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BC Historical Newspapers

Herald Jan 18, 1930

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 A little paper
with all the
• news and a big   |
circulation
THE HERALD
Published in the interests of Alice Arm and Anyox, B. C.
$2.50 a Year
Alice Arm and j
Anyox. $2.75 to j
all other points, j
i
VOL. 9,   NO. 29
Alice Arm, B. C, Saturday, January 18, 1930
5 cents each,
High
School Win Both
Basketball Games
Of Week
Cold weather, night schools, and,
no doubt, lack of enthusiasm prevent much progress in the senior
basketball division. The Miners
declined to make the trip down on
Wednesday unless for a strictly
league game. Exhibition games
have boen rather too frequent of
late.
A few devoted next-of-kin faced
a winter night to see two girls'
teams contend. Both Beaoh and
High School had only five players
each, but the pace was faster than
usual and the points scored reached a record height, the students
winning at 12-7.   The teams were:
High School: L. Dresser-6, M.
Cloke-2. M. Harriot-4, P. Loudon,
M. Dresser.
Beach Ladies: Mrs. Harmon-2,
Agues Kruzick, P. 0' Neill-2, T.
Gordon-3, T. 0' Neill.
The High and Ex-High opened
the evening with a fair game the
former winning at 3015. Two
points for the winners were the
gift of Roy Dunwoodie on an unlucky rebound. Eligibility rules
will likely affect the future personal of the student's team, and practice will give the Ex-High an even
chance.   The teams were:
Ex-High: Brown-1, Barclay-2,
Gillies-6, Mikele-6, Dunwoodie.
Watson, J. Cloke.   Total-15.
High: Davis-6, Calderoni-11,
Ariiistrong-6, Hill-7, Dodsworth.
Total-30.
Recruits for the season of 1935
were given a chance during the intervals and may be a regular feature hereafter.
Well  Known  Brokers
Records Being
Investigated
The Manitoba municipal and
public utility board last week ordered an audit of the records of
Solloway-Mills Co., Ltd., and also
Stobie, Forlong, and Matthews,
Ltd. The officers of each company
expressed their willingness to turn
their records over to the auditors.
"Our object is to satisfy ourselves
that things are as they should be,"
stated W. R. (Nottingham, chairman of the utility board.
All provinces in Canada will cooperate in strict control of financial and brokerage' firms under a
nation-wide scheme now in process of development, it was revealed last week, by Attorney-General
Ii. H. Pooley. Every province, he
said, will shortly pass identical
legislation enabling their officials
to investigate any financial firm
and to suspend its operations at
any time. Legislation is already
drafted for presentation to the
British Columbia legislature. It
is modelled along lines that are already in effect in Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta.
{Cyril Orme Is Elected
Mayor Prince Rupert
Special to The Herald
Cyril Orme was elected mayor
|of Prinoe Rupert on Thursday by
a majority of 221 over Alderman
f Priidhoniine. Sam Newton, who
, has been mayor of the town for
(about seven terms brought up the
I rear.
Geo. Rudderham, J. H. Pillsbury,
iJaines   Black   and   P. F.  Ptillen
Iwcre elected  aldermen  for a two
I'ear term.   Theo. Collart and P. H
jinzey were elected aldermen for a
|.ne year term.
The  proposal to  dispense with
Ihe provincial police and revert to
city police force was defeated by
112   majority.   Two    money  by-
iws were passed.
Anglican Ladies   Hold   An
Enjoyable Card Party
The Anglican Parish Hall was
the scene last Friday of probably
the most enjoyable card party and
dance yet arranged there.
Nine tables of players competed
at Court Whist, the winners being
Mrs. A. M. Morton and Mr. J.
Munro, with Mrs. M. Eld and Rev.
J.'S. Brayfield claiming the consolation awards. After a nice supper
Mr. John Gillies at the piano and
Mr. C. B. Dennis witli his violin
provided dance numbers for the
rest of the evening.
j      ANYOX NOTES      I
i ♦
Owing to Sickness  Herald
Is Late
Owing to sickness the Herald is
two days late this week. Our
readers can rest assured that every
thing possible was done to get the
paper out on time but it was impossible.
