UBC Undergraduate Research

The Persistence of the Fujimori Legacy in Peru Caceres Booth, Julia 2013

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Julia Caceres Booth Honours Thesis April 2013.pdf [ 554.97kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0076021.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0076021-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0076021-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0076021-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0076021-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0076021-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0076021-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0076021-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0076021.ris

Full Text

	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   The	
  Persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy	
  in	
  Peru	
   	
   By	
   	
   Julia	
  E.	
  Caceres	
  Booth	
   	
   Submitted	
  in	
  partial	
  fulfillment	
  of	
  the	
  requirements	
  of	
  the	
  Honours	
  Program	
  in	
  History	
   University	
  of	
  British	
  Columbia,	
  Okanagan	
   2013	
   	
   Faculty	
  Supervisor:	
  Dr.	
  Jessica	
  Stites	
  Mor,	
  Director	
  of	
  Latin	
  American	
  Studies	
   	
   Author’s	
  Signature:	
  _____________________________________________	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Date:________________	
   Supervisor’s	
  Signature:	
  	
  __________________________________________	
  	
  	
  	
  Date:________________	
   Honour’s	
  Supervisor’s	
  Signature:	
  ___________________________________	
  	
  Date:________________	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   Abstract	
   	
   The	
  legacy	
  of	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  in	
  Peru	
  has	
  been	
  previously	
  treated	
  by	
  scholars	
  as	
  moribund	
  at	
   the	
  regime’s	
  end	
  in	
  2000.	
  However,	
  this	
  thesis	
  reassesses	
  the	
  recent	
  past	
  to	
  shed	
  light	
  on	
  the	
   persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  in	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century.	
  Peru’s	
  twentieth	
  century	
  political	
  history	
   culminated	
  in	
  1990	
  with	
  a	
  breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  system	
  concurrent	
  with	
  grave	
  economic	
   and	
  social	
  crises.	
  These	
  developments	
  allowed	
  for	
  political	
  outsider,	
  neopopulist	
  and	
  authoritarian	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  become	
  president	
  in	
  1990.	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  administration	
  saw	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  a	
   persistent	
  legacy	
  that	
  powerfully	
  captured	
  and	
  shaped	
  meanings	
  of	
  an	
  internal	
  war	
  and	
  the	
  restoration	
   of	
  macroeconomic	
  stability,	
  despite	
  the	
  period’s	
  widespread	
  corruption.	
  This	
  thesis	
  argues	
  that	
   Fujimori’s	
  daughter	
  Keiko’s	
  near	
  presidential	
  win	
  in	
  2011	
  emphasizes	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  this	
  powerful	
   legacy.	
  Applying	
  a	
  contemporary	
  historical	
  methodology,	
  this	
  thesis	
  examines	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  via	
  the	
   intersection	
  of	
  public	
  opinion	
  and	
  intellectual	
  interpretation.	
    	
    2	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   Acknowledgements	
   	
   I	
  am	
  indebted	
  to	
  many	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  completion	
  of	
  my	
  Honours	
  thesis.	
  First	
  and	
  foremost,	
  I	
   would	
  like	
  to	
  thank	
  Dr.	
  Stites	
  Mor	
  for	
  her	
  encouragement	
  and	
  support	
  during	
  the	
  writing	
  of	
  this	
  thesis.	
   Her	
  guidance	
  and	
  knowledge	
  were	
  fundamental	
  to	
  the	
  completion	
  of	
  this	
  project.	
  I	
  would	
  also	
  like	
  to	
   thank	
  the	
  public	
  polling	
  agency	
  Apoyo	
  for	
  their	
  assistance	
  in	
  accessing	
  opinion	
  poll	
  data.	
  Finally,	
  I	
  am	
   extremely	
  grateful	
  for	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  my	
  mother	
  Laverne	
  and	
  my	
  father	
  Eduardo,	
  my	
  partner	
  Cameron	
   and	
  my	
  friends	
  for	
  their	
  patience	
  and	
  support	
  during	
  this	
  endeavour,	
  I	
  cannot	
  thank	
  you	
  enough.	
    	
    3	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   Table	
  of	
  Contents	
   	
   	
   List	
  of	
  Abbreviations…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…6	
   	
   Introduction:	
  Topic,	
  Methodology,	
  Literature	
  Review	
  and	
  Organization…………………………………………….…8	
   • • • • •  History	
  of	
  the	
  Topic	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  9	
   Methodology	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  9	
   Literature	
  Review	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  11	
   Sources	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  14	
   Organization	
  of	
  Thesis	
  and	
  Background	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  15	
   	
    Chapter	
  1:	
  Background	
  and	
  Crisis	
  in	
  the	
  1980s……………………………………………………………………………………..18	
   • • • • • •  Reform	
  under	
  the	
  Military	
  Government,	
  1968-­‐1980	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  20	
   Return	
  to	
  Civilian	
  Rule	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  24	
   The	
  Rural	
  Insurgency	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  25	
   Fernando	
  Belaúnde	
  Terry	
  and	
  the	
  Economic	
  Crisis,	
  1980-­‐1985	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  27	
   The	
  United	
  Left	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  29	
   Alan	
  García	
  Perez,	
  Political,	
  Economic	
  and	
  Social	
  Crisis,	
  1985-­‐1990	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  30	
   	
    Chapter	
  2:	
  The	
  1990	
  Elections……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….34	
   • • • • • • •  The	
  Municipal	
  Elections	
  and	
  the	
  Rise	
  of	
  Political	
  Outsiders	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  35	
   Division	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Left	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  36	
   The	
  Democratic	
  Front	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  38	
   The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  40	
   The	
  First	
  Round	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  42	
   The	
  Second	
  Round	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  43	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori’s	
  Presidential	
  Victory	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  45	
   	
   	
    	
    4	
    	
   	
   	
   Chapter	
   3:	
   Alberto	
   Fujimori	
   in	
   Office……………………………………..…………………………………………………………….48	
   • • • • •  Economic	
  Adjustment,	
  “Fujishock”	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  48	
   Self-­‐Coup,	
  Anti-­‐Terror	
  Measures	
  and	
  a	
  New	
  Constitution	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  51	
   The	
  1995	
  Elections	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  54	
   Fujimori’s	
  Second	
  Term,	
  1995-­‐2000	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  56	
   The	
  2000	
  Elections,	
  Growing	
  Unrest	
  and	
  the	
  Collapse	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Regime	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  60	
   	
    Chapter	
  4:	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy	
  in	
  the	
  Twenty-­‐First	
  Century…………………………………………………………….….65	
   • • • • •  Alejandro	
  Toledo	
  in	
  Office,	
  2001-­‐2006	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  66	
   The	
  2006	
  Elections	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  69	
   Fujimori	
  on	
  Trial	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  72	
   García	
  in	
  Office,	
  2006-­‐2011	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  73	
   The	
  2011	
  Elections	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  73	
   	
    Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….77	
   Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….81	
    	
    5	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   List	
  of	
  Abbreviations	
   	
   AF	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Alianza	
  por	
  el	
  Futuro—Alliance	
  for	
  the	
  Future	
   AP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Acción	
  Popular—Popular	
  Action	
   APEMIPE	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Asociación	
  de	
  Pequeños	
  y	
  Medianos	
  Industriales	
  del	
  Perú—Association	
  of	
  Small	
  and	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Medium	
  Sized	
  Industrialists	
  of	
  Peru	
   APRA	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Alianza	
  Popular	
  Revolucionaria	
  Americana—American	
  Popular	
  Revolutionary	
  Alliance	
   ASI	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Acuerdo	
  Socialista	
  de	
  Izquierda—Socialist	
  Accord	
  of	
  the	
  Left	
   ASN	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Alianza	
  solidaridad	
  Nacional—National	
  Solidarity	
  Alliance	
   C-­‐90	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Cambio	
  ’90—Change	
  ‘90	
   CCP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Confederación	
  Campesina	
  del	
  Perú—Peruvian	
  Peasant	
  Confederation	
    CGTP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Confederación	
  General	
  de	
  Trabajadores	
  del	
  Perú—General	
  Confederation	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Workers	
   GP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Gana	
  Perú—Win	
  Peru	
   CIA	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Central	
  Intelligence	
  Agency	
  (U.S.)	
   CNA	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Confederación	
  Nacional	
  Agraria—National	
  Agrarian	
  Confederation	
   CONFIEP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Confederación	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Instituciones	
  Empresariales	
  Privadas—Peruvian	
  Confederation	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  of	
  Industrialists	
  and	
  Entrepreneurs	
   FNTC	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frente	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Trabajadores	
  y	
  Campesinos—National	
  Front	
  of	
  Workers	
  and	
  Peasants	
   FOCEP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frente	
  Obrero	
  Campesino	
  Estudiantil	
  y	
  Popular—Worker,	
  Peasant,	
  Student,	
  and	
  Popular	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Front	
   FREDEMO	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frente	
  Democrático—Democratic	
  Front	
  	
   FREPAP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Frente	
  Popular	
  Agrícola	
  del	
  Perú—Agricultural	
  People’s	
  Front	
  of	
  Peru	
   IMF	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  International	
  Monetary	
  Fund	
    	
    6	
    	
   	
   IPC	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  International	
  Petroleum	
  Company	
   IS	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Izquierda	
  Socialista—Socialist	
  Left	
   IU	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Izquierda	
  Unida—United	
  Left	
   NM	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Nueva	
  Mayoría—New	
  Majority	
   MRTA	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Movimiento	
  Revolucionario	
  Túpac	
  Amaru—Tupac	
  Amaru	
  Revolutionary	
  Movement	
   OAS	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Organization	
  of	
  American	
  States	
   PCP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  Communista	
  Peruano—Peruvian	
  Communist	
  Party	
   PCR	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  Communista	
  Revolucionario—Revolutionary	
  Communist	
  Party	
   PNP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unión	
  por	
  el	
  Perú—Union	
  for	
  Peru	
   PP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Perú	
  Posible—Peru	
  Possible	
   PPC	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  Popular	
  Christiano—Christian	
  People’s	
  Party	
   PSR	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  Socialista	
  Revolucionario—Revolutionary	
  Socialist	
  Party	
   PUM	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  Unificado	
  Mariatiguista—Mariatiguist	
  Unified	
  Party	
   SIN	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Servicio	
  de	
  Inteligencia	
  Nacional—National	
  Intelligence	
  Agency	
   SODE	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Solidaridad	
  y	
  Democracia—Solidarity	
  and	
  Democracy	
  Party	
   UCI	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unión	
  Cívic	
  Independiente—Independent	
  Civic	
  Union	
   UD	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Partido	
  de	
  la	
  Unidad	
  Democrática—Democratic	
  Unity	
  Party	
   UDP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unidad	
  Democrático	
  Popular—Popular	
  Democratic	
  Unity	
   UN	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unidad	
  Nacional—National	
  Unity	
   UNIR	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unidad	
  de	
  Izquierda	
  Revolucionaria—Revolutionary	
  Left	
  Union	
   UNO	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unión	
  Nacional	
  Odrista—Odríst	
  National	
  Union	
   UPP	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Unión	
  Para	
  Perú—Union	
  for	
  Peru	
   	
   	
   	
    	
    7	
    	
   	
   	
   	
   Introduction:	
   	
  Topic,	
  Methodology,	
  Literature	
  Review	
  and	
  Organization	
   	
   	
    Across	
  Latin	
  America,	
  the	
  early	
  twentieth	
  century	
  saw	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  popular	
  demands	
  for	
  wider	
    political	
  inclusion,	
  the	
  loosening	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  oligarchy	
  and	
  land	
  reform.	
  These	
  demands	
  manifested	
   themselves	
  in	
  different	
  ways	
  throughout	
  the	
  region.	
  In	
  Peru,	
  the	
  early	
  twentieth	
  century	
  saw	
  the	
   formation	
  of	
  political	
  parties	
  and	
  popular	
  movements	
  that	
  aimed	
  to	
  address	
  these	
  demands	
  through	
   varied	
  means.	
  The	
  unique	
  political	
  and	
  social	
  trajectory	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  history	
  in	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  led	
   to	
  the	
  domination	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  scene	
  by	
  outsiders	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  decade	
  of	
  the	
  century.	
  As	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  this	
   shift	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  politics,	
  political	
  outsider1,	
  authoritarian	
  and	
  neopopulist2,	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori,	
  was	
  able	
  to	
   capture	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  1990,	
  remaining	
  in	
  office	
  until	
  2000.	
  Fujimori	
  fashioned	
  a	
  powerful	
  legacy	
  that	
   persisted	
  beyond	
  his	
  removal	
  from	
  office	
  and	
  subsequent	
  imprisonment	
  on	
  charges	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
   human	
  rights	
  violations	
  in	
  2000.	
  This	
  legacy	
  was	
  effectively	
  capitalized	
  on	
  by	
  his	
  daughter	
  Keiko	
  during	
   her	
  2011	
  presidential	
  bid.	
  This	
  thesis	
  attempts	
  to	
  uncover	
  aspects	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  political	
  legacy	
  that	
  have	
   previously	
  been	
  perceived	
  as	
  moribund	
  with	
  the	
  regime’s	
  end	
  in	
  2000,	
  drawing	
  a	
  new	
  discussion	
  of	
  this	
   legacy	
  into	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century.	
  	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   1  	
  The	
  term	
  “political	
  outsider”	
  denotes	
  any	
  political	
  actor	
  who	
  does	
  not	
  possess	
  previous	
  ties	
  to	
  the	
  political	
   establishment	
  and,	
  thus,	
  does	
  not	
  rely	
  upon	
  party	
  identity	
  to	
  form	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  an	
  electoral	
  platform.	
   2 	
  The	
  term	
  “neopopulist”	
  will	
  be	
  applied	
  according	
  to	
  Kurt	
  Weyland’s	
  succinct	
  definition	
  of	
  the	
  style	
  of	
  leadership	
   as,	
  “…a	
  majoritarian	
  conception	
  of	
  political	
  rule:	
  ‘the	
  will	
  of	
  the	
  people’—as	
  interpreted	
  by	
  a	
  predominant	
  chief	
   executive—reigns	
  supreme,	
  largely	
  unrestrained	
  by	
  parliament	
  and	
  the	
  courts.	
  Checks	
  and	
  balances	
  are	
  weak	
  and	
   horizontal	
  accountability	
  is	
  low,	
  but	
  the	
  vertical	
  relationship	
  between	
  a	
  personalistic	
  leader	
  and	
  ‘the	
  masses’	
   sustains	
  neopopulism.”	
  Taken	
  from:	
  Kurt	
  Weyland,	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neopopulist	
  Leadership,”	
  in	
   The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  13.	
  	
    	
    8	
    	
   	
   History	
  of	
  the	
  Topic	
   	
    A	
  great	
  deal	
  has	
  been	
  written	
  by	
  historians,	
  anthropologists,	
  sociologists,	
  economists	
  and	
    political	
  scientists	
  on	
  what	
  has	
  been	
  referred	
  to	
  as	
  the	
  “Fujimori	
  phenomenon.”	
  These	
  works	
  have	
   focused	
  on	
  the	
  social	
  and	
  economic	
  crisis	
  that	
  plagued	
  Peru	
  in	
  the	
  1980s	
  and	
  1990s,	
  the	
  concurrent	
   breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system,	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  from	
  obscurity	
  to	
  the	
  presidency,	
  his	
  subsequent	
   years	
  in	
  office	
  and	
  his	
  regime’s	
  breakdown	
  in	
  2000.	
  Such	
  works	
  have	
  proven	
  most	
  useful	
  for	
  this	
  project.	
   Up	
  to	
  this	
  point,	
  scholars	
  have	
  treated	
  the	
  rise	
  and	
  legacy	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  as	
  a	
  contained	
  phenomenon,	
   implying	
  Fujimori’s	
  ability	
  to	
  command	
  the	
  electorate	
  has	
  been	
  subverted	
  following	
  his	
  removal	
  from	
   office	
  and	
  his	
  subsequent	
  arrest	
  and	
  imprisonment	
  on	
  charges	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  human	
  rights	
   violations.	
  Few	
  scholars	
  have	
  included	
  Peru’s	
  recent	
  past,	
  from	
  2000	
  to	
  the	
  present,	
  in	
  their	
  historical	
   analysis	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  his	
  legacy	
  in	
  Peru.	
  The	
  continued	
  absence	
  of	
  traditional	
  parties	
  in	
  twenty-­‐first	
   century	
  Peruvian	
  politics	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  continuation	
  of	
  support	
  for	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  as	
  seen	
  in	
   widespread	
  support	
  for	
  his	
  daughter’s	
  2011	
  presidential	
  candidacy	
  provides	
  the	
  reasoning	
  to	
  reassess	
   this	
  topic.	
  	
   Methodology	
   	
    Contemporary	
  history	
  is	
  an	
  important	
  component	
  of	
  historical	
  understanding.	
  As	
  numerous	
    scholars	
  have	
  argued,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  study	
  recent	
  historical	
  developments	
  in	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  place	
  these	
   developments	
  in	
  a	
  wider	
  historical	
  context.	
  This	
  methodology	
  has	
  been	
  suggested	
  by	
  scholars	
  of	
   contemporary	
  history	
  such	
  as	
  Peter	
  Catterall,	
  who	
  notes	
  that	
  the	
  focus	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history	
  should	
   be	
  placed	
  on	
  “…[wider]	
  trends	
  rather	
  than	
  apparent	
  outcomes.”3	
  Taking	
  into	
  account	
  the	
  temporal	
   closeness	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history	
  can	
  prevent	
  the	
  historian	
  from	
  making	
  any	
  grand	
  statements	
  related	
   to	
  the	
  end	
  result	
  of	
  a	
  particular	
  historical	
  process,	
  a	
  problem	
  that	
  more	
  often	
  arises	
  in	
  history	
  of	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   3  	
  Peter	
  Catterall,	
  “What	
  (If	
  Anything)	
  is	
  Distinctive	
  about	
  Contemporary	
  History?”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  History	
   32,	
  no.	
  1	
  (1997):	
  451-­‐452.	
  http://jch.sagepub.com/content/32/4/441.citation	
  (accessed	
  February	
  25,	
  2013).	
    	
    9	
    	
   	
   distant	
  past	
  as	
  the	
  very	
  nature	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history	
  denotes	
  an	
  ongoing	
  process.4	
  Contemporary	
   history	
  is	
  by	
  its	
  nature	
  political,	
  thus	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  ground	
  our	
  understandings	
  of	
  the	
  recent	
  past	
  in	
   sound	
  historical	
  methodology	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  more	
  stable	
  understanding	
  of	
  current	
  situations	
  than	
   non-­‐historical	
  sources,	
  often	
  solicited	
  by	
  politicians	
  or	
  the	
  public	
  at	
  large	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  advance	
  certain	
   goals,	
  can	
  provide.5	
  Daniel	
  Little	
  argues	
  that	
  laying	
  a	
  solid	
  historical	
  foundation	
  for	
  future	
  scholars	
  is	
  a	
   necessary	
  pursuit;	
  the	
  work	
  may	
  be	
  subject	
  to	
  different	
  interpretation	
  by	
  later	
  scholars,	
  but	
  this	
  does	
   not	
  negate	
  its	
  intrinsic	
  value.6	
   The	
  “Tenets	
  of	
  Historicism”	
  first	
  put	
  forward	
  by	
  Leopold	
  von	
  Ranke	
  in	
  the	
  nineteenth	
  century,	
   now	
  over	
  a	
  century	
  old	
  and	
  vigorously	
  expanded,	
  outline	
  some	
  important	
  cautions	
  for	
  the	
  contemporary	
   historian.	
  The	
  most	
  widely	
  cited	
  concerns	
  for	
  the	
  practice	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history	
  can	
  be	
  traced	
  back	
  to	
   Ranke’s	
  assertions.	
  One	
  such	
  caution	
  is	
  that	
  historians	
  should	
  avoid	
  history	
  that	
  is	
  concerned	
  with	
   present-­‐day	
  realities,	
  that	
  is	
  historians	
  should	
  not	
  study	
  the	
  past	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  understand	
  contemporary	
   issues	
  but	
  instead	
  should	
  look	
  beyond	
  contemporary	
  conceptions	
  of	
  reality	
  to	
  attempt	
  to	
  re-­‐create	
  the	
   past.7	
  Ranke’s	
  concern	
  with	
  historical	
  undertakings	
  attempting	
  to	
  explain	
  the	
  present	
  is	
  valid.	
  Taking	
  this	
   caution	
  into	
  account,	
  this	
  project	
  aims	
  to	
  reassess	
  the	
  past	
  based	
  on	
  recent	
  developments	
  in	
  the	
   historical	
  process.	
  Michel	
  Foucault	
  has	
  convincingly	
  argued	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  possible	
  way	
  to	
  distance	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   4  	
  Timothy	
  Garton	
  Ash,	
  History	
  of	
  the	
  Present:	
  Essays,	
  Sketches,	
  and	
  Dispatches	
  from	
  Europe	
  in	
  the	
  1990s	
  (New	
  York:	
   Random	
  House,	
  1999),	
  xvi-­‐xvii.	
   5 	
  Jan	
  Palmowski,	
  “Speaking	
  Truth	
  to	
  Power:	
  Contemporary	
  History	
  in	
  the	
  Twenty-­‐First	
  Century,”	
  Journal	
  of	
   Contemporary	
  History	
  46,	
  no.	
  3	
  (2011):	
  499.	
  http://jch.sagepub.com/content/46/3/485.citation	
  (accessed	
  February	
   25,	
  2013).	
  	
   6 	
  Daniel	
  Little,	
  “History	
  of	
  the	
  Present,”	
  Understanding	
  Society:	
  Innovative	
  Thinking	
  about	
  Social	
  Agency	
  and	
   Structure	
  in	
  the	
  Global	
  World,	
  http://understandingsociety.blogspot.ca/2009/08/history-­‐of-­‐present.html	
  	
   (accessed	
  February	
  10,	
  2013).	
  	
   7 	
  John	
  Tosh,	
  The	
  Pursuit	
  of	
  History:	
  Aims,	
  Methods	
  and	
  New	
  Directions	
  in	
  the	
  Study	
  of	
  Modern	
  History	
  (Harlow:	
   Pearson	
  Education	
  Limited,	
  2010),	
  7-­‐8.	
    	
    10	
    	
   	
   oneself	
  or	
  one’s	
  assessment	
  of	
  the	
  past	
  from	
  the	
  present	
  and	
  that	
  an	
  awareness	
  of	
  this	
  relationship	
  is	
   necessary.8	
  	
   The	
  importance	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history’s	
  engagement	
  with	
  other	
  disciplines	
  has	
  been	
  duly	
   noted	
  by	
  contemporary	
  historians	
  who	
  argue	
  that	
  this	
  engagement	
  is	
  necessary	
  to	
  produce	
  “a	
  fuller	
   account	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history.”9	
  This	
  thesis	
  engages	
  with	
  sources	
  from	
  outside	
  the	
  discipline	
  of	
   history	
  while	
  making	
  every	
  effort	
  to	
  ground	
  the	
  discussion	
  in	
  sound	
  historical	
  methodology	
  and	
   presentation.	
  Furthermore,	
  in	
  viewing	
  these	
  recently	
  produced	
  scholarly	
  works	
  as	
  primary	
  documents	
  of	
   intellectual	
  history	
  and	
  examining	
  how	
  and	
  where	
  they	
  intersect	
  with	
  public	
  opinion	
  through	
  poll	
  data,	
   this	
  thesis	
  provides	
  a	
  well-­‐rounded	
  and	
  comprehensive	
  analysis	
  of	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  important	
  factors	
   underlying	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  in	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century.	
   Literature	
  Review	
   This	
  thesis	
  relies	
  primarily	
  on	
  literature	
  produced	
  by	
  political	
  and	
  social	
  scientists,	
  as	
  little	
   historical	
  work	
  on	
  this	
  period	
  in	
  recent	
  Peruvian	
  history	
  exists	
  to	
  date.	
  Patricia	
  Oliart’s	
  essay,	
  “Alberto	
   Fujimori:	
  ‘The	
  Man	
  Peru	
  Needed?,’”	
  published	
  in	
  1998,	
  provides	
  a	
  good	
  starting	
  point	
  for	
  the	
  discussion	
   of	
  secondary	
  sources	
  related	
  to	
  this	
  thesis.	
  Oliart	
  attempts	
  to	
  explain	
  the	
  force	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  influence	
  in	
   Peru	
  within	
  the	
  context	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  society	
  from	
  1990	
  to	
  1995.	
  Although	
  her	
  essay	
  focuses	
  on	
  the	
   “Fujimori	
  phenomenon”	
  through	
  the	
  lens	
  of	
  the	
  president’s	
  sociocultural	
  impact,	
  it	
  provides	
  valuable	
   insight	
  into	
  the	
  forces	
  that	
  allowed	
  him	
  to	
  remain	
  in	
  power,	
  despite	
  a	
  marked	
  shift	
  to	
  authoritarianism.	
  	
   Oliart’s	
  essay	
  also	
  analyses	
  the	
  forces	
  underlying	
  Fujimori’s	
  continued	
  popularity	
  up	
  until	
  1995.	
  Oliart	
   argues	
  that	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  high	
  approval	
  ratings	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  during	
  his	
  presidency	
  must	
  be	
  examined	
   within	
  the	
  context	
  of	
  strategic	
  relationships	
  between	
  the	
  president	
  and	
  certain	
  segments	
  within	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   8  	
  Michael	
  S.	
  Roth,	
  “Foucault’s	
  ‘History	
  of	
  the	
  Present’”	
  History	
  and	
  Theory	
  20,	
  no.	
  1	
  (1981),	
  35,	
   http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/stable/pdfplus/2504643.pdf?acceptTC=true	
  (accessed	
  February	
  10,	
   2013).	
   9 	
  Palmowski,	
  496.	
    	
