UBC Undergraduate Research

Five early contributors to the UBC Herbarium van der Pouw Kraan, Ashley 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-vanderPouwKraan_A_GEOG_429_2014.pdf [ 8.89MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0103578.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0103578-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0103578-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0103578-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0103578-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0103578-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0103578-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0103578-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0103578.ris

Full Text

	  	  	  	  	  	  Report	  prepared	  at	  the	  request	  of	  The	  UBC	  Herbarium	  in	  partial	  fulfillment	  of	  UBC	  Geography	  429:	  Research	  in	  Historical	  Geography,	  for	  Dr.	  David	  Brownstein	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Ashley	  van	  der	  Pouw	  Kraan	  429:	  Research	  in	  Historical	  Geography	  Professor	  Brownstein	  	  	   2	  	  Abstract	  The	  purpose	  of	  this	  paper	  is	  to	  delve	  into	  the	  histories	  of	  five	  of	  the	  early	  contributors	  to	  The	  UBC	  Herbarium.	  This	  research	  will	  fill	  some	  of	  the	  gaps	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium	  currently	  has	  in	  its	  history,	  and	  allow	  for	  a	  deeper	  understanding	  of	  the	  people	  who	  contributed	  to	  the	  Herbarium’s	  collections.	  The	  primary	  argument	  my	  paper	  focuses	  on	  is	  the	  reason	  these	  five	  contributors	  partook	  in	  the	  collecting	  of	  botanical	  samples,	  and	  what	  drove	  them	  along	  in	  their	  studies.	  My	  research	  methods	  consisted	  mostly	  of	  analyzing	  primary	  and	  secondary	  sources,	  either	  written	  by	  the	  collectors	  themselves,	  or	  by	  people	  who	  were	  interested	  in	  their	  work.	  For	  supplementary	  information,	  secondary	  sources	  focused	  on	  the	  subjects	  of	  botany,	  natural	  history,	  and	  the	  history	  of	  British	  Columbia	  were	  also	  analyzed.	  These	  methods	  opened	  up	  the	  histories	  of	  most	  of	  the	  collectors	  for	  scrutiny.	  It	  was	  found	  that	  the	  five	  contributors	  collected	  for	  the	  joy	  of	  being	  in	  nature,	  and	  to	  preserve	  knowledge	  of	  nature	  for	  future	  generations.	  	   Introduction	  Throughout	  history,	  plants	  and	  botany	  have	  held	  a	  special	  meaning	  for	  certain	  people.	  Explorers,	  both	  amateurs	  and	  professional,	  would	  go	  out,	  seeking	  new	  and	  unusual	  plants	  to	  document	  and	  preserve.	  Many	  of	  the	  first	  descriptions	  of	  Canadian	  plants	  came	  from	  when	  they	  were	  collected	  and	  exported	  back	  to	  Europe	  to	  be	  added	  to	  the	  collections	  of	  the	  wealthy	  and	  elite.	  Much	  later	  in	  Canada’s	  lifespan,	  around	  the	  beginning	  of	  the	  19th	  century,	  people	  who	  had	  settled	  down	  within	  its	  borders	  began	  accumulating	  plants,	  either	  for	  their	  own	  collections,	  or	  to	  be	  sent	  to	  professionals	  for	  identification.	  These	  people	  generally	  already	  held	  interest	  in	  botany,	  and	  it	  was	  their	  type	  of	  meticulous	  behavior	  that	  led	  to	  the	  creation	  and	  success	  of	  some	  of	  the	  first	  herbariums	  in	  Canada,	  including	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium.	  However,	  despite	  all	  this	  diligent	  behavior,	  by	  the	  end	  of	  the	  19th	  century,	  Canadian	  botany	  was	  still	  mainly	  composed	  of	  plant	  lists	  and	  inventories,	  published	  as	  books	  or	  papers.	  	  	   3	  	  Figure	  1:	  John	  Davidson	  in	  kilt,	  circa	  1911.	  Photo	  by	  John	  Davison.	  City	  of	  Vancouver	  Archives,	  CVA	  660-­‐641.	  	  	   