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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Sep 3, 1926

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 1*
A little paper
with all the
news and a big
circulation
THE HERALD
Published in the interests of Alice Arm and Anyox, B. C.
•*♦♦♦♦♦ f** t"»"*«*
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and
Anyox. $2.75 to
all other points.
VOL. 6,   NO. 9
Alice Abm, B. C, Friday, Seffembeb 3, 1926
5 cents each,
Sensational Ore Broken
Into During Mining
at LaRose
The richest deposit of high grade
silver ore ever found in the Alice
Ariri district and probably in British
Columbia was broken into the latter
part of last week, during mining
operations at the LaRose.
A piece of this ore of considerable
size, reposes in the office of Miles
Donald, manager of the mine. It
is composed of quartz crystals joined
together with native silver, the silver
in the crevices is much wider than
a silver dollar, and it is estimated
that the ore is composed of one third
pure silver. A wonderful specimen
of ore, and which give,s convincing
proof of the rich ore contained in
the district, awaiting the hand of
man to develop.
The ore was found during mining
operations at a verticle depth of 140
feet, which somewhat disproves
previous- statements of geologists
that high grade silver ore does not
carry values at depth. Ore is where
you find it, despite all geologists'
statements to the contrary.
Mining of ore at the LaRose is
being carried on uninterruptedly, on
a vein varying from 6 inches to 12
inches wide at a depth of 140 feet.
The vein at present is being drifted
on to the north at the bottom of the
raise. The vein also comprises
about two feet of good milling ore,
from which a handsome profit can
be obtained when a mill is installed.
Nearly 20 tons of ore has been
sacked for shipment, which will be
shipped when 40 tons are available.
By making large shipments, transportation costs can be considerably
lowered.
Mins>g Men are Investigating
Alice Arm
Bert F. Smith, superintendent of
I the Premier mine at Stewart,
I accompanied by G. G. Gilchrist,
[arrived in Alice Arm on Monday,
[and are making a general examination of the camp. Mr. Smith was
Ihere in 1919, and his visit chiefly
lis to mark tho progress made in
|mining since that date.
B. M. Sharp, of Spokane, who
lias spent a week in camp examining mining properties, expects to
|eave for the south today.   .
W. B. Timm, of the Dominion
|)epartment of Mines was a visitor
In town during the early part of
Ihe week gathering information.'
|lachinery for Toric   Mine
Arrived on Monday
liA considerable portion of ma-
iinery for the concentrating mill
Jthe Toric mine arrived on Mon-
ly from Vancouver on the S. S.
jfrdena, and tlie balance is expee-
1 to arrive at an early date.
It is the intention of tlie Consoli-
(bed Homestake Mining & Devel-
aent Co. to have the mill oper-
this fall, and continue   iu
bration throughout  the coming
liter.
Alice Arm Is Attracting
Mining Engineers
During the present year, more
mining engineers have visited the
Alice Arm district than .has been
the case for many years. All of
them represent influential mining
companies. Instead of rushing
over, the ground and covering the
whole territory in about two days,
they have made a systematic
examination, and in some cases
their visit has extended for several
weeks. This shows that they
considered the district rich enough
to spend their valuable time in.
Although no new deals have been
made to date, owners of mining
properties should not be too
impatient." It often takes consid
erable time to formulate plans for
a large undertaking. The engin
eei'8 are coming in; they see for
themselves the possibilities of the
oamp, which is an assurance that
the mineral wealth will be developed.
McMorris Well Pleased With
LeRoy Showings
W. G. McMorris, manager ofthe
Kitsault-Eagle Mines Ltd. returned
from an inspection of the LeRoy
property during the week. He
was greatly enthused with the
tremendous large ore deposits and
predicted that a big mine will be
developed there in the future. The
property extends to the summit of
LeRoy mountain, and the ore body
traverses the highest peak.
Anyox Shipping Notes
S. S. Marmion arrived at 7.30
p.m on Friday from Maple Bay
loaded with 200 tons of Outsider
ore and towing scow Pioneer,
loaded with 1000 tons.
The launch Cuprite left at 10.15
a.m. on Saturday for Alice Arm,
towing a scow loaded with five
Dolly Varden mining cars.
S. S Amur arrived from the
south on Saturday at 7 a.m. loaded
with coking coal, 65 tonsof cement
and 2000 cases of powder.
Tlie S. S. Mogul arrived from
Stewart at 10.40 a.m on Monday,
loaded with Premier ore and concentrates. She loaded copper and
left for the south at 6.35 p.m.