    11	
    	
   	
   population.	
  Specifically,	
  she	
  argues,	
  Fujimori’s	
  anti-­‐traditionalist	
  image	
  was	
  the	
  determining	
  factor	
  in	
  his	
   appeal	
  to	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  masses,	
  specifically	
  to	
  the	
  poor.10	
   The	
  2006	
  collection	
  of	
  essays	
  entitled	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  provides	
  a	
   survey	
  of	
  scholarly	
  works	
  aiming	
  to	
  unpack	
  the	
  legacy	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  most	
  controversial	
  president.	
  The	
  book	
   attempts	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  context	
  in	
  which	
  Fujimori	
  rose	
  from	
  obscurity	
  to	
  the	
  presidency,	
  and	
  the	
   means	
  by	
  which	
  his	
  administration	
  consolidated	
  its	
  power	
  and	
  why	
  it	
  suddenly	
  collapsed	
  in	
  2000.11	
  Each	
   essay	
  in	
  this	
  collection	
  assesses	
  different	
  aspects	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  rise	
  to	
  power,	
  his	
  administration	
  and	
  the	
   regime’s	
  breakdown	
  in	
  2000.	
  Especially	
  notable	
  of	
  these	
  essays	
  for	
  the	
  purposes	
  of	
  this	
  thesis	
  is	
  Kurt	
   Weyland’s	
  work	
  entitled	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neopopulist	
  Leadership.”	
  This	
  essay,	
   although	
  tightly	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  ramifications	
  of	
  neopopulism	
  under	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  the	
  tendencies	
   of	
  this	
  form	
  of	
  leadership,	
  provides	
  a	
  useful	
  analysis	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  rise,	
  time	
  in	
  office	
  and	
  the	
  forces	
  that	
   eventually	
  undermined	
  the	
  administration.	
  Weyland	
  argues	
  that	
  the	
  fall	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  regime	
  was	
  a	
   product	
  of	
  the	
  president’s	
  unwillingness	
  to	
  institutionalize	
  his	
  party	
  and	
  his	
  own	
  personalistic	
  style	
  of	
   leadership.12	
  Also	
  of	
  note	
  in	
  this	
  collection	
  is	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron’s	
  essay	
  “Endogenous	
  Regime	
   Breakdown:	
  The	
  Vladivideo	
  and	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Fujimori.”	
  Cameron	
  provides	
  a	
  valuable	
  discussion	
  of	
   the	
  internal	
  workings	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  regime,	
  highlighting	
  internal	
  forces	
  that	
  largely	
  contributed	
  to	
  the	
   regime’s	
  breakdown	
  in	
  2000.	
  Maxwell	
  argues	
  that	
  the	
  forces	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  clientelism	
  that	
  brought	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   10  	
  Patricia	
  Oliart,	
  “Alberto	
  Fujimori:	
  ‘The	
  Man	
  Peru	
  Needed?’”	
  in	
  Shining	
  and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
  in	
  Peru,	
   1980-­‐1995,	
  ed.	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern	
  (Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  1998),	
  411-­‐424.	
   11 	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  “Conclusion:	
  The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Fall	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  309.	
   12 	
  Kurt	
  Weyland,	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neopopulist	
  Leadership”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
   Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
   Press,	
  2006),	
  13-­‐38.	
    	
    12	
    	
   	
   the	
  Fujimori	
  regime	
  down	
  were	
  the	
  same	
  forces	
  that	
  were	
  intrinsic	
  to	
  the	
  president’s	
  rise	
  to	
  power	
  in	
   1990.13	
   Cynthia	
  McClintock,	
  a	
  political	
  scientist	
  and	
  scholar	
  of	
  international	
  affairs,	
  in	
  her	
  2006	
  article	
   “An	
  Unlikely	
  Comeback	
  in	
  Peru”,	
  provides	
  an	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  events	
  underlying	
  Alan	
  García	
  Perez’s	
   political	
  comeback	
  in	
  the	
  2006	
  elections.	
  This	
  essay	
  contains	
  valuable	
  insight	
  into	
  very	
  recent	
  political	
   processes	
  in	
  post-­‐2000	
  Peru,	
  including	
  the	
  transition	
  period	
  between	
  Fujimori’s	
  removal	
  from	
  office,	
  his	
   successor	
  Alejandro	
  Toledo’s	
  time	
  in	
  office,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  García’s	
  somewhat	
  shocking	
  return	
  to	
  the	
   presidency	
  after	
  his	
  disastrous	
  first	
  term	
  in	
  office	
  from	
  1985-­‐1990	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  McClintock’s	
  intellectual	
   interpretation	
  of	
  these	
  events.	
  This	
  analysis	
  provides	
  a	
  view	
  into	
  the	
  resurgence	
  of	
  political	
  actors	
  in	
   Peru	
  who	
  were	
  previously	
  discredited	
  but	
  managed	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  domestic	
  popularity,	
  providing	
  a	
   valuable	
  comparative	
  approach	
  that	
  is	
  utilized	
  to	
  better	
  understand	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
   legacy	
  and	
  the	
  intellectual	
  framework	
  that	
  scholars	
  have	
  constructed	
  around	
  such	
  political	
  resurgences	
   in	
  Peru.	
  McClintock	
  argues	
  that	
  García	
  returned	
  to	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  2006	
  because	
  he	
  tailored	
  his	
   campaign	
  platform	
  to	
  meet	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  concerns	
  for	
  democracy	
  and	
  social	
  justice	
   while	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  continuing	
  Peru	
  on	
  its	
  neoliberal	
  path	
  to	
  economic	
  development.14	
   In	
  a	
  similar	
  vein,	
  Steven	
  Levitsky’s	
  “A	
  Surprising	
  Left	
  Turn,”	
  published	
  in	
  2011,	
  offers	
  a	
   contemporary	
  analysis	
  of	
  the	
  process	
  underlying	
  Ollanta	
  Humala’s	
  successful	
  presidential	
  campaign	
  and	
   Keiko	
  Fujimori’s	
  near	
  win	
  in	
  2011.	
  Despite	
  the	
  article’s	
  emphasis	
  on	
  governmental	
  processes	
  the	
   document	
  offers	
  an	
  important	
  historical	
  framework	
  that	
  was	
  most	
  useful	
  in	
  this	
  project’s	
  attempts	
  at	
   situating	
  Peru’s	
  recent	
  past	
  in	
  a	
  historical	
  context	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  understanding	
  Levitsky’s	
  interpretation	
  of	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   13  	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron,	
  “Endogenous	
  Regime	
  Breakdown:	
  The	
  Valdivideo	
  and	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Fujimori,”	
  in	
  The	
   Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  267-­‐293.	
   14 	
  Cynthia	
  McClintock,	
  “An	
  Unlikely	
  Comeback	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  17,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2006):	
  95-­‐109,	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v017/17.4mcclintock.pdf	
  (accessed	
   January	
  20,	
  2013).	
    	
    13	
    	
   	
   important	
  historical	
  events	
  related	
  to	
  Humala’s	
  win.	
  Levitsky	
  argues	
  that	
  left-­‐leaning	
  president	
  Humala’s	
   2011	
  presidential	
  victory	
  can	
  be	
  traced	
  back	
  to	
  three	
  important	
  factors:	
  the	
  splitting	
  of	
  the	
  moderate	
   vote,	
  persistent	
  and	
  widespread	
  distrust	
  of	
  political	
  institutions	
  and	
  finally	
  Humala’s	
  efforts	
  to	
  moderate	
   his	
  image	
  in	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  that	
  allowed	
  him	
  to	
  capture	
  middle	
  class	
  voters	
  who	
  saw	
  Keiko	
   Fujimori	
  as	
  the	
  more	
  dangerous	
  of	
  the	
  two	
  undesirable	
  candidates.15	
   Sources	
   The	
  majority	
  of	
  sources	
  that	
  examine	
  Peru’s	
  post-­‐2000	
  recent	
  past	
  are	
  written	
  by	
  political	
   scientists,	
  sociologists,	
  economic	
  theorists	
  and	
  other	
  social	
  science	
  scholars	
  engaged	
  in	
  mapping	
   political,	
  social	
  and	
  economic	
  trends	
  with	
  an	
  eye	
  to	
  the	
  future.	
  This	
  thesis	
  argues	
  that	
  these	
  sources	
  can	
   also	
  be	
  viewed	
  as	
  primary	
  sources,	
  demonstrating	
  the	
  intellectual	
  framing	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  regime	
  in	
   dialogue	
  with	
  the	
  political	
  economy	
  of	
  Peru	
  after	
  2000.	
  While	
  viewing	
  these	
  sources	
  as	
  primary	
   documents,	
  particularly	
  works	
  produced	
  by	
  respected	
  Latin	
  American	
  scholars	
  and	
  intellectuals,	
  this	
   thesis	
  grounds	
  its	
  discussion	
  in	
  historical	
  processes	
  and	
  not	
  in	
  attempts	
  to	
  analyze	
  or	
  predict	
  Peru’s	
   future.	
  Such	
  social	
  science	
  works	
  have	
  provided	
  valuable	
  insight	
  into	
  social,	
  economic	
  and	
  political	
   processes	
  underlying	
  this	
  period	
  of	
  recent	
  Peruvian	
  history	
  while	
  a	
  critical	
  reading	
  of	
  them	
  provides	
  a	
   better	
  sense	
  of	
  the	
  constructed	
  nature	
  of	
  historical	
  understandings	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy.	
  These	
  sources	
   are	
  put	
  into	
  dialogue	
  with	
  opinion	
  poll	
  data,	
  election	
  results,	
  journalism,	
  Interviews	
  and	
  speeches	
  in	
   order	
  to	
  broaden	
  the	
  discussion	
  of	
  the	
  social	
  dimensions	
  of	
  historical	
  memory	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  its	
  uses.	
   Finally,	
  these	
  scholarly	
  primary	
  documents	
  provide	
  the	
  historical	
  framework	
  necessary	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
   persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  in	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century.	
  These	
  sources	
  were	
  gathered	
  with	
  the	
   help	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  non-­‐governmental	
  organizations	
  or	
  online	
  through	
  governmental	
  and	
  non-­‐ governmental	
  channels.	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   15  	
  Steven	
  Levitsky,	
  “A	
  Surprising	
  Left	
  Turn,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  22,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  84-­‐94,	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v022/22.4.levitsky.pdf	
  (accessed	
   February	
  10,	
  2013).	
  	
    	
    14	
    	
   	
   Organization	
  of	
  Thesis	
  and	
  Background	
   This	
  thesis	
  follows	
  a	
  chronological	
  historical	
  analysis	
  beginning	
  with	
  some	
  necessary	
  background	
   on	
  Peruvian	
  history	
  and	
  continuing	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  2011	
  elections	
  in	
  Peru.	
  A	
  chronological	
  narrative	
   approach	
  is	
  employed	
  in	
  the	
  lay	
  out	
  of	
  this	
  thesis	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  highlight	
  a	
  process	
  of	
  heightening	
  crisis	
  in	
   Pre-­‐Fujimori	
  Peru	
  that	
  allowed	
  him	
  to	
  rise	
  to	
  power	
  in	
  1990.	
  This	
  narrative	
  approach	
  also	
  best	
   documents	
  the	
  construction	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  during	
  his	
  decade	
  in	
  office	
  and	
  provides	
  the	
   momentum	
  to	
  explore	
  how	
  this	
  legacy	
  has	
  continued	
  and	
  evolved	
  in	
  the	
  years	
  after	
  his	
  regime’s	
  collapse	
   in	
  2000.	
  	
   The	
  first	
  chapter	
  covers	
  the	
  significant	
  political	
  history	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  1990	
   congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  elections.	
  Examining	
  the	
  ways	
  in	
  which	
  political	
  parties	
  were	
  formed	
  and	
   how	
  they	
  attempted	
  to	
  address	
  the	
  masses’	
  demands	
  for	
  increased	
  political	
  inclusion,	
  it	
  covers	
  the	
   breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  oligarchy	
  and	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  land	
  reform	
  as	
  important	
  elements	
  of	
  the	
  historical	
   context.	
  These	
  phenomena	
  help	
  explain	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  growing	
  distrust	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system.	
  In	
   addition,	
  these	
  political	
  players	
  mediated	
  a	
  growing	
  social	
  and	
  economic	
  crisis,	
  which	
  eventually	
  led	
  to	
   the	
  breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  1990	
  elections.	
  Early	
  demands	
  for	
  substantial	
   reform	
  went	
  unmet	
  until	
  1968,	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  somewhat	
  addressed	
  under	
  the	
  military	
  government	
   that	
  remained	
  in	
  power	
  until	
  1980.	
  The	
  1980	
  top-­‐down	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  left	
  a	
  number	
  of	
   institutional	
  weaknesses	
  in	
  its	
  wake	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  examined.	
  Furthermore,	
  1980	
  also	
  signalled	
  the	
   beginning	
  of	
  an	
  armed	
  rural	
  insurgency	
  that	
  aimed	
  to	
  topple	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  state,	
  throwing	
  the	
  country	
   into	
  social	
  turmoil	
  and	
  precipitating	
  a	
  near	
  complete	
  breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  institutional	
  and	
  political	
  party	
   systems	
  aided	
  by	
  a	
  simultaneous	
  national	
  economic	
  crisis.	
  The	
  examination	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  forces	
   up	
  until	
  1990	
  provides	
  the	
  contextualization	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  severity	
  of	
  the	
  economic,	
  social	
  and	
    	
    15	
    	
   	
   political	
  crisis	
  that	
  reached	
  its	
  height	
  in	
  1990	
  and	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  drastic	
  disintegration	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  party	
   system	
  by	
  1990.	
  	
   Chapter	
  two	
  looks	
  specifically	
  at	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  election	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  examine	
  the	
  political,	
   economic	
  and	
  social	
  conditions	
  that	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  unique	
  presidential	
  race	
  between	
  two	
  political	
  outsiders,	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa.	
  This	
  chapter	
  focuses	
  on	
  Fujimori’s	
  and	
  Llosa’s	
  campaigns	
  and	
   how	
  each	
  contender	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  employ	
  the	
  political	
  system’s	
  breakdown	
  to	
  their	
  own	
  advantage	
  with	
   Fujimori	
  ultimately	
  coming	
  out	
  on	
  top.	
  Finally,	
  this	
  chapter	
  provides	
  a	
  window	
  into	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
   Fujimori’s	
  image	
  as	
  a	
  “man	
  of	
  the	
  people,”	
  a	
  symbolism	
  that	
  would	
  continue	
  to	
  be	
  employed	
  by	
  the	
   president	
  during	
  his	
  ten	
  years	
  in	
  office	
  and	
  that	
  would	
  also	
  become	
  an	
  integral	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
   legacy	
  that	
  would	
  persist	
  after	
  the	
  regime’s	
  fall	
  in	
  2000.	
  	
   Chapter	
  three	
  attempts	
  to	
  analyse	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidency	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  locate	
  elements	
  that	
  have	
   continued	
  beyond	
  the	
  administration’s	
  rapid	
  fall	
  from	
  grace	
  in	
  2000	
  and	
  that	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  form	
  the	
   backbone	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  persistent	
  legacy	
  in	
  the	
  2000s.	
  Although	
  the	
  regime	
  sustained	
  itself	
  almost	
   entirely	
  on	
  rampant	
  corruption,	
  coercion	
  and	
  clientelism,	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  administration	
  also	
  saw	
  the	
  end	
   of	
  the	
  internal	
  war,	
  a	
  marked	
  shift	
  to	
  a	
  neoliberal	
  economic	
  mandate	
  that	
  brought	
  about	
  the	
  restoration	
   of	
  macroeconomic	
  stability,	
  increased	
  women’s	
  involvement	
  in	
  government,	
  careful	
  manipulation	
  of	
   public	
  opinion	
  and	
  strategic	
  social	
  assistance	
  initiatives.	
  The	
  factors	
  that	
  appear	
  to	
  underpin	
  the	
   persistence	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  legacy	
  as	
  seen	
  in	
  his	
  daughter’s	
  near	
  presidential	
  win	
  in	
  2011	
  despite	
  her	
   refusal	
  and	
  inability	
  to	
  effectively	
  remove	
  her	
  campaign	
  from	
  this	
  legacy	
  are	
  the	
  focus	
  of	
  this	
  chapter.	
  	
   Chapter	
  four	
  seeks	
  to	
  put	
  into	
  a	
  historical	
  context	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  as	
  well	
   as	
  the	
  continued	
  presence	
  of	
  party-­‐system	
  and	
  institutional	
  weakness	
  on	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  scene	
  in	
   the	
  2000s.	
  By	
  looking	
  at	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  transition	
  after	
  Fujimori’s	
  removal	
  from	
  office	
  in	
  2000	
  under	
  the	
   interim	
  president	
  Valentín	
  Paniagua,	
  Alejandro	
  Toledo’s	
  presidential	
  campaign	
  and	
  time	
  in	
  office	
  (2001-­‐  	
    16	
    	
   	
   2006),	
  Alan	
  García	
  Perez’s	
  surprising	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  presidency	
  (2006-­‐2011)	
  and	
  the	
  2011	
  elections	
  in	
   which	
  Ollanta	
  Humala	
  and	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  vied	
  for	
  the	
  presidency	
  under	
  their	
  respective	
  electoral	
   movements,	
  it	
  becomes	
  clear	
  that	
  post-­‐Fujimori	
  Peru	
  remains	
  politically	
  and	
  institutionally	
  weak	
  in	
  a	
   traditional	
  sense	
  and	
  also	
  that	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  cannot	
  be	
  contained	
  to	
  his	
  ten	
  years	
  in	
  office.	
    	
    17	
    	
   	
   	
   Chapter	
  One:	
   Background	
  and	
  Crisis	
  in	
  the	
  1980s 	
   	
    In	
  Peru,	
  two	
  parties	
  emerged	
  during	
  the	
  early	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  that	
  sought	
  to	
    address	
  the	
  majority’s	
  demands	
  for	
  wider	
  political	
  inclusion	
  and	
  put	
  an	
  end	
  to	
  oligarchic	
  domination;	
   the	
  American	
  Popular	
  Revolutionary	
  Alliance	
  (APRA,	
  or	
  Alianza	
  Popular	
  Revolucionaria	
  Americana),	
  and	
   the	
  Peruvian	
  Communist	
  Party	
  (PCP,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Communista	
  Peruano).1	
  APRA	
  was	
  established	
  in	
  1924	
   under	
  the	
  leadership	
  of	
  Víctor	
  Raúl	
  Haya	
  de	
  la	
  Torre	
  as	
  the	
  first	
  party	
  that	
  attempted	
  to	
  represent	
  the	
   majority	
  of	
  Peruvians	
  and	
  openly	
  challenge	
  the	
  established	
  order,	
  which	
  was	
  at	
  that	
  time	
  embodied	
  in	
   the	
  military	
  dictatorship	
  that	
  channelled	
  the	
  demands	
  of	
  a	
  small	
  group	
  of	
  ruling	
  elite.	
  The	
  two	
  major	
   issues	
  of	
  contention	
  that	
  APRA	
  leaders	
  perceived	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  politics	
  were	
  “…the	
  exploitation	
  of	
  the	
   indigenous	
  population	
  by	
  the	
  oligarchy	
  [and]	
  the	
  need	
  to	
  develop	
  a	
  dynamic	
  national	
  economic	
  capacity	
   to	
  free	
  Peru	
  from	
  its	
  extreme	
  dependence	
  on	
  external	
  trade	
  and	
  foreign	
  capital.”2Apristas	
  wanted	
  to	
   achieve	
  this	
  set	
  of	
  revolutionary	
  goals	
  through	
  democratic	
  means.	
  	
  Although	
  the	
  party	
  ultimately	
  failed	
   in	
  its	
  objectives,	
  it	
  evolved	
  over	
  time	
  and	
  maintained	
  a	
  large	
  support	
  base	
  in	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  up	
   until	
  1990.3	
  The	
  PCP	
  was	
  formed	
  in	
  1928	
  by	
  José	
  Carlos	
  Mariátigui	
  and	
  commanded	
  a	
  small	
  portion	
  of	
   the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  since	
  its	
  inception	
  despite	
  moments	
  of	
  complete	
  suppression	
  by	
  the	
  ruling	
   powers.4	
  Although	
  the	
  PCP	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  strong	
  force	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  politics	
  in	
  its	
  early	
  years,	
  it	
  would	
  come	
  to	
   be	
  the	
  inspiration	
  and	
  model	
  for	
  emerging	
  left-­‐wing	
  political	
  parties	
  from	
  the	
  1930s	
  onward.5	
  From	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   1  	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern,	
  “Introduction	
  to	
  Part	
  I,”	
  In	
  Shining	
  and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
  in	
  Peru,	
  1980-­‐1995	
  (Durham:	
   Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  1998):	
  13-­‐14.	
   2 	
  Carol	
  Graham,	
  Peru’s	
  APRA:	
  Parties,	
  Politics,	
  and	
  the	
  Elusive	
  Quest	
  for	
  Democracy	
  (Boulder	
  CO:	
  Lynne	
  Rienner	
   Publishers,	
  1992):	
  24.	
   3 	
  Ibid.,	
  23.	
   4 	
  David	
  Scott	
  Palmer,	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Authoritarian	
  Tradition	
  (New	
  York:	
  Praeger	
  Publishers,	
  1980):	
  98.	
   5 	
  James	
  D.	
  Rudolph,	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Evolution	
  of	
  a	
  Crisis	
  (Westport	
  CT:	
  Praeger	
  Publishers,	
  1992):	
  37-­‐38.	
    	
    18	
    	
   	
   these	
  humble	
  beginnings,	
  the	
  civilian	
  and	
  military	
  governments	
  that	
  emerged	
  over	
  the	
  twentieth	
   century	
  were	
  unable	
  to	
  effectively	
  address	
  the	
  majority’s	
  concerns	
  or	
  prevent	
  economic,	
  social	
  and	
   political	
  crisis	
  from	
  gripping	
  the	
  country	
  in	
  1990.	
  The	
  ineptitude	
  of	
  these	
  governments	
  to	
  return	
  order	
  to	
   Peru	
  by	
  the	
  last	
  decade	
  of	
  the	
  century	
  allowed	
  for	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  political	
  outsiders	
  by	
  1990	
  who	
  appeared	
   to	
  offer	
  novel	
  solutions	
  to	
  century-­‐old	
  demands	
  that	
  had	
  evolved	
  over	
  time	
  but	
  remained	
  largely	
   unaddressed.	
   The	
  military	
  and	
  APRA	
  would	
  have	
  many	
  confrontations	
  over	
  the	
  first	
  half	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
   century.	
  In	
  1948,	
  in	
  response	
  to	
  a	
  failed	
  coup	
  led	
  by	
  APRA	
  supporters	
  in	
  Callao,	
  near	
  Lima,	
  the	
  party	
  was	
   outlawed	
  and	
  a	
  military	
  junta	
  took	
  control	
  of	
  the	
  country.	
  	
  The	
  military	
  government	
  lasted	
  for	
  eight	
   years	
  under	
  a	
  thinly	
  veiled	
  guise	
  of	
  democratic	
  rule.	
  Due	
  to	
  economic	
  growth,	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  a	
  government-­‐ led	
  focus	
  on	
  exportation,	
  the	
  military	
  government	
  enjoyed	
  reasonable	
  popularity.	
  As	
  this	
  economic	
   boom	
  came	
  to	
  end	
  in	
  1953	
  the	
  military	
  government,	
  now	
  led	
  by	
  General	
  Odría,	
  ceded	
  a	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
   government	
  and	
  elections	
  were	
  scheduled	
  for	
  1956.	
  APRA	
  now	
  joined	
  into	
  an	
  alliance	
  with	
  Odria	
  and	
   together	
  they	
  supported	
  the	
  winning	
  candidate	
  Manuel	
  Prado	
  Ugarteche.	
  In	
  exchange	
  the	
  APRA	
  was	
   legalized	
  and	
  Odría	
  was	
  promised	
  not	
  to	
  be	
  investigated	
  on	
  suspicion	
  of	
  corruption	
  in	
  his	
  administration.	
   From	
  1956	
  onwards	
  APRA	
  further	
  aligned	
  itself	
  with	
  conservative	
  forces	
  and	
  distanced	
  itself	
  from	
  its	
   revolutionary	
  beginnings,	
  causing	
  an	
  internal	
  divide	
  between	
  the	
  more	
  radical	
  components	
  of	
  the	
  party	
   and	
  those	
  willing	
  to	
  convene	
  with	
  the	
  traditional	
  conservative	
  forces.	
  When	
  Fernando	
  Belaúnde	
  Terry	
   and	
  his	
  party,	
  Popular	
  Action	
  (AP,	
  or	
  Acción	
  Popular),	
  won	
  the	
  1963	
  election,	
  congress	
  was	
  controlled	
  by	
   a	
  coalition	
  of	
  APRA	
  and	
  Odristas	
  making	
  it	
  difficult	
  for	
  Belaúnde	
  to	
  proceed	
  with	
  his	
  proposed	
  reforms.	
   This	
  APRA-­‐Odrista	
  alliance	
  fostered	
  growing	
  mistrust	
  among	
  a	
  developing	
  reformist	
  wing	
  in	
  the	
  military	
   that	
  “…grew	
  increasingly	
  skeptical	
  of	
  the	
  possibility	
  of	
  social	
  reform	
  being	
  achieved	
  within	
  the	
  confines	
    	
    19	
    	
   	
   of	
  a	
  stalemated	
  constitutional	
  political	
  process.”6	
  Belaúnde	
  enacted	
  nominal	
  land	
  reforms	
  and	
  pushed	
   modernization	
  into	
  Peru’s	
  often	
  ignored	
  interior,	
  requiring	
  massive	
  financing	
  that	
  came	
  from	
  foreign	
   creditors	
  resulting	
  in	
  a	
  400%	
  increase	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  foreign	
  debt	
  during	
  his	
  term	
  in	
  office	
  and	
  a	
  40%	
   decrease	
  in	
  the	
  national	
  currency’s	
  value.	
  Small	
  illegal	
  land	
  seizures	
  made	
  by	
  poor	
  rural	
  Peruvians	
  took	
   place	
  during	
  these	
  years	
  exemplifying	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  growing	
  impatience	
  for	
  structural	
  reform.	
  Several	
   of	
  these	
  movements	
  became	
  uprisings	
  that	
  were	
  violently	
  put	
  down	
  by	
  the	
  Armed	
  Forces.	
  These	
   conflicts	
  solidified	
  a	
  small	
  group	
  of	
  reform-­‐minded	
  colonels’	
  resolve	
  to	
  intervene	
  before	
  the	
  agitation	
   became	
  a	
  widespread	
  and	
  resulted	
  in	
  a	
  successful	
  toppling	
  of	
  the	
  government.7	
  	
  Furthermore,	
  it	
   appeared	
  that	
  APRA	
  was	
  headed	
  for	
  a	
  victory	
  in	
  the	
  coming	
  election.	
  The	
  military	
  as	
  a	
  whole	
  wasn’t	
   prepared	
  to	
  cede	
  the	
  country	
  to	
  their	
  long-­‐standing	
  rivals,	
  a	
  predicament	
  that	
  aided	
  the	
  reformist	
   colonels’	
  cause	
  for	
  intervention.8	
   Reform	
  under	
  the	
  Military	
  Government,	
  1968-­‐1980	
   Juan	
  Velasco	
  Alvarado,	
  Commander	
  in	
  Chief	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces,	
  led	
  the	
  reformist	
   sector	
  of	
  the	
  military,	
  under	
  the	
  banner	
  of	
  the	
  Revolutionary	
  Government	
  of	
  the	
  Armed	
  Forces,	
  to	
   topple	
  the	
  Belaúnde	
  government	
  in	
  a	
  peaceful	
  coup	
  on	
  October	
  3,	
  1968.	
  The	
  minimal	
  reforms	
  proposed	
   in	
  previous	
  regimes,	
  based	
  in	
  large	
  part	
  on	
  the	
  doctrines	
  of	
  the	
  Alliance	
  for	
  Progress,	
  had	
  seen	
  little	
   action	
  and	
  the	
  patience	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  was	
  growing	
  thin.9	
  	
  The	
  reformist	
  colonels	
  had	
   convinced	
  General	
  Alvarado	
  to	
  lead	
  the	
  new	
  government	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  maintain	
  unity	
  within	
  the	
  military	
   establishment.	
  The	
  coup	
  was	
  welcomed	
  to	
  an	
  extent	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  perceived	
  inability	
  of	
  Belaúnde’s	
   government,	
  and	
  those	
  constitutional	
  governments	
  before	
  his,	
  to	
  impose	
  meaningful	
  structural	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   6  	
  Ibid.,	
  43-­‐47.	
   	
