Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

The Burrard Thermal Plant : Resistance, Politics and Economic Power. Keyserlingk, Emmett May 31, 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Keyserlingk_Emmett_GEOG_429_2016.pdf [ 268.41kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0304242.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0304242-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0304242-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0304242-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0304242-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0304242-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0304242-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0304242-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0304242.ris

Full Text

       The Burrard Thermal Plant: Resistance, Politics and Economic Power. By: Emmett Keyserlingk Report Prepared at the request of the Royal British Columbia Museum in Partial Fulfillment of GEOG 429: Research in Historical Geography for Dr. David Brownstein. May 2015           Abstract: The history of the Burrard Thermal Generating Station in Port Moody, BC, is told in two acts. The first tells the story of private­electricity generation in B.C. through the early 1960s and the second of environmental resistance and changing public opinion around energy projects from the late 1960s onward. Along the way it will narrate events at Burrard Thermal, from the reasoning underpinning its construction, through the beginnings of environmental organization around air pollution issues and wildly oscillating fuel prices to a decades long battle around pollution permits, carbon taxes and a scheduled decommission. Since the 1961 nationalization of B.C.’s electricity generating utilities to form B.C. Hydro, the changing energy preferences of the government in Victoria has supplanted the energy market as the primary factor influencing the fate of Burrard Thermal.             Introduction:  The Burrard Thermal Generating Station is a gas­powered electricity generating station located in Port Moody on the north shore of Burrard Inlet.  It was constructed from 1958 until 1975 and it is the largest single piece of electrical infrastructure in the lower Mainland, the largest thermal generating station in B.C. and, if it were operating at full­capacity, could provide up to 9% of the province’s electricity. But, this outsized plant has been peripheral, at best in the British Columbian energy mix for the better part of the last thirty years. Today, it is only used infrequently at times of high electricity demand in the wintertime and is scheduled to be turned off for good  in 2016.   The History of the Burrard Thermal Generating Station: In order to fully understand the history of the Burrard Thermal Generating Station. This paper must discuss how, why and by whom the installation and renovation of electricity infrastructure occurs. There are  a number of important questions that need answering if one is to conduct a comprehensive history of energy and electricity. First of all, what energy has been used in BC, where, and to what end?  Second, who is in charge of installing that infrastructure; has the location of power or the interests being represented in the process changed in the last half­century, and, finally, what is the current picture of energy use in British Columbia, who manages it, how much is being generated, where, by which mechanisms and how is that expected to change?  In general terms the early history of energy consumption in Canada can be summarized as moving from traditional sources of energy such as wind, wood and water through to fossil and hydroelectric energy as technology enabled access to them and systems of production became increasingly energy intensive.   From the early years of settlement, through the early 20th 1century, British Columbia lagged behind the rest of the country as its dependence on biomass­dependant forestry as an economic staple, weighted demand for energy away from the large coal­fired industrial operations of areas with higher historical reliance on secondary production and left the province with relatively little extant electricity infrastructure until comparatively late in its history. ​ Indeed, it was only in t 1862 that electricity was first brought to 2British Columbia when it was first used to power streetlights in Victoria.  From there, it was first 3used to power street­car networks in cities like Victoria and Vancouver and was, by the early years of the 20th century, increasingly used to power homes and industrial installations.  There was also a particular spatial and institutional pattern to early, street­car  and street­light based electricity in B.C.  