Among the arrivals from Vancouver on Monday were: A. Milne,
N. H. Ryan, J. Morrison, J. Cameron, G. H. Chisholme, M. Bilyan.
Mrs. Murphy was an arrival
from Vancouver on Monday.
Mrs. Geo. Sellers arrived on
Monday to join her husband here.
Mi's. P. MacKaracher was an
arrival from the south on Monday
and will spend holidays here.
W. Braniley, H. Sanning, D. H.
Anderson, E. Smith, A. Knight,
T. Higood, G. Young arrived from
Prince Rupert on Monday.
Mrs. Podchuck and Mrs. Stone
left for Prince Rupert on Monday's
boat.
E. McLean and R. L. Fox left
Monday for Prince Rupert.
Mrs. H. James aud sons left for
Vancouver on Monday on receiving
the news of the death of her
brother.
Mr. and Mrs. Jenson were
among the departures for Vancouver on Monday.
E. C. Stone left for Vancouver
on Monday's boat.
T. A. Cloke arrived home from
the south on Monday.
P. McKenzie arrived from Prince
Rupert on Monday.
Mrs. Shea was a south-bound
passenger on Wednesday.
R. A. Custer of the Bonanza
electrical staff, left for Vancouver
on Wednesday, where he will enter
the employ of the Boeing Aircraft
Company.
J. Warren and Cliff Carlton ar
rived from the south on Wednesday.
Mrs. Clay arrived from the
south on Wednesday.
Mrs. Geo. Bailey arrived home
on Wednesday from a visit south.
Mrs. R. A. Cowdell arrived on
Wednesday from the south, and is
visiting her uncle, Mr. W. F.
Aylward.       *
J. S. McMillan arrived from the
south on Wednesday.
Arrivals from the south on Wednesday, included: Mr. Lenning-
ton, W. Webber, C. A. Nord.
CARD  OF  THANKS
Mr. Richard Deeth and family
wish to extend thanks for the
sympathy accorded them in their
recent bereavement.
The remains of Mrs. R. Deeth
who recently died at Anyox were
shipped to Vancouver Monday for
burial. Mr. R. Deeth and son
Arthur accompanied the body
south.
I. 0. D. E. Hold
Monthly Meeting
The regular monthly meeting of
Collison of Kincolith Chapter I. O.
D. E. was held in the United
Church basement on Tuesday January 7th.
Mrs. Lang, the Regent conducted
the meeting. The meeting was
opened with the prayer of the
Order.
The minutes of the previous
meeting were read and adopted.
The reports of the various committees were duly read.
It'was suggested that the Annual
meeting be held in the evening to
give members with families an
opportunity to attend This was
left for decision at the next meet
ing.
Mesdames, Roy, McRae and
Baillie were selected as scrutineers
for the nomination of officers for
1930, Mrs. Roy acting as convener.
Tea was served by Mesdames, J.
A. D. Stewart, J. Smith and B.
Shelton. The meeting was closed
with the National Anthem.
Britannia Co. Proceed
With Development
Development at the Toric rrliiie
is being pushed ahead by the Britannia Mining and Smelting Co,
Good progress is being made with
the shaft and raise. An excess of
water in the shaft made progress
slow for some time, but a new
pump has been installed which has
speeded up work.
The shaft will be driven a distance of 250 feet. On its completion and also the raise, the Britannia Company will be satisfied regarding extent and richness of the
big ore body.
Mr. Clifton Shea of Anyox
Weds
Alice Arm Notes
T. W. Falconer left on Monday
for Vancouver where he will spend
holidays with Mrs. Falconer and
family,
A. Beaudin left on Monday for
Vancouver. He went south in order to receive advice about his
eyes.
On Tuesday evening, Rev. Father Chartiez of the Roman Catholic
Church, united in marriage Miss
Clare Murphy of White Rock.
B. C. and Mr. Clifton Shea of
Anyox. The bride was attended
by Miss Patricia O'Neill, and the
groom was supported by Mr. John
O'Neill.