Luckily,	  there	  were	  some	  notable	  exceptions	  of	  people	  whose	  diligent	  work	  allowed	  the	  interest	  in	  botany	  to	  keep	  flourishing	  in	  British	  Columbia.	  John	  Davidson	  was	  one	  of	  these	  people.	  Davison	  established	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium	  in	  1912	  on	  West	  Pender	  Street,	  and	  relocated	  to	  the	  UBC	  campus	  in	  1916.	  At	  the	  beginning,	  the	  herbarium	  mainly	  consisted	  of	  Davidson’s	  own	  collection	  of	  vascular	  plants,	  but	  donations	  from	  amateur	  collectors	  quickly	  expanded	  the	  scope	  of	  the	  project.	  Some	  	   4	  of	  the	  most	  notable	  early	  contributors	  were	  Albert	  James	  Hill,	  Joseph	  Kaye	  Henry,	  Eli	  Wilson,	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe,	  and	  William	  A.	  Newcombe.	  Eli	  Wilson	  Eli	  Wilson	  was	  the	  Principle	  of	  a	  school	  in	  Armstrong,	  BC,	  where	  he	  lived.	  For	  thirteen	  years,	  from	  1903	  to	  1913,	  Wilson	  dedicated	  much	  of	  his	  spare	  time	  to	  collecting	  and	  preserving	  native	  flora	  from	  around	  the	  Armstrong	  area.	  Although	  he	  had	  no	  formal	  training	  in	  botany,	  he	  was	  in	  regular	  correspondence	  with	  John	  Davidson,	  and	  even	  gave	  Davidson	  a	  tour	  of	  Armstrong	  when	  he	  came	  out	  to	  survey	  the	  area,	  showing	  Davidson	  ‘a	  number	  of	  the	  most	  interesting	  botanical	  districts	  in	  the	  vicinity;	  amongst	  the	  plants	  found	  were	  Disporum	  trackycarpum,	  Monarda	  fistulosa,	  Lupinus	  argenteus,	  Sambucus	  glauca,	  Berberis	  aquiifolium,	  a	  few	  Loniceras,	  Clematis,	  etc’.1	  In	  December	  of	  1913,	  Wilson	  presented	  his	  whole	  collection	  of	  over	  1000	  plants	  to	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium,	  which	  Davidson	  admired,	  describing	  it	  as	  ‘very	  representative	  of	  the	  Interior,	  and	  contain[ing]	  many	  interesting	  and	  rare	  plants’.2	  	   It	  is	  unfortunate	  that	  more	  information	  about	  Eli	  Wilson	  is	  not	  readably	  available.	  The	  Armstrong	  Archives	  may	  have	  more	  information	  about	  him,	  but	  their	  distance	  from	  Vancouver	  made	  it	  a	  difficult	  source	  to	  access.	  If	  one	  does	  wish	  to	  inquire	  further	  into	  the	  life	  of	  Wilson,	  there	  are	  volunteers	  at	  the	  archives	  who	  can	  complete	  research	  for	  an	  nominal	  fee.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  John	  Davidson	  (1914).	  First	  Annual	  Report	  of	  the	  Botanical	  Office	  of	  the	  Province	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  William	  H.	  Cullin,	  Victoria.	  2	  John	  Davidson	  (1914).	  First	  Annual	  Report	  of	  the	  Botanical	  Office	  of	  the	  Province	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  William	  H.	  Cullin,	  Victoria.	  	   5	  Albert	  James	  Hill	  	   Albert	  James	  Hill	  was	  another	  important	  amateur	  contributor	  to	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium.	  He	  was	  born	  April	  7th	  1836	  at	  Sydney,	  Cape	  Brenton,	  in	  Nova	  Scotia	  to	  parents	  John	  Lewis	  and	  Margaret	  (Whyte)	  Hill.3	  His	  early	  education	  took	  place	  at	  home	  under	  his	  parents	  care,	  and	  soon	  afterward	  he	  entered	  the	  shipbuilding	  industry	  with	  his	  brother,	  Arthur	  Edmund	  Hill,	  where	  he	  spent	  several	  years	  and	  was	  involved	  in	  the	  launch	  of	  two	  schooners.	  On	  July	  19,	  1866,	  he	  married	  Agnes	  Lawrence	  with	  whom	  he	  had	  two	  daughters	  and	  two	  sons:	  Elizabeth,	  Grace	  Irene,	  Egerton	  Boyd	  Lawrence,	  and	  Frederic	  Tremaine.	  In	  August	  of	  1866	  he	  left	  shipbuilding,	  and	  entered	  the	  Horton	  Collegiate	  Academy	  where	  he	  received	  his	  M.A.	  