Electricity generation occurred at a neighbourhood and municipal scale in the early years and was provided by a series of small power utilities most of which, as the years went by, would come to be owned  by the largest among them, the British Columbia Electrical Company (hereafter BCE).   Energy sources were originally small hydro 4and coal­fired steam generation with gasoline­fired turbines entering the mix as of the 1930s. Specific electricity generating stations were with gas plants being put in such as that on Carrall Street.   The key takeaway was the electricity was, at this time, a private venture.  Increasing 51 ​Unger, Richard W., and John Thistle. Energy Consumption in Canada in the 19th and 20th Centuries: A Statistical Outline 2 ​Belshaw, John Douglas. Becoming British Columbia: A Population History. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2009.  3 ​BC Hydro Power Pioneers. (1998). Gaslights to gigawatts: A Human History of BC Hydro and its Predecessors (A. Wilson, Ed.). Vancouver: Hurricane Press. 4 ​Ibid. 5 ​City of Vancouver Archives, Pamphlet Collection, ​AM1519,. “The Carrall Street Gas Plant” , 1932. electricity supply was mostly a factor of the increasing electrification of B.C.’s economy and the continually increasing demand resulting from population growth and not, in any significant way, from government policy.  This diffuse, privately owned and smaller scale pattern of electricity generation would come to be supplanted by the second third of the 20th century in favor of, first of all, a more integrated power system run by the BCE  and the British Columbia Power Corporation (hereafter BCPC) and, after 1961, by a publicly owned electricity system under B.C. Hydro.    6A mosaic of small­scale producers and sources, combined with the regime of private ownership creates a particular issue that was increasingly of public concern: rates for electricity could vary widely across relatively confined areas. That means that the price per unit of electricity might be dramatically different in neighbouring municipalities. By the time electricity was becoming commonplace in newly built homes, it was in the interest of homeowners and developers to ensure that there was rate­equality at a regional scale.   Larger private utilities such 7as the British Columbia Electricity Company took this to heart and began developing electricity systems at a larger scale. They were concerned with ensuring relative rate­equality as well as keeping up with the dramatic increase in demand for electricity during this period.  These two issues, rate equity and expansion of capacity dominated the thinking of the BCE for much of the post­war years until 1962.  The Port Mann gas­powered thermal generating station, completed in 1959, is typical of this period, as is the Burrard Thermal Generating Station the construction of which was begun the previous year,  as were some of the large dams built by 6 British Columbia Electric Railway Company. (1911). ​A short account of the plant and operations of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, the Vancouver Power Company, Limited and the Vancouver Island Power Company, Limited​. Vancouver 7 ​Barker, H. (1917). ​Public utility rates; a discussion of the principles and practice underlying charges for water, gas, electricity, communication and transportation services​. New York: McGraw­Hill Book Company. BCE. British Columbian hydroelectricity is worth pausing on however due to its predominance in the electricity mix for the last five decades.   Indeed, the great part of BC’s energy since the 8mid­century has been from hydroelectricity from big dams with only smaller provision for thermal generating stations like that at Burrard. Much of the reason this is the case comes from the unique topography of British Columbia.    While there had been some small­scale hydro built 9in the early years of B.C.’s electricity generation it would take off only in the post­war period.   10While hydroelectricity is not without its critics ­ especially in relation to both the large scale landscape changes it causes as well as equity issues with First­Nations ­ it was also an energy source that presented a relatively limited political costs because its large landscape effects occur away from large population centres.  ​  ​Finally, the nature of hydroelectricity is that even though 11it has very high upfront costs, it provides very low cost per­unit of electricity generated. The same is not true of thermal­generating which is subject to the caprices of cost of fuel.  Finally, it provides reliable electricity at a relatively constant provided that reservoirs are well stocked and transmission wires remain unmolested.   