  Palmer,	
  99.	
   8 	
  Rudolph,	
  48-­‐51.	
   9 	
  Palmer,	
  98.	
   7  	
    20	
    	
   	
   adjustment,	
  a	
  perception	
  that	
  had	
  fostered	
  “…a	
  certain	
  level	
  of	
  frustration	
  with	
  constitutional	
  processes	
   and	
  political	
  parties.”10	
   The	
  reformist	
  colonels	
  in	
  the	
  military	
  government	
  quickly	
  gained	
  control	
  of	
  the	
  Presidential	
   Advisory	
  Commission	
  and	
  aggressively	
  pursued	
  a	
  reformist	
  mandate	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  phase	
  of	
  the	
  military	
   government	
  until	
  1975.11	
  The	
  military	
  government	
  nullified	
  the	
  agreements	
  that	
  Belaúnde	
  had	
  made	
   with	
  the	
  American-­‐owned	
  International	
  Petroleum	
  Company	
  (IPC)	
  ceding	
  the	
  subsoil	
  mineral	
  rights	
  to	
   the	
  IPC	
  and	
  nationalized	
  all	
  the	
  IPC’s	
  mineral	
  extraction	
  plants.	
  The	
  Velasco	
  government	
  passed	
  the	
   Agrarian	
  Reform	
  Law	
  of	
  June	
  24,	
  1969	
  that	
  began	
  sweeping	
  land-­‐reforms	
  while	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
   elites	
  found	
  themselves	
  unable	
  to	
  stop	
  the	
  process	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  in	
  the	
  republic’s	
  history.12	
  The	
   reforms	
  provided	
  some	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  sectors	
  with	
  cooperative	
  lands	
  and	
  allowed	
  them	
  nominally	
   increased	
  control	
  over	
  their	
  working	
  conditions	
  and	
  relationships	
  with	
  their	
  employers.	
  Furthermore,	
   the	
  state	
  took	
  on	
  an	
  increasing	
  role	
  in	
  the	
  economy,	
  on	
  one	
  hand	
  to	
  increase	
  centralization	
  and	
  on	
  the	
   other	
  to	
  stimulate	
  economic	
  growth	
  needed	
  to	
  go	
  ahead	
  with	
  the	
  planned	
  reforms.13	
  The	
  military	
   government	
  also	
  nationalized	
  important	
  sectors	
  of	
  the	
  economy	
  previously	
  under	
  the	
  control	
  of	
  foreign	
   interests	
  such	
  as	
  agriculture,	
  banking,	
  and	
  telecommunications.	
  Valesco’s	
  nationalization	
  campaign	
  was	
   countered	
  with	
  increased	
  foreign	
  investment	
  into	
  sectors	
  such	
  as	
  manufacturing.	
  The	
  public	
  sector	
   reaped	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  government’s	
  plan	
  to	
  move	
  toward	
  a	
  ‘mixed	
  economy’	
  in	
  Peru.14	
  The	
   Peruvian	
  labour	
  movement,	
  under	
  the	
  banner	
  of	
  the	
  General	
  Confederation	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  Workers	
  (CGTP,	
   or	
  Confederación	
  General	
  de	
  Trabajadores	
  del	
  Perú),	
  made	
  headway	
  for	
  worker	
  rights	
  and	
  labour	
  laws	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   10  	
  Palmer,	
  98.	
   	
  Mauceri,	
  17.	
   12 	
  Ibid.,	
  17-­‐18.	
   13 	
  Palmer,	
  103-­‐104.	
   14 	
  Rudolph,	
  54-­‐55.	
   11  	
    21	
    	
   	
   during	
  the	
  reformist	
  period	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  government.	
  By	
  1980	
  the	
  CGTP	
  was	
  a	
  strong	
  and	
  influential	
   force	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  politics.15	
   The	
  agrarian	
  reforms	
  were	
  based	
  on	
  a	
  cooperative	
  model	
  that	
  saw	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  a	
  number	
  of	
   worker	
  and	
  peasant	
  leagues	
  including	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Peasant	
  Confederation	
  (CCP,	
  or	
  Confederación	
   Campesina	
  del	
  Perú)	
  and	
  the	
  National	
  Agrarian	
  Confederation	
  (CNA,	
  or	
  Confederación	
  Nacional	
  Agraria).	
   The	
  state	
  invested	
  large	
  amounts	
  of	
  capital	
  into	
  this	
  move	
  from	
  traditional,	
  oligarchical,	
  land	
   organizations	
  to	
  these	
  more	
  inclusive	
  organizations.	
  In	
  doing	
  so,	
  foreign	
  debt	
  rose	
  dramatically	
  in	
  these	
   years	
  despite	
  a	
  policy	
  move	
  away	
  from	
  foreign	
  dependence.	
  The	
  need	
  for	
  foreign	
  capital	
  was	
  further	
   compounded	
  by	
  a	
  drop	
  in	
  export	
  prices	
  in	
  the	
  1970s.	
  This	
  drain	
  on	
  state	
  capital	
  also	
  meant	
  that	
   industrial	
  investment	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  decline	
  during	
  these	
  years.16	
   By	
  1975,	
  the	
  economic	
  drain	
  of	
  the	
  agrarian	
  reforms	
  and	
  rising	
  political	
  tensions	
  led	
  the	
  military	
   government	
  to	
  implement	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  severe	
  economic	
  restrictions	
  that	
  went	
  some	
  way	
  to	
  undo	
  the	
   gains	
  made	
  in	
  previous	
  years.	
  The	
  public	
  opposition	
  to	
  the	
  restrictions	
  was	
  so	
  intense	
  that	
  Prime	
   Minister	
  General	
  Morales	
  Bermúdez,	
  with	
  full	
  military	
  support,	
  usurped	
  Valesco	
  in	
  hopes	
  that	
  new	
   leadership	
  would	
  quell	
  the	
  unrest.	
  After	
  taking	
  office	
  in	
  August	
  of	
  1975,	
  Bermúdez	
  reversed	
  community	
   ownership	
  policies	
  relating	
  to	
  industry	
  and	
  agrarian	
  cooperatives,	
  stripped	
  the	
  CNA	
  of	
  legal	
  recognition	
   and	
  promised	
  a	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  government	
  with	
  elections	
  scheduled	
  for	
  1980.	
  By	
  mid-­‐1978,	
   Bermúdez	
  began	
  meeting	
  with	
  traditional	
  party	
  leaders	
  in	
  preparation	
  for	
  the	
  election	
  of	
  a	
   constitutional	
  assembly	
  that	
  would	
  draft	
  a	
  new	
  constitution	
  to	
  guide	
  the	
  country’s	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule.	
  	
   This	
  move	
  symbolized	
  a	
  realignment	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  with	
  traditional	
  political	
  elites	
  and	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  sign	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   15  	
  Carmen	
  Rosa	
  Balbi,	
  “Politics	
  and	
  Trade	
  Unions	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
   eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
   134.	
   16 	
  Christine	
  Hunefeldt,	
  “The	
  Rural	
  Landscape	
  and	
  the	
  Changing	
  Political	
  Awareness:	
  Enterprises,	
  Agrarian	
  Produces,	
   and	
  Peasant	
  Communities,	
  1969-­‐1994,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
   Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  109-­‐111.	
  	
    	
    22	
    	
   	
   of	
  the	
  military’s	
  new	
  working	
  relationship	
  with	
  APRA.17	
  Spurring	
  on	
  the	
  transition,	
  the	
  labour	
  movement	
   staged	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  widespread	
  strikes	
  during	
  this	
  time.	
  The	
  conservative	
  political	
  forces	
  were	
  heavily	
   involved	
  in	
  the	
  writing	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  constitution	
  and	
  actively	
  engaged	
  in	
  the	
  transition	
  to	
  democracy	
  to	
   secure	
  themselves	
  a	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  civilian	
  regime	
  that	
  would	
  emerge.	
  The	
  political	
  parties	
  that	
  identified	
   themselves	
  on	
  the	
  left18	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  spectrum,	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  hand,	
  saw	
  a	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  as	
  a	
   return	
  to	
  the	
  conservatively	
  controlled	
  political	
  scene	
  of	
  the	
  pre-­‐1968	
  era	
  and	
  thus	
  did	
  not	
  take	
  part	
  in	
   the	
  assembly	
  elections.	
  As	
  a	
  result	
  the	
  constitution	
  and	
  the	
  civilian	
  regime	
  that	
  would	
  emerge,	
  was	
   dominated	
  by	
  an	
  alliance	
  between	
  APRA	
  and	
  the	
  Christian	
  People’s	
  Party	
  (PPC,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Popular	
   Christiano)	
  and,	
  “…reflected	
  a	
  consensus	
  forged	
  by	
  the	
  military	
  and	
  conservative	
  parties.”19	
  Peru	
   continued	
  to	
  fall	
  into	
  economic	
  crisis	
  during	
  the	
  final	
  years	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  government.	
  Finally	
  in	
  1977	
   and	
  1978,	
  Bermúdez	
  realized	
  the	
  severity	
  of	
  the	
  crisis	
  and	
  gave	
  into	
  the	
  austerity	
  measures	
  that	
  the	
   International	
  Monetary	
  Fund	
  (IMF)	
  and	
  other	
  foreign	
  creditors	
  had	
  been	
  proposing	
  for	
  some	
  years.	
  By	
   1979,	
  the	
  full	
  effects	
  of	
  the	
  austerity	
  measures	
  were	
  being	
  felt	
  across	
  the	
  country.	
  The	
  wide-­‐reaching	
   state	
  budget	
  restrictions,	
  limits	
  placed	
  on	
  imports,	
  the	
  removal	
  of	
  government	
  price	
  supports,	
  and	
  a	
   dramatic	
  devaluation	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  currency	
  spurred	
  wide-­‐spread	
  agitation.	
  The	
  military	
  government	
   had	
  exhausted	
  its	
  political	
  ambitions.20	
   The	
  military	
  government	
  under	
  Velasco	
  introduced	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  far-­‐reaching	
  economic,	
   foreign	
  policy	
  and	
  agrarian	
  reforms	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  history.21	
  From	
  the	
  years	
  between	
  the	
  military	
  coup	
  of	
   1968	
  and	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  in	
  1980	
  some	
  “…8.6	
  million	
  hectors	
  of	
  land	
  and	
  22	
  million	
  head	
  of	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   17  	
  Graham,	
  7.	
   	
  Note:	
  The	
  “left”	
  as	
  a	
  general	
  term	
  is	
  applied	
  in	
  this	
  thesis	
  to	
  encompass	
  left-­‐wing	
  political	
  parties	
  and	
  electoral	
   movements,	
  excluding	
  extreme	
  political	
  leftists	
  that	
  advocated	
  for	
  revolutionary	
  change	
  outside	
  of	
  electoral	
   channels.	
   19 	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  “The	
  Transition	
  to	
  ‘Democracy’	
  and	
  the	
  Failures	
  of	
  Institution	
  Building,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
   Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  19.	
   20 	
  Palmer,	
  125.	
   21 	
  Rudolph,	
  54.	
   18  	
    23	
    	
   	
   livestock…”	
  had	
  been	
  redistributed	
  to	
  almost	
  400,000	
  peasants.22	
  These	
  real	
  numbers	
  were	
  evidence	
  of	
   the	
  successes	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  government	
  that	
  in	
  many	
  respects	
  would	
  come	
  to	
  outweigh	
  its	
  many	
   failures	
  and	
  leave	
  in	
  the	
  minds	
  of	
  many,	
  especially	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  left,	
  a	
  belief	
  in	
  the	
  efficiency	
  of	
  a	
   strong	
  centralized	
  and	
  authoritarian	
  government.	
  The	
  effectual	
  military	
  government	
  that	
  had	
   implemented	
  the	
  farthest	
  reaching	
  reforms	
  in	
  the	
  republic’s	
  history	
  and	
  the	
  legacy	
  that	
  it	
  left	
  in	
  its	
  wake	
   would	
  aid	
  in	
  gradually	
  eroding	
  confidence	
  in	
  the	
  traditional	
  party	
  system	
  in	
  favor	
  of	
  authoritarian	
   efficiency.23	
   Return	
  to	
  Civilian	
  Rule	
   The	
  transition	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule,	
  led	
  by	
  the	
  military	
  and	
  the	
  conservatives,	
  suffered	
  from	
  three	
   main	
  failures.	
  The	
  first	
  was	
  related	
  to	
  party	
  structures	
  that	
  maintained	
  the	
  same	
  personalistic,	
  divided	
   and	
  authoritarian	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  pre-­‐1968	
  political	
  scene.	
  Criollos,	
  white	
  skinned	
  elites	
  from	
  Lima,	
   dominated	
  party	
  leadership	
  and	
  owing	
  to	
  “…a	
  lack	
  of	
  institutionalized	
  channels	
  of	
  renewal,”	
   disagreements	
  within	
  parties	
  led	
  to	
  the	
  splintering	
  of	
  traditional	
  parties.	
  Second,	
  the	
  constitution	
   retained	
  the	
  authoritarian	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  government	
  leaving	
  the	
  congress	
  severely	
  dominated	
   by	
  the	
  chief	
  executive.	
  Thirdly,	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule,	
  bound	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  1979	
  constitution,	
  left	
  the	
   civilian	
  government	
  without	
  the	
  means	
  to	
  assert	
  control	
  over	
  the	
  military.24	
  The	
  election	
  system	
  was	
   also	
  revamped	
  in	
  the	
  1979	
  constitution,	
  creating	
  the	
  run-­‐off	
  system	
  that	
  exists	
  today.	
  This	
  system	
   dictates	
  that	
  if	
  no	
  presidential	
  candidate	
  wins	
  a	
  majority	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting,	
  then	
  the	
  two	
   leading	
  candidates	
  face	
  off	
  in	
  a	
  second,	
  run-­‐off,	
  election.	
  This	
  new	
  system	
  would	
  come	
  to	
  have	
  some	
   bearing	
  on	
  election	
  results	
  in	
  the	
  following	
  years.	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  failings	
  of	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   22  	
  Hunefeldt,	
  110.	
   	
  Mauceri,	
  25.	
   24 	
  Ibid.,	
  32-­‐33.	
   23  	
    24	
    	
   	
   would	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
  successor	
  governments’	
  inability	
  to	
  effectively	
  govern	
  and	
  prevent	
  economic,	
   social	
  and	
  political	
  crisis	
  in	
  the	
  following	
  decade.25	
   The	
  Rural	
  Insurgency	
   Along	
  with	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule,	
  1980	
  saw	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  an	
  armed	
  struggle	
  led	
  by	
  a	
   Maoist	
  guerilla	
  group,	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  Guerillas	
  (Sendero	
  Luminoso),	
  that	
  would	
  come	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  largest	
   “peasant	
  rebellion”	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth-­‐century	
  in	
  Peru.	
  The	
  Shining	
  Path	
  was	
  centered	
  in	
  the	
  south-­‐ Andean	
  region	
  of	
  Ayacucho	
  and	
  concentrated	
  at	
  Ayacucho’s	
  National	
  University	
  of	
  San	
  Cristóbal	
  de	
   Huamanga,	
  where	
  the	
  group’s	
  leader	
  Abimael	
  Guzmán	
  Reynoso	
  (known	
  to	
  his	
  followers	
  as	
  Presidente	
   Gonzalo)	
  taught	
  in	
  the	
  Philosophy	
  department.26	
  Ayacucho,	
  like	
  many	
  Peruvian	
  provinces,	
  was	
   dominated	
  and	
  subordinated	
  by	
  Lima	
  and	
  the	
  criollo,	
  white-­‐skinned	
  elite,	
  class	
  that	
  governed	
  the	
   country.	
  Over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  a	
  reaction	
  to	
  this	
  relationship	
  emerged	
  and	
  came	
  to	
   fruition	
  in	
  an	
  intellectual	
  movement	
  known	
  as	
  indigenismo,	
  aimed	
  at	
  undoing	
  the	
  injustices	
  of	
   indigenous	
  subordination.	
  As	
  the	
  century	
  wore	
  on,	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  Lima	
  and	
  the	
  provinces	
   changed	
  somewhat,	
  and	
  more	
  notably	
  the	
  rhetoric	
  changed,	
  moving	
  the	
  discussion	
  from	
  race	
  to	
  class.	
   Still	
  by	
  the	
  latter	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  century,	
  racism	
  and	
  peasant,	
  or	
  campasino,	
  subordination	
  was	
  still	
  a	
  hot	
   topic	
  among	
  those	
  living	
  outside	
  of	
  Lima’s	
  orbit	
  and	
  would	
  go	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  in	
  determining	
  the	
  Shining	
   Path’s	
  structure	
  and	
  limitations.27	
   The	
  ideology	
  of	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  had	
  its	
  foundations	
  in	
  Mariátigui’s	
  1920s	
  critique	
  entitled	
  Seven	
   Interpretative	
  Essays	
  on	
  Peruvian	
  Reality	
  (that	
  Guzmán	
  and	
  his	
  followers	
  still	
  felt	
  applied	
  to	
  the	
  Peru	
  of	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   25  	
  Palmer,	
  124.	
   	
  Rudolph,	
  86-­‐87.	
   27 	
  Marisol	
  de	
  la	
  Cadena,	
  “From	
  Race	
  to	
  Class:	
  Insurgent	
  Intellectuals	
  de	
  Provincia	
  in	
  Peru	
  1910-­‐1970,”	
  in	
  Shining	
   and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
  in	
  Peru,	
  1980-­‐1995,	
  ed.	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern	
  (Durham,	
  NC:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
   1998),	
  22-­‐59.	
   26  	
    25	
    	
   	
   1970),	
  Mao	
  Tse-­‐Tung	
  and	
  Mao	
  Tse-­‐Tung	
  Thought,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  indigenismo.28	
  Once	
  a	
  thriving	
  part	
  of	
  the	
   Spanish	
  colonial	
  trade	
  network	
  from	
  Cusco	
  to	
  Lima,	
  Ayacucho	
  had	
  not	
  experienced	
  the	
  same	
   modernization	
  or	
  attention	
  from	
  the	
  state	
  in	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  that	
  other	
  regions	
  had,	
  and	
  some	
  of	
   its	
  residents	
  felt	
  betrayed	
  and	
  forgotten	
  by	
  coastal	
  elites.	
  The	
  land	
  reforms	
  under	
  the	
  military	
   government	
  had	
  done	
  little	
  to	
  benefit	
  those	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  province	
  and	
  government	
  expenditure	
  in	
  the	
   region	
  was	
  a	
  third	
  of	
  what	
  similar	
  provinces	
  received.29	
   The	
  Shining	
  Path	
  had	
  dominated	
  the	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  San	
  Cristóbal	
  de	
  Huamanga	
  since	
  the	
   party	
  was	
  founded	
  in	
  1973.	
  Students	
  trained	
  at	
  the	
  school	
  worked	
  to	
  widen	
  support	
  for	
  the	
  party	
  all	
   over	
  the	
  province,	
  especially	
  among	
  young	
  people,	
  as	
  they	
  moved	
  to	
  find	
  work	
  after	
  graduating.30	
  On	
   April	
  19th,	
  1980	
  Guzmán	
  presented	
  a	
  speech,	
  entitled	
  We	
  Are	
  the	
  Initiators,	
  to	
  the	
  trainees	
  of	
  the	
  Shining	
   Path’s	
  military	
  school	
  calling	
  for	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  an	
  armed	
  struggle	
  aiming	
  to	
  “…put	
  the	
  noose	
  around	
   the	
  neck	
  of	
  imperialism	
  and	
  the	
  reactionaries,	
  seizing	
  and	
  garroting	
  them	
  by	
  the	
  throat…	
  [t]hey	
  are	
   strangled,	
  necessarily.”31	
  On	
  May	
  18th,	
  1980	
  this	
  threat	
  was	
  put	
  into	
  symbolic	
  action.	
  The	
  Shining	
  Path	
   burned	
  the	
  ballot	
  boxes	
  in	
  the	
  town	
  of	
  Chushi,	
  signalling	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
  armed	
   insurrection.32	
  Peru’s	
  attention	
  was	
  aimed	
  at	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  and	
  the	
  military	
  was	
  worn-­‐out	
   and	
  fragmented.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  perfect	
  time	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  phase	
  of	
  the	
  struggle	
  for	
  revolution.	
  The	
  symbolic	
   gesture	
  espoused	
  the	
  party’s	
  distaste	
  and	
  rejection	
  of	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule.33	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   28  	
  R.	
  F.	
  Watters,	
  Poverty	
  and	
  Peasantry	
  in	
  Peru’s	
  Southern	
  Andes,	
  1963-­‐90	
  (Pittsburgh,	
  PA:	
  University	
  of	
  Pittsburgh	
   Press,	
  1994),	
  259.	
   29 	
  Rupolph,	
  86-­‐87.	
   30 	
  Ibid.,	
  87.	
   31 nd 	
  Abimael	
  Guzmán,	
  “We	
  Are	
  the	
  Initiators,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  2 	
  ed.,	
  eds.	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
   Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk	
  (Durham	
  NC:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  2005),	
  328.	
   32 	
  Rudolph,	
  86.	
   33 	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron,	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru:	
  Political	
  Coalitions	
  and	
  Social	
  Change	
  (New	
  York:	
   St.	
  Martin’s	
  Press,	
  1994),	
  25.	
  	
