Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

Do Children Always Trust Confident Individuals? : Not When it Comes to Moral Dilemmas and Subjective… Passacantilli, Allegra; Aggarwal, Aksh; Stewardson, Charlotte; Lau, Parky; Severson, Rachel; Woodard, Shailee; Birch, Susan A.J. 2020-04

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Notice for Google Chrome users:
If you are having trouble viewing or searching the PDF with Google Chrome, please download it here instead.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
75346-Passacantilli_A_et_al_Children_PURC_2020.pdf [ 247.33kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 75346-1.0392822.json
JSON-LD: 75346-1.0392822-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 75346-1.0392822-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 75346-1.0392822-rdf.json
Turtle: 75346-1.0392822-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 75346-1.0392822-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 75346-1.0392822-source.json
Full Text
75346-1.0392822-fulltext.txt
Citation
75346-1.0392822.ris

Full Text

Do Children Always Trust Confident Individuals? Not When it Comes to Moral Dilemmas and Subjective OpinionsIntroduction● Children often treat confident individuals as more credible sources of information, which makes sense when factual information is the domain of knowledge in question (Birch et al. 2010; Brosseau-Liard & Birch, 2010; Brosseau-Liard et al. 2014).● Hesitancy may reflect a deeper level of thoughtfulness, and thus, credibility, when addressing moral dilemmas or subjective opinions.● This study determined how children assess credibility in speakers varying in their level of confidence (confident vs. hesitant) in three different domains of knowledge (factual vs. moral vs. subjective).MethodConfident speaker: Not the elephant, not the parrot. The dolphin, definitely the dolphin! Unconfident speaker: Maybe the elephant, maybe the parrot, maybe the dolphin?Measures: After each speakers response, children were then asked four different questions: A. How confident was she? B. Did you like her? C. Is she smart? D. Do you agree with her answer? Results● No differences were found in how the hesitant person is interpreted across all conditions (p > 0.10). ● Differences were seen in how participants rate the confident person in moral and factual condition. Allegra Passacantilli, Aksh Aggarwal, Charlotte Stewardson, Parky Lau, Rachel Severson, Shailee Woodard, Susan A.J. Birch● Children prefer to learn from confident sources over hesitant sources when learning new facts but do not have this preference when being provided subjective information or an opinion on a moral dilemma. ● Being confident or answering quickly when it’s a matter of opinion or in a high stakes moral situation seems to undermine one’s credibility. ● This research sheds light on the remarkable level of sophistication with which children are able to evaluate informants.Corresponding author: kidlab@gmail.comDiscussion and ConclusionParticipants: 84 children ages 6 to 8Dilemma phase: 8 different stories Factual condition: Which of these animals is the most intelligent? Moral condition: Which of these animals should get a prize for being so helpful? Subjective condition: Which of these animals is the nicest?MethodResults● Children rated the confident model as more confident in all 3 conditions. ● The fact condition is the only condition where we see the confident speaker as significantly preferred, rated as smarter and agreed with more. * = p < .05* = p < .05

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.75346.1-0392822/manifest

Comment

Related Items