12The fusion of BCE and the BCPC in 1961 to create B.C. Hydro proved a watershed moment in the history of electricity generation in British Columbia. Since 1961, B.C.’s electricity is almost solely the purview of the state­owned power­utility, B.C. Hydro,  that is responsible for over 90% of the province’s electricity and regulated by  the provincial 8 ​British Columbia Electricity Company (1959) “Gas to electricity the story of the new B.C. Electric Port Mann gas turbine generating plant. City of Vancouver Archives Pamphlet Collection AM1519 9 Hoberg, G., and Rowlands, I. H. “Green Energy Politics in Canada: Comparing Electricity Policies in BC and Ontario.” American Political Science Association (2012): 1­25  10 BC Hydro Power Pioneers (1998) 11 Desbiens, Caroline. "Producing North and South: A Political Geography of Hydro Development in Quebec." The Canadian Geographer/Le Geographe Canadien 48, no. 2 (2004): 101­18.  12 ​Hoberg and Rowlands (2010).  government which, due to the particularities in the Canadian political system, means primarily that  implies a large degree of executive dominance over the energy system.   ​ Put differently, the ultimate source of most of the relevant decision­making authority with respect to the location of energy infrastructure rests with the provincial cabinet whose main motivator is likely to be their own re­election.    Beginning in the desire to drop rates to spur business development under 13premier Bennett in the 1950s and especially since the creation of B.C. hydro the direction of energy development in British Columbia, energy has been a political issue and much of the direction it has taken is resultant from that switch.    By the early 1970s the Burrard Thermal Generating Station was part of a large system of government­run energy infrastructure that, though derived primarily from hydroelectricity, also had significant contributions from gas­fired generation at Burrard Thermal but also smaller thermal generating stations in the Lower­Mainland.    Indeed, it was thought that energy policy 14would, roughly, follow the same trajectory it had since 1961.    At the time, Canada’s gas prices 15were largely regulated and B.C. shared a market for expensive Canadian oil with much of Western Canada.  However, beginning in 1973 as a result of an embargo on petroleum exportation by the newly established OPEC, world gas prices increased dramatically and would top out in 1979­80 as as result of the 1979 revolution in Iran. Because the alternative would be politically unpalatable increases in utility and transportation cost, the Government response to this was to freeze the domestic price of oil. While the Canadian domestic price of oil lagged behind world prices for much of this period, it still was subject to a fairly rapid rate of overall 13 ​Hoberg and Rowlands (2010). 14 ​Farley, A. L. (1979). ​Atlas of British Columbia: People, Environment, and Resource use​. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.  15 ​Picton, J. (1973, June 21). “Demand explosion expected to produce some of the world's largest power projects.“ The Globe and Mail​.  increase, especially after the failure of the national energy program in 1980.  This increase in oil­price dramatically increased the cost of purchasing gas, refined as it was from oil,  for electricity generation and, because British Columbia was running such a large energy surplus, B.C. Hydro was able to selectively turn off a number of its thermal generating stations.    16The changing politics and economics of oil prices were happening at the same time as the pro­development mindset that had prevailed in Victoria since before the advent of B.C. Hydro would be destabilized in the late 1960s and early 1970s as environmental organizing began taking off.  This lead to stricter environmental regulations being put into place by strengthening 17the pollution control act.    Under this new legislation, permits would be granted to air polluters 18like Burrard Thermal enabling them to continue emitting pollutants into the Vancouver airshed. By the late 1980s and through the 1990s the largest environmental concern in the Lower Mainland was acid rain caused by nitrous oxide emissions and Burrard Thermal was identified as a source of such nitrous oxide.   19The Burrard Thermal plant, as we have already discussed was more or less in disuse from the times of increasing oil­prices connected to the failure of the national energy program. It was not used at all, in fact, between 1981 and 1987 and only very selectively from 1987 until 1994. When the province sought to bring the plant back online in order to meet the increasing demand for energy in British Columbia it needed to reapply for pollution emission permits under the above­discussed pollution­control act.  This lead to fierce resistance by local politicians and 16 ​Chacra, Marwan (2002) Oil­Price Shocks and Retail Energy Prices in Canada. Bank of Canada Working Paper. 17 ​Hak, Gordon H. The Left in British Columbia: A History of Struggle. 2013 18 ​Kolankiewicz, Leon J. (1977) Implementation of British Columbia’s Pollution Control Act, 1967, in the lower Fraser River, School of Community and Regional Planning, UBC Theses and Dissertations. 