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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Mar 18, 1933

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 A little paper
with all the
news and a big
circulation
■»■■**•♦"•"»'»"»"•■ y""* t**™" t"*'
THE HERALD
Published in the interests of Alice Arm and Anyox, B. C.
S2.00 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. S2.25 to
all other points.
ii
VOL. 12,   NO. 42
Alice Arm, B. O, Saturday, March 18, 1933
5 cents each.
James Wintermute Was
Found Dead On
Thursday
James Wintermute, was found
dead in the snow at his ranch 10
miles from Aiyansh yesterday. He
was found by two Indians who called there to purchase some hay. It
is thought that he had been dead
for some days, and apparently had
died from natural causes as he was
cutting wood. Deceased lived half
a mile from the main road and the
last person known to have called
there was at the first of the month.
He was left undisturbed by the two
Indians who found him. Two men
left Aiyansh yesterday to investigate.
The late James Wintermute was
well known at Alice Arm. He left
here about 7 years ago for the Naas
Valley. He was the owner of the
launch Vesta which was wrecked
down the inlet in a violent storm.
He was also well known at Prince
Rupert.
. +■.,+,„+.»+..». ii).ii «.».»»>■ i
* T
ALICE ARM NOTES
I
4
J. W. Strombeek"; who Hfcs spent
nearly three months' holiday in Vancouver returned home on Thursday.
Mrs. J. Cotterell and son Colin,
arrived in town on Monday from
Vancouver.
Another very successful card party was held at the Club House on
Saturday evening by the Alice Arm
Athletic Association. The winners
of the evening were: ladies' first
prize, Miss Leah Kergin; Men's
first prize, Mr. W. B. Bower. Refreshments terminated a very pleasant evening.
Mayor of Prince Rupert
Asked to Arbitrate
At the meeting of the city council
last night, Alderman Casey asked
the Mayor if he would undertake to
approach the management at Anyox
with a view to getting a settlement
of the strike, not taking either side,
but for the sake of preventing friction and giving other local men an
opportunity to go to work at the
mining camp, says the Prince Rupert Daily News on Tuesday last.
At present they c6uld not do so at
the risk of being branded by all
workmen.
The Mayor promised to investigate the conditions under which
the strike was called and he would
base his decision on the report he
received from both parties to the
dispute.
The matter came up when Mr.
Lindsay of Anyox reported that
there was nothing to arbitrate as
the mines were now working and
the men who had left had been
dismissed.
The local strikers reported that
they were willing to discuss the
situation.
Successor to Sir Henry
Thornton
Vandals  Defeat   Mechanics
In First Play-off
A good, clean game of basketball
was played on Monday evening last
between the Mechanics and the
Vandals, this being the first of a
series of play-off games to decide
the runners-up of the League. The
miners won by the narrow margin
of three points, the final score being
35-30. At the breather the score
was 16-11 in favor of the Vandals,
and in the second spell the machinists got in some nice combined
work and almost succeeded in evening up the score. Lee was absent
from the Orangemen, his place
being taken by a new-comer,—J.
Gourlay. Frank Mikeli played a
sterling game for the losers. The
teams: Mechanics: J. Gillies 4, B.
Gourlay, C. Dresser 9, J. Buntain 7
L. Gillies, F. Dodsworth 2, F.
Mikeli 8. Vandals: H. Jack 14,
A. Calderoni 19, J. Walmsley 2, J.
Gourlay, G. Anderson.
S. J. Hungerford, who succeeded
Sir Henry Thornton as president
and general manager of the Canadian National Railways.
The funeral services of the late
Alexander Donaldson whose death
was recorded last week, were held
at Vancouver last week. The remains have been forwarded to Oakland, California for interment.
Beside his wife he is survived by
his father, a brother and sister in
Scotland and a niece in Calgary.
Sir Henry Thornton, former president and general manager of
the Canadian National Railways, died at New York on Tuesday
afternoon March 14th.    Death followed an abdominal operation
which caused pneumonia and euremic poisoning.
Anyox Plant Producing
Copper Again
Despite many difficulties, most of
which cannot be fully realized by
the average person, the Anyox
plant of the Granby Company is
again functioning and turning out
copper. An occasional slowing up
of the smelter and concentrating
mill in unavoidable, but the causes
will be remedied as speedily as
possible.
