Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

Chronicling UBC's "Library of Life" : the Cowan Tetrapod Collection Duhatschek, Paula 2014

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Duhatschek_Paula_GEOG_429_2014.pdf [ 200.88kB ]
52966-Stinson_Chris_Zoology_Interview.mp3 [ 3.14MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0103572.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0103572-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0103572-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0103572-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0103572-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0103572-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0103572-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0103572-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0103572.ris

Full Text

	  	  Chronicling	  UBC’s	  “Library	  of	  Life”:	  The	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  	  Paula	  Duhatschek	  	  Report	  prepared	  at	  the	  request	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  	  in	  partial	  fulfillment	  of	  UBC	  Geography	  429:	  	  Research	  in	  Historical	  Geography	  	  for	  Dr.	  David	  Brownstein	  	   	  Abstract:	  	  The	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  was	  first	  established	  in	  the	  early	  1940s	  as	  UBC’s	  “Zoology	  Museum,”	  under	  the	  supervision	  of	  UBC’s	  Department	  of	  Zoology1.	  	  Over	  the	  course	  of	  the	  latter	  half	  of	  the	  20th	  century,	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  grew	  in	  size	  and	  scope,	  was	  housed	  in	  three	  separate	  locations,	  and	  has	  undergone	  significant	  technological	  renovations.	  Today,	  it	  exists	  as	  a	  part	  of	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum,	  and	  is	  used	  for	  research,	  education,	  and	  outreach	  programs	  related	  to	  biodiversity	  research2.	  This	  paper	  seeks	  to	  chronicle	  the	  history	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  and	  situate	  it	  within	  the	  history	  of	  natural	  history	  museums	  in	  Western	  society.	  It	  will	  argue	  that	  the	  history	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Collection	  demonstrates	  how	  the	  20th	  century’s	  divide	  between	  “naturalists”	  and	  “experimentalists”	  in	  biology	  led	  to	  a	  decrease	  in	  the	  popularity	  of	  natural	  history	  museums.	  During	  periods	  of	  the	  discipline’s	  “unpopularity,”	  the	  continued	  functioning	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  was	  owed	  to	  the	  intense	  dedication	  of	  its	  curatorial	  staff,	  as	  well	  as	  numerous	  volunteers	  and	  student	  contributors.	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  1	  “University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  1942-­‐1943,”	  UBC	  Calendar	  Collection,	  last	  modified	  2008,	  http://ubcpubs.library.ubc.ca/?db=calendars2.	  	  2	  “How	  the	  Beaty	  Came	  to	  Be,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website,	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/history.	  Intro:	  The	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  housed	  at	  UBC’s	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum,	  was	  first	  founded	  in	  1943	  by	  its	  namesake:	  Ian	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan.	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan	  was	  an	  enormously	  prolific	  zoologist,	  whose	  work	  has	  been	  recognized	  with	  the	  Order	  of	  Canada	  and	  many	  other	  prestigious	  awards.	  Much	  has	  been	  written	  about	  his	  contributions	  to	  the	  discipline.	  However,	  the	  institutional	  history	  of	  the	  museum	  he	  founded	  at	  UBC	  is	  less	  well	  documented.	  This	  paper	  will	  therefore	  seek	  to	  summarize	  the	  institutional	  history	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  and	  tie	  it	  in	  to	  the	  “history	  of	  natural	  history	  museums”	  prior	  to	  and	  throughout	  the	  20th	  century.	  Indeed,	  the	  institutional	  history	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  demonstrates	  how	  natural	  history	  museums	  in	  the	  20th	  century	  struggled	  as	  a	  result	  of	  the	  split	  between	  “naturalist”	  and	  “experimentalist”	  biology.	  However,	  the	  presence	  of	  a	  dedicated	  curatorial	  staff	  that	  appreciated	  the	  usefulness	  and	  necessity	  of	  the	  extensive	  collection	  allowed	  it	  to	  withstand	  periods	  of	  difficulty	  and	  decreased	  funding.	  Therefore,	  this	  paper	  will	  further	  attempt	  to	  give	  an	  overview	  of	  the	  immense	  efforts	  put	  forward	  by	  the	  Collection’s	  curatorial	  staff.	  It	  must	  be	  noted	  that	  in	  a	  paper	  of	  this	  length	  it	  is	  impossible	  to	  do	  justice	  to	  the	  legions	  of	  staff,	  students,	  and	  volunteers	  who	  have	  contributed	  to	  the	  Collection	  over	  the	  course	  of	  its	  history:	  what	  follows	  is	  only	  a	  short	  summary.	  	  	  History	  of	  Natural	  History:	  Pre-­‐20th	  Century	  The	  earliest	  instances	  of	  natural	  history	  collection	  appeared	  during	  the	  16th	  and	  17th	  centuries,	  as	  imperial	  voyages	  of	  exploration	  created	  a	  steady	  supply	  of	  “exotic”	  plant	  and	  animal	  specimens	  that	  were	  sent	  back	  to	  Europe,	  and	  which	  became	  fashionable	  among	  members	  of	  the	  elite	  to	  collect	  and	  display.	  These	  so-­‐called	  “cabinets	  of	  curiosities”	  aimed	  to	  delight	  and	  astonish	  viewers,	  their	  novelty	  making	  them	  a	  popular	  status	  symbol	  among	  wealthy	  Europeans3.	  These	  collections	  were	  fairly	  limited	  in	  scope,	  however,	  and	  natural	  history	  collections	  did	  not	  take	  off	  in	  a	  significant	  way	  until	  the	  19th	  century,	  at	  which	  time	  there	  was	  an	  “explosion”	  in	  the	  popularity	  of	  natural	  history	  museums4.	  At	  this	  point	  in	  time,	  the	  desire	  for	  natural	  history	  collections	  to	  stimulate	  astonishment	  and	  wonder	  gave	  way	  to	  an	  increased	  focus	  on	  their	  educational	  and	  research	  potential:	  Carolus	  Linnaeus’	  system	  of	  taxonomic	  classification	  and	  Charles	  Darwin’s	  theory	  of	  evolution	  created	  new	  ways	  of	  studying	  the	  natural	  world,	  both	  of	  which	  required	  properly	  curated	  collections	  of	  plants	  and	  animals	  for	  effective	  study.	  Consequently,	  universities	  rapidly	  established	  museums	  and	  collections	  for	  professional	  study	  and	  teaching	  purposes5.	  The	  development	  of	  natural	  history	  museums	  was	  further	  facilitated	  by	  the	  discovery	  of	  newfound	  techniques	  for	  preserving	  animals,	  which	  allowed	  researchers	  to	  develop	  and	  maintain	  large	  collections	  over	  time6.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  3	  Sheets-­‐Pyenson,	  Susan.	  