19 ​B.C. Hydro (1992) The Burrard Utilization Study Report: Review and Analysis of the Future Role of Burrard Thermal Generating Station. regional activists like the Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC).  The pollution permits saga would be more­or­less resolved  in 1994 provided, among other conditions,  that B.C. Hydro spend 270­million dollars to retrofit the Burrard Thermal Generating Station so it could implement selective catalytic reduction technology to burn natural gas more cleanly.  20 ​Even if the Burrard Thermal Generating Station can legally generate electricity, public opposition has not gone away yet neither has public opposition to other energy projects in the province. There are not currently sufficient energy projects underway to meet demand and British Columbia may find itself importing electricity from the United­States by the mid­century.   21Despite the considerable level of public support for increasing the total electricity generating capacity of the province among more development­minded folks, the biggest blow to the Burrard Thermal Station’s future would happen in 2008 when Liberal Premier Gordon Campbell , as a result of the realities of climate change and also the significant public pressure he was receiving, put in place a carbon tax in British Columbia that was set to increase, shortly, to $30/ton.  Economic analysis has been done that when this happens it will no longer make economic sense to keep Burrard Thermal operational. The carbon tax has proved rather popular and some form of carbon pricing is expected to remain part of B.C.’s energy policy mix.     22   20 Nutt, Rod (1994, Mar 22), Emissions cut gives thermal plant new lease on life: Burrard station on line for $250­million upgrade 21 Sopinka, Amy and G.C Van Kooten, (2010) Is BC a Net Power Importer or Exporter? Victoria, BC: University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics & Policy Analysis Research Group,  22 Ibid.          Conclusion: The story of the Burrard Thermal generating station plant can be read as consisting of two chapters. First, a set of new uses for electricity that coupled with a growing population created a market for a succession of large power utilities. These private companies, of which the British Columbia Electrical Company was the largest, were concerned with improving their bottom lines. Much of the early history of B.C. electricity through the breaking of ground at the Burrard Thermal site in 1958 involves increasing capacity to keep up with that demand in order to maximize profits for the electricity providers. By the 1960s as a result of the election of a new, development minded, government and concerns over rate equity, the British Columbian government took the lead in developing new electricity projects. Most key to this was the creation of a state­owned power utility, B.C. Hydro. For the next decade, large hydroelectric capacity was brought online and electricity rates fell as income from electricity exports to the United­States rose. The Burrard Thermal Generating Station was a large contributor to the electricity mix during this period and would be through the 1970s. In 1973 and most significantly in 1979­80, the price of oil rose dramatically. This made gasoline, and hence the cost of producing electricity from the combustion of gasoline, much more expensive. B.C. Hydro, which was then running large electricity surpluses would respond by switching off most of its thermal generating stations according to the fluctuating price of gasoline.  One of the most significant changes that the advent of B.C. Hydro caused was that electricity generation was no longer solely influenced by the changing dynamics of the energy market but also, primarily, the changing nature of public opinion around energy projects. One of the most significant themes of resistance to energy projects was air pollution. Air pollution organizing in British Columbia began alongside the environmental movement in the 1960s. Acid rain was an issue that catalyzed environmental resistance to air pollution in the late 1980s and thermal generating stations like Burrard Thermal were shown to contribute to acid rain. Meanwhile, much of B.C.’s hydroelectricity capacity had been developed and by taking much of the thermal capacity out of the mix, the large electricity surpluses that had been characteristic of the late 1960s went away and a coming supply gap in electricity production was noticed.  More development minded individuals picked up on the supply gap to argue that Burrard Thermal should return to regular or full operation and that similar thermal installations be re­opened.  Meanwhile, The Burrard Thermal Generating Station began to be used only part­time following the oil­shocks of 1973 and 1979 and had been deactivated for a number of years due to high fuel costs.  