    	
    26	
    	
   	
   Fernando	
  Belaúnde	
  Terry	
  and	
  the	
  Economic	
  Crisis,	
  1980-­‐1985	
   On	
  the	
  same	
  day	
  that	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  lit	
  fire	
  to	
  the	
  ballet	
  boxes	
  in	
  Chushi,	
  Fernando	
  Belaúnde	
   Terry	
  was	
  elected	
  president	
  and	
  his	
  center-­‐right	
  party,	
  Popular	
  Action,	
  gained	
  a	
  majority	
  in	
  congress.	
   Despite	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  Belaúnde’s	
  re-­‐election	
  represented	
  a	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  pre-­‐1968	
  political	
  reality,	
  it	
  also	
   demonstrated	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  growing	
  propensity	
  to	
  look	
  for	
  personalistic	
  leaders	
  that	
  could	
  “save”	
   Peru	
  from	
  the	
  economic	
  crisis	
  that	
  it	
  faced.	
  In	
  spite	
  of	
  this,	
  it	
  was	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  failures	
  of	
  the	
  transition	
   to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  would	
  come	
  to	
  haunt	
  Belaúnde’s	
  term	
  in	
  office.	
  Belaúnde	
  continued	
  with	
  the	
  neoliberal	
   mandate	
  that	
  Bermúdez	
  had	
  set	
  in	
  motion	
  with	
  a	
  populist	
  twist.34	
  He	
  promoted	
  primary	
  exports,	
   invested	
  in	
  large	
  infrastructure	
  works,	
  encouraged	
  privatization,	
  expanded	
  economic	
  restriction	
  by	
  the	
   state,	
  overvalued	
  the	
  currency	
  exchange	
  rate	
  and	
  renegotiated	
  and	
  extended	
  foreign	
  and	
  public	
   borrowing.35	
  Belaúnde	
  did	
  little	
  to	
  support	
  or	
  bolster	
  the	
  popular	
  sectors.	
  When	
  the	
  recession	
  of	
  1983-­‐ 1985	
  swept	
  through	
  Peru,	
  labour	
  took	
  the	
  hardest	
  hit.	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  economy	
  remained	
  dependent	
  on	
   foreign	
  creditors,	
  especially	
  the	
  IMF,	
  and	
  was	
  exposed	
  to	
  global	
  economic	
  downturns	
  owing	
  to	
  a	
  heavy	
   reliance	
  on	
  primary	
  exports.36	
  Overall,	
  the	
  Belaúnde	
  administration	
  did	
  little	
  to	
  remedy	
  a	
  growing	
   economic	
  and	
  social	
  crisis,	
  a	
  failing	
  that	
  would	
  aid	
  a	
  growing	
  sense	
  of	
  mistrust	
  for	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
   system	
  among	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate.	
   During	
  Belaúnde’s	
  years	
  in	
  office,	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  insurgency	
  became	
  a	
  focal	
  point	
  of	
  tension	
   and	
  fear.	
  Early	
  in	
  his	
  term,	
  Belaúnde	
  dispatched	
  the	
  police	
  to	
  deal	
  with	
  the	
  growing	
  threat	
  in	
  the	
  region,	
   fearing	
  that	
  too	
  much	
  military	
  involvement	
  could	
  lead	
  to	
  another	
  coup.	
  Then	
  in	
  1981	
  he	
  enacted	
  an	
   antiterrorism	
  law	
  that	
  saw	
  much	
  protest	
  by	
  the	
  political	
  left	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
  law’s	
  broad	
  categorization	
  of	
   “terrorism.”	
  Late	
  in	
  1981,	
  following	
  an	
  attack	
  on	
  a	
  police	
  post	
  in	
  the	
  Ayacucho	
  province	
  of	
  La	
  Mar,	
  five	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   34  	
  Mauceri,	
  30.	
   	
  Carol	
  Wise,	
  “State	
  Policy	
  and	
  Social	
  Conflict	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
   Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  75.	
   36 	
  Mauceri,	
  30.	
   35  	
    27	
    	
   	
   Ayacucho	
  provinces	
  were	
  placed	
  under	
  a	
  state	
  of	
  emergency.	
  The	
  Shining	
  Path	
  did	
  not	
  wane.	
  Their	
   activities	
  became	
  more	
  violent,	
  widespread	
  and	
  unique.	
  These	
  activities	
  included	
  the	
  forced	
  closure	
  of	
   markets,	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  a	
  murder	
  campaign	
  aimed	
  mostly	
  at	
  bureaucrats,	
  landowners	
  and	
  business	
   owners,	
  and	
  attacks	
  on	
  electric	
  stations	
  that	
  caused	
  massive	
  power	
  outages	
  in	
  Lima	
  and	
  other	
   municipalities.	
  Perhaps	
  most	
  alarming	
  to	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  audience	
  was	
  the	
  escape	
  of	
  247	
  senderistas,	
   Shining	
  Path	
  soldiers,	
  from	
  Ayacucho’s	
  jail	
  in	
  1982	
  and	
  the	
  gathering	
  of	
  between	
  10,000	
  and	
  30,000	
   senderistas	
  at	
  a	
  fallen	
  soldier’s	
  funeral.	
  Suddenly	
  it	
  became	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  was	
  a	
  force	
  that	
   commanded	
  substantial	
  support.37	
  	
  As	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  continued	
  to	
  wage	
  its	
  murder	
  campaigns,	
  the	
   number	
  of	
  provinces	
  in	
  the	
  Ayacucho	
  region	
  under	
  a	
  state	
  of	
  emergency	
  grew	
  to	
  nine,	
  by	
  1983,	
  when	
   Belaúnde	
  finally	
  enlisted	
  the	
  armed	
  forces,	
  and	
  to	
  twelve	
  by	
  1984.	
  The	
  conflict	
  only	
  escalated	
  after	
  the	
   military	
  became	
  involved.	
  The	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  faced	
  criticism	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  rising	
  number	
  of	
  civilian	
   casualties	
  in	
  the	
  conflict.	
  Further,	
  in	
  1984,	
  the	
  Tupac	
  Amaru	
  Revolutionary	
  Movement	
  (MRTA,	
  or	
   Movimiento	
  Revolucionario	
  Túpac	
  Amaru)	
  began	
  its	
  own	
  armed	
  struggle,	
  including	
  bombing	
  and	
  murder	
   campaigns	
  in	
  Lima.	
  This	
  movement	
  was	
  led	
  by	
  a	
  former	
  member	
  of	
  APRA,	
  Víctor	
  Polay	
  Campos	
  and	
   other	
  radicals	
  who	
  had	
  broken	
  away	
  from	
  the	
  reformist	
  parties	
  following	
  what	
  they	
  saw	
  as	
  the	
  failed	
   transition	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule.	
  The	
  MRTA,	
  unlike	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path,	
  preferred	
  outright	
  and	
  symbolic	
  terrorist	
   acts	
  and	
  rarely	
  shied	
  away	
  from	
  media	
  attention.38	
   By	
  1985	
  the	
  death	
  toll	
  had	
  reached	
  over	
  7,000,	
  and	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  victims	
  of	
  the	
  internal	
   war	
  were	
  peasants	
  living	
  in	
  the	
  highland	
  regions,	
  such	
  as	
  Ayacucho.	
  The	
  conflict	
  profoundly	
  altered	
   public	
  opinion,	
  leaving	
  the	
  AP’s	
  hopes	
  for	
  a	
  third	
  term	
  dashed	
  and	
  the	
  idealistic	
  promises	
  of	
  democracy	
   completely	
  depleted	
  owing	
  to	
  numerous	
  accusations	
  of	
  human	
  rights	
  abuses	
  and	
  an	
  inability	
  to	
  quell	
  the	
   violence.	
  As	
  Belaúnde	
  prepared	
  to	
  leave	
  office	
  in	
  1985	
  “…there	
  was	
  a	
  widespread	
  sense	
  among	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   37  	
  Gustavo	
  Gorriti,	
  The	
  Shining	
  Path:	
  A	
  History	
  of	
  the	
  Millenarian	
  War	
  in	
  Peru	
  trans.	
  Robin	
  Kirk	
  (Chapel	
  Hill	
  NC:	
  The	
   University	
  of	
  North	
  Carolina	
  Press,	
  1999),	
  214-­‐215.	
   38 	
  Rudolph,	
  87-­‐90.	
    	
    28	
    	
   	
   electorate	
  that	
  the	
  president	
  had	
  abdicated	
  his	
  authority	
  over	
  the	
  deteriorating	
  situations	
  with	
  respect	
   to	
  both	
  Sendero	
  Luminoso	
  and	
  the	
  economic	
  crisis	
  and,	
  as	
  a	
  result,	
  the	
  nation	
  was	
  hopelessly	
  adrift.”39	
   The	
  deepening	
  economic	
  crisis	
  had	
  important	
  consequences	
  for	
  a	
  shifting	
  electoral	
  demographic	
   in	
  the	
  1980s.40	
  In	
  response	
  to	
  a	
  lack	
  of	
  employment	
  opportunity,	
  inadequate	
  state	
  support	
  and	
   continued	
  migration	
  from	
  the	
  highlands	
  into	
  Peru’s	
  urban	
  centers,	
  the	
  informal	
  sector	
  had	
  grown	
   dramatically	
  from	
  the	
  1950s	
  onwards,	
  taking	
  leaps	
  and	
  bounds	
  in	
  the	
  1980s	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  severity	
  of	
  the	
   economic	
  conditions.41	
  	
  By	
  mid-­‐1980,	
  after	
  the	
  crisis	
  had	
  pushed	
  industry	
  to	
  drastically	
  down-­‐size,	
  half	
  of	
   Lima’s	
  working	
  population	
  was	
  self-­‐employed	
  operating	
  small	
  unregistered	
  businesses.	
  This	
  new	
  group	
   of	
  voters	
  would	
  come	
  to	
  have	
  an	
  important	
  impact	
  on	
  the	
  changing	
  political	
  climate	
  of	
  Peru	
  that	
  would	
   persist	
  into	
  the	
  last	
  decade	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth-­‐century	
  as	
  the	
  informal	
  sector	
  continued	
  to	
  grow.42	
   The	
  United	
  Left	
   The	
  left-­‐leaning	
  parties	
  that	
  emerged	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  PCP	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
   gained	
  considerable	
  ground	
  following	
  a	
  disappointing	
  performance	
  in	
  the	
  1980	
  presidential	
  elections.	
   Recognizing	
  the	
  need	
  for	
  unification,	
  the	
  electoral	
  front	
  the	
  United	
  Left	
  (IU,	
  or	
  Izquierda	
  Unida)	
  was	
   formed	
  in	
  1983.	
  The	
  IU	
  brought	
  together	
  numerous	
  coalitions	
  of	
  Marxist	
  parties	
  including	
  the	
  Popular	
   Democratic	
  Unity	
  (UDP,	
  or	
  Unidad	
  Democrático	
  Popular),	
  the	
  Revolutionary	
  Left	
  Union	
  (UNIR,	
  or	
  Union	
   de	
  Izquierda	
  Revolucionaria),	
  the	
  Revolutionary	
  Socialist	
  Party	
  (PSR,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Socialista	
   Revolucionario),	
  the	
  Revolutionary	
  Communist	
  Party	
  (PCR,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Communista	
  Revolucionario	
  ),	
  the	
   Worker	
  Peasant	
  Student	
  and	
  Popular	
  Front	
  (FOCEP,	
  or	
  Frente	
  Obrero	
  Campesino	
  Estudiantil	
  y	
  Popular)	
   as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  original	
  PCP.	
  	
  In	
  1983,	
  the	
  IU	
  Mayoral	
  candidate	
  for	
  Lima,	
  Alfonso	
  Barrantes	
  Lingán,	
   secured	
  the	
  victory.	
  IU	
  had	
  proven	
  itself	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  serious	
  contender	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  scene.	
  After	
  a	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   39  	
  Ibid.,	
  91-­‐92.	
   	
  Wise,	
  72.	
   41 	
  Watters,	
  295.	
   42 	
  Cameron,	
  43.	
   40  	
    29	
    	
   	
   reasonably	
  successful	
  term	
  as	
  mayor,	
  Barrantes	
  ran	
  in	
  the	
  presidential	
  election	
  of	
  1985,	
  presenting	
   himself	
  as	
  a	
  moderate	
  leftist.	
  However	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  persistence	
  of	
  radical	
  factions	
  within	
  the	
  IU,	
  neither	
   the	
  military	
  nor	
  the	
  middle-­‐class	
  ever	
  came	
  to	
  support	
  his	
  bid	
  and	
  he	
  lost	
  to	
  Alan	
  García	
  Pérez,	
  the	
  APRA	
   candidate,	
  in	
  April	
  of	
  1985.43	
   Alan	
  García	
  Perez,	
  Political,	
  Economic	
  and	
  Social	
  Crisis,	
  1985-­‐1990	
   García	
  had	
  managed	
  to	
  align	
  APRA	
  with	
  the	
  center-­‐left,	
  a	
  move	
  that	
  proved	
  the	
  ultimate	
   antidote	
  for	
  what	
  the	
  electorate	
  perceived	
  as	
  the	
  previous	
  regime’s	
  move	
  from	
  center-­‐right	
  to	
  the	
  right	
   in	
  reaction	
  to	
  the	
  deepening	
  economic	
  crisis.	
  Furthermore,	
  García	
  managed	
  to	
  consolidate	
  his	
  support	
   through	
  an	
  integration	
  of	
  the	
  informal	
  sector	
  into	
  APRA’s	
  fold,	
  creating	
  a	
  new	
  brand	
  of	
  Peruvian	
   populism	
  that	
  was	
  not	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  expansion	
  of	
  industry	
  but	
  rather	
  in	
  the	
  embrace	
  of	
  the	
  informal	
   sector	
  and	
  the	
  maintenance	
  of	
  traditional	
  APRA	
  support:	
  workers,	
  peasants	
  and	
  the	
  middle-­‐class.44	
  	
  The	
   APRA	
  had	
  remade	
  its	
  image	
  and	
  García’s	
  campaign	
  slogan,	
  “my	
  promise	
  is	
  to	
  all	
  Peruvians,”	
  reflected	
  a	
   move	
  away	
  from	
  the	
  conservative	
  image	
  that	
  had	
  proven	
  so	
  damaging	
  to	
  the	
  party	
  in	
  previous	
  years.	
  As	
   had	
  been	
  the	
  case	
  in	
  Belaúnde’s	
  victory,	
  “…García	
  was	
  seen	
  as	
  the	
  only	
  salvation	
  at	
  a	
  time	
  of	
   extraordinary	
  national	
  distress.”45	
  It	
  appeared	
  as	
  though	
  García’s	
  policy	
  would	
  finally	
  signal	
  a	
  break	
  from	
   the	
  authoritarian	
  “transition-­‐era”	
  policies	
  that	
  seemed	
  utterly	
  hopeless	
  in	
  the	
  crisis-­‐stricken	
  Peru	
  of	
   1985.	
  However,	
  the	
  same	
  failures	
  of	
  the	
  transition	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  that	
  had	
  plagued	
  the	
  AP	
  leadership	
   would	
  yet	
  again	
  surface	
  under	
  García.46	
   García’s	
  economic	
  policy	
  reflected	
  a	
  new	
  developmental	
  model,	
  neostructuralism,	
  that	
  included	
   greater	
  state	
  involvement	
  in	
  the	
  economy	
  including	
  the	
  implementation	
  of	
  price	
  and	
  wage	
  controls,	
  an	
   economic	
  recovery	
  plan	
  that	
  was	
  based	
  in	
  supporting	
  domestic	
  consumption	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  far-­‐reaching	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   43  	
  Rudolph,	
  92-­‐95.	
   	
  Cameron,	
  42-­‐43.	
   45 	
  Rudolph,	
  95-­‐97.	
   46 	
  Mauceri,	
  30.	
   44  	
    30	
    	
   	
   trade	
  protections.	
  	
  The	
  currency	
  exchange	
  rate	
  was	
  superficially	
  high,	
  state-­‐spending	
  skyrocketed	
  and	
   Garcia	
  proposed	
  debt	
  payments	
  be	
  dramatically	
  reduced	
  to	
  only	
  ten	
  percent	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  export	
  profits.47	
   The	
  IMF	
  and	
  U.S.	
  creditors	
  were	
  the	
  most	
  perturbed	
  by	
  this	
  action	
  and	
  cut	
  military	
  funding	
  and	
  halted	
   private	
  U.S.	
  bank	
  loans.	
  	
  Meanwhile,	
  the	
  Garcia	
  administration	
  sought	
  to	
  broaden	
  its	
  relationships	
  with	
   other	
  foreign	
  creditors,	
  thereby	
  suspending	
  payments	
  while	
  increasing	
  the	
  debt	
  load.48	
  In	
  1986	
  the	
   World	
  Bank	
  declared	
  Peru	
  unfit	
  to	
  receive	
  more	
  loans	
  and	
  by	
  1989	
  the	
  Inter-­‐American	
  Development	
   Bank	
  came	
  to	
  the	
  same	
  conclusion.	
  Initially,	
  the	
  economy	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  growing.	
  The	
  GDP	
  was	
  up	
   dramatically	
  in	
  1986	
  and	
  1987.	
  Employment	
  rates	
  went	
  up	
  and	
  inflation	
  fell	
  from	
  200	
  percent	
  to	
  63	
   percent	
  in	
  1986	
  than	
  rose	
  again	
  the	
  following	
  year	
  to	
  115	
  percent.	
  It	
  became	
  clear	
  as	
  exchange	
   imbalances	
  and	
  price	
  fluctuations	
  became	
  more	
  severe	
  that	
  the	
  government’s	
  strategy	
  for	
  controlling	
   inflation	
  and	
  bolstering	
  consumer	
  demand	
  was	
  not	
  working.	
  Hyperinflation	
  was	
  inevitable.49	
   As	
  the	
  economic	
  situation	
  worsened,	
  insurgency	
  violence	
  increased	
  and	
  the	
  Garcia	
   administration	
  began	
  to	
  lose	
  the	
  widespread	
  support	
  that	
  had	
  secured	
  his	
  electoral	
  victory	
  in	
  1985.	
   When	
  Garcia	
  took	
  office	
  he	
  promised	
  to	
  improve	
  living	
  conditions	
  in	
  the	
  southern	
  provinces	
  to	
  curb	
   support	
  for	
  the	
  insurgents	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  to	
  reign	
  in	
  the	
  armed	
  forces	
  after	
  scandals	
  emerged	
  concerning	
   human-­‐rights	
  violations.	
  Although	
  reports	
  of	
  violations	
  did	
  decrease	
  under	
  Garcia,	
  many	
  of	
  his	
  earlier	
   measures	
  were	
  purely	
  symbolic.	
  In	
  Garcia’s	
  first	
  year	
  in	
  office,	
  a	
  prison	
  uprising	
  led	
  by	
  Shining	
  Path	
   prisoners	
  ended	
  in	
  a	
  brutal	
  massacre	
  of	
  at	
  least	
  249	
  senderistas.	
  Garcia	
  lost	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  political	
   left	
  and	
  progressive	
  elements	
  that	
  had	
  helped	
  him	
  win	
  in	
  1985	
  because	
  his	
  counter-­‐insurgency	
  actions	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   47  	
  Wise,	
  75.	
   	
  Rudolph,	
  103.	
   49 	
  Rudolph,	
  110.	
   48  	
    31	
    	
   	
   appeared	
  to	
  be	
  nothing	
  more	
  than	
  a	
  ceding	
  of	
  authority	
  to	
  the	
  Armed	
  Forces.	
  The	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  were	
   also	
  alienated	
  from	
  Garcia	
  by	
  his	
  attempts	
  to	
  rein	
  them	
  in	
  as	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  curb	
  human	
  rights	
  violations.50	
   Coca	
  cultivation,	
  which	
  had	
  always	
  existed	
  at	
  some	
  level	
  in	
  Peru,	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  rise	
  after	
  1985.	
  The	
   Shining	
  Path	
  became	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  trade	
  and	
  corruption	
  ran	
  rampant	
  throughout	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  judicial	
   system.	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  government	
  and	
  the	
  U.S.	
  led	
  Operation	
  Condor	
  worked	
  together	
  to	
  coopt	
  the	
  coca	
   growers	
  and	
  traffickers,	
  only	
  heightening	
  the	
  state	
  of	
  fear	
  and	
  violence	
  in	
  the	
  highlands	
  of	
  the	
  southern	
   provinces.	
  Coca	
  eradication	
  campaigns	
  led	
  by	
  the	
  Garcia	
  government	
  further	
  stretched	
  institutional	
   limits	
  that	
  were	
  already	
  over	
  extended.	
  The	
  violence	
  surrounding	
  the	
  coca	
  trade	
  and	
  coca	
  eradication	
   campaigns	
  thus	
  added	
  to	
  a	
  general	
  mistrust	
  in	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  as	
  corruption	
  infiltrated	
  all	
  levels	
  of	
   government	
  and	
  eradication	
  measures	
  in	
  the	
  southern	
  highlands	
  became	
  embroiled	
  in	
  the	
  internal	
   war.51	
   On	
  July	
  28,	
  1987	
  Garcia	
  announced	
  his	
  plan	
  to	
  nationalize	
  sixteen	
  banks	
  and	
  seventeen	
   insurance	
  companies,	
  shocking	
  the	
  country.	
  The	
  nationalization	
  was	
  not	
  only	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  “democratize	
   credit”	
  and	
  encourage	
  domestic	
  investment	
  but	
  also	
  to	
  regain	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  left	
  and	
  progressive	
   sectors	
  that	
  he	
  had	
  lost.	
  Both	
  efforts	
  failed	
  and	
  not	
  only	
  did	
  the	
  political	
  community	
  turn	
  away	
  from	
   APRA	
  and	
  toward	
  the	
  more	
  conservative	
  forces	
  in	
  government,	
  he	
  completely	
  alienated	
  the	
   conservatives	
  as	
  well.	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  economy	
  hit	
  a	
  wall	
  and	
  faced	
  the	
  worst	
  crisis	
  it	
  had	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
   twentieth-­‐century.52	
  The	
  GDP	
  fell	
  8.8	
  percent	
  in	
  1988	
  and	
  14	
  percent	
  in	
  1989.	
  Real	
  wages	
  dropped.	
   Inefficient	
  and	
  corrupt	
  state	
  enterprises	
  compounded	
  fiscal	
  deficits.	
  Furthermore,	
  hyperinflation	
  ran	
  out	
   of	
  control	
  rising	
  to	
  1,722	
  percent	
  in	
  1988	
  and	
  2,788	
  percent	
  in	
  1989.	
  By	
  1989	
  Peru	
  owed	
  $25	
  billion	
   dollars	
  to	
  foreign	
  creditors.	
  The	
  Garcia	
  administration	
  grossly	
  mishandled	
  the	
  economy	
  and	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   50  	
  John	
  Crabtree,	
  Peru	
  Under	
  Garcia	
  An	
  Opportunity	
  Lost	
  (Pittsburgh	
  PA:	
  University	
  of	
  Pittsburgh	
  Press,	
  1992),	
  109-­‐ 111.	
   51 	
  Rudolph	
  166-­‐125.	
   52 	
  Crabtree,	
  121.	
    	
    32	
    	
   	
   mounting	
  economic	
  crisis,	
  only	
  bringing	
  the	
  country	
  further	
  into	
  depression	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  that	
  came	
  to	
  be	
   known	
  as	
  desgobierno,	
  or	
  simply,	
  disorder.53	
   Allegations	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  massive	
  clientelism	
  only	
  further	
  alienated	
  Garcia	
  and	
  the	
  APRA	
   from	
  the	
  electorate.	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  APRA’s	
  only	
  term	
  in	
  office	
  in	
  1990,	
  “…Peru	
  had	
  entered	
  its	
  most	
   polarized	
  political	
  situation	
  in	
  half	
  a	
  century.”54	
  The	
  military’s	
  reformist	
  government	
  under	
  Velasco	
  and	
   the	
  legacy	
  it	
  had	
  created,	
  the	
  built-­‐in	
  failures	
  of	
  the	
  transition	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule,	
  the	
  deepening	
  economic	
   crisis,	
  the	
  heightened	
  violence	
  and	
  two	
  terms	
  of	
  ineffectual	
  civilian	
  leadership	
  left	
  Peru	
  deeply	
  disturbed	
   and	
  politically	
  adrift.	
  The	
  economic	
  depression	
  that	
  began	
  in	
  1976	
  and	
  lasted	
  until	
  1992	
  gradually	
   eroded	
  confidence	
  in	
  center	
  and	
  leftist	
  economic	
  models,	
  leading	
  to	
  a	
  gradual	
  realignment	
  of	
  many	
   ideologically	
  centrist	
  voters	
  or	
  center-­‐left	
  voters	
  with	
  the	
  right	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  ideologically	
  ambiguous	
   political	
  outsiders.	
  The	
  drastic	
  economic	
  crisis	
  would	
  also	
  precipitate	
  the	
  degradation	
  of	
  Peruvian	
   institutional	
  frameworks	
  from	
  the	
  judicial	
  system	
  to	
  the	
  electoral	
  system	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  contribute	
  to	
  the	
   deterioration	
  of	
  already	
  limited	
  state	
  infrastructure.55	
   The	
  unique	
  political	
  experience	
  of	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  in	
  Peru	
  left	
  a	
  lasting	
  impression	
  on	
  the	
   Peruvian	
  psyche	
  and	
  subsequently	
  on	
  voting	
  behaviors.	
  The	
  early	
  demands	
  for	
  wider	
  political	
  inclusion	
   and	
  land	
  reform	
  went	
  unmet	
  until	
  the	
  late	
  1960s,	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  enacted	
  under	
  a	
  reformist	
  military	
   government.	
  This	
  government	
  led	
  a	
  top-­‐down	
  return	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  in	
  1980	
  that	
  left	
  in	
  its	
  wake	
  several	
   institutional	
  weaknesses.	
  The	
  two	
  civilian	
  governments	
  that	
  emerged	
  in	
  the	
  1980s	
  were	
  unable	
  to	
   effectively	
  address	
  these	
  weaknesses.	
  A	
  growing	
  rural	
  insurgency	
  coupled	
  with	
  a	
  deepening	
  economic	
   crisis	
  further	
  compounded	
  institutional	
  failings	
  that	
  resulted	
  in	
  a	
  wide-­‐spread	
  and	
  profound	
  distrust	
  in	
   the	
  political	
  system	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  elections.	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   53  	
  Rudolph,	
  131-­‐136.	
   	