Cathedrals	  of	  Science:	  The	  Development	  of	  Colonial	  Natural	  History	  Museums	  During	  the	  Late	  Nineteenth	  Century	  (Kingston:	  McGill	  Queen’s	  University	  Press,	  1988),	  3-­‐5;	  Poliquin,	  Rachel.	  The	  Breathless	  Zoo:	  Taxidermy	  and	  the	  Cultures	  of	  Longing.	  (University	  Park:	  Pennsylvania	  State	  University	  Press,	  2012),	  11-­‐42.	  4	  Sheets-­‐Pyenson,	  Cathedrals	  of	  Science,	  3-­‐5.	  5	  Boylan,	  Patrick	  J.	  “Universities	  and	  Museums:	  Past,	  Present,	  and	  Future,”	  Museum	  	  	  Management	  and	  Curatorship	  18	  (1999),	  46-­‐47;	  Poliquin,	  The	  Breathless	  Zoo,	  111-­‐124.	  6	  Poliquin,	  The	  Breathless	  Zoo,	  124;	  Prince,	  Sue	  Ann,	  ed.	  "Stuffing	  Birds,	  Pressing	  Plants,	  Shaping	  Knowledge:	  Natural	  History	  in	  North	  America	  1730-­‐1860."	  American	  Philosophical	  Society	  (2003),	  11-­‐21.	  Museums	  became	  increasingly	  popular	  throughout	  the	  Victorian	  era	  among	  the	  general	  public,	  as	  well	  as	  academics	  and	  scientific	  professionals.	  Increasing	  urbanization	  engendered	  a	  yearning	  for	  the	  “natural	  world”	  amongst	  city-­‐dwellers,	  and	  the	  industrial	  revolution	  created	  a	  more	  educated	  and	  affluent	  middle	  class,	  who	  demanded	  “edifying”	  activities	  to	  fill	  their	  leisure	  time.	  Museums	  therefore	  became	  highly	  popular	  as	  they	  allowed	  the	  general	  public	  a	  way	  of	  both	  experiencing	  and	  learning	  about	  nature.7	  In	  sum,	  the	  boom	  in	  natural	  history	  museums	  during	  the	  19th	  century	  was	  the	  result	  of	  newfound	  streams	  of	  scientific	  thought,	  technological	  advances,	  and	  demand	  coming	  from	  both	  scientific	  professionals	  and	  the	  general	  public.	  	  	  The	  20th	  Century	  “Split”:	  During	  the	  20th	  century,	  a	  divide	  arose	  between	  what	  can	  be	  identified	  as	  “naturalist”	  and	  “experimentalist”	  biology.	  More	  and	  more	  work	  was	  done	  at	  the	  cellular	  or	  microscopic	  level;	  meanwhile	  the	  “whole	  animal,”	  taxonomic	  zoology	  that	  was	  popularized	  during	  the	  Victorian	  era	  began	  being	  seen	  as	  something	  of	  a	  scientific	  anachronism9.	  The	  “Allen	  Thesis”	  put	  forward	  by	  Garland	  Allen	  in	  1978	  suggested	  that	  this	  naturalist-­‐experimentalist	  divide	  had	  begun	  as	  early	  as	  1890,	  and	  escalated	  in	  the	  years	  leading	  up	  to	  the	  1950s10.	  Whereas	  taxonomic	  zoology	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  7	  Sheets-­‐Pyenson,	  Cathedrals	  of	  Science,	  4-­‐5;	  Poliquin,	  The	  Breathless	  Zoo,	  115;	  Steinbach,	  Susie	  L.	  Understanding	  the	  Victorians:	  Politics,	  Culture,	  and	  Society	  in	  Nineteenth-­‐Century	  Britain.	  (New	  York:	  Routledge,	  2012),	  229-­‐230.	  9	  Boylan,	  “Universities	  and	  Museums,”	  51.	  	  10	  Allen,	  Garland.	  Life	  Science	  in	  the	  Twentieth	  Century.	  (New	  York:	  Wiley,	  1975).	  Cited	  in	  Rader,	  Karen	  A.	  “From	  Natural	  History	  to	  Science:	  Display	  and	  the	  Transformation	  of	  American	  Museums	  of	  Science	  and	  Nature,”	  Museum	  and	  Society	  6:2	  (2008),	  154.	  and	  natural	  history	  collections	  had	  gained	  popularity	  partly	  due	  to	  their	  accessibility	  and	  the	  ease	  with	  which	  non-­‐academics	  could	  contribute,	  by	  the	  mid	  to	  late	  20th	  century	  science	  had	  become	  increasingly	  inaccessible	  and	  localized	  within	  the	  laboratory.	  As	  a	  result,	  many	  natural	  history	  collections	  at	  museums	  and	  universities	  suffered	  from	  a	  lack	  of	  funds,	  as	  their	  method	  of	  practicing	  science	  was	  increasingly	  perceived	  as	  outdated.	  Spending	  and	  staffing	  cuts	  have	  particularly	  affected	  university	  museums,	  as	  their	  role	  in	  providing	  educational	  and	  cultural	  experiences	  to	  the	  general	  public	  is	  often	  seen	  as	  outside	  the	  purview	  of	  an	  academic	  institution11.	  Furthermore,	  without	  the	  presence	  of	  curators	  who	  were	  trained	  in	  so-­‐called	  “traditional”	  science,	  contemporary	  university	  departments	  are,	  at	  times,	  inclined	  to	  see	  natural	  history	  collections	  as	  sentimental,	  rather	  than	  legitimately	  useful12.	  	  	   The	  institutional	  history	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  demonstrates	  how	  natural	  history	  museums	  in	  the	  20th	  century	  struggled	  as	  a	  result	  of	  this	  split	  between	  “naturalist”	  and	  “experimentalist”	  biology.	  However,	  the	  presence	  of	  a	  dedicated	  curatorial	  staff	  that	  appreciated	  the	  usefulness	  and	  necessity	  of	  the	  extensive	  collection	  allowed	  it	  to	  withstand	  periods	  of	  decreased	  funding	  and	  resources.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  11	  Boylan,	  “Universities	  and	  Museums,”	  50-­‐52.	  12	  Ibid.	  	  The	  Establishment	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  The	  first	  incarnation	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  was	  as	  the	  “University	  of	  British	  Colombia	  Zoological	  Museum”.	  The	  Zoological	  Museum	  was	  founded	  in	  1943	  as	  the	  result	  of	  a	  significant	  initiative	  on	  the	  part	  of	  its	  founder,	  Ian	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  who	  had	  come	  to	  UBC	  in	  1940	  as	  an	  assistant	  professor	  of	  zoology13.	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan	  had	  worked	  at	  the	  Royal	  BC	  Museum-­‐	  then	  known	  as	  the	  BC	  Provincial	  Museum-­‐	  for	  five	  years	  prior	  to	  coming	  to	  UBC.	  During	  his	  time	  at	  the	  BC	  Provincial	  Museum,	  he	  had	  contributed	  to	  a	  major	  expansion	  of	  the	  museum’s	  vertebrate	  collections:	  an	  initiative	  that	  he	  would	  replicate	  at	  UBC14.	  At	  this	  time,	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  was	  “housed	  mainly	  in	  the	  northern	  wing	  of	  the	  Applied	  Sciences	  Building”	  rather	  than	  having	  a	  building	  unto	  itself:	  this	  was	  typical	  of	  the	  University’s	  early	  history,	  as	  two	  World	  Wars	  and	  an	  economic	  depression	  meant	  that	  the	  it	  lacked	  resources,	  space,	  and	  funding15.	  The	  foundation	  of	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  during	  the	  throes	  of	  the	  Second	  World	  War,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  rapid	  turnaround	  time	  between	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan’s	  arrival	  at	  the	  university	  and	  the	  museum’s	  establishment	  speaks	  to	  the	  impressive	  abilities	  of	  its	  first	  curator.	  