When another pro­development government sought for it to be re­opened in 1988, they found their way blocked with steep resistance from a number of  environmental organizations. This began a multi­year public opinion battle around air pollution from the plant. While permits would eventually be issued, they also changed the role of the Burrard Thermal Power Plant.   From the mid­1990s on, the plant has only been used at times of high electricity demand in the late­summer and mid­winter and as a form of emergency preparedness in case of disruption of transmission lines from hydroelectric facilities further afield.  Finally, during the 2000s, as public concern over climate change grew in importance as an area of environmental advocacy, the Burrard Thermal Generating Station would be faced with a new set of government policies that, while a response to changing conditions of public opinion also affect its bottom line. In 2008, the Campbell government’s carbon tax and the plan to increase it undermined the long­term economic viability of Burrard Thermal. This, along with the upcoming need to renovate the facilities of Burrard Thermal and the associated price­tag means that there is little place in B.C.’s future electricity system for Burrard Thermal. Hence, the plan to permanently shut down the plant in 2016. This story has made apparent that while both market dynamics and changing government policy have affected the goings­on at the Burrard Thermal Generating Station, both the pollution permits saga and the current status of climate policy in British Columbia, alongside the public nature of much of the electricity industry mean that energy decisions today are more political than economic.  When the Burrard Thermal Generating Station closes its doors for good, the fact remains that there will be a large industrial installation in Port Moody that will belong to B.C. Hydro and be zoned for energy production. It is a good guess to to say that the fate of the Burrard Thermal site will be decided foremost by the court of public opinion.               Bibliography:  B.C. Hydro (1992) The Burrard Utilization Study Report: Review and analysis of the Future Role of Burrard Thermal Generating Station.  BC Hydro Power Pioneers. (1998). Gaslights to gigawatts: A Human History of BC Hydro and its Predecessors (A. Wilson, Ed.). Vancouver: Hurricane Press.   Barker, H. (1917). ​Public utility rates; a discussion of the principles and practice underlying charges for water, gas, electricity, communication and transportation services​. New York: McGraw­Hill Book Company.  Belshaw, John Douglas. Becoming British Columbia: A Population History. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2009.   British Columbia Electricity Company (1959) “Gas to electricity the story of the new B.C. Electric Port Mann gas turbine generating plant. City of Vancouver Archives Pamphlet Collection AM1519  British Columbia Electric Railway Company. (1911). ​A short account of the plant and operations of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, the Vancouver Power Company, Limited and the Vancouver Island Power Company, Limited​. Vancouver  City of Vancouver Archives, Pamphlet Collection, ​AM1519,. “The Carrall Street Gas Plant” , 1932.  Chacra, Marwan (2002) Oil­Price Shocks and Retail Energy Prices in Canada. Bank of Canada Working Paper.  Desbiens, Caroline. "Producing North and South: A Political Geography of Hydro Development in Quebec." The Canadian Geographer/Le Geographe Canadien 48, no. 2 (2004): 101­18.   Hak, Gordon H. The Left in British Columbia: A History of Struggle. 2013  Hoberg, G., and Rowlands, I. H. “Green Energy Politics in Canada: Comparing Electricity Policies in BC and Ontario.” American Political Science Association (2012): 1­25   Farley, A. L. (1979). ​Atlas of British Columbia: People, Environment, and Resource use​. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.   Kolankiewicz, Leon J. (1977) Implementation of British Columbia’s Pollution Control Act, 1967, in the lower Fraser River, School of Community and Regional Planning, UBC Theses and Dissertations.  Picton, J. (1973, June 21). Demand explosion expected to produce some of the world's largest power projects. ​The Globe and Mail​.   Nutt, Rod (1994, Mar 22), “Emissions cut gives thermal plant new lease on life: Burrard station on line for $250­million upgrade.”  Sopinka, Amy and G.C Van Kooten, (2010) Is BC a Net Power Importer or Exporter? Victoria, BC: University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics & Policy Analysis Research Group,   Unger, Richard W., and John Thistle. Energy Consumption in Canada in the 19th and 20th Centuries: A Statistical Outline   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0304242/manifest

Comment

Related Items