The Vancouver  Stock
Exchange Big Provincial Asset
Adcock Wins Billiard
Tournament
The finals of the Christmas billiard handicap were played on
Tuesday evening. Adcock, (plus
25) meeting Ballentine (minus 25)
The former ran out at 250 to 166.
A babel of shouting voices—
scurrying messengers—slips of
paper passed from hand to hand—
figures chalked rapidly on a great
green board—millions of dollars
changing hands. Such is the outwardly confused picture of one of
the most perfect functioning business machines in the world—the
stock exchange.
In the perfection of this smoothly operating system, has gone
more than 150 years  of experience
improvement born in the throes
of tremendous trading—volnme of
business transacted which would
leave in a befuddled daze, the old-
fashioned leisurely broker of the
English coffee house days.
Colorful History
The first stock exchange was
founded in London in 1773, a century and half ago. Previous to this
brokers held casual meetings in
some nearby coffee house. They
dealt principally in government
securities.
The exchange grew rapidly. It
established affiliations with the
Dutch and soon assumed international importance. As volume of
business grew, changes were imperative to keep pace with speeding
business. Plans were tried and
rejected. Other systems submitted
which proved a success. The telegraph and telephone gave wings to
commerce. Improved cable service
speeded international trading. The
ticker flashed market quotations to
distant points. The London stock
exchange became the focal point of
international commerce. Today it
deals in securities of companies in
every part of the globe. The pressure of such a tremendous volume
of business could only result in the
evolution of an almost perfect system.
When the Vancouver stock exchange was formed in 1907, under
Provincial Government charter, it
started with the full advantage of
those years of experience in older
exchanges. There were but twelve
seats. Its growth was rapid. Today it has assumed, with other
great public institutions, a vital
place in the commerce of Western
Canada. Witness its phenominal
growth. Volume of business in
1925 was $890,304.75; in 1928,.
$36,580,967.50, and in 1929 it was
$129,748,630.16.
Continued on Page 2
Birth At Alice Arm
A baby boy was born to Mr. and
Mrs. W. M. Stephen at Alice Arm
on Tuesday, January Hth.
The January meeting of the
P. T. A. will be held on Monday
evening in the United Church
Hall. Among the business to
come before the meeting are some
proposed changes in the constitution. There will be music and refreshments. All adults who are
interested in education are invited. ALICE  ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD, Saturday.    January   18. 1930
The Vancouver Stock
Exchange Big Provincial Asset
Continued from page 1
Simple in Principal
While the ramifications of stock
exchange trading are intricate and
far-reaching, the basis of its operation is simple The stock exchange
is a market place for the buying and
selling of stocks. The client places
his selling order for stock with his
broker. This order is transported
to the "floor" of the exchange,
where it is offered for sale by the
broker's representative, Should
another broker hold a buying order
for this stock at market, the sale is
completed and recorded by the
exchange. The price paid for the
stock is immediately chalked up on
the board and broadcast by telephone and ticker. This becomes
the official quotation for this particular stock.
The prices of stock are governed
by supply and demand. Buying
and selling orders set the price.
The investing public controls the
price. When buying orders pour
in and selling orders are few, prices
rise. The price quotation for a
stock is no more or less than what
the public wills.
As an institution, the Vancouver
stock exchange owns no stock in
any company, sponsors no stock
flotation, favors no broker, expresses no opinion about individual
stocks. It accepts no responsibility
for the rise and fall of prices ... it
does seek to prevent price manipulation unfair to the investors.
It maintains rigid rules governing
its members.
Exchange Brings Capital
When an investor buys stock, his
act converts capital into mining, oil
and industrial enterprises. His
purchase is not merely a stock certificate. This investment stands for
machinery and equipment, sinking
of  shafts,   building  of  roads  and
camps, busy smelters, factories,
payrolls. The result of such activity is the development of natural
resources, the creation of new
Wealth with consequent stimulation
to trade and the establishment of
thriving wholesale houses, retail
stores, farms, prosperous workmen.
The mining industry alone has
invested capital in this province of
$120,000,000; it spends vast sums
on fuel, equipment and provisions;
pays annually in wages $30,000,-
000, and employs 18,000 workmen.