After	  graduating,	  he	  spent	  two	  years	  teaching	  at	  the	  Academy,	  before	  moving	  on	  to	  work	  as	  a	  Civil	  Engineer	  at	  the	  European	  and	  North	  American	  Railroad	  (E&NAR).	  Apparently	  this	  was	  a	  position	  he	  found	  a	  great	  deal	  of	  satisfaction	  in,	  as	  he	  worked	  there	  for	  the	  next	  sixteen	  years.4	  	   Hill’s	  work	  at	  E&NAR	  initially	  involved	  assisting	  in	  deciding	  where	  various	  railways	  could	  be	  located	  in	  Nova	  Scotia	  and	  New	  Brunswick,	  but	  then	  evolved	  to	  include	  surveying,	  construction,	  exploration,	  and	  expansion	  of	  railways	  throughout	  all	  of	  Canada,	  until	  he	  finally	  settled	  in	  New	  Westminster,	  B.C.	  Done	  with	  working	  for	  E&NAR	  railway	  life,	  but	  not	  ready	  to	  retire,	  he	  started	  his	  own	  firm	  with	  a	  partner,	  named	  Hill	  and	  Kirk	  Engineers.	  They	  operated	  out	  of	  Guichon	  Block	  on	  Columbia	  Street	  in	  New	  Westminster.	  The	  work	  still	  included	  his	  specific	  skillsets,	  and	  there	  is	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  Ancestry.ca:	  Albert	  James	  Hill.	  4	  George	  Gordon	  (1914).	  British	  Columbia.	  From	  the	  Earliest	  Times	  to	  the	  Present,	  The	  S.J.	  Clark	  Publishing,	  Vancouver.	  p.	  37.	  	   6	  documentation	  saying	  his	  company	  did	  the	  surveying	  for	  the	  proposed	  Canadian	  Pacific	  Railway	  terminal	  in	  Port	  Moody.5	  	   Hill	  had	  quite	  an	  impact	  on	  New	  Westminster.	  He	  had	  built	  a	  luxurious	  house,	  known	  as	  ‘Idlewild’	  when	  he	  settled	  there	  in	  1891	  at	  the	  cost	  of	  $4000.	  His	  brother,	  Arthur,	  built	  the	  ‘Dunwood’	  house	  at	  the	  cost	  of	  $2400	  on	  the	  same	  city	  block,	  but	  facing	  a	  different	  street,	  so	  that	  the	  two	  could	  combine	  their	  properties	  and	  share	  a	  back	  yard,	  giving	  them	  a	  sense	  of	  privacy	  even	  when	  in	  the	  city.6	  The	  house	  was	  known	  for	  its	  lavishness:	  the	  fireplaces	  were	  supplied	  by	  Campbell	  and	  Anderson,	  and	  the	  mantles	  made	  of	  curly	  maple	  by	  the	  Wintemute	  Brothers.	  Unfortunately,	  both	  houses	  were	  demolished	  in	  1974,	  to	  the	  shock	  of	  nearby	  residents.	  In	  fact,	  the	  backlash	  was	  so	  bad,	  that	  out	  of	  this	  event,	  the	  New	  Westminster	  Heritage	  Preservation	  Society	  was	  formed.7	  They	  are	  a	  charity	  that	  work	  to	  support	  the	  conservation	  of	  heritage	  homes,	  buildings	  and	  structures	  and	  are	  still	  active	  today.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  5	  Gavin	  Hainsworth	  &	  Katherine	  Freund-­‐Hainsworth	  (2005).	  A	  New	  Westminster	  Album:	  Glimpses	  of	  the	  City	  As	  It	  Was,	  Dundurn	  Press,	  Toronto.	  p.	  43.	  	  6	  Gavin	  Hainsworth	  &	  Katherine	  Freund-­‐Hainsworth	  (2005).	  A	  New	  Westminster	  Album:	  Glimpses	  of	  the	  City	  As	  It	  Was,	  Dundurn	  Press,	  Toronto.	  p.	  43.	  7	  Gavin	  Hainsworth	  &	  Katherine	  Freund-­‐Hainsworth	  (2005).	  A	  New	  Westminster	  Album:	  Glimpses	  of	  the	  City	  As	  It	  Was,	  Dundurn	  Press,	  Toronto.	  p.	  43.	  	   7	  	  Figure	  2:	  Lounge	  and	  Dining	  room	  of	  Idlewild,	  circa	  1910.	  Photo	  by	  Lelsie	  Hill.	  New	  Westminster	  Heritage	  House	  Photo	  Tour.	  	  	  	   On	  October	  6th,	  1906,	  Hill	  narrowly	  escaped	  death	  when	  he	  was	  almost	  struck	  by	  an	  express	  train	  at	  Mission	  Junction.	  Apparently	  quite	  hard	  of	  hearing	  at	  this	  late	  point	  in	  his	  life,	  he	  had	  not	  heard	  the	  train	  come	  barreling	  down	  the	  tracks,	  and	  jumped	  off	  when	  it	  was	  only	  five	  feet	  away.	  Amazingly	  he	  was	  able	  to	  walk	  away	  from	  the	  incident	  with	  only	  a	  few	  cracked	  ribs.8	  After	  this	  event	  Hill	  retired,	  still	  in	  New	  Westminster,	  where	  he	  remained	  until	  he	  died	  on	  May	  23rd,	  1919	  at	  the	  age	  of	  83	  after	  living	  a	  full	  life.