When the familiar smelter smoke
came through the big stack a week
ago it was a welcome sight, as it
meant the re-starting of a large
number of workers. The uncanny
silence has gone. The muffled roar
from the furnaces, the rattling of
the crane bells, the sound of the
rolling cars, and the occasional
blasting of a chunk of ore at the
crusher makes sweet music to
Anyox folk.
Shortage of ore from the mine at
present does not allow the operation
of the mill and smelter continuously. The mill is closed down for a
few days this week-end to allow ore
to accumulate.
Mrs. R. Beck returned to Vancouver on Wednesday, after a visit
to her sister, Mrs. J. Kirkland.
United   Church   Bean
Supper Very Popular
"Exceeded our best hopes" was
the statement made by the Ladies'
Aid of the United Church on Friday
the 10th. after the dishes had been
cleared and the hall straightened
once more. Promptly at 6 o'clock
the lid of the bean pot was lifted
and the atmosphere was filled with
that delicious aroma beloved by
most everyone.
A large number of people availed
themselves of the chance of securing a substantial and tasty supper
for a nominal fee, and the committee of the Ladies' Aid had their
hands full keeping everyone sup
plied. There were many requests
for a similar banquet later, and this
will doubtless be forthcoming.
Anyox String Orchestra
Gives Delightful
Concert
A noteworthy concert was presented on Friday the 10th. in the
Recreation Hall, by Professor Hep-
peler's string orchestra, assisted by '
various artists. Throughout the
lengthy programme, which ranged
all the way from simple ballards to
gems of well known operas, the
orchestra acquitted itself admirably
showing marked, improvement in
technique and expression.
Outstanding numbers were:
"Sounds of Mozart,"and Mr. Hep-
peler's own arrangement of the
"Hungarian Melody." The waltz,
Tales from Vienna Woods," by
Strauss, and Mr. Heppeler's "Gavotte" were excellently rendered.
Another pleasing number was
Reinhardt's "Potpourri of Operas,"
which was followed by a dainty-
number, "The Goblin Parade."
Miss Maisie Kvans delighted the
audience with her violin solo,
"Mignon, do you know the Country," and the well known "Love's
Dream after the Ball." The violin
duet by Miss Evans and Miss B.
Lee, "The Dear Little Grandmother," was given with nice blending and expression. As an encore
they gave, "When the Spring goes
Over the Mountain."
The songs rendered by Mr. M. J.
Sheen were very acceptable, and
the Highland dancing of six of the
pupils of Mr. H. G. Laurie was
splendidly executed. The grace
and precision of these well trained
girls, completely won the audience.
Mrs. James MacMillan was the
able accompanist for the dancers.
Those comprising the string orchestra, were: Misses M. Evans, B.
Lee, E. MacDonald, D. Peterson,
violins; and Misses P. Arscott and
S. Kirkwood, piano.
Premier R. B. Bennett
CARD   OF   THANKS
Masters Allan Neil and John
Nicholson left on Monday for Vancouver, where they will reside.
It is with deep gratitude, that I
extend thanks to all those, who, by
many kindnesses and expressions
of sympathy have helped to lighten
the blow during my recent sad bereavement.
Mrs. J.   M.  DUNN
Mrs. Evan Baker left on Wednesday for a visit to her mother in
Prince Rupert.
Premier Bennett recently stated
that a plebicite of the people will
be taken at the next general
election as to whether the Canadian National Railways be
merged with the C. P. R. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD.   Saturday.  March  18.  1933
Alice Arm & Anyox Herald
Issued every Saturday at Alice Arm
Alice Ann and Anyox $2.00 Yearly
' ()ther Parts of Canada, $2.25
British Isles and United States, $2.50
Notices for Crown Grants - - $15.00
Laud Notices .... $15.00
Transient Advertising, nl)c. per inch
Contract Hates on Application.
k MOSS* Editor and Publisher.
Judging from press reports of the
past week or two the electors will J
have a wide choice of candidates
at the coming general election.
There will be the Tolmie party
composed of staunch and true conservatives; The Bowser party a
mixture of all parties. The straight
liberal Pattallo party, the Labor
party, and perhaps a few more
may be created before the election
takes place. Premier Tolmie may
still endeavor to form a union party
but it is doubtful, as Bowser seems
to have forestalled him. The
Conservative party seems to be in
a quandary as to what to do, especially as Bowser has taken a
leading part in the coming election.