S. S. Amur departed for Maple
Bay and Stewart on Tuesday at 9
a.m.
Makes Overland Trip to Alice Arm
W. A. Talbot assistant district
mining engineer accompanied by
Charlie Gordon of the Naas Valley
arrived in Alice Arm Thursday
evening, coming overland from the
Naas Valley in two days. Mr.
Talbot had been examining the
roads and trails in the Valley and
in order to acquaint himself with
the country decided to walk out to
civilization. Charlie Gordon spent a
few days in town before returning
home, renewing old acquaintances.
1
i     ANYOX NOTES
t ♦■•■+■■■♦ .».+.>..i'4 ■•■♦■#■♦'■'♦■«■ 4 .»»4 ■•■+'■■+1
Mrs. H. O. Cutler' returned on
Friday from a trip south.
Mrs. S. Grimason returned home
on Friday from a vacation spent in
Winnipeg and Toronto.
Mrs. Grolund was an arrival in
town on Friday.
H. Chapman was an arrival on
Friday from Vancouver.
After September 1st. speoial
rates will be given by the week, at
the Alice Arm Hotel during the
fall hunting aud fishing season.
Chris Cane arrived on Friday
from a vacation spent in Vancouver.
Among the arrivals on Friday,
were: B. Matthews, F. McMillan,
F. C. Bell, Mrs. Nechlezza.
Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Foster were
passengers to Prince Rupert on
Monday.
Mr§. H. A. Simmons and child
were southbound passengers on Friday to Vancouver where they will
spend a vacation.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. North, who
have been visiting Dr. and Mrs.
Simmons accompanied Mrs. Simmons south on Friday.
The two leaders in smokes El
Dora cigars, and Bensen and
Hedges cigarettes.
Mr. and Mrs, Chapman were passengers to Prince Rupert on Friday.
Mrs. A. W. Gigot arrived from
Prince Rupert on Friday.
Arrivals from Prince Rupert on
Friday, were: W. Goldbloom, C.
J. Killen, A. R. Davie, Stirling.,
Nicholas, Carson.
Morley Shier, MacKenzie, Ray,
and Flewin were passengers to
south on Friday.
Mrs. L. Ingram and children returned on Monday from a vacation
spent in the south.
Mrs. G. Thompson was an arrival
on Monday from Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Noel and son
returned home on Monday from a
vacation spent in Vancouver and
Vancouver Island points.
Messrs. Crompton and Tinman
returned on Tuesday after looking
over timber limits at Alice Arm.
Miss Janet Morley and Miss Rosie
O'Neill left on Monday for Prince
Rupert, where they will take positions of probation nurses at the General Hospital.
T. Spargo of the mining department, has vacated his position of
mine surveyor, and left for Vancouver to take up studies at the
B. C. University.
Geo, Lace of the General Store
office staff, returned on Monday
from a vacation spent in the south.
Mrs. J. A. Price and family arrived home on Monday from a trip to
Vancouver.
Mrs, Garvey and .family were arrivals on Monday from Vancouver.
Frank Cross arrived home on
Monday from a vacation spent in
Vancouver and southern points.
Among the arrivals from the
south on Monday, were: R.Griffith
J. A. Bray, W. Stanford, E R.
Blakely, H. Marshall.
"The Shunshine Club" held a
meeting on Tuesday, at which two
new members were initiated. The
two Grand Receivers present reported considerable progress since the
previous meeting."
Arrangements are being made by
Mr. T. Gillespie to turn over his
interests at the Beach Cafe to Mrs.
E. Armstrong and Mrs. B. Ellison.
Harry Earde and Geo. Gillispie
are spending a vacation at the
Alioe Arm Hotel.
Frank Stringham left on Tuesday for Alice Ann, where he will
spend a vacation ut Bowman
Lakes in company with Harry
Selfe, Al. LaFortune, and Alex
Davie, wiio have already spent
some time there.
Theodore Asimus and Frank
Dresser are spending a vacation at
Alice Arm.
Mrs. J. A. McMaster and children returned on Tuesday from a
vacation spent iu Prince Rupert.
Mrs. R. J. Manning and children
returned on Tuesday from a vaca
tiou spent at Stewart.
Miss Mary Maoknight, who has
been spending a vacation with her
parents, returned to her school
duties in tlie south on Tuesday.
Norman Cowan was a passenger
to Vancouver on Tuesday.
Cecil Parmiter was a _ passenger
to Prince Rupert on Tuesday.
Mrs. T. GilmouK left on Tuesday
for Vancouver, having received
word that her mother is seriously
ill.