  Mauceri,	
  31.	
   55 	
  Fransisco	
  Durand,	
  “The	
  Growth	
  and	
  Limitations	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Right,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
   and	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
   Press,	
  1997),	
  163.	
   54  	
    33	
    	
   Chapter	
  Two:	
  	
   The	
  1990	
  Elections	
   	
   By	
  1990,	
  Peru	
  was	
  facing	
  its	
  most	
  serious	
  economic,	
  political	
  and	
  violent	
  crisis	
  in	
  over	
  a	
  century.	
   Scholars	
  have	
  gone	
  as	
  far	
  as	
  to	
  argue	
  that	
  by	
  this	
  time	
  Peru	
  had	
  become,	
  “…a	
  political	
  economy	
  of	
   violence.”1	
  This	
  crisis	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  deep	
  mistrust	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  party	
  system	
  in	
  Peru	
  by	
  the	
  1990	
   congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  elections.	
  The	
  forces	
  of	
  hyperinflation	
  and	
  the	
  endemic	
  violence	
   propagated	
  by	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path,	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces,	
  and	
  to	
  a	
  lesser	
  extent	
  the	
  Tupac	
  Amarú	
   Revolutionary	
  Movement,	
  culminated	
  in	
  a	
  loss	
  of	
  faith	
  in	
  the	
  political	
  elites’	
  ability	
  to	
  govern	
  that	
  was	
   felt	
  by	
  virtually	
  all	
  social	
  and	
  economic	
  classes	
  across	
  the	
  country.2	
  At	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
  “the	
  explosion	
  of	
   social	
  demands—a	
  consequence	
  of	
  rapid	
  population	
  growth	
  and	
  of	
  the	
  increasing	
  unwillingness	
  to	
   tolerate	
  social	
  injustice—overran	
  the	
  capacity	
  of	
  government	
  organizations,	
  legislative	
  institutions,	
  the	
   legal	
  framework,	
  the	
  judiciary	
  system,	
  political	
  parties,	
  private	
  enterprises,	
  trade	
  unions	
  and	
  many	
  other	
   entities….”3	
  The	
  economic	
  and	
  violent	
  crisis	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  building	
  over	
  the	
  decade	
  of	
  the	
  1980s	
   culminated	
  in	
  a	
  moment	
  of	
  profound	
  political	
  disturbance	
  and	
  a	
  general	
  fear	
  that	
  Peru	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  verge	
   of	
  complete	
  social	
  and	
  political	
  breakdown	
  by	
  1990.	
  The	
  economic,	
  social	
  and	
  political	
  crisis	
  that	
  had	
   been	
  building	
  over	
  the	
  1980s	
  culminated	
  in	
  1990	
  allowing	
  for	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  outsiders	
  on	
  the	
  Peruvian	
   political	
  scene	
  that	
  seemed	
  to	
  offer	
  a	
  novel	
  approach	
  to	
  governing	
  and	
  represented	
  a	
  break	
  with	
  the	
   traditional	
  political	
  elite.4	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   1  	
  Carol	
  Wise,	
  “State	
  Policy	
  and	
  Social	
  Conflict	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society,	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
   Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  71.	
  	
   2 	
  John	
  Crabtree,	
  “Neo-­‐Populism	
  and	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Phenomenon,”	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Political	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
   John	
  Crabtree	
  and	
  Jim	
  Thomas	
  (London:	
  Institute	
  of	
  Latin	
  American	
  Studies	
  University	
  of	
  London,	
  1998),	
  15.	
  	
   3	
  Francisco	
  Sagasti	
  and	
  Max	
  Hernández,	
  “The	
  Crisis	
  of	
  Governance,”	
  in	
  Peru	
  in	
  Crisis:	
  Dictatorship	
  or	
  Democracy?,	
   eds.	
  Joseph	
  S.	
  Tulchin	
  and	
  Gary	
  Bland	
  (Boulder	
  CO:	
  Lynne	
  Rienner	
  Publishers,	
  1994),	
  25.	
   4 	
  Ibid.	
    	
   	
   The	
  destabilization	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  system	
  would	
  have	
  lasting	
  consequences	
  for	
  all	
  the	
   actors	
  involved	
  in	
  the	
  1990	
  election.	
  	
  The	
  Popular	
  Alliance	
  and	
  American	
  Popular	
  Revolutionary	
  Alliance	
   parties,	
  which	
  had	
  long	
  maintained	
  the	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  ideological	
  spectrum	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  history,	
   had	
  been	
  almost	
  completely	
  discredited	
  by	
  the	
  failed	
  presidencies	
  of	
  Fernando	
  Belaúnde	
  Terry	
  and	
  Alan	
   García	
  Perez.	
  Owing	
  to	
  García’s	
  complete	
  mismanagement	
  of	
  the	
  crisis,	
  the	
  disgobierno,	
  the	
  APRA	
  was	
   especially	
  isolated	
  from	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate.	
  Internal	
  divisions	
  within	
  the	
  traditionally	
  centrist	
   parties	
  further	
  propagated	
  a	
  burgeoning	
  trend	
  to	
  look	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  for	
  viable	
   congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  candidates.	
  As	
  one	
  scholar	
  put	
  it,	
  “competition	
  for	
  centrist	
  votes	
  would	
   have	
  stabilized	
  the	
  party	
  system,	
  but	
  internal	
  factions	
  within	
  parties	
  discouraged	
  centripetal	
   competition.”5	
  Thus,	
  the	
  center	
  was	
  “dangerously	
  vacant”	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  1990	
  election,	
  leaving	
  room	
  for	
   the	
  rise	
  of	
  relative	
  outsiders	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  scene.6	
   The	
  Municipal	
  Elections	
  and	
  the	
  Rise	
  of	
  Political	
  Outsiders	
   The	
  1989	
  municipal	
  election	
  in	
  Lima	
  serves	
  as	
  an	
  example	
  that	
  underscores	
  the	
  political	
  crisis	
   and	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  political	
  outsiders	
  who	
  sought	
  to	
  occupy	
  the	
  vacancy	
  of	
  the	
  center	
  on	
  the	
  political	
   spectrum.	
  Ricardo	
  Belmont	
  Cassinelli,	
  a	
  television	
  talk	
  show	
  host	
  and	
  independent	
  candidate,	
  won	
  the	
   1989	
  mayoral	
  election	
  securing	
  forty-­‐four	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  votes,	
  fifteen	
  points	
  ahead	
  of	
  the	
  right-­‐wing	
   coalition	
  and	
  over	
  thirty	
  points	
  more	
  than	
  either	
  the	
  left-­‐wing	
  parties	
  or	
  the	
  APRA.	
  Belmont	
  fashioned	
   himself	
  as	
  a	
  centrist	
  and	
  a	
  political	
  outsider,	
  creating	
  a	
  cross-­‐class	
  following	
  that	
  focused	
  on	
  apolitical	
   issues	
  such	
  as	
  public	
  works	
  for	
  the	
  city.	
  Belmont’s	
  election	
  signalled	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  a	
  voting	
  trend	
  that	
   would	
  lean	
  increasingly	
  toward	
  centrist,	
  ideologically	
  ambiguous	
  candidates,	
  reminiscent	
  of	
  earlier	
   populist	
  tendencies	
  but	
  more	
  tied	
  to	
  the	
  informal	
  sector	
  than	
  the	
  traditional	
  industrialist	
  focus.	
  Both	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   5  	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Eighteenth	
  Brumaire	
  of	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society,	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
   (University	
  Park	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  45.	
   6 	
  Ibid.,	
  41.	
    	
    35	
    	
   	
   left	
  and	
  the	
  APRA	
  took	
  the	
  hardest	
  hit	
  from	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  independents	
  and,	
  in	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  the	
  electoral	
   left,	
  this	
  forced	
  the	
  coalition	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Left	
  to	
  attempt	
  to	
  reorganize	
  and	
  regroup	
  heading	
  into	
  the	
   1990	
  presidential	
  election.7	
   Division	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Left	
   The	
  IU	
  remained	
  relatively	
  distant	
  from	
  the	
  political	
  power	
  locus	
  in	
  the	
  1980s	
  and	
  thus	
  was	
  not	
   as	
  severely	
  discredited	
  as	
  the	
  APRA	
  or	
  the	
  AP	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  1990	
  elections.	
  However,	
  the	
  coalition	
  was	
   unable	
  to	
  collectively	
  present	
  a	
  viable	
  presidential	
  candidate	
  in	
  the	
  1990	
  election	
  thus	
  leaving	
  the	
   political	
  arena	
  somewhat	
  vacant	
  allowing	
  for	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  political	
  outsiders	
  who	
  capitalized	
  on	
  traditional	
   party	
  fragmentation.	
  The	
  IU	
  had	
  been	
  experiencing	
  internal	
  division	
  for	
  much	
  of	
  the	
  latter	
  half	
  of	
  the	
   1980s.	
  Alfonso	
  Barrantes,	
  leading	
  the	
  IU,	
  had	
  become	
  Lima’s	
  mayor	
  in	
  1983	
  and	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  man	
   who	
  could	
  secure	
  the	
  volatile	
  coalition	
  and	
  lead	
  the	
  IU	
  to	
  power	
  in	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  election.	
   However,	
  beginning	
  with	
  Barrantes’	
  failed	
  bid	
  at	
  re-­‐election	
  in	
  Lima	
  in	
  1986,	
  the	
  coalition	
  under	
  his	
   leadership	
  began	
  to	
  fall	
  apart.	
  Barrantes’	
  faced	
  much	
  criticism	
  owing	
  to	
  his	
  “personalistic	
  and	
   dictatorial”	
  style	
  of	
  leadership	
  and	
  his	
  perceived	
  failure	
  to	
  confront	
  García’s	
  mismanagement.	
  This	
   served	
  to	
  alienate	
  the	
  IU	
  from	
  its	
  traditional	
  support	
  base,	
  Peru’s	
  working-­‐class	
  and	
  peasantry.	
  By	
  1987,	
   Barrantes	
  withdrew	
  from	
  the	
  leadership	
  of	
  the	
  IU,8	
  leaving	
  it	
  divided	
  “…by	
  issues	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  the	
   state,	
  cooperation	
  with	
  non-­‐leftist	
  political	
  parties,	
  and	
  the	
  legitimacy	
  of	
  armed	
  struggle	
  in	
  the	
  transition	
   to	
  socialism.”9	
  Division	
  was	
  heightened	
  by	
  two	
  strongly	
  opposing	
  goals	
  for	
  the	
  IU	
  within	
  the	
  coalition.	
   The	
  radicals	
  perceived	
  the	
  electoral	
  focus	
  as	
  secondary	
  to	
  gathering	
  mass	
  support	
  for	
  the	
  left	
  as	
  a	
   revolutionary	
  movement.	
  The	
  moderates	
  rallied	
  for	
  reformation	
  and	
  saw	
  the	
  electoral	
  system	
  as	
  the	
  key	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   7  	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  46.	
   	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron,	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru:	
  Political	
  Coalitions	
  and	
  Social	
  Change	
  (New	
  York:	
   St.	
  Martin’s	
  Press,	
  1994),	
  77.	
   9 	
  Barry	
  S.	
  Levitt,	
  Power	
  in	
  the	
  Balance:	
  President’s,	
  Parties	
  and	
  Legislatures	
  in	
  Peru	
  and	
  Beyond	
  (Notre	
  Dame	
  IA:	
   University	
  of	
  Notre	
  Dame	
  Press,	
  2012),	
  106.	
   8  	
    36	
    	
   	
   to	
  the	
  left’s	
  success.10	
  	
  In	
  the	
  lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  1989	
  municipal	
  elections	
  and	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
   elections,	
  the	
  various	
  factions	
  of	
  the	
  IU	
  attempted	
  to	
  reconcile	
  internal	
  divisions	
  and	
  come	
  to	
   agreement	
  on	
  the	
  IU	
  platform.	
  In	
  January	
  1989,	
  the	
  IU	
  split	
  in	
  two,	
  unable	
  to	
  reconcile	
  these	
  opposing	
   goals.	
  The	
  Socialist	
  Accord	
  of	
  the	
  Left	
  (ASI,	
  or	
  Acuerdo	
  Socialista	
  de	
  Izquierda)	
  was	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  moderate	
   factions	
  within	
  the	
  IU,	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  Revolutionary	
  Socialist	
  Party,	
  and	
  moderate	
  actors	
  within	
  the	
  radical	
   factions	
  of	
  the	
  IU,	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  Mariateguist	
  Unified	
  Party	
  (PUM,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Unificado	
  Mariateguista).	
  This	
   moderate	
  coalition	
  changed	
  its	
  name	
  to	
  the	
  Socialist	
  Left	
  (IS,	
  or	
  Izquierda	
  Socialista)	
  for	
  the	
  1990	
   elections	
  and	
  chose	
  Barrantes	
  as	
  their	
  presidential	
  candidate.	
  The	
  remaining	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  IU	
   maintained	
  the	
  name	
  and	
  surprisingly	
  chose	
  moderate	
  leader	
  Henry	
  Pease	
  García	
  to	
  lead	
  the	
  coalition	
  of	
   the	
  more	
  radical	
  leftist	
  factions.	
  Pease	
  attempted	
  to	
  reunite	
  the	
  left	
  for	
  the	
  congressional	
  and	
   presidential	
  elections,	
  but	
  Barrantes	
  and	
  the	
  IS	
  refused.	
  Thus,	
  not	
  only	
  was	
  the	
  left’s	
  electoral	
  support	
   effectively	
  halved	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  coalitions	
  but	
  party	
  members	
  were	
  demoralized	
  and	
  their	
   enthusiasm	
  sapped.11	
  Furthermore,	
  “…the	
  division	
  of	
  the	
  left	
  reinforced	
  the	
  impression	
  that	
  a	
  vote	
  for	
   one	
  of	
  the	
  two	
  leading	
  [leftist]	
  candidates	
  was	
  a	
  lost	
  vote.”12	
   Going	
  into	
  the	
  1990	
  congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  elections,	
  the	
  two	
  leftist	
  coalitions	
  that	
   emerged	
  shared	
  a	
  similar	
  platform	
  that	
  further	
  disorientated	
  left-­‐leaning	
  voters.	
  Both	
  the	
  IS	
  and	
  the	
  IU	
   focused	
  on	
  a	
  shift	
  to	
  private	
  market	
  development	
  and	
  a	
  step	
  back	
  from	
  state-­‐led	
  protectionism.	
  They	
   differed	
  in	
  their	
  implementation	
  and	
  party	
  structures.13	
  In	
  the	
  months	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  elections	
   opinion	
  polls	
  in	
  Lima	
  placed	
  the	
  IS,	
  under	
  Barrantes,	
  as	
  the	
  runner	
  up	
  behind	
  a	
  right-­‐wing	
  coalition	
  led	
   by	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa.14	
   	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   10  	
  Cameron,	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  78.	
   	
  Levitt,	
  106-­‐107.	
  	
   12 	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  45.	
   13 	
  Julio	
  Gamero,	
  “Estabilización:	
  ¿Gradualismo	
  o	
  Shock?,”	
  Quehacer	
  63	
  (March-­‐April,	
  1990):	
  14-­‐15.	
   14 	
  Rafeal	
  Roncagliolo,	
  “Elecciones	
  en	
  Lima:	
  Cifras	
  Testarudas?,”	
  Quehacer	
  62	
  (December	
  1989-­‐January	
  1990):	
  20.	
   11  	
    37	
    	
   	
   The	
  Democratic	
  Front	
   As	
  the	
  left’s	
  instability	
  was	
  causing	
  a	
  decline	
  in	
  electoral	
  support,	
  the	
  conservatives	
  experienced	
   a	
  surge	
  of	
  renewed	
  popularity	
  beginning	
  in	
  1987.	
  The	
  “new	
  right”	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  capitalize	
  on	
  the	
  growing	
   sense	
  of	
  fear	
  and	
  chaos	
  felt	
  by	
  the	
  middle-­‐	
  and	
  upper-­‐classes.	
  The	
  violence	
  surrounding	
  the	
  internal	
  war,	
   as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  previous	
  administration’s	
  inability	
  to	
  effectively	
  deal	
  with	
  the	
  guerillas,	
  helped	
  garner	
   support	
  for	
  the	
  right	
  whose	
  hardline	
  stance	
  on	
  insurgency	
  seemed	
  to	
  offer	
  a	
  possible	
  solution.15Mario	
   Vargas	
  Llosa,	
  a	
  Peruvian	
  born	
  novelist,	
  	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  economist	
  Hernando	
  de	
  Soto,	
  formed	
  the	
   Liberty	
  Movement	
  (Movimiento	
  Libertad),	
  known	
  simply	
  as	
  Liberty	
  (Libertad)	
  at	
  a	
  political	
  rally	
  in	
  1987	
   protesting	
  the	
  García	
  administration’s	
  nationalization	
  of	
  the	
  banks.	
  Llosa,	
  a	
  political	
  novice,	
  was	
  a	
  widely	
   read	
  political	
  commentator	
  who	
  had	
  initially	
  associated	
  himself	
  with	
  the	
  left	
  but	
  since	
  the	
  1970s	
  had	
   become	
  increasingly	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  Peru’s	
  conservative	
  right.	
  Liberty	
  was	
  first	
  presented	
  as	
  a	
  movement	
   focused	
  on	
  civic	
  involvement	
  and	
  not	
  a	
  political	
  party.	
  However,	
  from	
  early	
  on	
  it	
  was	
  clear	
  that	
  Llosa	
   hoped	
  to	
  secure	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  election	
  under	
  the	
  movement’s	
  banner.	
  Llosa	
  and	
  Liberty,	
   supported	
  by	
  Hernando	
  de	
  Soto’s	
  economic	
  analysis	
  of	
  Peru,	
  pushed	
  for	
  a	
  move	
  toward	
  liberalization	
   and	
  eventually	
  staunch,	
  free-­‐market	
  capitalism.	
  Despite	
  Llosa’s	
  personal	
  political	
  outsider	
  status,	
  by	
  all	
   accounts	
  Liberty	
  became	
  increasingly	
  associated	
  with	
  Peru’s	
  traditional	
  political	
  elite.	
  As	
  the	
  1990	
   election	
  approached,	
  Libertad	
  recognized	
  the	
  need	
  to	
  expand	
  its	
  support	
  base	
  and	
  in	
  1988	
  the	
   movement	
  formed	
  a	
  coalition	
  with	
  the	
  AP	
  and	
  the	
  conservative	
  Christian	
  People’s	
  Party	
  under	
  the	
   banner	
  of	
  the	
  Democratic	
  Front	
  (FREDEMO,	
  or	
  Frente	
  Democrático).	
  In	
  1989,	
  two	
  other	
  relatively	
  low	
   profile	
  parties	
  joined	
  FREDEMO’s	
  ranks,	
  the	
  Solidarity	
  and	
  Democracy	
  Party	
  (SODE,	
  or	
  Solidaridad	
  y	
   Democracia)	
  and	
  the	
  Independent	
  Civic	
  Union	
  (UCI,	
  or	
  Unión	
  Cívic	
  Independiente).	
  FREDEMO	
  did	
  well	
  in	
   the	
  municipal	
  elections	
  outside	
  of	
  Lima.	
  It	
  was	
  clear	
  that	
  it	
  had	
  become	
  a	
  force	
  with	
  which	
  to	
  be	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   15  	
  Francisco	
  Durand,	
  The	
  Growth	
  and	
  Limitations	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Right,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society,	
   Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
   Press,	
  1997),	
  166.	
    	
    38	
    	
   	
   reckoned.	
  Opinion	
  polls	
  for	
  Llosa	
  showed	
  he	
  was	
  consistently	
  above	
  the	
  IS’	
  Barrantes	
  and	
  the	
  APRA’s	
   presidential	
  candidate,	
  Luis	
  Alva	
  Castro	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  election;	
  Llosa’s	
  victory	
  seemed	
  inevitable.16	
   However,	
  Llosa’s	
  campaign	
  was	
  plagued	
  by	
  a	
  separation	
  between	
  the	
  party	
  and	
  the	
  conservative	
   political	
  forces	
  that	
  rallied	
  around	
  it,	
  and	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  electorate.	
  The	
  campaign	
  platform,	
  in	
  many	
   respects	
  aimed	
  to	
  break	
  ties	
  with	
  the	
  old	
  oligarchy	
  and	
  sought	
  to	
  gain	
  support	
  from	
  who	
  they	
  advocated	
   as	
  the	
  beneficiaries	
  of	
  neoliberal	
  reform,	
  the	
  informal	
  sector.	
  The	
  party	
  itself	
  was	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  individuals	
   who	
  represented	
  Lima’s	
  criollo	
  classes	
  and	
  had	
  virtually	
  no	
  connections	
  to	
  even	
  the	
  mestizo	
  (indigenous	
   and	
  Spanish	
  hybrid)	
  elements	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  society	
  or	
  the	
  informal	
  sector.	
  As	
  one	
  scholar	
  noted,	
  “the	
   FREDEMO	
  list	
  read	
  like	
  a	
  who’s	
  who	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  establishment.”	
  Llosa	
  focused	
  on	
  winning	
   the	
  election	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  while	
  his	
  opponents	
  sought	
  to	
  push	
  the	
  election	
  through	
  to	
  the	
   second	
  round	
  in	
  hopes	
  of	
  creating	
  enough	
  anti-­‐Llosa	
  sentiment	
  to	
  prevent	
  his	
  entrance	
  into	
  office.17	
   Despite	
  FREDEMO’s	
  detachment	
  from	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  majority,	
  their	
  economic	
  reforms,	
  although	
   frightening	
  to	
  many,	
  received	
  reasonable	
  support	
  on	
  the	
  basis	
  that	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  reverse	
  Peru’s	
  isolation	
   from	
  international	
  creditors,	
  the	
  country	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  embrace	
  a	
  neo-­‐liberal	
  mandate,	
  such	
  as	
  had	
   been	
  recommended	
  by	
  the	
  IMF	
  and	
  the	
  World	
  Bank	
  for	
  years.18	
  Llosa’s	
  opponents	
  capitalized	
  on	
  the	
   fear	
  that	
  FREDEMO’s	
  platform	
  invoked	
  in	
  voters.	
  Compounding	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  apprehension,	
  Llosa’s	
   campaign	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  expensive	
  and	
  media-­‐based	
  in	
  Peru’s	
  political	
  history,	
  which	
  further	
  served	
  to	
   reinforce	
  his	
  image	
  as	
  an	
  elitist	
  candidate	
  tied	
  to	
  big	
  business	
  and	
  conservative	
  forces.	
  Scholars	
  have	
   pointed	
  out	
  many	
  contradictions	
  in	
  his	
  campaign	
  which	
  further	
  alienated	
  FREDEMO	
  from	
  Peru’s	
   indigenous,	
  working-­‐class	
  majority.	
  Llosa’s	
  white,	
  criollo	
  heritage	
  made	
  it	
  difficult	
  for	
  him	
  to	
  gain	
  the	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   16  	
  James	
  D.	
  Rudolph,	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Evolution	
  of	
  a	
  Crisis	
  (Westport	
  CT:	
  Praeger,	
  1992),	
  139-­‐142.	
   	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  42-­‐44.	
   18 	
  Durand,	
  160.	
   17  	
    39	
    	
   	
   support	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  majority	
  of	
  indigenous	
  voters	
  while	
  his	
  anti-­‐party	
  rhetoric	
  was	
  sharply	
  contrasted	
  by	
   his	
  coalition	
  with	
  two	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  oldest	
  and	
  largest	
  established	
  political	
  parties,	
  the	
  AP	
  and	
  PPC.19	
   There	
  was	
  no	
  shortage	
  of	
  political	
  parties	
  to	
  choose	
  from	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  1989	
  municipal	
  election	
   or	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  election	
  but,	
  as	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  Mayor	
  Belmont	
  illustrated,	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  widespread	
   sense	
  of	
  mistrust	
  for	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  parties	
  to	
  effectively	
  quell	
  the	
  violence	
  and	
  restore	
   economic	
  order	
  to	
  the	
  country.	
  In	
  fact,	
  the	
  break	
  with	
  Peru’s	
  traditional	
  party	
  system	
  was	
  so	
  complete	
   that,	
  as	
  was	
  seen	
  in	
  Llosa’s	
  campaign,	
  “…[party	
  organizations]	
  were	
  seen	
  by	
  politicians	
  and	
  voters	
  alike	
   as	
  electoral	
  liabilities.”20	
  This	
  situation	
  allowed	
  for	
  independent	
  political	
  outsiders	
  to	
  garner	
  the	
  support	
   of	
  large	
  sectors	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  in	
  relatively	
  short	
  periods	
  of	
  time.	
  Such	
  was	
  the	
  case	
  for	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  his	
  party	
  Change	
  ‘90.	
  	
   The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  presented	
  himself	
  as	
  a	
  centrist,	
  a	
  moderate	
  and	
  political	
  outsider	
  managing	
  to	
   rise	
  from	
  virtual	
  obscurity	
  into	
  second	
  place	
  behind	
  FREDEMO	
  in	
  just	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  in	
  what	
  has	
  become	
   known	
  as,	
  “the	
  Fujimori	
  phenomenon.”	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  born	
  into	
  a	
  family	
  of	
  Japanese	
  immigrants.	
  He	
  was	
   rector	
  and	
  an	
  agricultural	
  engineer	
  at	
  Lima’s	
  respected	
  National	
  Agrarian	
  University.21	
  He	
  also	
  hosted	
   the	
  Chanel	
  7	
  television	
  show,	
  Concertando,	
  which	
  focused	
  on	
  issues	
  surrounding	
  agricultural	
  production,	
   such	
  as	
  policies	
  and	
  techniques,	
  and	
  was	
  widely	
  watched	
  among	
  rural	
  Peruvians.	
  He	
  was	
  relatively	
   unknown	
  among	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  elites	
  which	
  aided	
  the	
  image	
  on	
  which	
  he	
  rested	
  his	
  campaign,	
   presenting	
  himself	
  as	
  an	
  anti-­‐oligarchic,	
  anti-­‐party,	
  “man	
  of	
  the	
  people.”	
  However,	
  Fujimori	
  had	
   previously	
  attempted	
  to	
  establish	
  ties	
  with	
  the	
  APRA,	
  under	
  García,	
  whom	
  he	
  had	
  worked	
  for	
  in	
  an	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   19  	
  Levitt,	
  111.	
   	