It is possible that Bowser may
oust Tolmie as the Conservative
leader, but the next few weeks
will undoubtedly clarify the situation. One thing is certain, that
party lines will not be as strictly
observed as in former elections,
except perhaps in the smallest
towns of the province.
The Government of British Columbia spent $3,500,000 more than
it received during the year ending
March 31 st. Last year the sum
was $7,000,000. While the deficit has been greatly reduced it is
not enough. Expenditures should
be cut to balance the income.
Individuals were forced to do so
long ago, and there is no reason
why the government should not do
the same thing. The reason why
governments are not so anxious to
economize is because they are
spending other peoples' money. If
they were spending their own we
would quickly have a balanced
budget.
The Vancouver Financial News
published a very interesting editorial in a current issue, entitled, "Is
Democracy Doomed." The editorial states that a dictatorship form
of governmpnt is sweeping Europe
and is supported by those who
want action instead of stagnation.
It states that a dictatorship may be
on some occasions more efficient
than a democratic form of government, and instances the present
mess in the United States, brought
about by high tariffs and compelling Europe to pay her war debts
in gold. But in defending democracy it says:
''It was a long upward struggle
from autocracy to democracy and
the right of the ballot was bought
by more bloodshed and noble sacrifice than this generation is inclined
to remember. Our forbears, could
they hear our soliloquys on the
possible desirability of abandoning
democracy for dictatorship, of curtailing liberty of the presB and the
right of the people to public representation in parliament, would
have been astounded that the
birthright they won for us could
be so lightly weighed and assessed.
"For peoples who are ignorant
and unready for democracy, dictatorships may be desirable. For
British peoples and presumably for
our friends in the United States,
such a rulership would be intolerable.
"British peoples have always
agreed that a stupid democratic
administration is far better than
an efficient despotism holding the
people voiceless in its grip,
"Lands that let democracy slip
from them now must win it back
again some day by bitter struggle."
Premier Company Made
Bigger Profit Last
Year
Increase in the earnings of Premier Mining Co. Ltd. from $883,
871 in 1931 to $1,095,962 in 1932
was due to a slight increase in the
per ton value of the ore mined, as
compared witli 1931, to lessened
marketing expense because of a
higher concentration ratio in. the
mill, and to lower operating costs,
the per ton costs being $3.19 compared with §3.33 for 1931. This
explanation is given in the annual
report to shareholders under signature of H. A. Gue^s, vice-president
and nianaging-diieotor; The im
proved showing was made in spite
of a decline in tile average price of
silver from 28.70c in 1931 to27.89<
in 1932.
Gold production totalled 78,716
ounces compared with 82,394 ounces
in 1931. Silver production was
1,713,037 compared with 1,718,376.
Total broken and unbroken ore
reserves at the end of 1932 down
to the 6th. level of the present mine,
workings were 155,467 tons aver
aging 0.31 oz. gold and 6.9 oz. sil
ver. With gold at $20 per ounce
and silver at 25c this represents a
gross value of $7.92 per ton.
There was a reduction of 98,156
tons in total ore reserves during
the year. A total of 123,562 tons
of new ore were found and opened
up by exploration and development
during 1932, compared with 126,
735 tons opened up in 1932. During 1932, 221,718 tons dry weight
were mined.
After deduction of administrative expenses, taxes, depreciation
and depletion net profit of the
company for 1932 was $327,929.
Write-offs included $120,182 from
investment in Prosperity Mine and
$99,999 balance of investment in
Porter-Idaho leaving $107,749 to
apply on Premier dividends for the
year.
Malicious innuendo and ridicule
are a coward's weapon.
Much of the discomfort in this
world is caused by people neglecting their own business to lie about
others. *
B.  P. O.  ELKS
Dominion ol Canada and Newfoundland
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meeti every second and fourth Monday ol
the month
Halt for rent for dances, social functions, etc.
on application to club manager
Anyox Community
League
The Beach Council meets on the
Second and Fourth Wednesday of each
month, in the Recreation Hall, at 7
p.m.
The Mine Council meets on the First
and Third Thursday of each month, in
the Mine Hall, at 7.30 p.m.
If"
il
PIONEER MESS
CAFE
ANYOX B. C.