Working	  to	  his	  advantage,	  however,	  was	  the	  fact	  that	  “traditional”	  taxonomic	  zoology	  was	  still	  fairly	  popular	  in	  the	  1940s:	  although	  the	  museum	  frenzy	  of	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  13	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1942-­‐1943,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  26-­‐27.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://ubcpubs.library.ubc.ca/?db=calendars2;	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1943-­‐1944,	  22-­‐23.	  	  	  14	  Campbell,	  R.	  Wayne;	  Jakimchuk,	  Ronald	  D.;	  and	  Demarchi,	  Dennis	  A.,	  “In	  Memoriam:	  Ian	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  1910-­‐2010,”	  The	  Auk	  130:	  4	  (2013),	  807-­‐808.	  	  15	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1943-­‐1944,	  22-­‐23;	  Mackenzie,	  N.	  A.	  M.	  “The	  History	  of	  the	  University,”	  (Vancouver:	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Archives	  Online,	  2013).	  Originally	  published	  in	  the	  1957-­‐1958	  President’s	  Report.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/history.html.	  	  	  nineteenth	  century	  had	  come	  and	  gone,	  there	  was	  still	  work	  being	  done	  in	  naming	  specimens	  and	  the	  practice	  of	  so-­‐called	  “old	  school	  taxonomy16.”	  Furthermore,	  the	  accessibility	  of	  natural	  history	  as	  a	  discipline	  meant	  that	  it	  was	  easy	  for	  non-­‐academics	  to	  contribute	  to	  the	  collections:	  among	  the	  first	  donations	  to	  the	  Zoology	  Museum	  were	  specimens	  coming	  from	  several	  local	  collectors,	  as	  well	  as	  larger	  organizations	  such	  as	  the	  BC	  Game	  Commission17.	  	  The	  Post-­‐War	  Era	  In	  the	  years	  following	  World	  War	  Two,	  national	  prosperity	  and	  an	  influx	  of	  returning	  veterans	  attending	  university	  led	  UBC	  to	  undertake	  rapid	  initiatives	  in	  construction	  and	  expansion18.	  Consequently,	  a	  new	  Biological	  Sciences	  building	  was	  erected	  between	  1949	  and	  1950,	  with	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  added	  as	  part	  of	  the	  general	  “zoological	  complex”	  on	  the	  fourth	  floor	  of	  the	  building	  in	  195119.	  During	  this	  time,	  the	  collections	  continued	  to	  expand,	  and	  from	  1957-­‐1966	  a	  major	  expedition,	  sponsored	  by	  H.R.	  MacMillan	  to	  the	  Tres	  Marias,	  Galapagos,	  and	  Cocos	  Islands,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  west	  coast	  of	  Mexico,	  added	  several	  hundred	  bird	  specimens	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  16	  Richard	  Cannings,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  March	  4,	  2014.	  	  17	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1942-­‐1943,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  26-­‐27.	  18	  Mackenzie,	  N.A.M.,	  “The	  History	  of	  the	  University.”	  19	  “Biological	  Sciences	  Building,”	  Chronological	  Index	  of	  UBC	  Buildings,	  (Vancouver;	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Archives	  Online,	  2013).	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/bldgs/biology.html;	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1951-­‐1952,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  30-­‐31;	  Din,	  A	  Note	  on	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection:	  Its	  Collections	  and	  Historical	  Background,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1976).	  to	  the	  Ornithological	  collection20.	  Throughout	  these	  years,	  the	  museum	  never	  wanted	  for	  specimen	  donations,	  and	  by	  1958,	  its	  new	  quarters	  were	  full21.	  	  	  1970s	  and	  1980s:	  Continued	  Growth,	  New	  Technology,	  and	  a	  Shoestring	  Budget	  By	  1971,	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  had	  been	  subdivided	  into	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum,	  the	  Ichthyological	  Museum,	  and	  the	  Spencer	  Entomological	  Museum22.	  In	  1975,	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  was	  recognized	  as	  a	  significant	  North	  American	  institution	  due	  to	  its	  inclusion	  in	  the	  Official	  Museum	  Directory:	  United	  States	  and	  Canada	  by	  J.R.	  	  Choate	  and	  Hugh	  H.	  Genoways23,	  which	  speaks	  to	  the	  museum’s	  rapid	  expansion	  throughout	  the	  post-­‐war	  era,	  and-­‐	  again-­‐	  to	  the	  initiative	  of	  its	  founding	  curator.	  1977	  marked	  the	  end	  of	  an	  era	  in	  the	  Museum’s	  history,	  as	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan	  retired	  from	  his	  position	  as	  Director	  of	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum24.	  Shortly	  afterwards,	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  was	  re-­‐named	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum,	  in	  honour	  of	  its	  founding	  curator25.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  20	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1966-­‐1967,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  60.	  21	  Hawthorn,	  Harry.	  Statement	  from	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Anthropology	  on	  the	  Zoological	  Museum,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1958).	  22	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1971-­‐1972,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  34,	  23	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On.	  	  24	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1977-­‐1978,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  21.	  	  25	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1978-­‐1979,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  22.	  Aside	  from	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan’s	  retirement,	  the	  museum	  in	  the	  1970s	  and	  1980s	  was	  defined	  by	  an	  increasing	  focus	  on	  new	  technology	  for	  documenting	  specimens.	  From	  1973	  to	  1980,	  Nasser	  Din	  was	  employed	  at	  the	  museum	  as	  an	  assistant	  curator,	  and	  undertook	  the	  “laborious	  task	  of	  preparing	  an	  index	  card	  file	  of	  mammal	  and	  bird	  specimens26.”	  After	  Din	  left,	  Richard	  J.	  (Dick)	  Cannings	  was	  hired	  in	  1980	  and	  began	  the	  process	  of	  digitizing	  the	  museum’s	  collections.	  According	  to	  him,	  the	  process	  of	  digitization	  was	  the	  most	  important	  project	  he	  was	  involved	  with	  during	  his	  time	  at	  the	  museum.	  Digitization,	  and	  consequently	  having	  the	  museum’s	  catalogue	  available	  on	  a	  UBC	  website,	  allowed	  information	  to	  be	  readily	  transferred	  to	  researchers	  outside	  of	  UBC.	  The	  museum	  was	  one	  of	  the	  first	  in	  North	  America	  to	  fully	  digitize	  its	  catalogue,	  which,	  by	  the	  time	  Dick	  Cannings	  began,	  included	  13,490	  specimens	  of	  mammals,	  14,300	  birds,	  6650	  bird	  eggs,	  and	  1311	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles27.	  	  	  