  Kenneth	
  M.	
  Roberts,	
  “Do	
  Parties	
  Matter?	
  Lessons	
  from	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Experience,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park	
  PA:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
   2006,	
  85.	
   21 	
  Rudolph,	
  142.	
   20  	
    40	
    	
   	
   attempt	
  to	
  become	
  a	
  senator.22	
  After	
  being	
  turned	
  away	
  by	
  the	
  APRA,	
  Fujimori	
  created	
  his	
  own	
  political	
   movement	
  in	
  1988,	
  Change	
  ‘90,	
  to	
  support	
  his	
  bid	
  for	
  the	
  1990	
  congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
   elections.23	
  Even	
  after	
  the	
  establishment	
  of	
  C-­‐90	
  and	
  registering	
  his	
  candidacy	
  for	
  presidency	
  under	
  the	
   party,	
  Fujimori	
  attempted	
  to	
  form	
  ties	
  to	
  the	
  IS	
  under	
  Barrantes,	
  but	
  was	
  again	
  refused	
  entry	
  into	
  the	
   established	
  political	
  scene.	
  He	
  then	
  turned	
  his	
  focus	
  to	
  C-­‐90	
  and	
  began	
  campaigning	
  for	
  the	
  1990	
   elections.	
  Change	
  ‘90	
  relied	
  on	
  three	
  bases	
  of	
  support:	
  national	
  networks	
  made	
  up	
  of	
  his	
  connections	
   from	
  the	
  Agrarian	
  University	
  and	
  universities	
  across	
  Peru,	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Evangelical	
  community	
  and	
  the	
   Association	
  of	
  Small	
  and	
  Medium-­‐Sized	
  Industrialists	
  of	
  Peru	
  (APEMIPE,	
  or	
  Asociación	
  de	
  Pequeños	
  y	
   Medianos	
  Industriales	
  del	
  Perú)	
  that	
  held	
  connections	
  to	
  the	
  informal-­‐sector.	
  C-­‐90	
  also	
  received	
  direct	
   support	
  from	
  the	
  Japanese	
  Nisei	
  community	
  in	
  Lima	
  to	
  which	
  Fujimori’s	
  wife,	
  Susana	
  Higuchi	
  de	
   Fujimori,	
  maintained	
  strong	
  ties.	
  The	
  electoral	
  movement	
  was	
  tightly	
  controlled	
  by	
  Fujimori	
  himself	
   despite	
  its	
  coalescence	
  of	
  these	
  different	
  groups.	
  These	
  groups	
  were	
  given	
  the	
  charge	
  of	
  picking	
   legislative	
  candidates	
  to	
  fill	
  senate	
  and	
  deputy	
  spots	
  for	
  the	
  party.	
  However,	
  Fujimori	
  maintained	
  the	
   right	
  to	
  veto	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  chosen	
  candidates	
  and	
  insisted	
  that	
  the	
  candidates	
  be	
  political	
  novices	
  without	
   ties	
  to	
  established	
  political	
  parties.24	
  Fujimori	
  thus	
  capitalized	
  on	
  his	
  outsider	
  status	
  and	
  presented	
  an	
   image	
  that	
  espoused	
  his	
  humble	
  origins,	
  minority	
  status	
  and	
  disconnect	
  from	
  the	
  political	
  establishment	
   that	
  had	
  been	
  so	
  discredited	
  in	
  the	
  1980s.	
  He	
  erroneously	
  claimed	
  that	
  he	
  financed	
  his	
  1990	
  campaign	
   by	
  selling	
  off	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  his	
  assets,	
  when	
  in	
  reality	
  he	
  and	
  his	
  wife	
  owned	
  numerous	
  properties	
  in	
   and	
  around	
  Lima	
  of	
  which	
  only	
  a	
  few	
  were	
  sold	
  to	
  finance	
  the	
  campaign.25	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  did	
  not	
   initially	
  present	
  a	
  campaign	
  platform	
  instead	
  he	
  relied	
  on	
  apolitical	
  slogans	
  to	
  garner	
  support	
  from	
  the	
   working-­‐class	
  and	
  the	
  informal	
  sector,	
  recognizing	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  the	
  informal	
  sector’s	
  support,	
  a	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   22  	
  Levitt,	
  113.	
   	
  Rudolph,	
  142.	
   24 	
  Levitt,	
  112.	
   25 	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron.	
  “Endogenous	
  Regime	
  Breakdown:	
  The	
  Valdivideo	
  and	
  Fall	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Fujimori,”	
  in	
  The	
   Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  272-­‐273.	
   23  	
    41	
    	
   	
   fact	
  that	
  Hernando	
  de	
  Soto,	
  who	
  would	
  later	
  became	
  one	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  advisors,	
  emphasized.26	
  By	
  the	
   end	
  of	
  the	
  1980s,	
  60	
  percent	
  of	
  people	
  living	
  in	
  Lima	
  were	
  employed	
  in	
  the	
  informal	
  sector	
  partaking	
  in	
   unregulated	
  economic	
  activities	
  such	
  as,	
  “…ubiquitous	
  street	
  vending,	
  clandestine	
  manufacturing,	
   garbage	
  processing	
  and	
  innumerable	
  petty	
  services.”27	
  The	
  main	
  campaign	
  slogan,	
  “honesty,	
  technology	
   and	
  work,”	
  exemplifies	
  this	
  appeal	
  to	
  the	
  masses	
  and	
  a	
  move	
  away	
  from	
  traditional	
  political	
  rhetoric.28	
   Fujimori’s	
  campaign	
  consisted	
  almost	
  entirely	
  of	
  inexpensive,	
  mostly	
  rural,	
  tours	
  where	
  he	
  drove	
  a	
   tractor	
  to	
  and	
  from	
  public	
  appearances.	
  The	
  image	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  atop	
  a	
  tractor	
  became	
  the	
  campaign’s	
   powerful	
  symbol	
  and	
  emphasized	
  Change	
  ‘90’s	
  carefully	
  constructed	
  “humble	
  and	
  grassroots”	
  image.29	
   The	
  First	
  Round	
   As	
  the	
  presidential	
  campaign	
  heated	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  months	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
   scheduled	
  for	
  April	
  8th,	
  1990	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  went	
  from	
  virtual	
  unknowns	
  to	
  winning	
  second	
  place	
   in	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  and	
  wrestling	
  away	
  Llosa’s	
  dream	
  of	
  securing	
  a	
  majority.	
  Llosa	
  came	
  in	
  first	
  after	
  the	
   first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  with	
  32.6	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote	
  and	
  Fujimori	
  second	
  with	
  29.2	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
   vote.	
  	
  The	
  APRA,	
  under	
  Castro,	
  came	
  in	
  third	
  with	
  22.5	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote.	
  The	
  IU,	
  under	
  Pease,	
  came	
  in	
   fourth	
  with	
  8.2	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote.	
  The	
  IS,	
  under	
  Alfonso	
  Barrantes	
  Lingán,	
  came	
  in	
  fifth	
  with	
  only	
  4.8	
   percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote.	
  The	
  remaining	
  contenders	
  including	
  the	
  National	
  Front	
  of	
  Workers	
  and	
  Peasants	
   (FNTC,	
  or	
  Frente	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Trabajadores	
  y	
  Campesinos),	
  the	
  Agricultural	
  People’s	
  Front	
  of	
  Peru	
   (FREPAP,	
  or	
  Frente	
  Popular	
  Agrícola	
  del	
  Perú),	
  the	
  Odríst	
  National	
  Union	
  (UNO,	
  or	
  Unión	
  Nacional	
   Odrista)	
  and	
  the	
  Democratic	
  Unity	
  Party	
  (UD,	
  or	
  Partido	
  	
  de	
  la	
  Unidad	
  Democratica)	
  commanded	
  only	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   26  	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  46.	
   	
  Gregory	
  D.	
  Schmidt,	
  “Fujimori’s	
  1990	
  upset	
  Victory	
  in	
  Peru:	
  Electoral	
  Rules,	
  Contingencies	
  and	
  Adaptive	
   Strategies,”	
  Comparative	
  Politics	
  28,	
  no.	
  3	
  (1996),	
  323.	
  http://www.jstor.org/	
  (accessed	
  September	
  15,	
  2012).	
  	
   28 	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  46.	
   29 	
  Levitt,	
  112.	
   27  	
    42	
    	
   	
   2.8	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote	
  collectively.30	
  In	
  a	
  matter	
  of	
  three	
  weeks,	
  Fujimori	
  had	
  gone	
  from	
   receiving	
  only	
  4.8	
  percent	
  of	
  national	
  voter	
  preference	
  to	
  placing	
  second	
  behind	
  Llosa	
  who	
  had	
  been	
  the	
   leader	
  in	
  opinion	
  polls	
  up	
  until	
  that	
  point.31	
   The	
  Second	
  Round	
   Going	
  into	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  of	
  the	
  presidential	
  election	
  scheduled	
  for	
  June	
  10th,	
  1990,	
  only	
   FREDEMO	
  and	
  C-­‐90	
  stood	
  as	
  contenders,	
  severely	
  polarizing	
  the	
  electorate.	
  FREDEMO	
  had	
  few	
  votes	
  to	
   gain	
  owing	
  to	
  its	
  right-­‐wing	
  alignment	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round,	
  whereas	
  C-­‐90	
  seemed	
  destined	
  to	
  receive	
  the	
   advantage	
  this	
  polarization	
  created	
  by	
  receiving	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  anti-­‐right	
  votes	
  that	
  had	
  previously	
  been	
  lost	
   to	
  the	
  IU,	
  IS	
  and	
  other	
  smaller	
  political	
  parties.	
  Regardless	
  of	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
  neither	
   candidate	
  would	
  enter	
  office	
  with	
  a	
  majority	
  in	
  congress	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
  electoral	
  system	
  and	
  the	
  results	
  of	
   the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  that	
  dictated	
  the	
  congressional	
  makeup.32	
  	
  Sensing	
  this	
  undesirable	
  post-­‐ election	
  outcome	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  unlikelihood	
  of	
  winning	
  the	
  votes	
  needed	
  to	
  win	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
   Llosa	
  proposed	
  to	
  Fujimori	
  that	
  FREDEMO	
  and	
  C-­‐90	
  merge	
  congressional	
  forces,	
  offering	
  Fujimori	
  the	
   presidency	
  under	
  this	
  new	
  coalition.	
  Fujimori	
  refused	
  this	
  offer,	
  recognizing	
  that	
  much	
  of	
  his	
  electoral	
   power	
  lay	
  in	
  his	
  anti-­‐party	
  identity,	
  and	
  chose	
  to	
  run	
  under	
  C-­‐90	
  against	
  Llosa	
  and	
  FREDEMO.	
  Fujimori	
   refocused	
  the	
  Change	
  ‘90	
  campaign	
  towards	
  the	
  left	
  in	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  secure	
  the	
  votes	
  he	
  needed.33	
  In	
   general	
  Fujimori	
  attacked	
  Llosa	
  for	
  his	
  neoliberal	
  approach	
  to	
  economic	
  policy	
  and	
  the	
  brutal	
  shock	
  plan	
   for	
  stabilization	
  laid	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  FREDEMO	
  platform.	
  Fujimori,	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  hand,	
  did	
  not	
  present	
  any	
  kind	
   of	
  formal	
  campaign	
  platform	
  until	
  right	
  before	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  and	
  instead	
  used	
  anti-­‐Llosa	
  sentiment	
   to	
  bolster	
  his	
  campaign.	
  He	
  criticized	
  Llosa’s	
  shock	
  plan	
  as	
  too	
  extreme	
  and	
  promised	
  to	
  deliver	
  a	
  more	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   30  	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales,	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1990	
  Primera	
  Vuelta,	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RESUMEN/GENERALES/2.pdf	
  (accessed	
  November	
  04,	
   2012).	
  	
   31 	
  Rudolph,	
  139-­‐142.	
   32 	
  Cameron,	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  129.	
  	
   33 	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  47.	
    	
    43	
    	
   	
   moderate	
  approach	
  to	
  “save”	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  economy.	
  However,	
  what	
  proved	
  most	
  powerful	
  in	
   persuading	
  electoral	
  support	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  his	
  outsider	
  status.34	
   FREDEMO,	
  essentially	
  boxed	
  into	
  a	
  corner,	
  attempted	
  to	
  discredit	
  Fujimori	
  on	
  a	
  number	
  of	
   levels,	
  including	
  alluding	
  to	
  his	
  ethnicity	
  in	
  a	
  derogatory	
  sense,	
  which	
  only	
  further	
  solidified	
  anti-­‐rightist	
   sentiment	
  in	
  an	
  ethnically	
  diverse	
  electorate	
  that	
  identified	
  with	
  Fujimori’s	
  plight	
  as	
  a	
  minority.	
  The	
   Catholic	
  Church	
  also	
  campaigned	
  for	
  FREDEMO,	
  responding	
  to	
  perceived	
  criticism	
  of	
  the	
  church	
  by	
   members	
  of	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  and	
  their	
  Protestant	
  allies,	
  which	
  again	
  solidified	
  FREDEMO’s	
  public	
  image	
  as	
   deeply	
  connected	
  to	
  the	
  established	
  order	
  and	
  the	
  white	
  elite.	
  Furthering	
  C-­‐90’s	
  campaign,	
  the	
  APRA	
   and	
  some	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  left	
  began	
  a	
  campaign	
  which	
  directly	
  attacked	
  FREDEMO	
  for	
  its	
  elitist	
  image	
   and	
  neoliberal	
  policy	
  tied	
  to	
  the	
  IMF	
  that	
  proved	
  very	
  persuasive	
  in	
  forging	
  mistrust	
  for	
  Llosa,	
  especially	
   among	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  sectors.35	
  Although	
  Fujimori	
  had	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  large	
  APRA	
  and	
  left-­‐leaning	
   newspapers	
  such	
  as	
  Pagina	
  Libre,	
  La	
  Crónica	
  and	
  La	
  República	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  Panamericana	
  Televisión	
  he	
   came	
  under	
  attack	
  by	
  the	
  media	
  that	
  was	
  in	
  Llosa’s	
  camp.	
  Allegations	
  of	
  tax	
  evasion,	
  surreptitious	
  land	
   transfers,	
  sexual	
  harassment	
  at	
  the	
  Agrarian	
  University	
  and	
  even	
  possible	
  “…falsification	
  of	
  his	
  birth	
   records”	
  began	
  to	
  surface	
  and	
  threatened	
  to	
  harm	
  the	
  campaign	
  he	
  seemed	
  so	
  likely	
  to	
  win.36	
  	
   In	
  response	
  to	
  these	
  damaging	
  allegations,	
  Fujimori	
  enlisted	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  attorney	
  Vladimiro	
   Montesinos.	
  Mentesinos	
  had	
  been	
  the	
  subject	
  of	
  an	
  exposé	
  published	
  in	
  a	
  well-­‐read	
  Peruvian	
  magazine,	
   Caretas,	
  in	
  1983	
  that	
  detailed	
  his	
  shady	
  connections	
  with	
  Peru’s	
  National	
  Intelligence	
  Service	
  (SIN,	
  or	
   Servicio	
  de	
  Inteligencia	
  Nacional)	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  his	
  expulsion	
  from	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  for	
  sharing	
   military	
  secrets	
  with	
  the	
  U.S.	
  Central	
  Intelligence	
  Agency	
  (CIA).	
  	
  Despite	
  Montesinos’	
  reputation,	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   34  	
  Kurt	
  Weyland,	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neopopulist	
  Leadership,”	
  in	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
   Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park	
  PA:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
   2006,	
  20.	
   35 	
  Rudolph,	
  143-­‐144.	
  	
   36	
  Catherine	
  M.	
  Conoghan,	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  Deception	
  in	
  the	
  Public	
  Sphere	
  (Pittsburgh	
  PA:	
  University	
  of	
  Pittsburgh	
   Press,	
  2005),	
  19.	
    	
    44	
    	
   	
   Fujimori	
  hired	
  him	
  to	
  deal	
  with	
  the	
  negative	
  press	
  he	
  was	
  receiving.	
  He	
  soon	
  became	
  C-­‐90’s	
  most	
   important	
  campaign	
  strategist.	
  This	
  was	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  a	
  complex	
  relationship	
  between	
  Fujimori	
  and	
   Montesinos.37	
   Despite	
  Fujimori’s	
  success	
  in	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  campaign,	
  Change	
  ‘90	
  remained	
  disorganized	
   and	
  institutionally	
  weak.	
  Fujimori’s	
  leadership	
  prevented	
  any	
  attempts	
  made	
  by	
  party	
  members	
  to	
  form	
   some	
  kind	
  of	
  C-­‐90	
  organizational	
  leadership	
  and	
  Fujimori	
  maintained	
  a	
  strong	
  executive	
  authority.38	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori’s	
  Presidential	
  Victory	
   Fujimori	
  won	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  with	
  62.4	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  votes	
  and	
  Llosa	
  came	
   in	
  second	
  with	
  only	
  37.6	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote.39	
  The	
  numbers	
  testify	
  that	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  C-­‐90	
  were	
   able	
  to	
  effectively	
  rally	
  the	
  traditional	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  APRA	
  and	
  the	
  left-­‐wing	
  voters	
  during	
  the	
  second	
   round	
  campaign.	
  This	
  success	
  was	
  especially	
  pronounced	
  in	
  the	
  countryside	
  where	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
   Fujimori’s	
  support	
  was	
  based,	
  as	
  the	
  margin	
  of	
  victory	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  in	
  Lima	
  was	
  much	
  smaller	
  at	
  only	
  6	
   percent.40	
  In	
  congress,	
  Fujimori	
  faced	
  serious	
  difficulties	
  as	
  C-­‐90	
  only	
  held	
  14	
  of	
  the	
  60	
  Senate	
  positions	
   and	
  49	
  of	
  the	
  180	
  positions	
  in	
  the	
  Chamber	
  of	
  Deputies.41	
  Owing	
  to	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  his	
  rise	
  to	
  presidency	
   and	
  the	
  C-­‐90’s	
  lack	
  of	
  any	
  institutional	
  framework,	
  Fujimori,	
  “…owed	
  nothing	
  to	
  the	
  country’s	
  political	
   institutions...	
  [and]	
  he	
  was	
  not	
  constrained	
  by	
  campaign	
  promises.”	
  He	
  was	
  free	
  to	
  proceed	
  in	
  whatever	
   way	
  he	
  chose.	
  Fujimori	
  immediately	
  began	
  to	
  consolidate	
  his	
  executive	
  power,	
  perfect	
  his	
  man	
  of	
  the	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   37  	
  Ibid.	
   	
  Levitt,	
  113.	
   39 	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1990	
  Segunda	
  Vuelta.	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RESUMEN/GENERALES/2.pdf	
  (accessed	
  November	
  04,	
   2012).	
   40 	
  Cameron,	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  140.	
   41 	
  Ibid.,	
  129.	
   38  	
    45	
    	
   	
   people	
  image	
  and	
  solidify	
  his	
  relationship	
  with	
  Montesinos	
  who	
  would	
  become	
  the	
  man	
  who	
  held	
   Fujimori’s	
  corrupt	
  regime	
  together.42	
   Immediately	
  following	
  his	
  victory	
  in	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
  Fujimori	
  began	
  to	
  undermine	
  what	
  little	
   organization	
  Change	
  ‘90	
  had	
  maintained	
  pre-­‐election.	
  He	
  effectively	
  dismantled	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  in	
  a	
  matter	
  of	
   days,	
  closing	
  the	
  office	
  doors	
  and	
  removing	
  any	
  institutional	
  remnants	
  of	
  the	
  party	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  position	
   of	
  secretary	
  general.	
  In	
  essence,	
  “Fujimori’s	
  disdain	
  for	
  institutionalization	
  carried	
  over	
  into	
  his	
   relationship	
  with	
  his	
  own	
  senators	
  and	
  deputies	
  [when]	
  those	
  political	
  novices	
  tried	
  to	
  coordinate	
  their	
   legislative	
  activities	
  and	
  policy	
  analysis	
  with	
  one	
  another	
  and	
  with	
  more	
  experienced	
  groups;	
  Fujimori	
   reacted	
  with	
  great	
  displeasure….”	
  C-­‐90	
  was	
  beginning	
  to	
  get	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  way.	
  He	
  quickly	
  took	
  steps	
  to	
   prevent	
  any	
  kind	
  of	
  legislative	
  restraint	
  coming	
  from	
  his	
  own	
  party.43	
   	
  Following	
  Montesinos’	
  advice,	
  Fujimori	
  moved	
  his	
  family	
  to	
  the	
  Círculo	
  Militar,	
  which	
  was	
  an	
   exclusive	
  military	
  facility	
  in	
  Lima.	
  This	
  move	
  initiated	
  what	
  would	
  become	
  an	
  ever-­‐increasing	
  alignment	
   with	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  and	
  provided	
  the	
  space	
  necessary	
  to	
  begin	
  dialogues	
  with	
  the	
  military’s	
   most	
  important	
  officials.	
  The	
  move	
  also	
  cemented	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  Montesinos	
  and	
  Fujimori	
   and	
  gave	
  the	
  attorney	
  the	
  credibility	
  he	
  desired	
  as	
  Fujimori’s	
  most	
  trusted	
  advisor,	
  or	
  “El	
  Doctor,”	
  as	
  he	
   became	
  known.44	
   	
    The	
  political,	
  economic	
  and	
  social	
  crisis	
  that	
  gripped	
  Peru	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  1990	
  congressional	
  and	
    presidential	
  elections	
  was	
  so	
  profound	
  a	
  force	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  scene	
  that	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  time	
  in	
  Peruvian	
   history	
  two	
  political	
  outsiders,	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Llosa,	
  battled	
  for	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  a	
  unique	
  campaign.	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  under	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  banner	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  capitalize	
  on	
  the	
  nature	
  and	
  severity	
  of	
  the	
  crisis	
  as	
   well	
  as	
  a	
  marked	
  shift	
  in	
  voting	
  behavior	
  to	
  successfully	
  align	
  himself	
  with	
  centrist	
  voters	
  as	
  well	
  as	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   42  	
  Cameron,	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  48.	
   	
  Levitt,	
  113-­‐114.	
  	
   44 	
  Conoghan,	
  25.	
   43  	
    46	
    	
   	
   secure	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  APRA,	
  IU	
  and	
  IS	
  electorate	
  during	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  to	
  win	
   the	
  presidency.	
  Owing	
  to	
  the	
  C-­‐90’s	
  weak	
  institutional	
  framework,	
  lack	
  of	
  ties	
  with	
  the	
  political	
   establishment,	
  and	
  a	
  minority	
  for	
  the	
  party	
  in	
  congress	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  left	
  unconstrained	
  when	
  he	
  became	
   the	
  president	
  elect	
  in	
  July	
  1990	
  and	
  in	
  desperate	
  need	
  of	
  new	
  allies	
  in	
  the	
  political	
  establishment.	
   	
    	
    	
    47	
    	
   	
   	
   Chapter	
  Three:	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  in	
  Office 	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  became	
  president	
  elect	
  on	
  June	
  10,	
  1990.	
  The	
  neopopulist	
  president	
  remained	
   in	
  office	
  for	
  a	
  decade,	
  precipitating	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  electoral	
  authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru.	
  The	
  regime	
  was	
   sustained	
  by	
  corruption	
  that	
  came	
  to	
  light	
  in	
  2000,	
  after	
  Fujimori	
  had	
  questionably	
  secured	
  a	
  third	
  term	
   in	
  office,	
  resulting	
  in	
  the	
  administration’s	
  meteoric	
  fall.	
  Despite	
  widespread	
  recognition	
  of	
  corruption	
   and	
  human	
  rights	
  violations	
  under	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government,	
  his	
  daughter	
  Keiko	
  Sofía	
  Fujimori	
  launched	
   a	
  bid	
  for	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  2011	
  running	
  on	
  her	
  father’s	
  legacy	
  that	
  was	
  only	
  narrowly	
  defeated	
  by	
   Ollanta	
  Humala.	
  It	
  was	
  owing	
  in	
  large	
  part	
  to	
  Peru’s	
  unique	
  political	
  history,	
  the	
  economic	
  and	
  social	
   crisis	
  of	
  the	
  1980’s	
  and	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  the	
  1990	
  election	
  that	
  made	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidency	
  a	
  reality	
  and	
   provided	
  the	
  framework	
  under	
  which	
  electoral	
  authoritarianism	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  flourish.	
  Once	
  in	
  power,	
  the	
   president’s	
  clear	
  successes	
  in	
  restoring	
  economic	
  stability	
  and	
  growth	
  and	
  ending	
  the	
  internal	
  war	
   provided	
  the	
  most	
  enduring	
  memories	
  of	
  the	
  decade	
  under	
  Fujimori.	
  However,	
  it	
  was	
  his	
  careful	
   manipulation	
  of	
  public	
  opinion,	
  his	
  close	
  attention	
  to	
  the	
  maintenance	
  of	
  his	
  support	
  base	
  among	
  Peru’s	
   poorest	
  classes	
  and	
  his	
  appeal	
  to	
  women	
  that	
  provided	
  the	
  more	
  subtle	
  and	
  lasting	
  legacy	
  that	
  made	
  it	
   possible	
  for	
  his	
  daughter	
  to	
  run	
  under	
  his	
  name	
  a	
  decade	
  after	
  his	
  regime	
  fell.	
   Economic	
  Adjustment,	
  “Fujishock”	
   Before	
  taking	
  office	
  on	
  July	
  28	
  1990,	
  Fujimori	
  travelled	
  to	
  the	
  U.S.	
  and	
  Japan	
  in	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
   gain	
  financial	
  support	
  to	
  confront	
  Peru’s	
  desperate	
  economic	
  crisis.	
  He	
  was	
  guaranteed	
  a	
  bridge	
  loan	
   from	
  the	
  U.S.	
  Treasury	
  and	
  the	
  Japanese	
  Export-­‐Import	
  Bank	
  to	
  offset	
  IMF	
  and	
  World	
  Bank	
  payments	
  on	
   the	
  condition	
  that	
  he	
  would	
  implement	
  a	
  stabilization	
  program	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  the	
  Washington	
  Consensus.	
    	