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Manzer and
family who have spent the past
seven weeks at Alice Arm, returned
home on Tuesday thoroughly satisfied with their summer vacation.
Mr. Manzer is a devoted diciple of
Isaac Walton, and caught numerous fish from every stream in the
Alice Arm district. He arrived
home with a string of twenty-eight
all of which he caught the evening
before his departure.
Mr. Frank Stringham has sold
out his business of both barber
shops at the Beach to Mrs. Bryden.
Mr. Stringham has been a resident
at Anyox for the last 11 years, and
is relinquishing his business here on
account of his health.
Steve Morrison Returns from
South
Steve Morrison arrived on Saturday from a trip to Vanoouver.
He was in attendance at the Alice
Arm mineral display at the Vancouver Exhibition during a considerable portion of tlie time, and
stated that the display was one of
the chief attractions in the mining
section of the exhibition.
Exhibition of Alice Arm
Ores Arouses Interest
in South
The Alice Arm ore display at the
Vancouver Exhibition received a
great deal of attention states S.
Morrison, who arrived from the
south last week. Mining engineers,
managers of mining companies,
promoters etc. evinced great interest in the ores, and a multitude of
questions were asked Jack Morrison
and his brother Steve who were in
attendance during the exhibition.
The ore display was a great boost
for the camp, and bigger results are
attained by exhibiting our ores than
most local people realize.
At the close of the exhibition the
specimen from the LaRose mine,
which obtained second prize was
assayed, and gave the following
high returns.
No. 1. sample; gold .10 ozs;
silver 2,566.4 ozs. per ton, a total
of $1,644.50 per ton.
No. 2 sample; gold .08 ozs;
silver 934.2 ozs. at total value of
$597.81 per ton.
This ore was taken out during
mining operations at a depth of 140
feet from the surface.
Police Court Docket Is
Heavy During Week
Several persons were convicted
at the Anyox Police Court during
the week charged with infringements of the Liquor Act. The
oharges included giving liquor to a
drunken person, and supplying
liquor to minors. Fines of $50.00
and $2.50 costs, and $300.00 and
costs were imposed,
Gow Wing, a Chinaman, appeared before stipendary magistrate R.
M. McGusty on Friday, charged
with supplying liquor to Herbert
Martin and Oswald Alexander, both
Indians, of Naas Harbor.
Accused was found guilty and
fined $100.00 or three month's hard
labor, the fine was paid. Both
Indians were fined $5 each or 14
clays hard labor for being drunk,
the fine was paid.
Wong Hing. appeared before
stipendary magistrate R. M. McGusty on Thursday, charged with
assaulting his brother. He was
convicted and fined #10.00 -mid
costs.
Election  of  Officers   Alice
Arm Chamber of Mines
The annual election of officers of
the Alice Arm branch of the
British Columbia Chamber of
Mines will be held on Tuesday
evening at 8 p.m. sharp. The
meeting will be held in the Anglican church building and everyone
interested in the welfare of the
camp are earnestly requested to be
present. Other important business
will be transacted in addition to
the election of officers.
Sabicribe to jrour local Paper NOV. ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,    Friday,   September   3rd.   1926
Alice Arm & Anyox Herald
Issued every Saturday at Alice Arm
Alice Arm and Anyox $2.50 Yearly
Other Parts of Canada, $2.75
British Isles and United States, $3.00
Notices for Crown Grants - - $.10.00
Land Notices- - - - $10.00
Coal Notices - - : - - $0.00
Transient Advertising; 50c. per inch
Contract Rates on Application.
E. MOSS, Editor.iwid Publisher.
Alice Arm people who have
recently returned from a visit south
are 100 per cent, more optimistic
regarding the early development
of the camp upon their return than
when they departed. Mining men
of the south are confident that Alice
Arm is next in line for big developments, and the camp is receiving a
great deal of attention. Events
are being watched with great
interest. Alice Arm is recognized
as a camp of vast mining potentialities, and its early development on
a big scale will shortly be consummated. The splendid ore display at
the Vancouver Exhibition of the
past two years have played an
important part in attracting attention, and the conservative programme of publicity being carried
out by the local branch of the
Chamber of Mines will keep alive
the interest aroused, and also
acquaint those who have not heard
of our large mineral resources.
Big Ore Showings  on
Marnmot Metals Will
be Tunnelled
Portland Canal News
Angus McLeod, managing director of the Marmot Metals Mining
Co., visited the property this week
and reports having found very satisfactory progress being niade.
This season's exploration work,
he said, has resulted in the location
of four parallel veins, on the east
end of the property, striking up and
down the mountain in a large
mineralized zone.