Along	  with	  the	  development	  of	  new	  technologies	  for	  documentation,	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  in	  the	  1980s	  increasingly	  felt	  the	  effects	  of	  the	  “naturalist-­‐experimentalist	  divide”	  in	  terms	  of	  decreased	  support	  to	  the	  museum.	  For	  example,	  when	  Dick	  Cannings	  was	  first	  hired,	  his	  budget	  was	  around	  $3,600;	  by	  the	  next	  year,	  it	  was	  cut	  to	  $2,600,	  which	  largely	  went	  towards	  buying	  basic	  supplies	  for	  upkeep.	  To	  put	  this	  into	  perspective,	  access	  to	  a	  computer	  terminal-­‐	  necessary	  for	  digitization-­‐	  cost	  around	  $1,000,	  which	  was	  nearly	  half	  the	  museum’s	  budget.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  26	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On.	  27	  Richard	  Cannings,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  March	  4,	  2014;	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1980-­‐1981,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  26.	  Therefore,	  there	  were	  no	  excess	  funds	  available	  to	  sponsor	  field	  expeditions,	  much	  less	  expand	  the	  museum’s	  quarters,	  which	  were	  rapidly	  overflowing.	  The	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  never	  wanted	  for	  specimens	  at	  this	  time,	  and	  its	  drawers	  were	  completely	  full.	  By	  Dick’s	  own	  account,	  his	  job	  largely	  revolved	  around	  re-­‐organizing	  and	  maintaining	  the	  museum’s	  specimens28.	  	  Struggling	  in	  the	  21st	  Century	  Moving	  into	  the	  21st	  century,	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  suffered	  further	  from	  the	  “naturalist-­‐experimentalist”	  divide,	  as	  the	  scientific	  community’s	  research	  interests	  became	  increasingly	  focused	  on	  micro-­‐level	  science,	  and	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  largely	  fell	  by	  the	  wayside.	  According	  to	  Dick	  Cannings,	  the	  taxonomic	  work	  that	  was	  still	  popular	  when	  the	  museum	  was	  founded	  in	  the	  1940s	  had	  largely	  fallen	  out	  of	  fashion	  by	  the	  1970s.	  	  In	  his	  own	  words:	  	  [The	  museum]	  was	  just	  a	  bunch	  of	  dead	  birds	  and	  mammals	  and	  bones,	  and	  people	  were	  doing	  exciting	  things	  with	  genes	  and	  proteins	  and	  things,	  and	  that’s	  not	  what	  we	  were	  at	  the	  time	  […]	  Traditionally	  the	  museum	  was	  seen	  as	  a	  place	  where	  people	  would	  come	  and	  measure	  beaks	  and	  legs	  […]	  and	  certainly	  that	  kind	  of	  approach	  was	  seen	  to	  be	  an	  anachronism29.	  	   The	  perceived	  divide	  between	  “experimental,”	  micro-­‐level	  biology	  and	  old-­‐school,	  taxonomic	  “naturalism”	  had	  evidently	  made	  itself	  known	  at	  UBC,	  and	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  became	  something	  of	  a	  casualty.	  Consequently,	  when	  Dick	  Cannings	  retired	  from	  his	  position	  at	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  in	  1995,	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  28	  Richard	  Cannings,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  March	  4,	  2014.	  	  29	  Ibid.	  the	  University	  did	  not	  hire	  anyone	  in	  his	  place.	  Budgets	  were	  tight	  at	  the	  time,	  and	  a	  full-­‐time	  salary	  was	  the	  largest	  expense	  incurred	  by	  the	  museum-­‐	  an	  institution	  that,	  it	  was	  suggested,	  may	  have	  outlived	  its	  usefulness30.	  By	  2001,	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  was	  officially	  listed	  in	  the	  UBC	  Academic	  Calendar	  as	  “inactive,	  owing	  to	  a	  lack	  of	  resources	  and	  curatorial	  support31.”	  	  	  Once	  again,	  the	  force	  of	  a	  dedicated	  staff	  was	  able	  to	  keep	  the	  museum	  going	  through	  lean	  times:	  throughout	  the	  early	  2000s,	  Dr.	  Rex	  Kenner,	  who	  had	  been	  a	  volunteer	  at	  the	  museum	  since	  1993,	  took	  on	  its	  curatorial	  duties.	  Although	  he	  was	  only	  paid	  for	  part-­‐time	  work,	  he	  put	  in	  what	  were	  essentially	  the	  full-­‐time	  hours	  required	  to	  care	  for	  the	  museum’s	  extensive	  collections32.	  By	  2003,	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  was	  once	  again	  available	  for	  public	  use33.	  	  	  A	  New	  Beginning	  with	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  In	  2010,	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  became	  amalgamated	  within	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum.	  The	  campaign	  to	  construct	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  was	  initiated	  by	  staff	  and	  faculty	  members,	  who	  had	  applied	  for	  a	  grant	  from	  the	  Canadian	  Foundation	  for	  Innovation	  to	  build	  a	  facility	  that	  would	  house	  the	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  30	  Ibid.	  31	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1980-­‐1981,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  76.	  32	  Chris	  Stinson,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014;	  Cannings,	  Robert,	  A.	  “Rex	  Kenner:	  In	  Memoriam,”	  The	  Coleopterists	  Bulletin	  64:2	  (2010).	  33	  UBC	  Calendar,	  2003-­‐2004,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online,	  67.	  campus’s	  various	  collections34.	  The Beaty Biodiversity Museum	  and	  Biodiversity	  Research	  Centre	  was	  eventually	  funded	  by	  a	  number	  of	  sources:	  the	  B.C.	  Knowledge	  Development	  Fund	  provided	  $16.5	  million,	  which	  was	  matched	  by	  the	  Canada	  Foundation	  for	  Innovation.	  UBC	  alumni	  Ross	  and	  Trisha	  Beaty	  donated	  $8-­‐million,	  the	  Djavad	  Mowafaghian	  Foundation	  contributed	  $3-­‐million,	  and	  UBC	  itself	  contributed	  $6-­‐million35.	  	  	  The	  years	  spent	  moving	  to	  the	  new	  facility	  re-­‐affirm	  the	  immense	  efforts	  of	  the	  museum’s	  curatorial	  staff:	  Chris	  Stinson,	  the	  current	  curatorial	  assistant,	  had	  begun	  volunteering	  at	  the	  museum	  in	  2005,	  and	  recalls	  the	  immense	  effort	  that	  went	  into	  cataloguing,	  preparing,	  and	  moving	  a	  collection	  that	  numbered	  36,000	  total	  specimens36.	  Dr.	  Rex	  Kenner	  passed	  away	  in	  January	  of	  2010.	  Rex’s	  passing	  left	  the	  museum	  without	  its	  dedicated	  curator;	  sadly,	  he	  was	  unable	  to	  see	  the	  outcome	  of	  years	  spent	  keeping	  the	  museum	  afloat	  with	  limited	  resources37.	  	  	  In	  2010,	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  opened	  its	  doors,	  including	  the	  newly	  renamed	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  UBC	  Marine	  Invertebrate	  Collection,	  the	  UBC	  Herbarium,	  the	  Spencer	  Entomological	  Collection,	  and	  the	  UBC	  Fish	  Collection.	  Additionally,	  the	  University’s	  Fossil	  Collection	  became	  included	  in	  the	  Pacific	  Museum	  of	  the	  Earth,	  located	  in	  the	  Earth	  and	  Ocean	  Sciences	  Building	  on	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  34	  Chris	  Stinson,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014.	  