Bread,  Cakes, Pastry,
Catering
SPECIAL DINNERS
ARRANGED ON REQUEST
PHONE 273
L.
r
MEiYS SHOES
We keep on hand at all times a large stock of Men's
Shoes, for both work and dress wear.   Heavy Mining
Shoes, strong and well made with No. 1 leather, nailed,
and toe plate and heel, 8 1-2 inch top, $8.75.
Strong Work Shoes, panco and leather sole, in black or
tan, $3.75 and $4.50.
Dress Shoes in black and tan. All sizes, from $5.50 to $6.50.
-ll
LEW  LUN  &  Go.
General Merchants, Anyox West side of Smelter
Cr-
LAMB'S R9MS
IN BULK AND CASES
FINE OLD NAVY
(The Sailors love it)
GOLDEN GROVE
(The Doctors recommend it)
Shipped by
ALFRED LAMB &  SON
LONDON Established 1849
This advertisement is not published or displayed by   the   Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia
The Britannia Mining Co. a subsidiary of the Howe Sound Mining
Co. holds approximately 1000 mining claims in the Cariboo Country.
It is the largest single holding
{company in that district.
CRAZY CRYSTALS
A NATURAL MINERAL WATER
PRODUCT
For all ailments:   Stomach  Trouble,
Neuritis, Rheumatism, Colds, Hrthritis.
Colitis
Is Now For Sale in Canada
$2.00 a Package—Postage Paid
One Package makes 15 gallons of
Mineral Water at a cost of only 13c
a gallon
CRAZY CRYSTALS WATER Co.
DISTRIBUTORS
850, Haitiifi St. Weil, Vucomer, B. C.
BUILDING LOTS
ALICE ARM
First-class Business Lots at
$200   each,, and   Residential
Lots as low as $25.
Now it Ihe Time to Buy Property
E. MOSS
Agent for Alice Arm Mining
and Development Co.
OPEN   UNTIL   10   P.M.
GENERAL OUTFITTERS
We carry at all times a Full Line of First Class
Groceries;   also Heavy and  Shelf Hardware.
Clothes,   Boots,   Shoes  and   Rubbers   of   all
descriptions.    A large stock to choose from
3
%
T.   W.   FALCONER Alice Arm
GENERAL  MERCHANT
A. C. L. Libraries Are a Boon
To The Public
In these days of economic living the Community League
Libraries furnish pleasurable and instructive reading at
very low expense. Those using the libraries and
reading rooms are naturally expected to belong to the
League.
Membership in the League carries many other privileges.   Anyone may join.   The dues are only 50c.
per month.   The Secretary will be g'ad to give you
full information.
You may join at the Beach or Mine Libraries.
Beach or Mine Counters, or with the Secretary
MINING IN
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Among the Canadian Provinces, British Columbia is the
leading producer of Silver, Lead and Zinc
In this Province, about 45 per cent, of Canada's Silver,
97 per cent, of the Lead and 93 per cent, of the Zinc are
produced.
British Columbia has produced approximately $1,300,000,-
000 worth of minerals.
About 200,000 square miles of unexplored mineral-bearing
lands are open for prospecting.
Practically every mineral known to be found on the
Continent occurs to some extent in British Columbia
RECENT PUBLICATIONS:
Annual Report of the Honourable the Minister of
Mines for the calendar year 1931.
"Lode Gold Deposits of British Columbia."
"Placer Mining In British Columbia."
"McConnell Creek Placer Area"
Non-Metallic Mineral Investigations:    "Barite,"
"Asbestos," "Glassware," "Clay."
ADDRESS ENQUIRIES TO:
THE HONOURABLE THE MINISTER OF MINES,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
.JJ V
v
ALICE   ARM   AND  ANYOX   HERALD.   Saturday. March 18. 1933
Overnight Bedroom Sleeping Cars Popular
1 please reserve bedroom on
* Canadian Pacific 11.69 p.m.
train for Toronto," is a common
call nowadays into the railway
offices by the travelling public.
The company reports a very
heavy demand of late for this
type of accommodation and this
has necessitated operation of
bedroom sleeping cars on the runs
between Montreal and Quebec,
Montreal and Toronto, Ottawa
and Toronto, Toronto and Detroit, and Montreal and Detroit.