    48	
    	
   	
   Furthermore,	
  the	
  program	
  would	
  include	
  large-­‐scale	
  structural	
  reform	
  and	
  the	
  continuation	
  of	
  foreign	
   debt	
  payments	
  under	
  the	
  IMF’s	
  and	
  the	
  World	
  Bank’s	
  guidance	
  if	
  Fujimori’s	
  administration	
  was	
  to	
   receive	
  the	
  $1.7	
  billion	
  dollar	
  loan.1	
  In	
  the	
  final	
  days	
  before	
  Fujimori	
  assumed	
  power,	
  he	
  and	
  his	
  closest	
   advisors,	
  including	
  Vladimiro	
  Montesinos,	
  worked	
  on	
  the	
  new	
  austerity	
  plan.	
  	
  Fujimori’s	
  move	
  to	
  the	
   right	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  spectrum,	
  seen	
  in	
  his	
  embrace	
  of	
  neoliberal	
  economic	
  planning,	
  precipitated	
  a	
  shift	
   in	
  what	
  was	
  left	
  of	
  the	
  governing	
  coalition	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  Change	
  ‘90.	
  Many	
  of	
  the	
  members	
  of	
  C-­‐90	
  who	
   still	
  supported	
  Fujimori,	
  despite	
  his	
  attempts	
  at	
  undermining	
  party	
  unity,	
  were	
  repulsed	
  by	
  his	
   abandonment	
  of	
  C-­‐90’s	
  vague	
  campaign	
  promises	
  and	
  his	
  alignment	
  with	
  the	
  military	
  and	
  the	
   conservative	
  business	
  sector	
  that	
  rallied	
  behind	
  his	
  economic	
  adjustment	
  plan	
  that	
  came	
  to	
  be	
  known	
  as	
   “Fujishock.”2	
   After	
  Fujimori’s	
  inauguration	
  in	
  July,	
  he	
  announced	
  his	
  economic	
  adjustment	
  plan	
  and	
  enlisted	
   his	
  new	
  found	
  allies	
  in	
  congress.	
  Many	
  of	
  these	
  new	
  congressional	
  allies	
  were	
  drawn	
  from	
  the	
  majority-­‐ holding	
  conservative	
  pools—lacking	
  leadership	
  after	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa’s	
  departure	
  from	
  Peru	
  following	
   his	
  defeat	
  in	
  the	
  1990	
  presidential	
  election—to	
  pass	
  through	
  the	
  new	
  legislation.	
  Fujimori	
  defended	
  his	
   harsh	
  austerity	
  measures	
  with	
  the	
  realities	
  of	
  the	
  economic	
  and	
  political	
  crisis,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  endemic	
   violence	
  of	
  the	
  internal	
  war	
  while	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  politically	
  intimidating	
  his	
  opponents	
  in	
  congress,	
   namely	
  the	
  American	
  Popular	
  Revolutionary	
  Alliance	
  led	
  by	
  Alan	
  García,	
  to	
  push	
  through	
  sweeping	
   economic	
  and	
  social	
  reforms.	
  As	
  part	
  of	
  these	
  reforms,	
  Fujimori	
  officialised	
  the	
  military’s	
  supremacy	
   over	
  the	
  national	
  police	
  force	
  in	
  the	
  fight	
  against	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  and	
  the	
  Tupac	
  Amaru	
  Revolutionary	
   Movement,	
  solidifying	
  his	
  administration’s	
  alliance	
  with	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces.3	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   1  	
  Luigi	
  Manzetti,	
  Privatization	
  South	
  American	
  Style	
  (New	
  York:	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1999),	
  234-­‐235.	
   	
  Stéphanie	
  Rousseau,	
  Women’s	
  Citizenship	
  in	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Paradoxes	
  of	
  Neoliberalism	
  in	
  Latin	
  America	
  (New	
  York:	
   Palgrave	
  Macmillan,	
  2009),	
  49.	
  	
   3 	
  Manzetti,	
  236.	
   2  	
    49	
    	
   	
   The	
  economic	
  adjustment	
  plan	
  went	
  into	
  effect	
  in	
  August	
  producing	
  severe	
  shock	
  waves	
   throughout	
  the	
  country	
  as	
  the	
  depth	
  of	
  the	
  adjustment	
  was	
  realized.	
  The	
  plan	
  included	
  a	
  multitude	
  of	
   reforms	
  that	
  lowered	
  the	
  inflation	
  rate	
  from	
  397	
  percent	
  to	
  23.7	
  percent	
  in	
  less	
  than	
  six	
  months	
  while	
   also	
  leading	
  to	
  a	
  marked	
  increase	
  in	
  poverty	
  levels,	
  a	
  deepening	
  of	
  the	
  recession,	
  and	
  a	
  further	
  19.4	
   percent	
  decrease	
  in	
  real	
  wages	
  by	
  1991.4	
  The	
  plan	
  saw	
  “draconian	
  spending	
  cuts	
  aimed	
  at	
  reducing	
   public-­‐sector	
  deficits,	
  and	
  the	
  unification	
  of	
  the	
  multitiered	
  exchange	
  rate.	
  Virtually	
  overnight,	
   government-­‐controlled	
  prices	
  and	
  subsidies	
  were	
  lifted	
  on	
  everything	
  from	
  gasoline	
  to	
  utilities,	
  from	
   sugar	
  and	
  rice	
  to	
  medicines.”5	
  To	
  offset	
  the	
  burden	
  of	
  Fujishock	
  on	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  segments	
  of	
  the	
   population,	
  many	
  of	
  whom	
  had	
  brought	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  power	
  in	
  1990,	
  the	
  administration	
  set	
  aside	
  a	
   poverty	
  relief	
  fund	
  of	
  $400	
  million	
  dollars	
  and	
  quadrupled	
  minimum	
  wage.6	
  In	
  a	
  further	
  effort	
  to	
   preserve	
  his	
  grass-­‐roots	
  image,	
  Fujimori’s	
  administration	
  openly	
  encouraged	
  and	
  praised	
  women’s	
   organizations’	
  involvement	
  in	
  coordinating	
  neighbourhood	
  efforts	
  aimed	
  at	
  ensuring	
  daily	
  survival.7	
  This	
   move	
  and	
  the	
  conscious	
  preservation	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  man	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  image	
  was	
  critical	
  at	
  this	
  juncture	
   as	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path’s	
  increasingly	
  indiscriminate	
  actions	
  were	
  severely	
  alienating	
  the	
  insurgency	
  group	
   from	
  the	
  substantial	
  urban	
  poor	
  and	
  rural	
  peasant	
  support	
  base	
  it	
  had	
  earlier	
  commanded.	
  This	
   sentiment	
  is	
  illistrated	
  in	
  a	
  1991	
  interview	
  with	
  grass-­‐roots	
  women’s	
  activist,	
  María	
  Elena	
  Moyano,	
  in	
   which	
  she	
  talks	
  about	
  her	
  realization	
  of	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path’s	
  desire	
  to	
  “…snuff	
  out	
  survival	
  organizations	
  so	
   that	
  levels	
  of	
  malnutrition	
  and	
  death	
  rise.”	
  Moyano	
  was	
  assassinated	
  by	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  just	
  five	
   months	
  after	
  this	
  interview	
  was	
  published.8	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   4  	
  Ibid.,	
  235.	
  	
   	
  Carol	
  Wise,	
  “Against	
  the	
  Odds:	
  The	
  Paradoxes	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Economic	
  Recovery	
  in	
  the	
  1990’s,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
   The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  209.	
   6 	
  Manzetti,	
  235.	
   7 	
  Rousseau,	
  49.	
   8 	
  María	
  Elena	
  Moyano,	
  “There	
  have	
  Been	
  Threats,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  eds.	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
   Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk	
  (Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  2005),	
  388.	
   5  	
    50	
    	
   	
   Public	
  opinion	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  administration	
  waned	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  year	
  and	
  a	
  half	
  of	
  his	
  presidency	
   prompting	
  the	
  solidification	
  of	
  alliances	
  with	
  the	
  conservatives	
  in	
  congress.	
  As	
  the	
  initial	
  shocks	
  of	
  the	
   austerity	
  measures	
  gave	
  way,	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidential	
  approval	
  rating	
  began	
  to	
  recover,	
  reaching	
  60	
   percent	
  in	
  December	
  of	
  1991.	
  As	
  popular	
  support	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  increased,	
  he	
  began	
  to	
  consolidate	
  the	
   executive	
  power,	
  eroding	
  congressional	
  alliances,	
  using	
  his	
  high	
  approval	
  ratings	
  as	
  means	
  to	
  justify	
  his	
   actions.9	
  1991	
  saw	
  the	
  widening	
  of	
  austerity	
  measures	
  and	
  the	
  embrace	
  of	
  large-­‐scale	
  privatization	
   campaigns	
  including	
  the	
  down-­‐sizing	
  of	
  public	
  enterprises	
  and	
  the	
  promotion	
  of	
  private	
  and	
  foreign	
   investment	
  under	
  Carlos	
  Boloña,	
  the	
  head	
  of	
  the	
  Ministry	
  of	
  Economics	
  and	
  Finance	
  that	
  restored	
  a	
   measure	
  of	
  stability	
  to	
  the	
  economy.10	
  The	
  gradual	
  return	
  of	
  economic	
  stability	
  under	
  Fujimori	
  provided	
   him	
  the	
  continued	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  middle-­‐	
  and	
  upper-­‐classes	
  and	
  provided	
  the	
  material	
  support	
  for	
  his	
   developing	
  positive	
  legacy.	
   Self-­‐Coup,	
  Anti-­‐Terror	
  Measures	
  and	
  a	
  New	
  Constitution	
   With	
  hyperinflation	
  quelled,	
  Fujimori	
  refocused	
  his	
  administration	
  on	
  combating	
  the	
  Shining	
   Path	
  and	
  MRTA	
  insurgents.	
  He	
  proposed	
  a	
  radical	
  anti-­‐terror	
  plan	
  to	
  end	
  the	
  insurgency	
  that	
  was	
  met	
   with	
  wide-­‐spread	
  public	
  approval.11	
  Despite	
  Fujimori’s	
  public	
  approval	
  ratings	
  for	
  the	
  plan,	
  he	
  still	
  faced	
   opposition	
  within	
  congress	
  and	
  from	
  those	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  power	
  locus	
  that	
  began	
  to	
  slow	
  the	
   passing	
  of	
  his	
  executive	
  orders.12	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  employ	
  the	
  general	
  mistrust	
  for	
  the	
  political	
  and	
   bureaucratic	
  systems	
  to	
  garner	
  opposition	
  to	
  congressional	
  delays	
  of	
  his	
  orders.	
  The	
  APRA’s	
  lack	
  of	
   credibility	
  only	
  fostered	
  support	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  that	
  he	
  cleverly	
  manipulated	
  to	
  his	
  advantage	
  when	
  he	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   9  	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  “Public	
  Opinion,	
  Market	
  Reforms,	
  and	
  Democracy	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  128.	
   10 	
  Manzetti,	
  237.	
   11 	
  Kurt	
  Weyland,	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neopopulist	
  Leadership,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
   Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
   2006),	
  21.	
   12 	
  Manzetti,	
  237.	
    	
    51	
    	
   	
   staged	
  a	
  self-­‐coup	
  with	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  on	
  April	
  5,	
  1992.	
  Despite	
  the	
  coup’s	
   authoritarian	
  overtones,	
  the	
  move	
  received	
  impressive	
  domestic	
  public	
  support,	
  with	
  approval	
  ratings	
   for	
  the	
  president	
  and	
  the	
  coup	
  at	
  82	
  percent	
  in	
  the	
  months	
  following.13	
   Fujimori	
  justified	
  the	
  non-­‐violent	
  self-­‐coup	
  and	
  the	
  suspension	
  of	
  the	
  constitution	
  and	
  closing	
  of	
   congress	
  in	
  simple	
  terms,	
  stating	
  “…I	
  faced	
  a	
  predicament:	
  either	
  Peru	
  continued	
  walking,	
  quickly	
   heading	
  to	
  the	
  abyss	
  of	
  anarchy	
  and	
  chaos,	
  pushed	
  by	
  terrorism	
  and	
  before	
  the	
  passiveness	
  of	
  the	
  state	
   organization,	
  or	
  I	
  took	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  providing	
  the	
  state	
  with	
  necessary	
  instruments	
  for	
  putting	
  an	
  end	
  to	
   that.”14	
  The	
  self-­‐coup	
  cemented	
  the	
  relationship	
  between	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  his	
  executive	
  branch	
  and	
  the	
   Armed	
  Forces	
  that	
  remained	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  only	
  intact	
  institutions	
  that	
  operated	
  on	
  a	
  national	
  level.	
  The	
   peculiar	
  legacy	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  scene	
  made	
  this	
  alliance	
  not	
  only	
  a	
  viable	
  one	
  but	
  also	
  a	
   reasonably	
  respected	
  one.15	
  Despite	
  the	
  authoritarian	
  shift	
  precipitated	
  in	
  the	
  self-­‐coup,	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
   Peruvians	
  still	
  felt	
  that	
  Fujimori’s	
  unmitigated	
  and	
  strong	
  anti-­‐terrorist	
  stance	
  was	
  worth	
  the	
  loss	
  of	
   democratic	
  rights	
  and	
  thus	
  his	
  approval	
  ratings	
  immediately	
  following	
  the	
  coup	
  remained	
  strong.	
   International	
  observers,	
  although	
  constrained	
  by	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  internal	
  war,	
  immediately	
  put	
   pressure	
  on	
  Fujimori’s	
  government	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  democratic	
  rule.	
  The	
  immediate	
  revocation	
  of	
  U.S.	
  and	
   European	
  aid	
  signalled	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  restoring	
  democratic	
  rule	
  for	
  the	
  economic	
  stability	
  that	
  had	
   cost	
  Peru	
  so	
  much	
  since	
  the	
  implementation	
  of	
  Fujishock.	
  Recognizing	
  this,	
  Boloña	
  threatened	
  to	
  resign	
   if	
  Fujimori	
  did	
  not	
  concede	
  to	
  a	
  slow	
  return	
  to	
  democracy.16	
  The	
  undermining	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  that	
   had	
  occurred	
  in	
  the	
  1980s	
  was	
  compounded	
  during	
  Fujimori’s	
  first	
  years	
  in	
  office	
  so	
  that	
  by	
  April	
  1992	
   traditional	
  party	
  systems	
  	
  and	
  other	
  public	
  sector	
  or	
  labour	
  union	
  groups	
  that	
  would	
  traditionally	
  lead	
   opposition	
  movements	
  were	
  unorganized	
  and	
  unable	
  to	
  effectively	
  respond	
  to	
  Fujimori’s	
  new	
  dictatorial	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   13  	
  Weyland,	
  22.	
   	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori,	
  “A	
  Momentous	
  Decision,”	
  in	
  in	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  eds.	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
   Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk	
  (Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  2005),	
  460-­‐461.	
   15 	
  John	
  Crabtree,	
  “Neoliberalism	
  and	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Phenomenon,”	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Political	
  Economy	
  (London:	
   Institute	
  of	
  Latin	
  American	
  Studies,	
  1998),	
  19.	
   16 	
  Weyland,	
  22.	
   14  	
    52	
    	
   	
   regime.17	
  The	
  inability	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  system,	
  or	
  institutional	
  organizations	
  to	
  limit	
  presidential	
  power	
  in	
   1992	
  was	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  a	
  wider	
  trend	
  in	
  the	
  1990s	
  that	
  saw	
  the	
  essentially	
  unchecked	
  expansion	
  of	
   executive	
  powers	
  until	
  2000	
  when	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidency	
  came	
  to	
  an	
  end.18	
  In	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  mounting	
   international	
  pressure	
  to	
  return	
  Peru	
  to	
  democracy,	
  Fujimori	
  begrudgingly	
  called	
  for	
  elections	
  to	
  elect	
  a	
   Democratic	
  Constitution	
  Congress	
  that	
  would	
  be	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  drafting	
  a	
  new	
  constitution.	
  In	
  order	
  to	
   maintain	
  control	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  constitution,	
  Fujimori	
  created	
  a	
  new	
  electoral	
  body,	
  New	
  Majority	
  (NM,	
  or	
   Nueva	
  Mayoría),	
  that	
  drew	
  from	
  his	
  supporters	
  in	
  the	
  executive	
  branch	
  while	
  still	
  maintaining	
  what	
  was	
   left	
  of	
  the	
  C-­‐90	
  party	
  to	
  run	
  in	
  the	
  congressional	
  elections.	
  This	
  clever	
  maneuvering	
  won	
  Fujimori	
  a	
  clear	
   majority	
  in	
  the	
  newly	
  established	
  congress	
  and	
  control	
  over	
  the	
  drafting	
  of	
  the	
  new	
  constitution.19	
   	
    On	
  September	
  12th,	
  1992,	
  Abimael	
  Guzmán,	
  the	
  leader	
  of	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  Guerillas,	
  was	
    arrested	
  precipitating	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  twelve	
  years	
  of	
  armed	
  struggle.	
  Although	
  Shining	
  Path	
  attacks	
  did	
  not	
   immediately	
  end	
  with	
  Guzmán’s	
  capture,	
  the	
  following	
  year	
  saw	
  the	
  lessoning	
  of	
  attacks	
  and	
  appeals	
   made	
  from	
  Guzmán	
  from	
  behind	
  bars	
  to	
  find	
  an	
  end	
  to	
  armed	
  struggle.	
  These	
  developments	
  saw	
  a	
   gradual	
  tapering	
  off	
  of	
  guerilla	
  activities	
  and	
  a	
  return	
  to	
  a	
  pre-­‐1980	
  normalcy	
  in	
  much	
  of	
  Peru.20	
  Not	
   surprisingly,	
  Guzmán’s	
  capture	
  lead	
  to	
  a	
  spike	
  in	
  approval	
  for	
  Fujimori’s	
  anti-­‐terror	
  policies	
  that	
  jumped	
   from	
  44	
  percent	
  at	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  1992	
  to	
  66	
  percent	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  year.21	
  Even	
  by	
  1995,	
  when	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   17  	
  Rousseau,	
  51.	
   	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  “An	
  Authoritarian	
  Presidency:	
  How	
  and	
  Why	
  Did	
  Presidential	
  Power	
  Run	
  Amok	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
   Peru?”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
   PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  39.	
   19 	
  Barry	
  S.	
  Levitt,	
  Power	
  in	
  the	
  Balance:	
  Presidents,	
  Parties,	
  and	
  Legislatures	
  in	
  Peru	
  and	
  Beyond	
  (Notre	
  Dame,	
  IA:	
   University	
  of	
  Notre	
  Dame	
  Press,	
  2012),	
  114-­‐115.	
   20 	
  Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori,	
  “After	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
  Abimael	
  Guzmán:	
  The	
  Limits	
  of	
  Sendero	
  Luminoso,”	
  in	
  The	
  Peruvian	
   Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society,	
  Economy,	
  eds.	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997),	
  188-­‐190.	
   21	
  Carrión,	
  131-­‐133.	
   18  	
    53	
    	
   	
   terrorism	
  had	
  taken	
  a	
  back	
  seat	
  to	
  the	
  more	
  relevant	
  issues	
  of	
  poverty,	
  unemployment	
  and	
  low	
  wages,	
   approval	
  for	
  his	
  anti-­‐terror	
  legislation	
  remained	
  high.22	
   	
    In	
  1993,	
  the	
  new	
  constitution	
  was	
  narrowly	
  passed	
  in	
  a	
  nation-­‐wide	
  plebiscite.	
  The	
  new	
    constitution	
  created	
  a	
  unicameral	
  congress,	
  further	
  strengthened	
  executive	
  powers	
  and	
  gave	
  Fujimori	
   the	
  ability	
  to	
  be	
  immediately	
  re-­‐elected,	
  something	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  illegal	
  under	
  the	
  1979	
  constitution.	
   Amidst	
  accusations	
  of	
  fraud	
  pertaining	
  to	
  the	
  plebiscite,	
  it	
  was	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  was	
   beginning	
  to	
  forget	
  the	
  economic	
  and	
  anti-­‐terror	
  gains	
  made	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  two	
  years	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
   presidency	
  and	
  had	
  turned	
  its	
  focus	
  on	
  more	
  difficult	
  issues	
  of	
  contention.23	
   The	
  1995	
  Elections	
   The	
  plebiscite	
  controversy	
  signalled	
  not	
  an	
  end	
  to	
  Fujimori’s	
  high	
  approval	
  ratings,	
  which	
   remained	
  relatively	
  constant,	
  but	
  a	
  growing	
  dissatisfaction	
  with	
  governmental	
  policy	
  that	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
   addressed,	
  especially	
  as	
  the	
  1995	
  presidential	
  election	
  was	
  growing	
  near.	
  Fujimori	
  recognized	
  the	
   importance	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  populations	
  in	
  maintaining	
  his	
  grip	
  on	
  the	
  presidency	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
   maintenance	
  of	
  his	
  man	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  image	
  and	
  thus	
  initiated	
  carefully	
  constructed	
  social	
  aid	
  programs	
   that	
  targeted	
  the	
  urban	
  poor	
  and	
  Andean	
  peasantry.	
  To	
  compound	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  his	
  carefully	
   maneuvered	
  social	
  spending,	
  which	
  was	
  undertaken	
  by	
  his	
  own	
  presidential	
  ministry,	
  Fujimori	
  tirelessly	
   toured	
  the	
  countryside	
  in	
  the	
  lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  1995	
  municipal	
  and	
  presidential	
  elections	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  years	
   after,	
  garnering	
  the	
  wide-­‐spread	
  support	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  populations	
  and	
  boosting	
  his	
  image	
  as	
  a	
  man	
   of	
  the	
  people.24	
  After	
  stabilizing	
  his	
  administration	
  in	
  the	
  wake	
  of	
  the	
  1992	
  self-­‐coup,	
  Fujimori	
   concentrated	
  all	
  of	
  his	
  efforts	
  on	
  the	
  1995	
  election.	
  This	
  drive	
  “…shaped	
  public	
  policy,	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   22  	
  Ibid.	
   	
  Weyland,	
  25.	
   24 	
  Crabtree,	
  19.	
   23  	
    54	
    	
   	
   intergovernmental	
  relations,	
  political	
  rhetoric,	
  ethics,	
  military	
  affairs,	
  and	
  the	
  conduct	
  of	
  the	
  media.”25	
   As	
  the	
  election	
  approached,	
  Fujimori	
  became	
  increasingly	
  hostile	
  to	
  critics	
  of	
  his	
  regime	
  and	
  allegations	
   of	
  corruption,	
  taking	
  any	
  means	
  necessary	
  to	
  root	
  out	
  opposition	
  and	
  quiet	
  such	
  criticism.	
  Fujimori’s	
   wife	
  Susana	
  Higuchi	
  became	
  a	
  target	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  censorship	
  when	
  she	
  raised	
  questions	
  first	
  about	
   Fujimori’s	
  sister’s	
  involvement	
  in	
  a	
  charity	
  scandal	
  in	
  1992	
  and	
  then	
  in	
  1994	
  when	
  she	
  accused	
  two	
   cabinet	
  ministers	
  of	
  corruption.	
  Fujimori	
  hastened	
  to	
  divorce	
  Higuchi	
  in	
  1994,	
  claiming	
  she	
  was	
   emotionally	
  unsound	
  and	
  manipulated	
  by	
  his	
  rivals.	
  With	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  Montesinos	
  in	
  corrupting	
  public	
   officials	
  and	
  the	
  C-­‐90/NM	
  majority	
  in	
  congress,	
  Fujimori	
  had	
  his	
  ex-­‐wife	
  banned	
  from	
  running	
  for	
  the	
   presidency	
  or	
  congress	
  in	
  1995,	
  highlighting	
  the	
  main	
  apparatus	
  Fujimori	
  employed	
  in	
  the	
  silencing	
  of	
   his	
  critics	
  throughout	
  his	
  decade	
  in	
  office.	
  After	
  the	
  divorce,	
  Higuchi	
  continued	
  to	
  charge	
  Fujimori’s	
   administration	
  with	
  corruption,	
  identifying	
  Montesinos	
  as	
  a	
  main	
  component	
  of	
  the	
  underhanded	
   dealings	
  between	
  the	
  government	
  and	
  the	
  National	
  Intelligence	
  Service	
  (SIN	
  or	
  Servicio	
  de	
  Inteligencia	
   Nacional).	
  This	
  prompted	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  remove	
  Higuchi	
  from	
  the	
  position	
  of	
  first	
  lady	
  and	
  install	
  their	
   eldest	
  daughter,	
  Keiko	
  Sofía,	
  as	
  her	
  replacement.	
  Keiko	
  was	
  studying	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  at	
  the	
  time	
  but	
  would	
   remain	
  in	
  the	
  government	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  eye	
  throughout	
  her	
  father’s	
  presidential	
  years	
  and	
  beyond.26	
   In	
  2006,	
  Keiko	
  Sofía	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  elected	
  to	
  congress	
  and	
  in	
  2011	
  when	
  she	
  ran	
  for	
  president	
  with	
  her	
   electoral	
  movement	
  Force	
  2011	
  (Fuerza	
  2011)	
  only	
  to	
  be	
  narrowly	
  defeated	
  by	
  Ollanta	
  Humala.27	
   Censorship	
  under	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  by	
  no	
  means	
  limited	
  to	
  those	
  closest	
  to	
  him.	
  The	
  media	
  was	
   severely	
  restricted	
  throughout	
  his	
  ten	
  years	
  in	
  power.	
  In	
  previous	
  decades,	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  media	
  had	
   prided	
  itself	
  on	
  its	
  relatively	
  open	
  reporting	
  and	
  investigative	
  journalists	
  presented	
  every	
  side	
  of	
  the	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   25  	
  Catherine	
  M.	
  Conaghan,	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  Deception	
  in	
  the	
  Public	
  Sphere	
  (Pittsburgh:	
  University	
  of	
  Pittsburgh	
   Press,	
  2005),	
  14.	
   26 	
  Catherine	
  M.	
  Conaghan,	
  “The	
  Immoral	
  Economy	
  of	
  Fujimorismo,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
   Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
   114.	
   27 	
  John	
  Otis,	
  “Peru:	
  The	
  Return	
  of	
  Fujimori,”	
  Globalpost,	
  March	
  19,	
  2011,	
   http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/110307/alberto-­‐fujimori-­‐keiko-­‐peru-­‐election	
   (accessed	
  January	
  10,	
  2013).	
  	