35	  Office	  of	  the	  Premier,	  Ministry	  of	  Small	  Business,	  Technology,	  and	  Economic	  Development.	  2010.	  “New	  UBC	  Centre	  Home	  to	  Canada’s	  Largest	  Whale	  Exhibit.”	  [press	  release]	  May	  13,	  2010.	  36	  Chris	  Stinson,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014.	  37	  Cannings,	  R.	  A.	  ,	  “Rex	  Kenner:	  In	  Memoriam.”	  the	  UBC	  campus	  38.	  Currently,	  there	  is	  significant	  work	  done	  at	  both	  the	  levels	  of	  research	  and	  community	  engagement:	  just	  as	  with	  the	  early	  natural	  history	  museums	  of	  the	  Victorian	  era,	  diverse	  groups	  ranging	  from	  researchers	  to	  art	  classes	  and	  elementary	  school	  groups	  are	  counted	  among	  the	  museum’s	  audience39.	  Modernizing	  and	  increasing	  online	  access	  to	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  collections	  continues	  to	  be	  a	  priority.	  Projects	  include	  the	  OMBIRDS	  Protocol	  (Online	  Museum	  of	  Bird	  Images	  Records	  DNA	  Specimens),	  which	  facilitates	  the	  curation	  of	  avian	  blood	  samples.	  Additionally,	  the	  process	  of	  digitization	  that	  began	  in	  the	  1980s	  has	  extended	  to	  the	  present	  day,	  and	  all	  the	  mammal,	  bird,	  reptile,	  and	  amphibian	  specimens	  housed	  at	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  can	  now	  be	  searched	  online	  using	  the	  international	  multiple-­‐museum	  search	  engine,	  VertNet40.	  The	  size	  and	  historic	  scope	  of	  the	  collection	  make	  it	  a	  valuable	  resource	  to	  have	  archived	  online.	  As	  Chris	  Stinson	  explains,	  	  	   It’s	  basically	  a	  library	  of	  life.	  A	  sample	  was	  collected	  in	  a	  specific	  time	  in	  a	  specific	  place	  that	  you	  can	  never	  go	  back	  to.	  And	  it	  gives	  you	  a	  historical	  perspective	  in	  so	  many	  different	  ways,	  and	  probably	  an	  infinite	  amount	  of	  ways	  that	  we	  haven’t	  even	  thought	  of	  yet.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  38	  “How	  the	  Beaty	  Came	  to	  Be,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/history;	  “The	  Collections,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/collections.	  39	  “Group	  Programs	  and	  Tours,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/group-­‐programs-­‐tours;	  Chris	  Stinson,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014.	  40	  Szabo,	  Ildiko.	  “Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Annual	  Report.	  Fortunately,	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Collection	  has	  withstood	  periods	  of	  difficulty	  in	  lacking	  funding	  and	  resources;	  with	  increasing	  online	  accessibility,	  researchers,	  graduate	  students,	  and	  citizen	  scientists	  worldwide	  are	  able	  to	  access	  the	  Collection.	  	  	  Conclusion	  Natural	  history	  collections	  have	  existed	  in	  some	  capacity	  since	  the	  16th	  century,	  when	  it	  became	  popular	  for	  members	  of	  the	  European	  elite	  to	  collect	  and	  display	  “objects	  of	  wonder.”	  Throughout	  the	  19th	  century,	  technological	  innovation,	  new	  systems	  of	  scientific	  thought,	  and	  a	  demand	  for	  diversions	  among	  the	  middle	  class	  resulted	  in	  a	  “boom”	  in	  natural	  history	  museums.	  The	  popularity	  of	  natural	  history	  waned	  throughout	  the	  20th	  century	  as	  the	  discipline	  of	  biology	  focused	  more	  on	  micro-­‐level	  science	  rather	  than	  the	  “whole	  animal”	  zoology41.	  The	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  was	  established	  during	  a	  period	  of	  time	  where	  taxonomic	  zoology	  was	  still	  fairly	  popular;	  however,	  over	  the	  course	  of	  its	  history	  the	  Collection	  has	  suffered	  as	  a	  result	  of	  the	  split	  between	  “experimentalist”	  and	  “naturalist”	  biology.	  Fortunately,	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  was	  able	  to	  weather	  lean	  periods	  of	  time,	  largely	  owing	  to	  the	  efforts	  of	  its	  curatorial	  staff.	  	  It	  must	  be	  noted	  that	  in	  a	  paper	  of	  this	  length	  it	  is	  impossible	  to	  fully	  recognize	  the	  legions	  of	  individuals,	  including	  staff	  members	  as	  well	  as	  volunteers	  and	  students,	  who	  have	  worked	  in	  the	  Collection	  over	  the	  course	  of	  its	  history;	  therefore	  this	  paper	  has	  only	  touched	  on	  the	  activities	  of	  a	  few.	  For	  a	  more	  complete	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  41	  Boylan,	  “Universities	  and	  Museums,”	  52.	  list	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection’s	  staff	  since	  the	  inception	  of	  the	  UBC	  Zoology	  Museum,	  please	  see	  Appendix	  A,	  which	  outlines	  the	  approximate	  start	  and	  end	  dates	  of	  the	  curatorial	  staff.	  The	  author,	  as	  well	  as	  the	  current	  staff	  of	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  would	  like	  to	  extend	  gratitude	  and	  recognition	  to	  the	  many	  staff	  members,	  students,	  and	  volunteers	  who	  have	  worked	  countless	  hours	  in	  preparing	  skins,	  specimens,	  and	  otherwise	  contributing	  to	  the	  ongoing	  maintenance	  and	  functioning	  of	  the	  collection	  for	  the	  past	  6	  decades.	  	  	  Looking	  ahead,	  further	  research	  could	  examine	  in	  greater	  detail	  the	  administrative	  machinations	  involved	  with	  funding	  the	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum,	  which	  allowed	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  to	  gain	  attention	  after	  a	  period	  of	  decline.	  Additionally,	  further	  research	  could	  examine	  the	  history	  of	  the	  UBC	  Faculty	  of	  Science,	  in	  order	  to	  further	  examine	  the	  hypothesized	  division	  between	  “experimentalist”	  and	  “naturalist”	  biology	  during	  the	  20th	  century,	  and	  its	  effects	  on	  the	  Zoology	  Department	  and	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection.	  	   	  Appendix	  A:	  Staff	  	  Staff	  Member	   Title	   Start	  and	  End	  Date	  Dr.	  Ian	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan	   Curator,	  Director	  -­‐	  Zoological	  Museum	   1943	  -­‐	  197742	  A.	  Witt	   Curator	  of	  Terrestrial	  Vertebrates	  -­‐	  Zoological	  Museum	   1958	  -­‐	  197043	  R.	  Wayne	  Campbell	   Curator	  -­‐	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1969	  -­‐	  197344	  Dr.	  J.	  Mary	  Taylor	   Curator,	  Director	  –	  UBC	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1971	  -­‐	  198245	  Nasser	  Din	   Assistant	  Curator	  –	  UBC	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1973	  -­‐	  198046	  (?)	  Richard	  (Dick)	  Cannings	   Assistant	  Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1980	  -­‐	  199547	  Dr.	  H.D.	  