Privacy, comfort and the last
word in convenience and luxury
are keynotes of this latest development in overnight travel by
Canadian Pacific as expressed in
these single and double bedroom
and compartment care, which
represent the equivalent of the
finest of hotel accommodation.
They provide all the luxurious
appointments of individual private rooms with a real bed that
assures deep and refreshing Bleep.
Each room haB toilet, lavatory,
electric fan, overhead ventilator
with exhaust fan, reading lamp
and other conveniences, the
whole being decorated in restful
colors. In the double bedroom
cars an overhead bed may be
opened from the wall, if desired,
affording   additional   facilities.
Some further features of,the
sleeping cars may be enumerated,
which make the hours of sleep bo
refreshingly delightful. Temperatures are controlled thermostatically throughout the
train; roller bearings assure
smoothness of motion; coil spring
mattresses invite restful slumber; heavily padded
carpeting harmonizes with interior arrangements,
creating a general Boothing effect. Berths are wide
and long and unusually roomy. The service is
presented to travellers as a masterpiece of transportation luxury and comfort. It is the realization
of all those refinements of art and efficiency of
which travel equipment designers long nave
dreamed. From the inception of thiB new service it
has won increasing favor among travellers who
distinguish between good average service and perfection in travel. The word "moderne" has its fullest
and most inclusive expression in these cars.
In the women's dressing rooms attached to the
sleeping cars there is real comfort and satisfaction.
The most fastidious woman will find facilities such
as she would expect to see in a first-class hotel.
Mirrored dressing table and other toilet accessories
provide maximum accommodation without overcrowding. Here are vanity chairs conveniently
placed, ample artificial and natural lights in softly
colored shades, spotlessly white lavatories with hot
and cold running water, specially dispensed soap
and a never-ending supply of clean linen. This
affords the requisite pendant to refreshing Bleep—
perfect toilette.
The men are treated in like fashion. They too
have commodious dressing rooms where they can
foregather not only for the purpose of making their
toilets but also for an enjoyable smoke before
retiring or after they have slept. Their room is
perfectly lighted, well ventilated amply supplied
with lavatories of newest design and in decorations
harmonizes with the general finish and furnishings.
Lay-out shows (lower picture) single nedroom
car and (above) double bedroom car.
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Herald Ads. Will Bring You Business
Your Message To
The Public
Will give you 100 Per Cent. Results
when it is Published in The Herald
If you are holding a Dance, Card Party,
Concert, Public Celebration, or any Public
Affair, or if you have anything to sell, the
quickest, cheapest and easiest way to inform
the Public is to carry an advertisement in
the Herald
Our Advertising Rates are
Cheap
The Herald finds its way into almost every
home in the district, and your message is carefully and leisurely read by the whole family
round their own fireside. It is not scanned
over and forgotten as is a small weather-beaten
message stuck on a post
We can also handle your printing orders cheaply, quickly and
efficiently.
WE DO  REAL PRINTING
Anyox Representative—Mr. P. Powell,
Phone 262
PRINTING
THE  LUBRICANT  OF THE
: WHEELS OF  INDUSTRY :
The Herald Job Printing Department is
equipped to handle any class of work
;   :   :  Promptly and Efficiently :   :   :
Posters
Billheads
Letterheads
Oflice Forms
Business Cards
Admission Tickets
Booklets
Envelopes
Programmes
Visiting Cards
Invitation Cards
and Announcements
Are among the many forms of Printing
handled by the Herald Office
During the past ten years the Herald
Printing  has  won an enviable  record
OUR  MOTTO:
PROMPTITUDE, FIRST-CLASS WORK
AND A FAIR PRICE ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Saturday,  March 18.  1933
Concentrator Win From
Vandals In Hectic
Struggle
The Gymnasium housed a large
crowd of eager fans on Friday the
10th. when three games of basketball wore played, any one of which
was well worth seeing. The third
tilt of the evening between the Concentrator and the Vandals, was
packed with excitement and ended
with the miners two men short and
righting a hopeless battle. The
referee, N. Youngs, came in for
much criticism, but it was obvious
that his every effort was centred on
the strict observance of the i tiles.
The first game brought the Mechanics and the High School together, and was featured by poor
shooting on both sides. Both
missed many chances. For the
losers, Mclnnes played an excellent
game, being speedy and resourceful.
