes
At Anyox Mine
The Ladies of the Mine Apartment Bridge Clnb closed a very
enjoyable season on a week last
Thursday evening, by entertaining
their gentlemen friends at bridge,
at the residence of Mr. and Mrs.
A. Jenkinson.
After refreshments were served
at half-past eleven, a beautiful
flower basket was presented to
Mrs. James Shepherd, by the club,
for high score. during the season.
Mr. Shepherd being the recipient
bf the gentlemen's prize for the
evening.
At the conclusion, a neat little
surprise was sprung on the ladies,
when the gentlemen presented a
handsome Royal Doulton plate to
Mi's. L. Morrison, who held the
highest score for the evening.
BE
HI
3BE
3E3E
30
BRUGGY'S   STORE
Wholesale and Retail
Fresh Meats,   Groceries, Provisions,
Hardware,   and General  Outfitters
POWDER  .  CAPS  -  FUSE
ALICE   ARM   PIONEER   STORE
SHE
3E3E
313
RIC
3IC
3HC
3NC
30Q0H 3IC=
3MC
ALICE ARM HOTEL
FIRST   CLASS   ACCOMODATION
Dining Room  and
Club in Connection
Hot & Cold Water
Electric Light
Special Rates for Families
Uk=3iic
=xic
E. McCOY, Proprietress
=aic;     Hoooic
3HC
3HC
DIE
ay
FRESH EGGS FOR
SALE
H. H. Carney, Alice Arm
SHOE REPAIRING
OF ALL KINDS
QUICK SERVICE
LEO PAULCER   Alice Arm
B. W. BARRETT
ALICE ARM
General
Merchandise
xxxx
♦♦♦♦«♦♦**♦♦*«♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦
Soft Drinks, Cigars, Jobacco
Rooms to Rent by Day,
Week or Month
GIVE  US A CALL
John Lulich & Thomas
PROPS.
PARENTS who have children
wanting to take Music Lessons
kindly phone Community League
Secretary at 150, as it is the
intention of the Anyox Community League to get a first class
Music Teacher from the outside.
THE Anyox Community League
is now over 500 strong, and is
still looking for new members.
Join folks and let's make the A.
C. L. a live issue.
Anyox Baseball League
SENIOR
May 16th. ' Elks        vs. Mine
"   18th.    Smelter  vs. Elks
23rd.    Mine       vs. Smelter
25th.    Elks        vs. Smelter
"   30th.    Mine      vs. Elks
June 1st.      Smelter  vs. Mine
6th.     Elks        vs. Smelter
"   8th.     Mine      vs. Elks
13th.  .Smelter   vs. Mine
"   15th.    Smelter   vs. Elks
"    20th.   Elks        vs. Mine
22nd.    Mine        vs. Smelter
First half of series
Games played Mondays & Wednesdays
Anyox Intermediate Baseball
League
May 7th.       Beach   vs. Mine
"   12th.     Mine     vs. Beach
14th.      Beach   vs. Mine
"   19th.      Mine     vs. Beach
"   21st.      Beach   vs. Mine
26th.     Mine    vs. Beach
"   28th.     Beach   vs. Mine
June 2nd.      Mine     vs. Beach
4th.       Beach   vs. Mine
9th.       Mine     vs. Beach
"   11th.     Beach   vs. Mine
"   16th.     Mine    vs. Beach
Games played on Thursdays and
Saturdays
Anyox Football League
May 10th. Mine vs. Smelter
"   17th. Elks vs. Mine
"   20th. Smelter vs. Elks
"   27th. Smelter vs. Mine
"   31st. Mine vs. Elks
June 3rd- Elks vs. Smelter
"   7th. Mine vs. Smelter
"   10th. Elks vs. Mine
"   14th. Smelter vs. Elks
"   17th. Smelter vs. Mine
"   20th. Mine vs. Elks
"   24th. Elks vs. Smelter
First half of series
Qames played on Tuesdays and
Fridays
Subscribe to the
HERALD
$2,50 a year
LAUNCH, "AWAKE"
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
i»l<-l»l"l><l-<l»l"t«M»M«*"*>«
SPECIAL   TRIPS   BY   ARRANGEMENT
KITSAULT   CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
MEAT, BREAD & PASTRY ALWAYS FOR SALE
Luncheons Supplied for Picnic Parties
GUS  ANDERSON,  Proprietor
T.   W.  FALCONER
ALICE ARM
Shelf and Heavy Hardware, Paints and
Oils, Groceries, Drygoods, Boots & Shoes
Dynamite Caps & Fuse
McClarys Stoves and Ranges
Brighten your House with Paint and Preserve the Wood
C. P. RIEL
ALICE ARM T0WNSITE AGENT
LUMBER  FOR SALE
Summer Camping-out Cottages
Built to Order
Kitsault Cigar Store
Cigars, Tobacco & Soft Drinks
Wholesale and Retail
ROBERTSON & DUMAS, Props.
timimmmimimimmmmmmsm
Subscribe to
XX
4*
XX ■'■-»-"!.i "•':.'' i&i
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Alice Abm,   Saturday, June 18th., 1921
THE MAN AROUND
TOWN
Are you on the Voter's List,?