According to Bulletin No. 2, issued
by the Provincial Department of
Mines, the gross mineral production of British Columbia during the
past year created a new high record
being estimated at $70,030,976, an
increase over the previous year of
$4,658,393. Copper production exceeded 100,000,000 pounds, a record.. Structural materials output is
estimated at $3,800,000, an increase'
of 14 per cent as compared with
1928.
A Public Institution
The stock exchange plays an important part in diverting the flood
tide of capital to British Columbia
enterprises. Through its members,
the facts of investment opportunities in B. C. are known throughout
the world. The stock exchange
makes an investment in stock a
liquid asset. Stock has a market
ibility impossible without an ex
change.
Every stock listed on the exchange
is scrutinized as to proper capital
ization, reputation of the directors
of the company and soundness of
the enterprise. Each stock is subject to removal from the listings,
should such action best serve investors.
This great public institution plays
an important part in creating public
confidence, in safeguarding the
investor, in speeding up and improving the trading in stocks. It
is an instrument controlled by the
public and for the public good. It
is a powerful force in increasing
British Columbia's prosperity.
British Columbia
Department of Mines
British Columbia, the Mineral Province of Canada,
has produced approximately $1,184,200,000.00 worth
of mineral products.
Mineral Production year 1928   $65,372,583.00
Estimated Production year 1929 $70,030,976.00
The Preliminary Review and Summary of
Mining Operations for the Year 1929
Now is available, and may be obtained, together with
copies of the Annual Reports, Bulletins, etc., upon
application to
THE HON. THE MINISTER OF MINES,
VICTORIA, B. C.
Government May Broadcast
By Radio
National Radio Broadcasting has
been recommended in Canada and
if the Dominion should adopt it,
one of the courses it will likely give
will be that of agricultural and home
economics. Canada is a farming
country and it is essential that the
farmers and homemakers receive a
program. It is probable this program would be prepared by the
Department of Agriculture and
would be correlated so as to give
farmers in each district technical
and economic information which is
locally adapted to their particular
needs.
Excursion   Fares   Canadian
National Steamships
Effective December 25th, a substantial reduction will be made in
round trip fares from Anyox to
Prince Rupert, Vancouver and Victoria. Fare Anyox to Prince Rupert return will be $13.35; Anyox,
to Vancouver or Victoria and return $53.35. Tickets will be on
sale up to Februarv 28, 1930 with
final return limit March 31, 1930.
Purchase tickets from Purser on
steamer.
MINING CAMP SUPPLIES
A COMPLETE SERVICE
Powder. Caps, Fuse, Steel and Tools.   Rain test Clothing,
Stanfield's Underwear. Hand-made Boots.   A full line of
Quality Groceries for Mining needs.
BRUGGY'S STORE
Alice Arm
Ht=
3DE
3BE
30
KEEP WARM
We have a Large Selection of Men's Heavy Clothing for Outdoor Wear, including:
Heavy Woollen Underclothes, Socks, Gloves,
Sweaters, Heavy Mackinaw Coats and Pants,
Heavy Woollen Shirts, Rubber Shoes & Leather
Shoes in all styles. Overcoats for Dress Wear.
Also Heavy Blankets to keep out the cold while
you are asleep
fl
LEW  LUN  & Co.
General Merchants, Anyox
West side of Smelter
OPEN   UNTIL   10   P.M.
-J
A POWERf HI AID
to PAYROI1BUIMHNG
THE Vancouver Stock Exchange Is
the machinery which converts
capital into mining, oil and industrial
enterprises employing Western Canada
labor. When investors buy listed stocks,
their purchases represent machinery,
shafts, roads and camps, smelters,
factories, payrolls. The result of such
activity is the development of natural
resources, the creation of new wealth,
thriving wholesale houses, retail stores,
farms, prosperous workmen.
The mining industry in this province
alone pays annually in wages . 30,000,000
and employs 18,000 workmen.
What part does the Vancouver Stock
Exchange play in this activity, this
enlarging of our payrolls?
The Exchange provides a ready market
for securities of value. This encourages
the investor to participate in those
meritorious enterprises that have contributed to the development of British
Columbia, her Industries and payrolls.