Bud Gillies' long shots missed by
fractions as did those by his teammates. Buntain was the best of the
machinists, while Dodsworth and
L. Gillies did yeoman work. The
teams: High School Mclnnes 5,
B. Gillies 6, F. Gordon 3, W.
Shields, H. Dresser 4. Mechanics:
L. Gillies 4, F. Dodsworth 4, C.
Bushfield 2,   Buntain 10,   Mikeli 4.
Vim and vigor characterized the
ladies' game between the Pals and
Spooks, which was won by the latter
7-6, Close checking on both sides
was responsible for the low scoring,
although both sides lost chances.
It was a good game to watch, the
winning point coming in the last
few minutes from a penalty shot by
H. Calderoni. The teams: Pals J.
Pinckney, L. Dresser 4, M. Dresser,
J. McDonald, P. Loudon 2, M.
Barclay. Spooks, Mrs. Phillips,
M. Cloke, T. Gordon 2, H. Calderoni 3, P. Sheen 2.
Full of thrills was the go between
the Vandals and the Concentrator,
the third card on the evening's programme. The game was made a
little one-sided when the miners
were reduced to four players and
finally to three, but despite this they
continued to play brilliant basketball and made further additions to
their total. However the reduction
in the working crew was their undoing, as the mill machinery ran up
points with monotonous regularity.
Lee, for the losers was the shining
star. Rangy, tricky, and a lovely
shot, he had the crowd on tip-toe.
Walmsley, the captain, played his
usual heady steady game and was
unfortunate in being sent to the
showers. Tony Calderoni was too
closely watched to run into double
figures, and was finally obliged to
follow his captain to the lockers.
H. Jack, closely checked though he
was, made some nice field shots and
played an heroic game. Dwyer,
Falconer and Steele played a wonderful game for the millmen.
Steele made several long shots tell,
THE PICTURES
"NIGHTj:0URT"
SATURDAY,   MARCH  18
Phillips   Holmes,   Walter  Huston,
Anita  Page,    Lewis  Stone,  Mary
Carlisle.
The crooked magistrate; the
frame-up of the wife; the placing
of the young husband on the spot
because he threatens the magistrate;
the murder of the investigator, and
the magistrate's alibi, this makes
up a powerful story. A new, vital
throbbing idea is proudly offered
by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corporation and the highest hopes of
its producers have been realized.
Directed by W. S. Van Dyke.
From the true story by Mark Hellin-
ger and Charles Beahan. Satur-
dav's showing.
"The Most Dangerous
Game"
TUESDAY,  MARCH  21st,
Joel  McCrea,   Fay  Wray,   Leslie
Banks, Robert Armstrong.
A hunter, who has tired of tracking big game in the jungles, now
stalks the most clever and most
dangerous of all game, human beings. It is also the story of another
b'g game hunter and a girl who are
trapped on this weird creature's
tropical island and how they use
every bit of courage and ingenuity,
to escape Count Zaroff's ferocity.
It is taken from Richard Connell's
book of the same title. You'll live
with Joel McCrae and Fay Wray in
their struggle to outwit Zaroff. A
real thriller for Tuesday.
Rover Frank Mikeli Is Honored Before Departure
On Tuesday evening last, at the
home of Rover Loudon, the First
Anyox Rover Troop met to do
honor to Rover Mikeli, who is leaving Anyox. A number of girls of
the Rangers were present and a very
sociable evening was spent.'
Chief Rover Cutler, on behalf of
the troop, presented Rover Mikeli
with a snapshot album. He made
reference to the splendid qualities
and cheerful disposition of the departing member and expressed the
great regret of all his mates at
losing him. Frank has been in
Anyox for many years and is well
liked (especially in basketball circles)
and is respected by everyone. He
carries with him the good wishes of
a host of friends.
You may lead a fool to talk, but
you can't make him think.
An evil thought does little harm
if you don't express it to listening
ears.
No man with a fiery temper can
accomplish much.
Has it ever occurred to you that
no one ever repeated a scandalous
story with a good purpose.
■H-H*+4+-H>H-++>++^++4+U+i4-»+++l^^
Bishop Rix Will Officiate At
Christ Church Tomorrow
The Right Rev. G. A. Rix,
Bishop of Caledonia, will hold a
Confirmation service at Christ
Church tomorrow, (Sunday) evening at 7.45. Ten candidates will
be presented by the Rector Rev. W.