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  8	  Gavin	  Hainsworth	  &	  Katherine	  Freund-­‐Hainsworth	  (2005).	  A	  New	  Westminster	  Album:	  Glimpses	  of	  the	  City	  As	  It	  Was,	  Dundurn	  Press,	  Toronto.	  p.	  43.	  	   8	  	   Hill’s	  life	  can	  be	  commemorated	  for	  his	  work	  as	  a	  railway	  engineer,	  but	  also	  for	  his	  active	  membership	  in	  various	  societies,	  including	  the	  Historical	  Society	  of	  Nova	  Scotia,	  the	  American	  Association	  for	  the	  Advancement	  of	  Science,	  the	  National	  Geographic	  Society,	  the	  Sullivant	  Moss	  Society,	  and	  as	  a	  correspondent	  to	  the	  Ottawa	  Field	  Naturalists	  Club.9	  One	  can	  see	  what	  a	  deep	  love	  and	  appreciation	  for	  plants	  Hill	  had	  through	  the	  titles	  of	  the	  associations	  he	  was	  a	  part	  of,	  and	  the	  contributions	  he	  made	  to	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium	  of	  over	  2500	  plants	  from	  1884	  to	  1912,	  spanning	  from	  Nova	  Scotia	  to	  British	  Columbia,	  and	  down	  into	  the	  United	  States.	  Hill’s	  work	  as	  a	  railway	  engineer	  put	  him	  in	  the	  unique	  position	  where	  he	  had	  ample	  opportunity	  to	  collect	  plants	  all	  over	  Canada,	  as	  can	  be	  seen	  in	  a	  showcase	  of	  his	  collection,	  and	  is	  truly	  a	  testament	  to	  the	  impact	  an	  amateur	  can	  make	  to	  the	  field	  of	  botany.	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe	  	   One	  of	  the	  most	  famous	  contributor	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium	  has	  in	  their	  database	  is	  probably	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe.	  Born	  in	  1851	  in	  Newcastle	  upon	  Tyne,	  in	  England,	  Dr.	  Newcombe’s	  influence	  spread	  so	  far	  over	  his	  lifetime	  that	  he	  even	  had	  a	  plant	  named	  after	  him	  –	  Sinosenecio	  newcombei	  –	  named	  by	  Dr.	  C.V.	  Piper,	  one	  of	  the	  founders	  of	  the	  University	  of	  Washington	  Herbarium,	  and	  a	  man	  Dr.	  Newcombe	  frequently	  corresponded	  with.	  It	  was	  named	  after	  him	  to	  commemorate	  his	  work,	  as	  he	  was	  always	  deeply	  interested	  in	  the	  native	  plants	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  and	  especially	  on	  Vancouver	  Island,	  where	  he	  resided	  later	  in	  life.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  9	  George	  Gordon	  (1914).	  British	  Columbia.	  From	  the	  Earliest	  Times	  to	  the	  Present,	  The	  S.J.	  Clark	  Publishing,	  Vancouver.	  p.	  38.	  	   9	  	  Figure	  3:	  Sinosenecio	  newcombei,	  circa	  2011.	  Photo	  by	  Hans	  Roemer.	  E-­‐Flora	  BC:	  Electronic	  Atalas	  of	  the	  Flora	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  Photo	  ID	  #26182.	  	  	   Dr.	  Newcombe’s	  parents	  were	  William	  Lister	  Newcombe	  (1817-­‐1908)	  and	  Eliza	  Jane	  (Rymer)	  (1816-­‐1888).	  They	  were	  both	  from	  Yorkshire,	  England.	  He	  was	  the	  eighth	  of	  fourteen	  children.	  He	  received	  his	  M.B.	  from	  the	  University	  of	  Aberdeen	  in	  1873	  and	  his	  M.D.	  is	  1878.	  He	  married	  Arian	  Arnold	  (1857-­‐1891)	  in	  1879	  and	  had	  six	  children	  with	  her:	  May,	  Nelly,	  Percy,	  William,	  Arthur	  and	  Duncan.10	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  10	  Ancestry.ca:	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe.	  	   10	  	   After	  graduation	  Dr.	  Newcombe	  briefly	  worked	  as	  an	  assistant	  medical	  officer	  at	  Rainhill,	  an	  asylum	  near	  Liverpool.	  However,	  it	  is	  said	  that	  his	  wife	  found	  living	  near	  an	  asylum	  unsettling,	  and	  they	  left	  Rainhill	  to	  open	  a	  general	  practice	  in	  Windmere,	  located	  in	  the	  Lake	  District	  of	  North	  West	  England.	  