If no such market were available,
Investors would be reluctant to place
funds in securities which would remain
"frozen." The activity of this market
represents the public's desire to buy
and sell securities and keeps every
investor posted as to the cash value of
his holdings and the success of the
industries those holdings represent.
The Stock Exchange requires that every
stock listed on the Exchange be scrutinized as to capitalization, directors,
soundness of the enterprise.
Through members of the Exchange,
British Columbia's investment opportunities are advertised, world-wide
interest of capital aroused.
The Vancouver Stock Exchange thus
plays its part in creating confidence and
in diverting capital to British Columbia
enterprises. The Exchange is a powerful
force in increasing your prosperity, in
building payrolls.
ii
V.S.E. 3*240
This advertisement is published by Members oi tke Vancouver Stock Exchange in order to
disseminate information concerning the functions of a Stock Exchange and the Business of
Buying and Setting Securities* ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD.  Saturday.    January   18. 1930
White Civilization Kills
Off Eskimos
The Department of Interior,
alarmed by reports from agents in
the Arctic and sub-Arctic, is studying ways and means of circumventing the threatened extinction of the
Esquimo in Canada.
Six thousand Esquimo residents
of Canada live along the northern
coast line of the Dominion of Canada, and according to information
'reaching the capital, the northward
march of civilization imperils their
existence. The problem is difficult
of solution for many ailments, considered trivial among white people,
prove fatal to the Arctic native.
He turns, says a statement issued
by the Department, the advantage
of trade with the white people into
an agency for his own destruction.
Despite his kindly disposition and
good-hcartcdncss he is a great killer. With his newly acquired rifle
he shoots all tbe game he can lincl
and ultimately will transform a naturally bountiful country into a land
of hunger.
The Esquimo is a practical as
well as colourful asset to the Dominion. Stretched along the northern coast line he is increasingly im-
potrant as the guide and agent of
the white man in an area where
the white man cannot long exist on
his own resources. But civilization, it is said, does one of three
things to the Esquimo; it absorbs
him, kills him, or drives him farther into the North.
The Home Oil Company, brought
into production through the expenditure of Vancouver business men,
paid its 4th dividend of 20 cents
per share to shareholders of record
December 31st, payable January
20th, 1930.
"Was Harold's wedding a swell
affair?"
"Positively. They even used
puffed rice."
Canadian Candy Bill Is
Enormous
The aunual candy bill of the
Dominion of Canada as issued by
the Department of Commerce represents a large outlay of money for
confectionery sugar products. For
candy, confectionery and chewing
gum the amount spent in the last
year amounted to $53,128,000 and
this amount is nearly the average
of the past eight years. Candy
and confectionery include biscuits,
chocolate cocoa, ice cream, pop
corn, and sugar products.
There were 12,486 employees of
these manufactures and tbe amount
spent in the wages was seven and a
half million dollars. The capital
invested is $50,000,000.
"Wall Street has no heart!" exclaimed the broker.
"Oh yes it has," replied his wife.
"I was just reading that bonds
dropped in sympathy with stocks."
New Mining Companies Are
Incorporated
Incorporations last week include
that of the Taku Mines Co. Ltd.,
with capitalization of $5,000,000
and head office in Vancouver which
will operate mining properties in
Taku camp and elsewhere in the
province.
The Babine Silver King Mining
Co., Ltd., with head office in Vancouver, was also incorporated with
capitalization of three million
shares at no par value.
"I hate those impromptu complexions, don't you?"
"What do you mean?"
"Those who make up as they go
WRIGHT & HINTON
LAND SURVEYORS
P.   O.   BOX  1604
PRINCE   RUPERT
MINERAL CLAIMS
'r
"\
JOIN The Community
E^EEEE       League
FOR THE CHILDREN
1. Books and Magazines
2. Good Movies at Low Prices
3. Supervised Play Indoors
4. Outdoor Playing Grounds
5. Summer Camp and Bathing Beach
6. Physical Education in School
7. Free Seasonal Treats
YOUR MEMBERSHIP WILL HELP
JOIN   THE  COMMUNITY  LEAGUE
^
J
rs
■\
FREE!