Up until the last week work has
been confined to tracing these out,
and open cutting, though the first
part of the season necessitated considerable trail building in order to
get to them. One of the center
veins has been traced from the top
of the mountain down over very
steep ground to near the bottom of
tho hill, a-differenoe in elevation of
some 2000 feet. Three cuts on this
vein recently sampled by a competent and thoroughly experienced
person independent of the company
gave the following results: $30.50;
115.50 and $19.50. These three
cuts varied in width from five to
15 feet. The values were in gold,
silver and zinc, with the latter mineral predominating.
Mr. McLeod stated that he is
increasing the crew immediately
for the purpose of driving two
tunnels, one on each of two veins
in order to explore these showings
underground as much as possible
before snow flies. Both these
tunnels will be in ore from the
portals and will gain about one
foot of depth for eaoh foot driven.
They are roughly 150 feet apart.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Crawford of
Stewart announce the engagement
of their daughter, Edith Margaret,
to Mr. Louis Behiison, the wedding
to take place on Oct. 4.
' A man and a strange umberella
often go without saying.
H.   M.   SELFE
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
ANYOX
HARRY  SMITH
LIMITED
REAL ESTATE
For. Information Write Us
P. O. Box 45, Alice Arm, B. C.
M. M. STEPHENS & Co. Ltd.
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
WRITTEN ANYWHERE
The oldest Financial Office in Northern B. C.
Office:  PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
B. P. O. ELKS
Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets every second and fourth Monday of
the month
Hall for rent for dances, social functions, etc.
on application to club manager
rm
Residental and
Business Lots
ALICE ARM
MINING AND
DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY
^
That the town of Alice Arm will become a mining centre of
considerable importance within the next few years is the
opinion of numerous influential mining men who have recently
visited the camp. The mining industry is undoubtedly on the
eve of big developments, which means a big payroll and a
much larger town. Increased activity will result in placing
o-ood residental and business lots at a premium. At the present
time lots can be secured at attractive prices and on easy terms.
RESIDENTAL   LOTS   FROM   $200  TO   $300
BUSINESS    LOTS    FROM    $200    TO   $500
Alice Arm Lots offer a sound investment.   For particulars apply
S.   DUMAS
Agent for the Alice Arm Mining & Development Co.
Js-
-Ja
Carlton Cafe
Alice Arm
If you desire that comfortable
feeling which comes after partaking of a well cooked appetising meal, try the Carlton,
and you will become one of
our boosters
NEAR PIONEER HOTEL
J. TRINDER   -   Prop.
Al. Falconer
Alice Arm
Baggage, Freighting, Pack
and Saddle Horses
COAL & FINISHED LUMBER
Slab Wood Cut any Length
Every Order Given
Immediate Attention
HE
3E3E
30E
Dr.  MIDDLETON'S
WHOLE WHEAT FOOD PRODUCTS
Including the celebrated 100 per cent whole wheat Irondized
Flour and bread. Whole wheat health cookies, in sealed
half pound packages.     Grain cereal and Pancake  Flour  for
breakfast.
All goods  guaranteed, and money   refunded  if  not satisfactory
Watch for additional articles each week
BRUGGY'S STORE
Alice Arm
BE3E
3DE
STEAMSHIP AND TRAIN
SERVICE
S. S. Prince George or Prince Rupert, leaves
Anyox each Saturday 1.00 a.m., via Stewart,
and S. S. Prince Charles leaves each Tuesday
p.m. via. Massett, for Prince Rupert, Vancouver,
Victoria,   Seattle,
S. S. Prince John leaves Prince Rupert, fortnightly for Vancouver,
via South Queen Charlotte Island ports.
PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE FROM PRINCE RUPERT
Trains leave Prince Rupert daily except Sunday at 11.30 a.m., for
Jasper, Edmonton, Winnipeg, direct connections for all points
East and Smith.
Use Canadian National Express for Money Orders, Foreign
Cheques, etc., also for your next shipment.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or further information, apply to any Canadian
National Agent, or to R. F. Mc-NAUGHTON, District Passenger Agent
Prince Rupert, B. C.
rr
^
LAUNCH,  "AWAKE"
Leaves Alice Arm for Anyox 9 a.m.
Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays
Returning Same Days at 3 p.m.
SPECIAL   TRIPS   BY   ARRANGEMENT
i^-
~4
SYNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vaoant, unreserved, aurveyed
Crown landi may be pre-empted by
Brltlih subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjeots, conditional upon residence, occupation,
j.nd Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regu-
atlons regarding pre-emptions la
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained tree of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Viotoria, B.C., or to any Oovernment Agent.