He	  stayed	  here	  for	  several	  years,	  and	  during	  this	  time,	  took	  a	  three-­‐month	  trip	  to	  Canada	  and	  the	  United	  States,	  traveling	  as	  far	  as	  California.	  He	  left	  for	  a	  second	  trip	  in	  1883,	  this	  time	  heading	  to	  the	  north	  coast	  of	  San	  Francisco.	  He	  enjoyed	  his	  time	  so	  much	  that	  he	  decided	  to	  set	  up	  a	  general	  practice	  in	  Hood	  River,	  Oregon.	  By	  1884	  he	  went	  back	  to	  England	  to	  collect	  his	  wife	  and	  children,	  and	  they	  moved	  to	  Hood	  River,	  where	  they	  remained	  for	  five	  years.	  Here	  is	  when	  his	  family	  began	  to	  dedicate	  time	  to	  collecting	  –	  both	  botanical	  specimens	  and	  First	  Nation	  arrowheads.	  After	  the	  five	  years,	  Dr.	  Newcombe	  picked	  up	  his	  family	  once	  more	  and	  moved	  to	  Victoria,	  British	  Columbia,	  abandoning	  an	  apparently	  successful	  practice	  for	  no	  discernible	  reason	  in	  1889.	  Two	  years	  after	  settling	  in	  Victoria,	  his	  wife	  Marion	  gave	  birth	  to	  their	  sixth	  child,	  and	  died	  a	  week	  later,	  in	  February	  1891.	  Newly	  widowed	  and	  with	  a	  newborn,	  Newcombe	  brought	  his	  children	  back	  to	  England	  and	  left	  the	  three	  oldest	  there,	  and	  after	  a	  year	  of	  getting	  them	  settled	  in	  with	  relatives,	  brought	  the	  three	  youngest	  back	  to	  Victoria	  with	  him.11	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  11	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  52.	  	   11	  	  Figure	  4:	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe.	  Photo	  via	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith.	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum.	  	  	   Back	  in	  Victoria,	  Dr.	  Newcombe	  once	  again	  put	  his	  efforts	  into	  establishing	  a	  general	  practice,	  but	  it	  did	  not	  prosper.	  Independently	  wealthy	  through	  investments	  in	  railways,	  he	  became	  increasingly	  involved	  in	  geology	  and	  natural	  history,	  and	  decided	  to	  officially	  cease	  to	  practice	  medicine	  in	  1894	  to	  focus	  entirely	  on	  this	  new	  project.12	  After	  about	  a	  year,	  he	  was	  commissioned	  to	  collect	  for	  the	  Canadian	  Geological	  Survey,	  the	  Museum	  of	  Chicago,	  and	  the	  American	  Museum	  of	  Natural	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  12	  Kevin	  Neary	  (2005).	  Newcombe,	  Charles	  Frederick	  in	  Dictionary	  of	  Canadian	  Biography,	  vol.	  15,	  University	  of	  Toronto.	  	   12	  History.	  By	  the	  end	  of	  the	  early	  1890s,	  he	  had	  established	  an	  international	  reputation	  as	  a	  naturalist	  and	  as	  an	  anthropologist.	  He	  was	  appointed	  Secretary	  at	  the	  first	  meeting	  of	  the	  Natural	  History	  Society	  of	  British	  Columbia	  on	  March	  26,	  1890.	  He	  was	  so	  popular	  that	  he	  was	  even	  offered	  a	  job	  by	  the	  Provincial	  Secretary	  as	  the	  Curator	  of	  the	  Provincial	  Museum,	  for	  the	  handsome	  sum	  of	  $50	  per	  month.	  However,	  he	  did	  not	  accept	  the	  role.	  Perhaps	  he	  enjoyed	  venturing	  out	  to	  collect	  specimens	  too	  much	  –	  he	  had	  even	  designed	  his	  own	  boat	  for	  his	  expeditions.13	  Sadly	  this	  also	  proved	  to	  be	  his	  downfall.	  Dr.	  Newcombe	  died	  October	  19,	  1924	  in	  Victoria	  of	  pneumonia	  after	  a	  sailing	  trip.14	  	  	   Dr.	  Newcombe	  led	  a	  lucky	  life.	  His	  considerable	  investments	  in	  British	  railways	  allowed	  him	  to	  follow	  his	  passion	  for	  natural	  history,	  and	  become	  a	  key	  contributor	  to	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium,	  both	  with	  plant	  specimens	  that	  he	  donated,	  but	  also	  in	  the	  less	  tangible	  form	  of	  the	  ideas	  he	  exchanged	  with	  John	  Davidson.	  