A Beautiful Gold Trimmed Cup and Saucer
with Every Pound
BRAID'S
BEST
TEA
ORANGE PEKOE, THE
FINEST TEA IN
CANADA
BRAID'S
BLUE LABEL
TEA
A POPULAR TEA AT
A POPULAR PRICE
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
THE COFFEE THAT
MADE OUR
REPUTATION
TAKE   NO   SUBSTITUTE
9
Braid Tuck & Co. Ltd.
Vancouver, B C.
Vi==
LAND ACT
Notice of Intention to Apply
to Purchase Land
In the Alice Ann Division of the
Land Recording district of Prince
Rupert and situate about two miles
ii]) the North-east Fork road from
Alice Arm, adjoining the North-east
Fork of the Kitsault River.
Take notice that I, Cornelius
Marshall Smith of Alice Arm, B. 0.,
occupation, miner, intend to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands;—
Commencing at a post planted tit
the North-west corner of Lot 57, Kitsault Flats, thence 20 chains westerly;
thence 20 chains southerly; thence 20
chains easterly; thence 20 chains
northerly and containing 40 acres
more or less.
CORNELIUS  MARSHALL SMITH
Dated November 26th. 1029
MINERAL ACT
(Form F.)
Certificate of  Improvements
NOTICE
"Easterly" and "Silver Bow" Mineral Claims, situate in the Naas River
Mining Division of Cassiar District.
Where located:—in the upper Kitsault Valley and lying East of and
adjoining the Ruby Mineral Claim
Lot 4210.
TAKE NOTICE that we, Olier
Besner, Free Miner's Certificate No.
11897-D, and Thomas Shackleton, Free
Miner's Certificate No. 13267-D, intend,
sixty days from the date hereof, to
apply to" the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements foi- the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claims.
And further take notice thataction,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
• Dated this  25th.   day of  Octobor,
A. D. 1929.
OLIER BESNER
THOMAS  SHACKLETON
MINERAL
(Form
ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
New World No. 3, B.J.No. 2, B.J.
No. 3, and B. J. No. 4 Mineral Claims,
situate in the Naas River Mining Division of Cassiar District.
Where located;—on Jones Creek
about two miles from its mouth, and
about six miles from Alice Arm,
TAKE NOTICE that we, (Canada
Permanent Trust (Jo., committee, for
Beverly E. Jones.)
Free Miner's Certificate No. 11054-D,
intend, sixty days from the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a Certificate of Improvements for
the purpose of obtaining a Crown
Grant of tbe above claims.
And further take notice thataction,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 23rd. day of October,
A. D. 1929.
CANADA PERMANENT TRUST
COMPANY
MINERAL  ACT
(Form F)
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
"Summit No. 23," and "Camp Bird"
Mineral Claims, situate in Hie Naas
River Mining Division of Cassia! District,
Where located:—on North end of
summit of McGrath Mountain.
TAKE NOTICE that I. A. Shan-
beck, Free Miner's Certificate No.
11090-D, intend, sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
And further take notice thai action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 23rd. day of October,
A. D. 1029.
A.  SHANBECK.
Ir"
STEAMSHIP AND TRAIN
SERVICE
Sailings from Anyox for Prince Rupert and Vancouver via Stewart each Wednesday at 12.00
midnight.
For North and South  Queen Charlotte Islands
fortnightly
PASSENGER TRAIN  SERVICE FROM  PRINCE RUPERT
Trains leave Prince Rupert Monday, Wednesday, Saturday 11.30 a.m.,
for Jasper, Edmonton, Winnipeg, direct connections for all  points
East and South.
For Atlantic Steamship Sailings or further information, apply to an) , Canadian
National Agent, or to R. F. McNAUGHTON, District Passenger Agent
Prince Rupert, B. C.
-J
Alice Arm
The Bonanza Silver
Camp of B. C.
We invite you to investigate the mining- shares now
being offered in Alice Arm properties and recommend
Kitsault-Eagle Silver Mines Ltd. (N.P.L.)
British Colonial Securities Ltd.