Reoords will be granted covering
only land suitable for aijrlcultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 fe6t per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
,o be addressed to the Land Com-
nlssloner of the Land Recording Division, In which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
:'orms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and Improvements made
to value of (10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHA8E
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
tor agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is $6
per aore, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Furtfier information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purohased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESITE   LEASES
TJnsurveyod areas, not exoeeding 20
aores, may be leased as homesifes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
orootcd in the first year, title belnij
obtainable after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
|   " LEASES
Fdr fazing and industrial purposes areas not eacseding 840 acres
may be leased by one person or k
company.
_.        GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Provinoe la divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Oraalng Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially free,
permit* ar* available for aettlers,
camper* and traveller*, up J# ten
head.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
The Mineral Province of Western Canada
The Herald
$2.50 a Year
Anyox & Alice, Arm
Aggregate Value of $920,919,628
The substantial progress of the Mining industry of this Province is strikingly exhibited in the following
figures, whioh show the,vaj,ue of production for successive live-year periods: For all yeans to 1895, inclusive $94,547,241; forfive years, 1896 1900, $57,607,967; for live years, 1901-1905, $96,507,968; for five years-
1906-1910, $125,534,474; for five years, 1911,1915, $142,072,603; for five years, 1916-1920, $189,922,725;
1921, $28,066,641; tor Mewear 1922, $35,158,843; for 1923, $41,304,320; for 1924. $48,704,604, and for 1925,
$61,492,242.       •   ';''' ffj,,,,'1
. Production Last Ten Years, $404,649,375
Lode mining has oliTy'fe in progress for about 25 years, and only about one-half of the Province has
been even prospected; 200,000 square miles of unexplored mineral bearing land are open for prospecting.
The Mining Laws of this Province are more liberal and the fees lower than those of any other Province!
in the Dominion, or any Colony in the British Empire.
Mineral locations are granted to discoverers for nominal fees.
Absolute Titles are obtained by developing such properties,  security of which  is guaranteed   bji
Crown Grants.
Practically all British Columbia Mineral Properties upon which development work has been done
are described in some one of the Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines. Those oon'aiderhij
mining investments should refer to such reports. They are available without charge on application;
to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B. C. Reports covering each of the six mineral Survej
Districts are published separately, and are available on application. Reports of the Geologica
Survey of Canada, Winch Building, Vancouver, are recommended as valuable sources of information
Full information, together with Mining Reports and Maps, may be obtained gratis bv addressini
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, British Columbi 1
V
ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD,   Friday,   September   3rd.   1926
Increased Output   Britannia
Mine
Britannia has made some increase
in production during the quarter
ending June 30th over the previous
quarter. Copper production was
9,016,120 lbs. A dividend of 75
cents per share was paid on July
15th.
The customs concentrator at Trail
I established last year by the Consolidated, is a factor in increased
activity in small mines. Heretofore, zinc ores were penalized 50
| cents a unit over eight per cent.
Now there is a charge of only $3
per ton for concentrating, and the
shipper gels paid for both lead and
zinc at the market prices. This
service helps the small operator
who cannot afford a concentrator.
Bullion Silver Made at Mine
Among exhibits at the Vancouver exhibition display of the B. C.
Chamber of Mines were several
bricks, aggregating 6000 ounces
and 64 ounces gold, shown by the
Horn Silver Mining Corporation,
of this city. This company's property is in the Similkameen district, and has been worked for about
a year by the present owners,
The silver bricks shown were the
first made direct from the ore without smelting in British Columbia.
Trail Operations Show Big
Profit
Estimated profits of the Consolidated M. & S. Company, Trail, for
the first six months of the present
year are $5,638,640. This amount
is given after the regular deductions
are made.
Why Home-brewed
Beer Can Be Bad
For Your Health
BREWING beer at home, a habit that has
become widespread in the United
States since prohibition deprived the people
of the right to purchase pure and healthful
beer legally and openly, presents difficulties and dangers of which those who
SKgagfi in jt are rar«!y aware.
fOME-BREWED beer can be actually dangerous to those who drink it, for the home
brewer works by rule of thumb, perforce, and
usually has no acquaintance, with or control over
the complex physical: and chemical reactions that
take place in the brewing of beer. Pure beer can
only be made in a modern brewery by scientifically trained brewmasters who have at their disposal the most modern equipment and who are
bound by the most exacting standards.