Fisher	   Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1982	  -­‐	  198648	  Dr.	  James	  N.	  M.	  Smith	   Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1986	  -­‐	  200549	  Christine	  Adkins	   Acting	  Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1995	  -­‐	  200050	  Gary	  W.	  Kaiser	   Associate	  Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1998	  -­‐	  200051	  Dr.	  Rex	  D.	  Kenner	   Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum	   1994	  (volunteer),	  2001	  -­‐	  201052	  Dr.	  Darren	  E.	  Irwin	   Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	   2005	  -­‐	  present	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  42	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1943-­‐1944	  and	  1976-­‐1977,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://ubcpubs.library.ubc.ca/?db=calendars2.	  	  43	  Din,	  A	  Note	  on	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection:	  Its	  Collections	  and	  Historical	  Background,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1976).	  44	  Ibid.	  45	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1971-­‐1972	  and	  1982-­‐1983.	  	  46	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On.	  47Richard	  Cannings,	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  March	  4,	  2014;	  Handwriting	  Samples	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection).	  48	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1982-­‐1983	  and	  1986-­‐1987.	  49	  UBC	  Calendar	  1985-­‐1986	  and	  	  2003-­‐2004.	  50	  Correspondence	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection);	  Oral	  History	  Interview	  with	  Richard	  	  	  	  Cannings.	  51	  Dawe,	  Neil	  K.;	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  Ian;	  Cooper,	  John	  M.;	  Kaiser,	  Gary	  W.;	  McNall,	  Michael	  C.E.	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Wood-­‐Warblers	  Through	  Old	  World	  Sparrows.	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  2001),	  735.	  	  52	  Cannings,	  Rob.	  “Rex	  Kenner:	  In	  Memoriam,”	  The	  Coleopterists	  Bulletin	  64:2	  (2010).	  	  Christopher	  M.	  Stinson	   Curatorial	  Assistant	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	   2005	  (volunteer),	  2007	  -­‐	  present	  Dr.	  Sampath	  S.	  Seneviratne	   Assistant	  Curator	  -­‐	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	   2010	  -­‐	  2011	  Ildiko	  Szabo	   Assistant	  Curator-­‐	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	   2006	  (volunteer),	  2012	  -­‐	  present	  	  	  	  Appendix	  B:	  General	  Timeline	  	  Date	   Event	  1942-­‐1943	   Donations	  and	  endowments	  are	  listed	  in	  the	  UBC	  Academic	  Calendar	  for	  a	  “Museum	  of	  Zoology.”	  The	  largest	  donation	  comes	  from	  Dr.	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan’s	  personal	  collection	  (619	  total	  specimens,	  316	  amphibians	  &	  reptiles	  and	  303	  North	  American	  birds).	  Other	  donors	  include	  Mr.	  Kenneth	  Racey,	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan’s	  father-­‐in-­‐law	  and	  mentor-­‐,	  Mr.	  J.W.	  Plowden-­‐Wardlaw,	  and	  the	  BC	  Game	  Commission.53	  	  1943-­‐1944	   The	  UBC	  Academic	  Calendar	  officially	  lists	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  among	  the	  University’s	  museums.	  At	  this	  time,	  the	  Zoological	  Museum	  is	  housed	  “mostly	  in	  the	  northern	  wing	  of	  the	  applied	  sciences	  building.	  Owing	  to	  a	  lack	  of	  room	  in	  the	  museum,	  the	  collection	  is	  distributed	  in	  hallways	  and	  rooms	  wherever	  space	  can	  be	  found.”	  	  	  At	  this	  time,	  the	  collection	  of	  vertebrates	  numbers	  4,399	  specimens54.	  1949	   Post-­‐war	  construction	  begins	  on	  the	  Biological	  Sciences	  Building,	  which	  would	  later	  house	  the	  Zoological	  Museum55.	  1951	   The	  Vertebrate	  Museum	  is	  moved	  to	  new	  quarters	  on	  the	  fourth	  floor	  of	  the	  Biological	  Sciences	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  53	  UBC	  Calendar	  1942-­‐1943.	  54	  UBC	  Calendar	  1943-­‐1944.	  	  55	  “Biological	  Sciences	  Building,”	  Chronological	  Index	  of	  UBC	  Buildings,	  (Vancouver;	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Archives	  Online,	  2013).	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/bldgs/biology.html.	  Building,	  as	  part	  of	  a	  general	  Zoological	  Museums	  Complex56.	  	  	  At	  this	  time,	  the	  collection	  of	  vertebrates	  numbers	  6,417	  specimens57.	  1954	   The	  Kenneth	  Racey	  Collection	  of	  Birds	  and	  Mammals	  is	  acquired.	  	  	  With	  this	  addition,	  the	  Museum’s	  of	  vertebrates	  increased	  to	  contain	  4,500	  birds,	  6,225	  mammals,	  and	  949	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles58.	  	  1957	   The	  “Marijean”	  expeditions	  to	  the	  west	  coast	  of	  Mexico,	  Tres	  Marias	  Is.,	  Galapagos	  Is.,	  and	  Cocos	  Is.,	  begin,	  sponsored	  by	  H.R.	  MacMillan59.	  	  	  The	  collection	  of	  vertebrates	  numbers	  about	  7,000	  birds,	  7,000	  mammals,	  949	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles60.	  	  1958	   A.	  Witt	  of	  UBC’s	  Sopron	  Forestry	  School	  begins	  working	  as	  the	  Curator	  of	  Terrestrial	  Vertebrates61.	  	  	  Collection	  numbers	  8,500	  birds,	  7,500	  mammals,	  and	  about	  1,000	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles.	  1960	   The	  collection	  numbers	  9,000	  specimens	  of	  birds,	  7,500	  mammals	  and	  1,000	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles62.	  1961	   The	  collection	  numbers	  9,500	  specimens	  of	  birds,	  7,500	  mammals,	  and	  1,000	  amphibians63.	  1964	   UBC	  PhD	  candidates	  Peter	  Grant	  (of	  the	  Galapagos	  Finch	  study64.)	  and	  Peter	  Larkin	  (future	  UBC	  Dean	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  56	  Din,	  A	  Note	  on	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection:	  Its	  Collections	  and	  Historical	  Background,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1976).	  57	  UBC	  Calendar	  1956-­‐1957.	  58	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On	  ;	  Hawthorn,	  Harry.	  Statement	  from	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Anthropology	  on	  the	  Zoological	  Museum,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1958);	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1955-­‐56.	  	  59	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1958-­‐1959;	  Hawthorn,	  Statement.	  	  60	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1954-­‐1955	  61	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On;	  Hawthorn,	  Statement.	  62	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1960-­‐1961.	  63	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1961-­‐1962.	  	  of	  Graduate	  Studies)	  participant	  in	  the	  “Marijean”	  expeditions	  and	  prepare	  bird	  skins	  for	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum.	  	  	  