Applications must be in the Government office, Anyox by Monday.
Colonel Crabbe left on Thursday's
boat, after giving the plant a thorough overhauling. Everyone is
now breathing u little more freely.
Rev. Hewitt and wife left for
Hazelton after 2 years service at
the Union Church here. We wish
him success hi his new sphere of
labor.
The mosquitos are getting in
their work in great old style from
various accounts we have received,
The Elk's held a very successful
smoker on Friday last. The star
bout of the evening was between
Jack Sherman and Fitzpatrick.
Jack was counted out in the fourth
round. We expect to see great
things of Fitzpatrick one of these
days.
The mothers of the town were
up in arms last Wednesday night
on account of the baseball rooters
waking up their offsprings. Boys!
take fair warning. You were
babies once upon a time.
It is reported that the Community League are contemplating
buying a few giraffes, so that those
wishing to see the tennis games
ean do so without craning their
necks.
Some folk have even gone so far
as to suggest putting a high fence
around the baseball grounds to
keep   the   sun from the pitchers
eye?.
Paddy Ryan was in the Hospital
for a few days. He is about again
now and doing well with the help
of a. cane. Yon cannot kill an
Irishman.
Many corgoes loaded to capacity
are to be seen even in our fair city
these days. Drink and be merry
boys, for soon will be the 15th. of
June.
It's an ill wind that blows nobody any good. The jitney service
are working overtime these nights.
The Vancouver Board of Trade
was in our midst on Saturday for
a few hours. Whilst here, they
visited'the smelter, mine and store,
and found we were just about as
up-to-date as the next fellow.
The mine and the Elk's had a
battle royal at the baseball grounds
last Wednesday evening. The
rooters of both teams were there in
full force. We even had a fog horn
there to warn the boys of their
mistakes.
„ The mine should have won the
game. They had it all their own
way until the 7th. innings, when
the Elk's team tied the score, making it' 5-5. Neither side scored in
the 8th. innings, and then the Elks
gobbled four runs in the 9th, and
retired the mine with no further
scoring. Ed. Swanson and his
team wended their way up home
sadder,but wiser men. Evidently
the inside dope whicli they were
giving everyone previous to the
game, was a bum steer. Shame on
you Eddy, treating the boys that
way. The atmosphere is sulphurous yet when that, game is mentioned.
Ben Selfe of Prince Rupert came
in on Monday's boat. He visited
Anyox Lodge No. 47, B. P. 0. E.
and gave a very interesting talk
on the work the Elks are doing
down in Rupert.
An exhibition game was played
on the grounds, Sunday evening,
between boys picked from the local
teams. There was a good crowd
in attendance, and Paul Armour
was deadly with the ball. In fact
four of them are still limping
around town.
The policeman, has his eye on
Sam Downs these days. Look out
Sam, he will get you yet for exceeding the speed limit with that
darned old Ford truck of yours.
The store employees will hold
their annual picnic at the Arm, on
Sunday, weather permitting. We
are looking for a good time with
the Alice Arm people, who are
regular sports when it comes to
making anyone welcome.
Monday is the last day to get on
the Voter's List.
B. C. Lightweight Cham
pionship Bout at Anyox
on July 1st.
Jimmy Gibson of Anyox and Joe
Farrell of Prince Rupert, will meet
here on July 1st. for the B. C. title.
Farrell, the present holder, comes
with a good reputation, and Gibson
who appeared in action with his
brother, at the Elk's smoker last
Friday, gave a good exhibition of
skill, speed and endurance.
If Farrell intends to retain the
title, he will have to go some,
because Gibson is working hard in
preparation for the bout. He is
out to win and the Anyox boosters
are behind him, and things will be
interesting on Dominion Day.
ig League Items
When Duster Mails fanned Babe
Ruth his first two times up in the
game pitched against the Yankees
on May 16th., it was three times
straight, for Mails favored him the
only time he pitched to him last
season.
Everett Scott, short stop of the
Boston Red Sox, on May 17th.
played his 700th. straight game—
not counting 11 world series games
—In that time, he has had 4755
fielding chances of which he had
bobbled 116.
New Wage Scale at
Premier Mine, Stewart
Miners, $5.50; Muckers, |5.00;
Laborers, $4.75; Foreman and
Shift Bosses, $6.25; Timbermen,
$5.50; Hoistmen, $5.50; Blacksmith aud Tool Sharpener, $5.75;
Compressormen, $5.25; Carpenters,
$6.75; Engineers, $5.75; Teamsters
1 or 2 horses, $5.00; four horses,
$150>00 and board.