,?rpHE same materials which, in a modern brewery, are
X made into pure, healthful beer, can become, in the
hands of a home brewer, a raw, incompletely fermented, indigestible and harmful mixture unfit for consumption. But where an established brewery uses only
the highest grade of material—malt and hops—tested for
purity, the home brewer is forced to purchase in stores
imported syrup concoctions of inferior malt and low-grade
hop extracts frequently blended with synthetic essences.
TTie product of such mixtures is always harmful to the
stomach and digestive system and dangerous to drink for
any length of time.
THE home brewer is hampered not only by lack of
knowledge of the science of brewing, but home
equipment does not include the elaborate plant necessary for prolonged sterilization and filtering to assure
a pure, healthful beer free from bacterial infection. In
beer that is the product of a perfectly equipped brewery
all fermentation is complete; in home-brewed beer fermentation continues, and continues after it is consumed.
It is really an explosive mixture, whether in your stomach
or in the bottle, as shown by the way in which bottles
explode and tops are blown off.
TJOME-BREWED beers are usually higher In alcoholic eon-
•* tent than th*y should he. In the beers supplied by the
Amalgamated Breweries to the people of British Columbia
through licensed premises or through government stores the
alcohollo strength Is only i% per cent., the most favorable
strength for the stimulation of the stomaoh toward aiding
digestion. Home-brewed beers also usually contain greater or
less percentages of deadly fusel oil, from whioh properly
brewed, stored and aged beers are free.
ANT physician oan tell of the dangers of home-brewed beer,
from whioh, happily, the people of British Columbia are
free, for they have the privllego of obtaining pure, good beer
made by the Amalgamated Breweries of British Columbia in
plants that are equipped with every faollity for the brewing
of pure beer, perfeotly flavored, well matured and healthful.
Visitors are cordially welcomed at the plantt
of the members of the Amalgamated Breweries of British Columbia: Vancouver Breweries, Limited; Rainier Brewing Co. of
Canada. Limited; Westminster Brewery.
Limited; Silver Spring Brewery, Limited; ana
the Victoria Phoenix Brewing Co. Limited.
I'hia advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Cranby Co's Production
of Copper Running
rfigh
'The Granby Consolidated Mining
Shielting & Power Co. reports for
the quarter ended June 30, 1926,
profit of $461,833 after expenses
arid interest, but before deprecia
tio'ii and depletion. This compares
with a profit of $429,598 in the
preceding quarter and $269,861
iiT'th'e second quarter of 1925.
Profit for the first half of 1926
totalled $891,431 before depreciation and depletion, against $465,821
in the first half of the previous year.
The oompany produced 9,519,032
lb. -of copper, an average of 3,173,-
011 a month, in the second quarter,
against 9,390,890, an average of
3,130,296 lb. a month, in the lirst
quarter or a total of 18,909,922 lb.
of refined copper iu the lirst half
year.
Allenby production for the second
quarter came to 4,374,177 lb. of
copper recovered from milling 153,-
949 tons of copper ore. During the
preceding quarter 3,822.957 lb. of
(.•upper was produced from tlie
treatment of 144,514 tons of ore.
Profits from Allenby operations
during the second quarter amounted to §86.733, compared with $55,-
749 ill1 the first quarter. These
production figures and profits are
not included in Granby statistics
for the quarter.
STOCKS & BONDS
We trade in all LISTED and
UNLISTED STOCKS.  Your
orders promptly attended to
Buyers or Sellers.
ARTHUR  J. BROWN
513 Pender Street W.
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Sey. 5061 /
Member  Vancouver Stock
Exchange
Worthy of your Support
,      THE
Anyox Community League
Reading Room and Library
A wide range of Newspapers,
Magazines and Periodicals on
file.   New books regularly
received.
< Join Up!
Make   the League better
through your influence
USE
GRANBY BENZOL
THE BEST MOTOR FUEL
FOR  SALE BY  THE
GRANBY STORE
ANYOX
HE
3Q
Anyox
Barber Shops
MINE AND  BEACH
□E
r-
Miners!     Miners!
We carry in stock at all times a full
supply of miners' supplies.
Complete Outfits
T.W. FALCONER Alice Arm
GENERAL MERCHANT
_J
r
Latest   Colors   in Silk
Silk Crepe de Chine.   All the latest fancy
colors at $1.75 per yard.
New fancy colors in silk.   A large variety
of patterns at $1.75 per yard.
LEW LUN & CO., General Merchants
West Side of Smelter ANYOX, B. C.
OPEN   UNTIL   10   P.M.