To	  this	  day	  he	  is	  known	  for	  both	  his	  botanical	  and	  anthropogenic	  work.	  	  William	  Arnold	  Newcombe	  	   William	  Arnold	  Newcombe,	  named	  for	  his	  grandfather,	  was	  born	  on	  April	  29th,	  1884	  in	  Hoch	  River,	  Oregon,	  USA.	  His	  parents	  were	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe	  (1851-­‐1924)	  and	  Arian	  Arnold	  (1857-­‐1891).	  While	  he	  was	  born	  in	  Hoch	  River,	  he	  spent	  most	  of	  his	  life	  in	  Victoria,	  growing	  up	  at	  138	  Dallas	  Road.	  He	  was	  as	  drafted	  into	  the	  First	  World	  War	  in	  1918	  when	  he	  was	  33.15	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  13	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  53.	  14	  Kevin	  Neary	  (2005).	  Newcombe,	  Charles	  Frederick	  in	  Dictionary	  of	  Canadian	  Biography,	  vol.	  15,	  University	  of	  Toronto.	  15	  Ancestry.ca:	  William	  Arnold	  Newcombe.	  	  	   13	  	  Figure	  5:	  William	  Arnold	  Newcombe.	  Photo	  via	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith.	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum.	  	  	   Like	  Albert	  Hill,	  William	  Newcombe	  grew	  up	  with	  a	  sporadic	  education.	  At	  an	  early	  age,	  he	  began	  to	  accompany	  his	  father	  on	  his	  sailing	  expeditions	  to	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  and	  then	  later	  began	  to	  assist	  with	  the	  collections	  that	  took	  place.	  Despite	  his	  lack	  of	  formal	  education,	  he	  gained	  a	  respected	  reputation	  for	  his	  knowledge,	  assisted	  by	  his	  competence	  when	  he	  acted	  as	  his	  father’s	  secretary	  and	  began	  taking	  over	  Dr.	  Newcombe’s	  correspondences	  with	  scientific	  contacts.16	  In	  June	  of	  1928,	  he	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  16	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  60.	  	  	   14	  was	  appointed	  as	  an	  assistant	  biologist	  at	  the	  Provincial	  Museum	  in	  Victoria.	  However,	  ‘Billy’	  Newcombe’s	  career	  would	  not	  prove	  to	  be	  as	  illustrious	  as	  his	  fathers.	  The	  Provincial	  Museum	  Director,	  a	  man	  named	  Francis	  Kermode,	  hired	  Billy	  Newcombe.	  He	  worked	  for	  the	  Provincial	  Museum	  for	  four	  years,	  ‘toiling	  relentlessly	  to	  restore	  order	  from	  something	  approaching	  chaos’.17	  However,	  friction	  arose	  between	  Kermode	  and	  Newcombe	  after	  only	  a	  few	  years.	  What	  apparently	  started	  as	  a	  misunderstandings	  over	  whom	  correspondences	  should	  contact	  within	  the	  museum	  escalated	  into	  a	  full	  feud:	  Kermode	  ‘always	  jealous	  of	  his	  prerogatives	  as	  director,	  became	  increasingly	  resentful’18	  as	  scientific	  correspondents	  began	  addressing	  letters	  to	  Billy	  Newcombe	  rather	  than	  him.	  In	  1932,	  Kermode	  decreed	  that	  ‘all	  correspondences	  to	  the	  Museum	  must	  be	  addressed	  to	  the	  Director,	  to	  pass	  on	  to	  his	  staff	  only	  if	  he	  decided	  to;	  and	  all	  outgoing	  correspondence	  from	  the	  Museum	  must	  leave	  under	  his	  signature,	  no	  matter	  who	  wrote	  it’.19	  He	  applied	  the	  same	  rule	  to	  scientific	  publications	  that	  were	  being	  published	  from	  the	  museum	  at	  the	  time	  –	  no	  matter	  who	  they	  had	  been	  written	  by,	  Kermode’s	  name	  had	  to	  be	  on	  them.	  It	  was	  this	  second	  half	  of	  Kermode’s	  declaration	  that	  caused	  the	  kettle	  to	  boil	  over.	  Newcombe	  ‘appears	  to	  have	  resisted,	  if	  not	  outright	  ignored	  this	  dictum’.20	  He	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  17	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  61.	  18	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  62.	  19	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  62.	  