B. Jennings. At 10 a.m. Holy
Communion will be celebrated and
Sunday School will be held at 11
a. m. It is probable that the Bishop
will speak at the morning service,
as well as at the evening service.
This will be the second confirmation held by the Bishop at Anyox,
and everyone is heartily invited to
attend the service.
Canada in the year 1932 occupied
fourth place among nations with
her products in British markets
against twelfth place in 1931. In
one year British imports have increased from this country more
than 31 per cent in value and much
more in volume.
while Dwyer's aim was unerring.
The teams: Vandals, G. Anderson
2, J. Walmsley 4, T. Calderoni 7,
R. Lee IS, H. Jack 13, total 41.
Concentrator: Heinkey 2, Dwyer
13, McLeod 5, Falconer 6, McDonald 11, S. Steele 13.   Total 50.
A. C. L.   Badminton  Club
Entertain Elks
On Thursday the 9th. the A. C.
L, Badminton Club entertained the
members of the Elks' Lodge to an
evening of friendly games and social enjoyment, A number of the
Brother Bills accepted the invitation
about fifty people in all being present, and a most enjoyable session
of badminton was spent. A delightful supper was served, and the remainder of the evening was devoted
chiefly to dancing.
At the supper, President Edwards
on behalf of the Badminton Club
welcomed the visitors, Mr. M. J.
Sheen responded on behalf of the
Elks. The antlered herd will reciprocate by entertaining their confreres at a social evening on Friday
March 31st.
•f ■•' f ■•' $ '•■ 'f ■•'^ ♦'•' ♦'•' W '•'♦'•■ V'*'T'*'T,**T*T'
f      ANYOX NOTES     I
t |i(i|i) ui\
G. Engstrom left on Monday for
Vancouver.
Ten mine workers arrived by the
Catala on Monday.
F. Mikeli left on Wednesday for
Vancouver. He will stop off at
Prince Rupert for a brief visit.
R. Ingraham returned .on Wednesday after a lengthy visit to the
States.
J. Carr returned on Wednesday
from Vancouver.
H. Cathro returned on Wednesday, from a visit to Prince Rupert.
A. Cade arrived on Wednesday
from Prince Rupert.
J. Anderson arrived on Wednesday from Vancouver.
Dale Pitt passed through on the
way to Premier from Vancouver.
Several mine workers arrived on
Wednesday.
E. 0. Aves, of the Provincial Income Tax Department, arrived on
Monday and is attending to income
tax matters on behalf of the taxpayers of the district. His helpful
and genial manner makes him well
liked by everyone.
DISTINGUISHED
for its Hospitality
and Service . . .
THE
HOTEL
GROSVENOR
Offers:
NEW LOW WINTER RATES
Detached Bath        With Bath
Daily $L50 $2.00
Weekly    7.50 10.00
Monthly 25.00 30.00
"The Vancouver home
for B. C. people."
Our guests are invited to visit CJOR,  Vancouver's most modem radio station—just completed on the Lower Floor of
THE    GROSVENOR
Vancouver, B. C.
E.  G.   BAYNES,  Owner-Manager
+♦+♦+♦++♦♦++♦ ♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦■♦-^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+-»~»4~»-»-M-f-H-»+
a i=iaq[ ii laaac
3GE—1
Candies, Stationery, Proprietary
j Medicines, Toilet Articles, Etc
W. M. CummillgS.   Agent for all Vancouver Daily iapers
Post Office Building, Alice Arm
On
3CDQC
ac
*r
Subscribe to the Herald
Tip Top For Less!
Tip Top Clothes are now
Only $22.50
Not one bit of quality has been sacrificed.   The same
high-class British Woollens, the same expert hand cut
and individual tailoring, and the same careful
workmanship.
Call in today and examine the new Spring line of
Tweeds, Serges, Worsteds, Cheviots, ar 1  Flannels.
You will be delighted with the new patterns and the
splendid values offered at this new low price.   '
Lighter Underwear for Spring!
New Dress Shirts.   Work Clothes in excellent variety.   Visit our Men's Department
for your clothing needs.
GRANBY STORES
ANYOX, B. C.
*Vi
-»
■bbMbvM

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