J
KITSAULT CAFE
ALICE ARM
Meals Served at All Hours
BREAD   AND   PASTRY   ALWAYS   FOR   SALE
GUS.   ANDERSON,   Proprietor
L_
-J
EAT   MARKET-
ALICE ARM
WHOLESALE  AND   RETAIL
Dealer in Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats,
Fish and Poultry
W.   A.   WILSON,   Proprietor
□[
3C3DC
3B
Candies, Magazines, Stationery,
Proprietary Medicines, Toilet Articles, Etc.  0
W. M. CummingS,   Aijent for all Vancouver Daily Papers
Post Office Building, Alice Arm
31=101=
313
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED MINING,
SMELTING & POWER Co. Limited
Producers of Copper, Coal, Coke, Benzol and
Ammonium Sulphate
Purchasers of Ores of Copper and Siliceous Ores
of Gold and Silver
MAIN OFFICE:-Anyox, B. C. ALICE   ARM   AND  ANYOX   HERALD,   Friday,   September   3rd.   1926
Beach Cafe
ANYOX
BREAD, CAKES,   PASTRY
De Luxe Ice Cream
SODA   FOUNTAIN
Soft Drinks, Sweet Milk and
Buttermilk
T. GILLESPIE
BLUE FRONT CIGAR
STORE
Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobacco, Soft Drinks
Rooms for rent by Day Week or Month
Geo.  Beaudin
Prop.
FRANK D. RICE
B. C. LAND SURVEYOR
Surveys of Mineral Olaims, Subdivisions, Underground  Surveys,
Etc.
ALICE ARM, B. C.
Order
of Moose
Anyox Lodge No. 1412
Lodge Meets 2nd. and 4th. Wednesday
in each month, at 8 p.m. prompt
Headquarters: Elks' Hall, Anyox
Dictator:
H. Ward
Secretary:
J. W. Webster,
P. 0. Box 407
Phono 320
ANYOX
COMMUNITY
LEAGUE
Beach Recreation Hall:
Pictures:  Tuesdays,
Thursdays, and Saturdays
Mine Recreation Hall:
Pictures:   Wednesdays and
Fridays'
POOL, BILLIARDS, SMOKES, Etc
Help the Organization
that Serves You
MINERAL ACT
(Form P.)
Cebth'icatb Of Improvements
NOTICE
"Climax," and "Climax No. 2,"
Mineral Claims, situate in the Naas
River Mining Division of Cassiar
District. Where located:—On Trout
Creek, Upper Kitsault River, Alice
Arm.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Prank D.
Rice, agent for Olier Besner, Pvee
Miner's Certificate No. 672280, intend,
sixty days from the date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of tlie above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 1st. day of August,
A.D. 1926.
PRANK D. RICE, B.C.L.S.
|   ALICE ARM NOTES ,♦
♦ *f?»+'»+'»4*— ■•■ ♦ .f+««>+.«.+>•■+■«•+.»+.»+■ f
R. D. Escomhe, superintendent
at the Toric arrived on Saturday
from a trip to Stewart, where he
visited the Premier and other
mines.
A. C. H. Gerhardi, arrived on
Saturday from a short visit to
Vancouver
Elmer Ness was a southbound
passenger on Monday for Vancouver, and will probably proceed to the
Boundary country.
Fred Stork, liberal candidate at
the coining election, and twice
elected to represent this riding will
speak in the Coliseum on Monday
evening.
Harry Owen, arrived home on
Saturday after spending the past
few months holidaying in Vancouver.
Mrs. Roland King and son
returned home to Spokane on
Monday, Mr. King intends to spend
a few more weeks here.
Mrs. J. Trinder and daughter
Joan left on Monday for her home
iii Kent, England, where she will
spend the winter with her parents.
Lome Falconer left on Monday
for Vancouver, where he will
rejoin his mother and resume his
studies.
Mrs. F. D. Rice, and family left
on Monday for Prince Rupert after
spending two month's vacation
with Mr. Rice. Mrs. Rice will spend
the coming winter in the northern
metropolis.
Mrs. Al. Falconer and family
returned home on Monday from
Vancouver, where they have spent
a vacation for the past seven
weeks.
H. M. Benjamin and J. Marasky
were arrivals from Vancouver on
Monday.
B. Cranipton arrived on Monday
from Vancouver.
The log carrying barge Drumrock
left for Powell River on Friday
loaded with 875,000 feet b.m. of
ogs. She was towed south by
the tug Cape Scott:
Mr. Woodcock, who has been
spending a vacation with his uncle
F. L. Housley, left on Friday for
Vancouver, where he will take up
his duties as school principal.
history instead of the wildest.