20	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  63.	  	   15	  also	  ‘may	  have	  at	  one	  point	  told	  Kermode	  that	  ‘he	  was	  batty	  and	  off	  [his]	  head’.21	  Retaliating,	  Kermode	  began	  to	  keep	  mail	  from	  Newcombe,	  and	  reportedly	  Newcombe	  became	  very	  difficult	  to	  work	  with.	  The	  local	  government,	  hearing	  of	  these	  difficulties,	  felt	  bound	  to	  support	  authority,	  despite	  Newcombe’s	  popularity.	  The	  decision	  was	  made	  to	  claim	  Newcombe’s	  position	  was	  cut	  due	  to	  a	  lack	  of	  funding.	  Later	  this	  was	  found	  to	  be	  a	  complete	  fabrication.	  A	  letter	  has	  since	  come	  to	  light	  which	  states	  ‘the	  reason	  he	  was	  discharged	  was	  because	  he	  would	  not	  conform	  to	  the	  rules	  and	  regulations	  of	  the	  Department’.22	  Various	  friends	  and	  distinguished	  people	  sent	  in	  letters	  protesting	  the	  decision	  to	  relieve	  Newcombe	  of	  his	  position,	  but	  to	  no	  effect.	  Billy	  Newcombe,	  ‘embittered	  by	  the	  experience,	  became	  a	  virtual	  recluse	  for	  the	  rest	  of	  his	  life,	  living	  as	  a	  near	  neighbour	  to	  Emily	  Carr	  in	  James	  Bay.	  He	  used	  to	  do	  odd	  jobs	  for	  her	  …	  In	  return,	  she	  gave	  him	  paintings	  –	  paintings	  that	  were	  found	  after	  his	  death	  [in	  1960]23	  piled	  up	  in	  a	  considerable	  heap	  on	  the	  floor	  of	  his	  own	  house’.24	  	  	   Although	  Billy	  didn’t	  have	  the	  same	  success	  his	  father	  did,	  he	  was	  still	  an	  important	  contributor	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium.	  His	  donations	  spans	  from	  fungi	  to	  lichen,	  but	  the	  majority	  of	  them	  are	  in	  the	  vascular	  plant	  section,	  with	  many	  hundreds	  of	  specimens	  coming	  in	  from	  all	  over	  Canada.	  He	  spent	  most	  of	  his	  life	  working	  to	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  21	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  63.	  22	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  63.	  23	  Ancestry.ca:	  William	  Arnold	  Newcombe.	  	  24	  Peter	  Corley-­‐Smith	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  p.	  64.	  	   16	  better	  the	  public’s	  understanding	  of	  natural	  history	  and	  botany,	  and	  his	  contributions	  should	  not	  be	  forgotten.	  	  Joseph	  Kaye	  Henry	  	   Joseph	  Kaye	  Henry	  was	  born	  in	  1866	  and	  died	  March	  7,	  1930.	  He	  was	  an	  English	  Professor	  at	  the	  McGill	  College	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  He	  stayed	  at	  the	  campus	  when	  the	  university	  became	  independent	  and	  changed	  to	  the	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  in	  1915.	  He	  married	  Mary	  Eliza	  McDougall	  on	  July	  27,	  1899.	  25	  It	  is	  known	  that	  he	  worked	  with	  the	  Botanical	  Staff	  of	  the	  Geological	  Survey	  in	  Ottawa	  for	  a	  short	  period,	  and	  that	  for	  his	  whole	  life	  he	  held	  a	  passion	  for	  ‘varied	  and	  attractive	  wild	  flowers’.26	  This	  passion	  cumulated	  in	  his	  book:	  ‘Flora	  of	  Southern	  British	  Columbia	  and	  Vancouver	  Island’	  which	  was	  published	  in	  1915.	  Henry	  wrote	  the	  book	  to	  fill	  a	  gap	  in	  BC	  botany.	  He	  wrote	  ‘to	  determine	  plants	  of	  British	  Columbia	  is	  at	  present	  a	  task	  of	  considerable	  difficulty.	  No	  general	  herbarium	  has	  been	  established,	  and	  descriptions	  of	  plants	  are	  scattered	  through	  many	  books	  and	  scientific	  publications.	  To	  make	  these	  descriptions	  available	  to	  the	  amateur,	  rather	  than	  to	  attempt	  an	  authoritative	  survey	  of	  our	  Flora,	  the	  materials	  for	  which,	  indeed	  have	  not	  yet	  been	  assembled	  in	  British	  Columbia,	  [was]	  the	  general	  aim	  of	  this	  book’.27	  Valuable	  correspondences	  of	  Henry’s	  included	  Eli	  Wilson,	  Dr.	  