Camp conditions have been improved, and all strikers have been
reinstated. There were about 200
men in Stewart before the strike,
waiting for a start, and more men
are going in or every boat,
Alice Arm, May, 1920
The following eruption was found
in a prospectors cabin on the Kitsault. It is somewhat shaky, as
perhaps he was, after his hike, or
maybe it came after the eating of
his first bannock. Anyway, it
shows he must have spent many
winter evenings at the old Kitsault
House.
The song of the Hooter is heard in the
hills.
While the rise in the river marks the
winter snows going.      -
From the canyons and gulches of the
hinterland vast.
With their leads and lodes of native
and ruby showing. '
Gone are the days of the Hot Stove
League.
No more are the evenings when the
hot coals glowed,
To the tales of finding thousand ounce
float.
And  of the rich  ore the  last shot
showed.
Farewell, Stove, rich with wisdom of
mining lore,
Of  formations,  dips, lends, contacts
and strikes.
Of slips and gouge, folds and country
rock.
Of the nature of faults and the why of
4lykes.
Your door turns on an empty room,
And the Prospector's shack is boarded
and closed.
For the season is on and the oiitdoor's
calls,
For a summer of activity after the
winter's repose.
The pack is strapped and the  trail
beckons on.
Tis time  to  mush, and each sallies
■>    forth.
Bach having a hunch for a particular
spot,
And eiich one taking a different course.
The "Bear Hunter" is hiking with the
Clear Water fever.
"Hooter Bill" is off for the :Glacier on
the run.
"Shovel  Nose" is staking   along the
the Illiance,
And the "Dutchman" is for Jacob's
Creek with his whistler gun.
L'Bnvoi
Pederson Hill has a  billion  tons   in
sight.
Eagle   Bay   echoes  witli  a   copper
bottom sound.
McGraw mountain staggers under a
mile wide lead.
While the Spanish Mine with its ruby
glare lights up the town.
BIRTHS   AT  ANYOX
Mr. and  Mrs.  Angus  McLean,
Anyox Mine, June 6th, a son.
Mr. and Mrs. A. R Kent, June
7th, a son.
Mr.   and   Mrs.  Hugh Johnson,
June 10th, a daughter.
WILLIAM SLOAN]
ASSAYER
Gold and Silver . • $2.00
Copper  1.50
Lead      1.50
Zinc       2.50
Price List of other Metal* on Application.
Mail Orders Promptly Attended to.
Remit Money Order with Samples.
OFFICE & LABORATORY
ALICE ARM, B. C.
BERT WHITE
A. I?, O. M.
TEACHER OF VIOLIN   ,
LEADER OF THE A.  C.  L.
ORCHESTRA
Those wishing to take Lessons, ting up   '■
or see the Secretary,  of the  Anyox
Community League at Library.
See Al. Falconer for Freight or
Pack Horses
ANYOX  THEATRE
SHOWS FOR WEEK OF JUNE 20th.
Tuesday, at 7 p.m.
Louis B. Meyer's, "The Woman in His House"
Educational Reel, "Pigmy Circus"
Special Orchestra Numbers.
Thursday, at 7.15 p.m.
Kathleen McDonald in "My Lady's Latchkey"
And a 2-reel Comedy, "A Sure Cure"
Special Orchestra Numbers.
<
Saturday, at 7.15 p.m.
Douglas McLean, in "Let's be Fashionable"
Travel Picture and Paramount Magazine.
Special Orchestra Numbers.
Are you on the
VOTER'S LIST?
Applications must be in
the Government Office,
Anyox, by MONDAY
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
Has produced minerals valued as follows: Placer Gold,"$75,722,603; Lode Gold, $100,272,431; Silver,
$50,432,304; Lead, $43,821,106; Copper, $153,680,965; Zinc, $16,818,487; Coal and Coke, $199,123,323;
Building Stone, Brick, Cement, etc., $29,991,757; Miscellaneous Minerals, $786,918; making its mineral production to the end of 1919 show an
Aggregate Value of $670,649,894
The substantial progress of the Mining Industry of this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures which show the value of production for successive five-year periods: For all years to 1895, inclusive,
$94,547,241 for five years, 1896-1900, $57,605,967; for five years, 1901-M05, $96-509,968; for five years, 1906-
1910; $125,534,474; for five years, 1911-1915, $142,072,603; for the year 1916, $42,290,462; for the year 1917,
$37,010,392; for the year 1918, $41,782,474; for the year 1919, $33,296,'313.
Production During last ten years, $322,829,310
Lode-mining has only been in progress for about 25 years, and not 20 per cent of the Province has been
even prospected; 300,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties, the security of which is guaranteed by
Crow^i Grants. x ,
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis by addressing   ,
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, British Columbia

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