The smoke will still pour from
the Anyox smelter, the roar of the
mill will still continue, and Alioe
Arm will still enjoy increased
prosperity whatever party happens
to sit in the seats of the mighty at
Ottawa.
In 1924, British Columbia
accounted for nearly one-eighth of
the gold, nearly half of the silver,
two-thirds of the copper and most
of the lead. and zinc produced in
Canada.
The Herald job printing department is always anxious to cater to
your wishes. Our prices are right
and our work is right.
The principle apartment in a
gambling house is the anteroom.
Too many marriage are for publication only and not as a guaranty
of good faith.
Anyox Community
League
The Council of the League
meets on the Second and
Fourth Wednesday of each
month, in Recreation Hall,
-   at 7.30 p.m. -
WATER NOTICE
(Diversion and Use)
TAKE NOTICE that The Consolidated Homestake Mining & Development Oo. Ltd., whose, address is 706
Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver,
B. C. will apply for a licence to take
and use one cubic foot per second of
water out of Tumble Creek, which
flows westerly and drains into
Kitsault River, about 300 feet north
of Kitsault River Suspension Bridge.
The water will be diverted from the
stream at a point about 550feet north
50° east of south-west corner of Ruby
Mineral Claim, Lot 4210, and will be
used for wash water for Concentrator
purpose upon the mine described as
Tone Mineral Claim, Lot 935 Cassiar
District. This notice was posted on
the ground the 2nd. day of August,
1926. A copy of this notice and an
application pursuant thereto and to
the "Water Act" will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at Prince
Rupert, B. C. Objections to the application may be filed with the said
Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B. C, within
thirty days after the first appearance
of this notice in a local newspaper.
THE CONSOLIDATED HOME-
STAKE MINING AND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LIMITED
Applicant
By A. 0. H. GERHARDI,
General Manager
'   Agent
f-M- -f-f ♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ -H-+4- -f -H-f ♦ -f ♦♦ ♦
♦
Alice Arm Electric \
LAUNDRY      I
OPPOSITE HERALD OFFICE   t
Clothes Cleaned and Pressed
J. LAIDLAW    -    -    PROP.
("""
Welcome Hotel
Alice Arm
Comfortable Rooms for Rent
Tobacco and Soft Drinks
Pool Tables, Cigars, Cigarettes
A. BEAUDIN, Proprietor
-J
Advertise in the Herald
Sunset Rooming
House
ALICE ARM
First-class Rooms for Rent,
by Day, Week or Month
COLD LUNCHES SERVED
J. THOMAS   -   Prop.
PIONEER
HOTEL
Alice Arm
Comfortable Rooms for Rent
By Day, Week or Month at
Reasonable Rates
N. Sutilovich        Prop.
Election Promises to be
Rattier Tame
The coming election was practiced by the big dailies of the Dominion as being one of the bitterest
fought in the country. We are
now less than two weeks from
election day, and we have not yet
noticed anyone showing any bitter
feelings.
Elections are becoming too fre
quent for anyone to enbitter them
ves, and the politicians are
trying to flog life into a dead horse
when they endeavor to create political excitement twice within
twelve months. Viewed from a
looal angle this election will be
Agent | about one of the tamest affairs in
(r
"%
SfcHOOL DAYS SUIT
SPECIAL
ONE WEEK ONLY
With each Boys' suit we are offering your choice of any pair of Boys' Pants—same
size as suit—in stock, also your choice of a Belt or Tie as well.
EXTRA PANTS AND A TIE OR BELT FREE WITH EACH SUIT
Sizes 24 to 35
A big range of SHIRTS, SWEATERS and PANTS in stock for boys of all ages
School Supplies
NOW ON DISPLAY
Comprising all  modern requirements for the Public or
High School Student.
TEXT BOOKS,
REEVES WATER COLORS
EXERCISE BOOKS,
ERASERS,
PENS AND PEN HOLDERS,
PENCILS,   INK,   CRAYONS,
DRAWING PORTFOLIOS,
SET SQUARES, ETC.
School Days Are
Hard Days On
Boots And Shoes
Try our  LECKIE'S School
Boys' Special
Sizes 11 to 13 $4.00
Sizes  1 to 5 $4.50
Misses and Girls' Black and Tan
high cut shoes $2.85 to $4.00
Boys' and Little Gents' Tan and
Black Elk Scuffer shoes from $2.25
to $2.85
I
Dry Goods Department
Special Sale of Ladies' Corsets
GRANBY  STORES

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