Suite 312, Standard Bank Building, Vancouver
Alice Arm Representative:   A. McGuire
\~
THE ALICE ARM MEAT MARKET
VV. A. WILSON, Proprietor
WHOLESALE  AND   RETAIL
Dealers in Fresh, Salt, and Smoked Meats,
Fish, Poultry, Butter and Eggs
Equipped with  Modern  Cold Storage Plant
L-
=y
ADVERTISE IN THE HERALD ALICE   ARM   AND   ANYOX   HERALD. Saturday.    January   18.  1930
Canadian Mineral Production Mounting
Every Year
Total metal production of Canada
for 1(12!) will amount to over $161,-
000,000 according to a compilation
ol' government reports and production records available, made by the
Financial News Bureau. The
year 11)30 will witness another
large increase. The above figures
take into consideration only the
provinces of Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. At present
production in Canada other than
in these provinces is negligible,
although the Maritimes and other
parts of the Dominion will, in the
near future, enter the arena as
mineral producing areas. These
figures do not include production
of such non-metallic minerals as
coal, asbestos and oil building
materials, etc., but refer to gold,
silver and other precious metals,
cobalt, copper, lead, zinc and
nickel. Metal production in 1928
aggregated $128,500,000 and output of all minerals was $274,000-
000.
Employment in Canada during
1929 reached a new record, the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics
announced in a report which listed
6700 firms employing a monthly
average of 1.020,035 persons.
There were twenty thousand
more employed in the Dominion on
December 1 than at the corresponding date in 1928
Al. Falconer
Alice Arm
Baggage, Freighting, Pack
and Saddle Horses
COAL & FINISHED LUMBER
Slab Wood Cut any Length
Every Order Given
Immediate Attention
ir
Life can not become entirely
conventional while there are country editors. Said the editor of the
Timmins (Out.) Advance in a recent issue: "The Northern Tribune of Kapuskasing started out as
a vory bright little paper. Recently it seems to have become red
hot. It appears as if it may go to
blazes."
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR AOT
Notice of Application for Consent to
Transfer of Beer Licence
Notice is hereby given that, on the,
1st. day of February next, the undersigned intends to apply to the Liquor
Control Board for consent to.transfer
half of Beer Licence Number 1585 and
issued in respect of premises being
part of a building known as the Alice
Arm Hotel, situate at Alice Arm, B.
C. upon tbe lands described as Lot No.
3643, Cassiar, Prince Rupert Land
Registration District, in the Province
of British Columbia, from Olaf Evind-
sen to .Mrs. Sven K. Evindseii of Alice
Arm. British Columbia, the transferee.
Dated at Alice Arm this 1th. day
of January, 1980. i
OLAF EVINDSEN
MRS. SVEA K. EVINDSEN
Art Needle Work
D. M. C. Embroidery Thread, all
shades, 5 c.
Stamped    Pillow   Cases,   Luncheon
Sets, Centres, Etc.
All kinds of Stamping done
Mrs. B. R. WILSON,
ALICE  ARM, B. C
M. M. STEPHENS & Co. Ltd.
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
WRITTEN ANYWHERE
The oldest Financial Office in Northern B. C.
Office:  PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
BUILDING LOTS
ALICE ARM
Business Lots from $200 to
8500
Residential Lots from $200
to $300
Robertson & Dumas
Agents for Alice Arm Mining
and Development Co.
DC
ji pa      ii ncnBcnac
3l^=]C
3D
Candies, Stationery, Proprietary
j Medicines, Toilet Articles, Etc.
W. M. CummingS,   Agent for all Vancouver Daily Papers
Post Office Building, Alice Ann
DC
3C3PC
n*
IF
"^
Winter Clothing
We carry a Full Line of Men's Clothing
for Winter Wear, including Mackinaw
Shirts and Pants, Waterproof Jumpers
and Overalls, Hats,  Etc.
T. W. FALCONER Alice a™
GENERAL  MERCHANT
V:.
J
B.  P. O.  ELKS
Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland
ANYOX LODGE No. 47
Meets every second and fourth Monday of
the month
Hall for rent for dances, social functions, etc.
on application to club manager
FIRE, LIFE AND ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Acadia Fire Insurance Co.
Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada.
Ontario Equitable Life and Accident
Insurance Co.