The	  collection	  numbers	  11,800	  specimens	  of	  birds,	  8,900	  mammals,	  and	  1,000	  amphibians65.	  1966	   The	  “Marijean”	  expeditions	  conclude.	  The	  total	  number	  of	  specimens	  has	  grown	  to	  12,600	  birds,	  9,200	  mammals,	  1,100	  amphibians66.	  1970	   A.	  Witt	  resigns	  from	  his	  position	  as	  full-­‐time	  curator,	  and	  is	  replaced	  by	  R.	  Wayne	  Campbell67.	  During	  his	  time	  at	  the	  Museum,	  Campbell	  establishes	  the	  Photo-­‐Records	  File	  system	  of	  documenting	  rare	  BC	  vertebrates,	  and	  contributes	  to	  the	  continued	  development	  of	  the	  B.C.	  Nest	  Records	  Scheme68.	  	  At	  this	  time,	  the	  collection	  numbers	  13,422	  specimens	  of	  birds,	  9,487	  mammals,	  and	  1,248	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles69.	  	  1971	   Dr.	  J.	  Mary	  Taylor	  is	  hired	  as	  Curator	  of	  the	  Vertebrate	  Museum.	  	  1973	   R.	  Wayne	  Campbell	  resigns.	  Campbell	  is	  replaced	  by	  Nasser	  Din,	  who	  undertakes	  the	  creation	  of	  an	  index	  card	  file	  system	  of	  the	  Museum’s	  mammal	  and	  bird	  specimens	  during	  his	  time	  as	  Assistant	  Curator70.	  1976	   The	  collection	  numbers	  14,071	  birds,	  10,770	  mammals	  and	  1,258	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles71.	  1978	   Vertebrate	  Museum	  re-­‐named	  the	  “Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum72”.	  1980	   Nasser	  Din	  resigns.	  	  Richard	  J.	  (Dick)	  Cannings	  is	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  64	  Grant,	  Peter,	  “Curriculum	  Vitae,”	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.princeton.edu/eeb/people/data/p/prgrant/CV.pdf.	  65	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1964-­‐1965.	  	  66	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1966-­‐1967.	  67	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On.	  68	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On;	  Campbell,	  R.	  Wayne	  Dawe,	  Neil	  K.	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  Ian.	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Volume	  One:	  Nonpasserines:	  Introduction,	  Loons	  Through	  Waterfowl,	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  1990),	  513.	  	  	  69	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1970-­‐1971.	  70	  Din,	  A	  Note	  On.	  71	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1976-­‐1977.	  72	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1978-­‐1979.	  hired	  as	  the	  Assistant	  Curator73.	  During	  his	  time	  at	  the	  Museum,	  Dick	  Cannings	  undertakes	  the	  process	  of	  computerizing	  the	  specimen	  catalogues.	  	  The	  collection	  numbers	  13,490	  specimens	  of	  mammals,	  14,300	  birds,	  6,650	  bird	  eggs,	  and	  1,311	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles74.	  1982	   Dr.	  J.	  Mary	  Taylor	  resigns	  and	  H.D.	  Fisher	  begins	  working	  as	  Curator75.	  1986	   Dr.	  H.D.	  Fisher	  resigns	  and	  is	  replaced	  by	  Dr.	  J.N.M.	  Smith	  as	  Curator76.	  1990	   The	  first	  volume	  of	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia	  is	  published,	  3	  of	  the	  6	  authors	  are	  former	  museum	  staff:	  Campbell,	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  and	  Kaiser77.	  1992	   The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  2	  is	  published78.	  1995	   Dick	  Cannings	  retires	  and	  Christine	  Adkins	  is	  hired	  as	  Acting	  Curator79.	  1997	   The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  3	  is	  published80.	  2000	   The	  collection	  catalogue	  contains	  17,400	  	  mammal	  specimens,	  15,200	  birds,	  2,100	  clutches	  of	  bird	  eggs,	  and	  1,600	  amphibians	  and	  reptiles81.	  2001	   The	  museum	  is	  listed	  in	  the	  UBC	  Academic	  Calendar	  as	  “inactive”	  due	  to	  a	  “lack	  of	  resources	  and	  curatorial	  support.82”	  	  Dr.	  Rex	  Kenner,	  a	  volunteer	  since	  1994,	  is	  hired	  part–time.	  Kenner	  works	  close	  to	  full-­‐time	  hours	  in	  order	  to	  fill	  the	  gap	  in	  curatorial	  support83.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  73	  Handwriting	  Samples.	  74	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1980-­‐1981.	  75	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1982-­‐1983.	  76	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1986-­‐1987.	  77	  Campbell	  et	  al.	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  	  78	  “The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Volume	  2,”	  UBC	  Press	  Webpage.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1573.	  	  79	  Oral	  History	  Interview	  with	  Richard	  	  J	  Cannings;	  Correspondence	  Addressed	  to	  Christine	  Adkins	  (1995	  Correspondence:	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Collection).	  	  	  80	  “The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  3,”	  UBC	  Press	  Webpage.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1276.	  81	  UBC	  Calendar,	  2000-­‐2001.	  	  82	  UBC	  Calendar,	  2001-­‐2002.	  83	  Cannings,	  R.	  A.,	  “Rex	  Kenner,	  In	  Memoriam.”	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  4	  is	  published84.	  2005	   Dr.	  Darren	  E.	  Irwin	  is	  appointed	  Curator.	  	  	  Chris	  M.	  Stinson	  begins	  volunteering	  at	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum.	  	  	  Dr.	  Rex	  Kenner	  and	  Allan	  Jensen	  (volunteer)	  begin	  specimen	  inventory	  in	  preparation	  for	  moving	  the	  collection	  to	  a	  new	  building.	  2007	   Chris	  Stinson	  is	  hired	  (Curatorial	  Assistant).	  	  	  Ildiko	  Szabo	  begins	  volunteering	  at	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum.	  2007	   The	  Inner	  Bird:	  Anatomy	  and	  Evolution	  is	  published	  by	  Gary	  W.	  Kaiser,	  partially	  owing	  to	  skeletal	  material	  accessed	  at	  the	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Museum85.	  2009	   Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Collection	  is	  moved	  out	  of	  the	  Biosciences	  building	  and	  is	  stored.	  	  UBC	  alumnus,	  Dr.	  Peter	  Grant,	  along	  with	  his	  wife	  and	  research	  partner,	  Dr.	  Rosemary	  Grant	  wins	  the	  Kyoto	  Prize	  for	  their	  decades-­‐long	  research	  on	  Galapagos	  finches86.	  	  2010	   Dr.	  Rex	  Kenner	  dies	  suddenly.	  	  	  Chris	  Stinson	  takes	  over	  the	  task	  of	  unpacking	  the	  specimens.	  	  The	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  (BBM)	  opens	  its	  doors.	  Museum	  is	  renamed	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection	  (CTC).	  	  	  The	  “Working	  with	  Birds”	  BBM	  webpage	  (bird	  specimen	  pre.	  manual)	  is	  launched.	  2012	   Ildiko	  Szabo	  is	  hired	  (Assistant	  Curator).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  84	  “The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  3,”	  UBC	  Press	  Webpage.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1276.	  