Charles	  Frederick	  Newcombe,	  and	  Albert	  James	  Hill.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  25	  Ancestry.ca:	  Joseph	  Kaye	  Henry	  26	  Davidson	  (1914).	  First	  Annual	  Report	  of	  the	  Botanical	  Office	  of	  the	  Province	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  William	  H.	  Cullin,	  Victoria.	  27	  Joseph	  Kaye	  Henry	  (1915).	  Flora	  of	  Southern	  British	  Columbia	  and	  Vancouver	  Island:	  With	  many	  references	  to	  Alaska	  and	  northern	  species,	  W.J.	  Gage	  &	  Co.	  Limited,	  Toronto.	  	  	   17	  	  Figure	  6:	  J.	  Kaye	  Henry.	  Unknown	  photographer.	  UBC	  Historical	  Photograph	  Collection.	  Access	  Identifier:	  UBC	  1.1/951.	  	  	   The	  majority	  of	  Henry’s	  collection	  is	  located	  at	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium,	  mostly	  in	  the	  vascular	  plants	  section.	  His	  collection	  spans	  most	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  and	  occasionally	  voyages	  into	  Alberta	  as	  well.	  He	  is	  an	  excellent	  example	  of	  a	  person	  who	  has	  specialized	  in	  one	  area	  of	  work	  but	  does	  not	  let	  that	  slow	  them	  down	  or	  prevent	  them	  from	  picking	  up	  a	  new	  interest.	  Henry	  was	  truly	  an	  amateur	  –	  his	  book	  has	  been	  edited	  by	  multiple	  sources	  and	  expanded	  on	  since	  its	  original	  publishing	  date	  –	  but	  he	  loved	  plants	  and	  wanted	  to	  share	  that	  love	  with	  other	  people.	  	  	   These	  five	  men	  came	  from	  all	  around	  the	  world,	  but	  held	  a	  mutual	  interest	  in	  botany,	  collection,	  and	  taxonomy.	  They	  lived	  in	  an	  exciting	  age	  where	  one	  could	  make	  their	  name	  in	  the	  botanical	  world	  by	  describing	  a	  new	  species,	  and	  they	  were	  	   18	  all	  trying	  to	  do	  that.	  They	  existed	  in	  a	  network	  of	  relationships	  where	  they	  could	  send	  specimens	  to	  each	  other	  trying	  to	  assist	  each	  other	  in	  identifying	  new	  plants.	  They	  would	  also	  send	  their	  specimens	  to	  John	  Davidson	  at	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium,	  assisting	  in	  the	  creation	  of	  one	  of	  the	  largest	  Herbaria	  in	  Canada,	  and	  in	  the	  process,	  creating	  the	  legacies	  they	  were	  looking	  for.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	   19	  Bibliography	  Primary	  Sources:	  Ancestry.ca	  Archives	  City	  of	  Vancouver	  Archives:	  John	  Davidson	  Fonds.	  	  	   Secondary	  Sources	  Corley-­‐Smith,	  Peter	  (1989).	  White	  Bears	  and	  Other	  Curiosities:	  The	  First	  100	  Years	  of	  the	  Royal	  British	  Columbia	  Museum,	  RBCM	  special	  publication,	  Victoria.	  	  	  Davidson,	  John	  (1914).	  First	  Annual	  Report	  of	  the	  Botanical	  Office	  of	  the	  Province	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  William	  H.	  Cullin,	  Victoria.	  	  	  Gordon,	  George	  (1914).	  British	  Columbia.	  From	  the	  Earliest	  Times	  to	  the	  Present,	  The	  S.J.	  Clark	  Publishing,	  Vancouver.	  	  	  Hainsworth,	  Gavin	  &	  Katherine	  Freund-­‐Hainsworth	  (2005).	  A	  New	  Westminster	  Album:	  Glimpses	  of	  the	  City	  As	  It	  Was,	  Dundurn	  Press,	  Toronto.	  	  	  Henry,	  Joseph	  Kaye	  (1915).	  Flora	  of	  Southern	  British	  Columbia	  and	  Vancouver	  Island:	  With	  many	  references	  to	  Alaska	  and	  northern	  species,	  W.J.	  Gage	  &	  Co.	  Limited,	  Toronto.	  	  	   20	  Neary,	  Kevin	  (2005).	  Newcombe,	  Charles	  Frederick	  in	  Dictionary	  of	  Canadian	  Biography,	  vol.	  15,	  University	  of	  Toronto.	  Accessed	  April	  1,	  2014,	  http:	  //www.biographi.ca/en/bio/newcombe_charles_frederic_15E.html.	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0103578/manifest

Comment

Related Items