RESIDENT AGENT:
Wm. T. TAMKIN
Mine   ...       -   Anyox, B. C.
H.   M.  SELFE
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
ANYOX
Office:    Opposite Liquor Store
r
"i
PIONEER MESS
CAFE
ANYOX B.  C.
Bread,  Cakes, Pastry,
Catering
SPECIAL DINNERS
ARRANGED ON REQUEST
PHONE 273
L-
_l
ALICE ARM
FREIGHTING
COMPANY
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
Puck Trains, Saddle Horses
and Heavy Teams
No Contract too Large or
too Small
MILES DONALD Manager
MINERAL AOT
(Form P.)
CliUTlKICA'l'lS   OP   hll'UoVNMUNTS
NOTICE
"Basin," "Basin No. 1," "Basin No.
2," and Basin No.'8" Mineral Claims,
situate in the Naas River Mining Division of the Oassiar District. Where
located: about 17 miles up the Kitsault River and ii miles East of it.
TAKE NOTIOE that the Angus
McLeod Estate, Free Miner's Certificate No. 82829D, intend, sixty days
from the date Hereof, to apply to the
Mining Recorder for a Certificate of
Improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 8th. dav of January,
A. D. 1930.
THE ANGUS McLEOD ESTATE
L. H. HINTON, Agent.
Advertise in The
Herald
r~
PIONEER
HOTEL
Alice Arm
Comfortable Rooms for Rent
By Day, Week or  Month at
Reasonable Rates
N. Sutilovich        Prop.
L-
-J
Anyox Community
League
The Council of the League
meets on the Second and
Fourth Wednesday of each
month, m Recreation Hall,
at 7.30 p.m.
KITSAULT CAFE
Alice Arm
MEALS SERVED  AT ALL
HOURS
Bread and Pastry Always for
Sale
Gus Anderson
Proprietor
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
EXTRA TROUSERS FREE
SPECIAL OFFER BETWEEN JANUARY  1st. TO  31st.
What does an Extra Pair or Trousers mean to a Suit ?
Answer:  It means double life for the Suit.
Well, this Extra Pair of Trousers can be had FREE with every Suit measured this
month of January
A guarantee of Perfect Fit or Money Back goes with Every Suit
DO NOT  MISS THIS  WONDERFUL OFFER
This is a Special Offer made with the Well Known Tailors,  "House of Hobberlin,
Limited," for the benefit of our patrons
The variety of Fancy Cloths is wide and good.    CHOOSE  NOW.    Staple  Blues
and Blacks excepted.    Suits range from $28.50 up to $70.00
SHOE DEPARTMENT
In order to make room for new Spring Styles, we are making a  Special Offer on
our Short Lines and Oddments.    These Shoes are in  Black'Kid,   Patent  Leather
and Brown, and should appeal to most Ladies at the low price of $3.95
DRUG DEPT.
Dr. West's Tooth Brush with Tube of Paste,
Regular Value 75c. for 50c.
Kent's "Peiietratnr" Double Tuft  Dental
Plate Brush, 75c. each
Children's Medium Bristle Tooth Brushes in
Assorted Shapes, Colored Handles, 25c.each
Baby Cough Syrup 25c.
Premier Liquid Brilliantine 50c.
Palmolive Shampoo 50c.
Rowntree's Honey, Eucalyptus, Ginger and
Glycerine Throat Pastilles, 4-oz. tins, 25c.
DRY GOODS
MAYBELL CHILDRFN'S LINGERIE
Vests, 4 to 8 years 75c.
Vests, 8 to II years 80c.
Bloomers, 4 to 8 years $1.00
Bloomers, 8 to 14 years $1,10
Princess Slips, 8 to 14years $1.50
Night Gowns, 8 to 12 years $1.40
Pyjama Sets, 0 to 8 years $2.50
Pyjama Sets, 8 to 12 years $3.00
Colors: Peach, Pink, White and Sky.
HARDWARE DEPARTMENT
MOPS
Small Floor Mops. 65c.
Self Wringing Mops  85c.
Dusting Mops $2.00, $2.50
Janitor Mops $2.00
O'Cedar Mops   2.00
Dish Mops 15c.
GRANBY   STORES
^
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