85	  Kaiser,	  Gary.	  The	  Inner	  Bird:	  Anatomy	  and	  Evolution	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  2007),	  Acknowledgements.	  86	  MacPherson,	  Kitta,	  “Noted	  Husband	  and	  Wife	  Team	  Wins	  Kyoto	  Prize,”	  News	  at	  Princeton,	  June	  19,	  2009.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S24/53/41M02/index.xml?section=topstories.	  	  	  Museum	  specimen	  holding	  uploaded	  to	  VertNet	  	  (international	  multi-­‐museum	  search	  engine).	  	  Ildiko	  Szabo	  is	  nominated	  to	  the	  American	  Ornithology	  Union	  Collections	  Committee,	  in	  recognition	  for	  her	  BBM	  webpage	  “Working	  with	  Birds,”	  and	  the	  “Using	  and	  Contributing	  to	  Avian	  Collections	  NAOC-­‐V	  Workshop,”	  held	  at	  the	  BBM.87	  	  2013	   Chris	  Stinson	  undertakes	  the	  photo-­‐digitization	  of	  the	  avian,	  mammal,	  and	  herpetological	  collections.	  Specimen	  photos	  are	  incorporated	  in	  the	  CTC	  specimen	  catalogues	  (databases)	  prior	  to	  being	  uploaded	  to	  VertNet	  as	  part	  of	  the	  CTC	  annual	  updates88.	  	  2014	   Szabo,	  Hurley,	  Cavaghan,	  and	  Irwin	  publish	  a	  new	  curation	  protocol	  “A	  call	  for	  the	  preservation	  of	  images,	  recordings,	  and	  other	  data	  in	  association	  with	  avian	  genetic	  samples,	  and	  the	  introduction	  of	  a	  solution:	  OMBIRDS”	  in	  The	  Auk:	  Ornithological	  advances.	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  87	  “Ildiko	  Szabo	  Becomes	  Member	  of	  AOU	  Committee	  on	  Bird	  Collections,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/blog/ildiko-­‐szabo-­‐aou-­‐committee.	  88	  Stinson,	  Chris.	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014.	  Bibliography:	  Secondary	  Sources:	  Allen,	  Garland.	  Life	  Science	  in	  the	  Twentieth	  Century.	  (New	  York:	  Wiley,	  1975).	  	  “Biological	  Sciences	  Building,”	  Chronological	  Index	  of	  UBC	  Buildings,	  (Vancouver;	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Archives	  Online,	  2013).	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/bldgs/biology.html.	  	  “The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Volume	  2,”	  UBC	  Press	  Webpage.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1573.	  	  “The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Volume	  3,”	  UBC	  Press	  Webpage.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=1276.	  	  Boylan,	  Patrick	  J.	  “Universities	  and	  Museums:	  Past,	  Present,	  and	  Future,”	  Museum	  Management	  and	  Curatorship	  18	  (1999),	  43-­‐56.	  	  Campbell,	  R.	  Wayne;	  Jakimchuk,	  Ronald	  D.;	  and	  Demarchi,	  Dennis	  A.,	  “In	  Memoriam:	  Ian	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  1910-­‐2010,”	  The	  Auk	  130:	  4	  (2013),	  807-­‐809.	  	  Campbell,	  R.	  Wayne	  Dawe,	  Neil	  K.	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  Ian.	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Volume	  One:	  Nonpasserines:	  Introduction,	  Loons	  Through	  Waterfowl,	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  1990),	  513.	  	  Cannings,	  Robert	  A.	  “Rex	  Kenner:	  In	  Memoriam,”	  The	  Coleopterists	  Bulletin	  64:2	  (2010).	  	  Dawe,	  Neil	  K.;	  McTaggart-­‐Cowan,	  Ian;	  Cooper,	  John	  M.;	  Kaiser,	  Gary	  W.;	  McNall,	  Michael	  C.E.	  The	  Birds	  of	  British	  Columbia:	  Wood-­‐Warblers	  Through	  Old	  World	  Sparrows.	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  2001),	  735.	  	  Grant,	  Peter,	  “Curriculum	  Vitae,”	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.princeton.edu/eeb/people/data/p/prgrant/CV.pdf.	  	  Kaiser,	  Gary.	  The	  Inner	  Bird:	  Anatomy	  and	  Evolution	  (Vancouver:	  UBC	  Press,	  2007),	  Acknowledgements.	  	  Mackenzie,	  N.	  A.	  M.	  “The	  History	  of	  the	  University,”	  (Vancouver:	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Archives	  Online,	  2013).	  Originally	  published	  in	  the	  1957-­‐1958	  President’s	  Report.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/history.html.	  	  MacPherson,	  Kitta,	  “Noted	  Husband	  and	  Wife	  Team	  Wins	  Kyoto	  Prize,”	  News	  at	  Princeton,	  June	  19,	  2009.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S24/53/41M02/index.xml?section=topstories.	  	  Poliquin,	  Rachel.	  The	  Breathless	  Zoo:	  Taxidermy	  and	  the	  Cultures	  of	  Longing.	  (University	  Park:	  Pennsylvania	  State	  University	  Press,	  2012).	  	  Prince,	  Sue	  Ann,	  ed.	  "Stuffing	  Birds,	  Pressing	  Plants,	  Shaping	  Knowledge:	  Natural	  History	  in	  North	  America	  1730-­‐1860."	  American	  Philosophical	  Society	  (2003).	  	  Rader,	  Karen	  A.	  “From	  Natural	  History	  to	  Science:	  Display	  and	  the	  Transformation	  of	  American	  Museums	  of	  Science	  and	  Nature,”	  Museum	  and	  Society	  6:2	  (2008),	  152-­‐171.	  	  Sheets-­‐Pyenson,	  Susan.	  Cathedrals	  of	  Science:	  The	  Development	  of	  Colonial	  Natural	  History	  Museums	  During	  the	  Late	  Nineteenth	  Century	  (Kingston:	  McGill-­‐Queen’s	  University	  Press,	  1988).	  	  Steinbach,	  Susie	  L.	  Understanding	  the	  Victorians:	  Politics,	  Culture,	  and	  Society	  in	  Nineteenth-­‐Century	  Britain.	  (New	  York:	  Routledge,	  2012).	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Primary	  Sources:	  Cannings,	  Richard	  J.	  (Dick),	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  March	  4,	  2014.	  	  Correspondence	  Addressed	  to	  Christine	  Adkins	  (1995	  Correspondence:	  Cowan	  Vertebrate	  Collection).	  	  “The	  Collections,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/collections.	  	  Din,	  A	  Note	  on	  the	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection:	  Its	  Collections	  and	  Historical	  Background,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1976).	  	  “Group	  Programs	  and	  Tours,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/group-­‐programs-­‐tours.	  	  Hawthorn,	  Harry.	  Statement	  from	  the	  Faculty	  of	  Anthropology	  on	  the	  Zoological	  Museum,	  (History	  File:	  Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,	  1958).	  	  “How	  the	  Beaty	  Came	  to	  Be,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Website.	  Retrieved	  from:	  http://www.beatymuseum.ubc.ca/history.	  	  Office	  of	  the	  Premier,	  Ministry	  of	  Small	  Business,	  Technology,	  and	  Economic	  Development.	  2010.	  “New	  UBC	  Centre	  Home	  to	  Canada’s	  Largest	  Whale	  Exhibit.”	  [press	  release]	  May	  13,	  2010.	  	  Stinson,	  Chris.	  Oral	  history	  interview,	  February	  27,	  2014.	  	  Szabo,	  Ildiko.	  “Cowan	  Tetrapod	  Collection,”	  Beaty	  Biodiversity	  Museum	  Annual	  Report.	  	  UBC	  Calendar,	  1942-­‐1983,	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  Calendar	  Collection	  Online.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://ubcpubs.library.ubc.ca/?db=calendars2.	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0103572/manifest

Comment

Related Items