    	
    55	
    	
   	
   political	
  spectrum	
  and	
  often	
  played	
  an	
  essential	
  role	
  in	
  the	
  formation	
  of	
  public	
  opinion.	
  It	
  was	
  in	
  large	
   part	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
  media’s	
  influence	
  that	
  Fujimori	
  sought	
  to	
  control	
  it.	
  The	
  administration	
  “…actively	
   engaged	
  in	
  a	
  pattern	
  of	
  harassment	
  and	
  manipulation,	
  used	
  supposed	
  tax	
  code	
  violations	
  to	
  prosecute	
   journalists	
  and	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  media;	
  extorting	
  money	
  from	
  and	
  bribing	
  media	
  owners…wiretapping	
   journalists	
  …[and]	
  using	
  trumped	
  up	
  charges	
  of	
  treason	
  to	
  persecute	
  opponents.”	
  At	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
   Fujimori	
  established	
  his	
  own	
  media	
  teams	
  that	
  disseminated	
  pro-­‐Fujimori	
  propaganda	
  and	
  manipulated	
   public	
  opinion.	
  That	
  is	
  not	
  to	
  say	
  that	
  independent	
  media	
  did	
  not	
  exist	
  in	
  Peru	
  under	
  Fujimori’s	
  regime.	
   But	
  the	
  influence	
  of	
  such	
  media	
  was	
  significantly	
  reduced	
  under	
  the	
  oppressive	
  measures,	
  further	
   stifling	
  the	
  ability	
  of	
  civil	
  society	
  to	
  coalesce	
  and	
  provide	
  meaningful	
  opposition	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  undermining	
   the	
  administration’s	
  democratic	
  legitimacy.28	
   In	
  the	
  direct	
  lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  1995	
  elections,	
  Fujimori’s	
  regime	
  experienced	
  a	
  surge	
  in	
  support	
   from	
  the	
  middle-­‐	
  and	
  upper-­‐classes	
  owing	
  to	
  his	
  neoliberal	
  market	
  reforms	
  and	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  internal	
   war.	
  Macroeconomic	
  stability	
  had	
  been	
  restored	
  by	
  1994,	
  when	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  economy	
  showed	
   substantial	
  gains	
  and	
  the	
  inflation	
  rate	
  had	
  stabilized	
  at	
  around	
  15	
  percent.	
  This	
  new	
  spring	
  of	
  electoral	
   support	
  allowed	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  adhere	
  to	
  democratic	
  principles	
  in	
  the	
  1995	
  elections,	
  effectively	
  restoring	
   some	
  of	
  his	
  administration’s	
  lost	
  legitimacy.29	
   Fujimori’s	
  Second	
  Term,	
  1995-­‐2000	
   	
    In	
  1995,	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  his	
  two	
  parties,	
  C-­‐90	
  and	
  NM,	
  won	
  a	
  majority	
  in	
  congress	
  winning	
  51.1	
    percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote.30	
  Fujimori	
  also	
  secured	
  a	
  strong	
  majority	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  elections	
  with	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   28  	
  Mauceri,	
  58.	
   	
  Carrión,	
  130-­‐131.	
   30 	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales,	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1995	
  Nacional	
  (Congreso),	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RESUMEN/CONGRESO/5.pdf	
  (accessed	
  January	
  4,	
  2013).	
   29  	
    56	
    	
   	
   64.3	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote,	
  guaranteeing	
  his	
  administration	
  another	
  five	
  years	
  in	
  office.31	
  The	
   APRA	
  faced	
  internal	
  division.	
  The	
  left	
  was	
  more	
  divided	
  in	
  1995	
  than	
  it	
  had	
  been	
  in	
  1990	
  and	
  thus	
  was	
   unable	
  to	
  effectively	
  challenge	
  Fujimori.	
  Both	
  the	
  Popular	
  Alliance	
  and	
  Christian	
  People’s	
  Party	
  were	
  so	
   discredited	
  by	
  1995	
  that	
  many	
  of	
  their	
  candidates	
  chose	
  to	
  run	
  as	
  independents	
  who	
  did	
  not	
  gain	
   substantial	
  electoral	
  support.	
  Again,	
  the	
  failure	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  system	
  to	
  redeem	
  itself	
  in	
  the	
   public	
  eye	
  allowed	
  Fujimori’s	
  political	
  stronghold	
  to	
  remain	
  unchecked.	
  The	
  independents	
  who	
  ran	
  in	
   opposition	
  to	
  Fujimori	
  in	
  1995	
  were	
  the	
  only	
  political	
  actors	
  who	
  managed	
  to	
  garner	
  substantial	
   support.	
  However,	
  their	
  efforts	
  were	
  not	
  sufficient	
  to	
  challenge	
  a	
  C-­‐90/NM	
  majority	
  in	
  congress,	
   although	
  they	
  experienced	
  some	
  success	
  at	
  the	
  municipal	
  level.32	
   	
    	
    Early	
  on	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  second	
  term,	
  achieving	
  gender-­‐equality	
  and	
  expanding	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  women	
    in	
  Peruvian	
  society	
  took	
  on	
  an	
  increasing	
  role	
  in	
  the	
  government’s	
  administration	
  and	
  policy-­‐making	
   processes.	
  In	
  1995,	
  directly	
  following	
  the	
  election,	
  Fujimori	
  began	
  a	
  family	
  planning	
  campaign.	
  In	
  1996	
   the	
  Ministry	
  for	
  the	
  Promotion	
  of	
  Women	
  and	
  Human	
  Development	
  was	
  formed	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  Committee	
   on	
  Women	
  in	
  Congress.	
  At	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
  women	
  were	
  given	
  increasingly	
  important	
  roles	
  within	
  the	
   public	
  sector.33	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  administration	
  had	
  openly	
  supported	
  the	
  use	
  and	
  accessibility	
  of	
   contraception	
  during	
  its	
  first	
  term.	
  However,	
  in	
  1995,	
  this	
  promotion	
  took	
  on	
  a	
  new	
  form	
  as	
  sterilization	
   was	
  legalized	
  as	
  a	
  viable	
  contraceptive	
  method.	
  Despite	
  receiving	
  condemnation	
  from	
  the	
  Catholic	
   Church,	
  this	
  law	
  was	
  supported	
  in	
  the	
  media,	
  the	
  international	
  community	
  and	
  domestic	
  public	
  opinion	
   polls.	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  received	
  aid	
  from	
  the	
  U.S.	
  Agency	
  for	
  International	
  Development	
  for	
  the	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   31  	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales,	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1995	
  Nacional	
  (Presidente),	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RESUMEN/GENERALES/10.pdf	
  (accessed	
  January	
  4,	
   2013).	
   32 	
  Levitt,	
  121-­‐126.	
   33 	
  Gregory	
  D.	
  Schmidt,	
  “All	
  the	
  President’s	
  Women:	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Gender	
  Equality	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  Politics,”	
  in	
  The	
   Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  158.	
    	
    57	
    	
   	
   program.34	
  Racism	
  and	
  regionalism	
  fueled	
  what	
  became	
  coercive	
  sterilization	
  campaigns	
  resulting	
  in	
  the	
   forced	
  sterilization	
  of	
  200,000	
  poor	
  rural	
  women	
  and,	
  to	
  a	
  lesser	
  extent,	
  men.35	
  Despite	
  the	
  regime’s	
   clever	
  manipulation	
  of	
  family	
  planning	
  campaigns	
  to	
  bolster	
  its	
  image	
  as	
  an	
  empowerer	
  of	
  women,	
  the	
   campaign’s	
  experience	
  underscores	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  the	
  opposite	
  was	
  true	
  in	
  relation	
  to	
  contraception.	
   Peru’s	
  poorest	
  were	
  not	
  given	
  the	
  control	
  to	
  choose	
  their	
  own	
  reproductive	
  futures	
  but	
  coerced	
  to	
   ensure	
  Peru	
  met	
  its	
  goals	
  for	
  population	
  control.36	
   In	
  the	
  public	
  arena,	
  women	
  were	
  given	
  increasing	
  attention	
  under	
  Fujimori’s	
  regime	
  as	
  they	
   entered	
  public	
  office	
  in	
  growing	
  numbers	
  during	
  Fujimori’s	
  second	
  term.	
  Fujimori	
  made	
  significant	
   headway	
  for	
  women	
  during	
  his	
  final	
  term	
  in	
  office	
  encouraging	
  the	
  establishment	
  of	
  gender	
  quotas	
  in	
   1997.	
  He	
  supported	
  bringing	
  women’s	
  issues	
  into	
  the	
  political	
  arena	
  and	
  even	
  established	
  a	
  women-­‐ focused	
  micro-­‐lending	
  bank	
  in	
  1998.	
  Scholars	
  have	
  argued	
  that	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  employing	
  clever	
  support-­‐ garnering	
  tactics	
  in	
  his	
  embrace	
  of	
  women	
  and	
  women’s	
  issues,	
  citing	
  that	
  public	
  opinion	
  polls	
  point	
  to	
   the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate’s	
  perception	
  of	
  women	
  as	
  more	
  effective	
  and	
  trustworthy	
  than	
  men	
  in	
  public	
   office.	
  Furthermore,	
  Fujimori’s	
  strategic	
  relationship	
  with	
  the	
  female	
  electorate	
  (that	
  was	
  bolstered	
  as	
   he	
  encouraged	
  female	
  participation	
  in	
  government)	
  and	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  perceived	
  gender	
  equity	
  in	
   Fujimori’s	
  government	
  lent	
  his	
  administration	
  legitimacy	
  in	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  critics’	
  attacks	
  on	
  the	
   administration’s	
  lack	
  of	
  democratic	
  practices	
  and	
  contributed	
  to	
  the	
  creation	
  of	
  a	
  positive	
  legacy	
  among	
   the	
  female	
  electorate.37	
   	
    After	
  Fujimori’s	
  re-­‐election	
  in	
  1995,	
  the	
  pace	
  of	
  market	
  reform	
  was	
  reigned	
  in	
  on	
  the	
  advice	
  of	
    the	
  World	
  Bank	
  and	
  other	
  foreign	
  creditors,	
  and	
  thus,	
  “…privatization	
  slowed	
  considerably,	
  exports	
  were	
   still	
  lackluster	
  and	
  too	
  dependent	
  on	
  raw	
  materials…and	
  social	
  policy	
  had	
  yet	
  to	
  reach	
  sufficiently	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   34  	
  Jelke	
  Boesten,	
  “Choice	
  or	
  Poverty	
  Alleviation?	
  Population	
  Politics	
  in	
  Peru	
  under	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori,”	
  European	
   Review	
  of	
  American	
  and	
  Caribbean	
  Studies	
  82	
  (2007):	
  7,	
  http://www.jstor.org/	
  (accessed	
  January	
  10,	
  2013).	
   35 	
  Schmidt,	
  170.	
   36 	
  Boesten,	
  15-­‐16.	
   37 	
  Schmidt,	
  158-­‐166.	
    	
    58	
    	
   	
   beyond	
  the	
  executive’s	
  concern	
  for	
  political	
  survival	
  and	
  hence	
  his	
  doling	
  out	
  of	
  immediate	
  adjustment	
   relief.”38	
  The	
  rate	
  of	
  economic	
  growth	
  dropped	
  to	
  2.6	
  percent	
  and	
  employment	
  levels	
  continued	
  to	
   fall.39	
  When	
  the	
  promised	
  benefits	
  of	
  market	
  reform	
  failed	
  to	
  materialize	
  after	
  1995,	
  approval	
  for	
   Fujimori’s	
  economic	
  strategy	
  fell	
  drastically	
  especially	
  among	
  the	
  middle-­‐	
  and	
  upper-­‐classes	
  amidst	
   allegations	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  human	
  rights	
  abuses	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  a	
  perceived	
  failure	
  to	
  create	
  employment.40	
   Interestingly,	
  popular	
  support	
  among	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
  classes	
  remained	
  relatively	
  high	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  his	
   administration	
  even	
  during	
  the	
  2000	
  election	
  controversy	
  that	
  began	
  to	
  emerge	
  after	
  1998.41	
   	
    In	
  1995,	
  allegations	
  arose	
  implicating	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  security	
  forces	
  in	
  a	
  1992	
  massacre	
  of	
    students	
  and	
  professors	
  suspected	
  to	
  be	
  subversives	
  at	
  Lima’s	
  National	
  University	
  of	
  Education	
  that	
  was	
   often	
  referred	
  to	
  as	
  La	
  Cantuta	
  University.	
  In	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  stifle	
  further	
  allegations,	
  Fujimori	
  immediately	
   pushed	
  an	
  amnesty	
  law	
  for	
  all	
  military	
  officers	
  alleged	
  to	
  have	
  committed	
  human	
  rights	
  abuses	
  through	
   congress.	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  continued	
  to	
  blatantly	
  intervene	
  in	
  the	
  judiciary	
  system	
  until	
  1998,	
   using	
  secret	
  military	
  courts	
  to	
  prosecute	
  labelled	
  terrorists	
  in	
  a	
  manner	
  that	
  clearly	
  dispensed	
  with	
   notions	
  of	
  due	
  process,	
  actions	
  that	
  served	
  to	
  further	
  undermine	
  notions	
  of	
  the	
  regime’s	
  democratic	
   legitimacy.	
  Furthermore,	
  these	
  judiciary	
  interventions	
  led	
  to	
  further	
  allegations	
  of	
  human	
  rights	
  abuses	
   domestically	
  and	
  abroad	
  throughout	
  the	
  1990s	
  and	
  most	
  notably	
  after	
  Fujimori’s	
  removal	
  from	
  office	
   when	
  many	
  of	
  these	
  allegations	
  became	
  accepted	
  fact.42	
   	
    Compounding	
  Fujimori’s	
  problems	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  eye,	
  just	
  a	
  year	
  after	
  his	
  re-­‐election	
  it	
  came	
  to	
    light	
  that	
  he	
  was	
  planning	
  on	
  running	
  for	
  an	
  unconstitutional	
  third	
  term.	
  The	
  regime	
  fought	
  to	
  retain	
  a	
   “veneer	
  of	
  legality”	
  and	
  publicly	
  denied	
  any	
  plans	
  for	
  re-­‐election	
  in	
  2000.	
  However,	
  as	
  Fujimori’s	
  second	
   term	
  continued	
  this	
  illusion	
  was	
  eroded	
  as	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Montesinos	
  increasingly	
  relied	
  on	
  bribery	
  and	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   38  	
  Wise,	
  218.	
   	
  Weyland,	
  27.	
   40 	
  Carrión,	
  136.	
   41 	
  Ibid.,	
  130.	
   42 	
  Mauceri,	
  49-­‐50.	
   39  	
    59	
    	
   	
   lies	
  to	
  open	
  the	
  necessary	
  channels	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  third	
  term	
  possible.	
  As	
  has	
  been	
  noted	
  by	
  scholars,	
   “…[Fujimori’s]	
  relentless	
  pursuit	
  of	
  the	
  2000	
  election	
  was	
  the	
  defining	
  feature	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  second	
  term	
   in	
  office.”43	
  The	
  constitution	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  amended	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  legally	
  pursue	
  a	
  third	
  term	
  and	
   this	
  could	
  only	
  happen	
  if	
  the	
  amendment	
  won	
  a	
  two-­‐thirds	
  majority	
  vote	
  in	
  congress	
  or	
  by	
  gaining	
   approval	
  for	
  the	
  amendment	
  in	
  a	
  national	
  referendum	
  that	
  would	
  only	
  pass	
  with	
  a	
  majority	
  vote	
  in	
   congress.	
  Instead	
  congress,	
  at	
  the	
  behest	
  of	
  Fujimori,	
  passed	
  two	
  laws,	
  26654	
  and	
  26657,	
  in	
  August	
   1996,	
  that	
  essentially	
  reinterpreted	
  the	
  1993	
  constitution	
  providing	
  a	
  loophole	
  through	
  which	
  Fujimori’s	
   first	
  term	
  was	
  not	
  counted,	
  allowing	
  him	
  to	
  run	
  for	
  a	
  true	
  “second”	
  term	
  in	
  2000.	
  In	
  September	
  of	
  1996,	
   opposition	
  leaders	
  in	
  congress	
  led	
  by	
  Socialist	
  Left	
  member	
  Javier	
  Diez	
  Canseco	
  coalesced	
  to	
  launch	
  a	
   petition	
  for	
  a	
  referendum	
  to	
  over-­‐turn	
  the	
  new	
  interpretive	
  laws.	
  The	
  movement	
  gained	
  substantial	
   domestic	
  support	
  despite	
  a	
  momentary	
  eclipse	
  of	
  the	
  issue	
  during	
  the	
  four	
  month	
  long	
  1996	
  Japanese	
   Embassy	
  Crisis,	
  when	
  public	
  approval	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  surged	
  after	
  the	
  army	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  put	
  down	
  the	
   insurgent	
  MRTA	
  members.44	
  The	
  calls	
  for	
  referendum	
  saw	
  the	
  first	
  significant	
  social	
  mobilization	
  of	
  the	
   decade	
  that	
  built	
  upon	
  earlier	
  opposition	
  movements	
  aimed	
  at	
  the	
  regime’s	
  ongoing	
  privatization	
   campaigns.45	
  In	
  1998,	
  over	
  a	
  million	
  signatures	
  had	
  been	
  gathered	
  calling	
  for	
  a	
  referendum	
  to	
  vote	
  on	
   the	
  law	
  that	
  allowed	
  Fujimori	
  to	
  run	
  in	
  the	
  2000	
  election.	
  However,	
  congress	
  ignored	
  the	
  petition,	
   further	
  violating	
  the	
  1993	
  constitution.	
  This	
  move	
  only	
  solidified	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  growing	
  concern	
  for	
   Fujimori’s	
  underhanded	
  dealings	
  at	
  all	
  levels	
  of	
  government,	
  which	
  by	
  this	
  time	
  had	
  become	
  the	
  only	
   thing	
  sustaining	
  the	
  regime.46	
   	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   43	
  Conaghan,	
  “The	
  Immoral	
  Economy	
  of	
  Fujimorismo,”	
  117-­‐126.	
   44  	
  Conaghan,	
  “The	
  Immoral	
  Economy	
  of	
  Fujimorismo,”	
  117-­‐126.	
   	
  Kenneth	
  M.	
  Roberts,	
  “Do	
  Parties	
  Matter?	
  Lessons	
  from	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Experience,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  98.	
   46 	
  Rousseau,	
  56.	
   45  	
    60	
    	
   	
   The	
  2000	
  Elections,	
  Growing	
  Unrest	
  and	
  the	
  Collapse	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Regime	
   	
    As	
  civil	
  society	
  began	
  to	
  mobilize,	
  albeit	
  lacking	
  cohesion	
  and	
  organization,	
  and	
  the	
  economic	
    situation	
  remained	
  more	
  or	
  less	
  static,	
  Fujimori’s	
  popularity	
  continued	
  to	
  wane,	
  especially	
  among	
  the	
   middle-­‐class.	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  maintain	
  bureaucratic	
  support	
  for	
  his	
  re-­‐election	
  bid,	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Montesinos	
   increased	
  payoffs	
  and	
  other	
  illegal	
  incentives	
  to	
  entice	
  political	
  support,	
  further	
  deepening	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
   corruption	
  within	
  the	
  government.	
  In	
  Fujimori’s	
  attempts	
  to	
  maintain	
  an	
  image	
  of	
  legitimacy	
  it	
  was	
  his	
   unbridled	
  use	
  of	
  coercion	
  and	
  corruption	
  that	
  led	
  to	
  his	
  undoing.	
  Owing	
  to	
  the	
  poor’s	
  reliance	
  on	
  the	
   regime’s	
  social	
  programs,	
  support	
  among	
  this	
  group	
  continued	
  to	
  rise,	
  threatening	
  to	
  push	
  Fujimori	
  into	
   his	
  third	
  term	
  by	
  electoral	
  numbers	
  alone.	
  The	
  opposition	
  attempted	
  to	
  present	
  viable	
  alternatives	
  to	
   Fujimori	
  in	
  the	
  coming	
  2000	
  elections	
  but	
  was	
  again	
  constrained	
  by	
  the	
  disintegration	
  and	
  further	
   degradation	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  and	
  institutional	
  systems	
  during	
  the	
  1980s	
  and	
  1990s.	
  Lima’s	
  mayor	
  and	
   opposition	
  leader	
  Alberto	
  Andrade,	
  Luis	
  Castañeda	
  Lossio	
  (a	
  defunct	
  member	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
   administration),	
  and	
  eventually	
  Alejandro	
  Toledo,	
  represented	
  the	
  only	
  serious	
  opposition.	
  All	
  of	
  these	
   men	
  presented	
  themselves	
  in	
  the	
  neo-­‐populist	
  fashion,	
  as	
  personalistic	
  leaders,	
  relying	
  on	
  charisma,	
   personal	
  ideologies	
  and	
  their	
  leadership	
  roles	
  within	
  the	
  respective	
  established	
  political	
  parties	
  that	
  they	
   were	
  loosely	
  affiliated	
  with.47	
   	
    In	
  the	
  lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  elections,	
  thousands	
  of	
  poor	
  urban	
  immigrants	
  staged	
  land	
  seizures	
  in	
    Lima’s	
  outskirts	
  in	
  January	
  of	
  2000.	
  Fujimori	
  affirmed	
  the	
  opposition’s	
  suspicion	
  that	
  the	
  move	
  was	
  part	
   of	
  a	
  wider	
  plot	
  to	
  elicit	
  electoral	
  support,	
  when	
  he	
  ceded	
  sanctioned	
  lots	
  to	
  the	
  squatters	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  a	
   Family	
  Lot	
  Program	
  in	
  February.	
  Interestingly,	
  public	
  polls	
  show	
  that	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  respondents	
   recognized	
  the	
  move	
  as	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
  buy	
  votes	
  but	
  still	
  supported	
  the	
  initiative.48	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   47  	
  Weyland,	
  31-­‐33.	
   	
  Carrión,	
  143-­‐144.	
    48  	
    61	
    	
   	
   	
    The	
  2000	
  elections	
  were	
  wrought	
  with	
  inconsistencies.	
  Public	
  opinion	
  polls	
  demonstrate	
  that	
    the	
  electorate	
  was	
  well	
  aware	
  of	
  these	
  irregularities.49	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  the	
  electoral	
  movement	
  that	
  he	
  put	
   together	
  to	
  back	
  his	
  bid	
  for	
  re-­‐election,	
  Perú	
  2000,	
  secured	
  victory	
  in	
  the	
  polls	
  for	
  a	
  third	
  term.	
  As	
  in	
   1990,	
  it	
  was	
  Peru’s	
  urban	
  and	
  rural	
  poor	
  who	
  provided	
  the	
  bulk	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  electoral	
  support.	
   However,	
  public	
  opinion	
  polls	
  demonstrated	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
  concern	
  over	
  the	
  electoral	
  process	
  and	
  the	
   widespread	
  belief	
  that	
  the	
  election	
  race	
  had	
  not	
  been	
  fairly	
  conducted	
  and	
  also	
  that	
  the	
  vote	
  count	
  had	
   been	
  skewed.50	
  International	
  organizations	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  Organization	
  of	
  American	
  States	
  (OAS)	
  openly	
   called	
  into	
  question	
  the	
  2000	
  electoral	
  process	
  but	
  did	
  not	
  meaningfully	
  respond	
  after	
  Fujimori’s	
   suspicious	
  victory,	
  validating	
  the	
  election,	
  continuing	
  to	
  provide	
  aid	
  and	
  maintaining	
  the	
  diplomatic	
   status	
  quo.	
  Efforts	
  were	
  made	
  to	
  “strengthen	
  democracy”	
  but	
  no	
  official	
  inquiry	
  was	
  launched	
  into	
  the	
   election’s	
  democratic	
  validity.51	
  In	
  response	
  to	
  Fujimori’s	
  unjust	
  victory,	
  the	
  opposition	
  finally	
  came	
   together	
  and	
  rallied	
  around	
  Alejandro	
  Toledo	
  who	
  had	
  come	
  in	
  second	
  during	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
   and	
  boycotted	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
  claiming	
  that	
  the	
  “playing	
  field	
  was	
  too	
  tilted.”	
  Opposition	
  leaders	
   mobilized	
  civil	
  society	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  substantial	
  protests	
  since	
  the	
  institutional	
  crisis	
  of	
  the	
  1980s	
  had	
  taken	
   hold.	
  Massive	
  public	
  demonstrations	
  that	
  came	
  to	
  be	
  known	
  as	
  the	
  March	
  of	
  the	
  Four	
  Suyos	
  (la	
  Marcha	
   de	
  los	
  Cuatro	
  Suyos)	
  signalled	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  monopoly	
  on	
  popular	
  support	
  and	
  destabilized	
  the	
   regime	
  so	
  much	
  so	
  that	
  when	
  videos	
  that	
  documented	
  the	
  regime’s	
  widespread	
  corruption	
  were	
   released	
  to	
  the	
  media	
  a	
  few	
  months	
  later	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  left	
  for	
  the	
  administration	
  to	
  stand	
  on.	
  The	
   veneer	
  of	
  legitimacy	
  that	
  strong	
  public	
  support	
  had	
  provided	
  was	
  dissolved.	
  Although	
  widespread	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   49	
  Ibid.,	
  145.	
   50  	
  Ibid.	
   	
  Cynthia	
  McClintock,	
  “Electoral	
  Authoritarian	
  versus	
  Partially	
  Democratic	
  Regimes:	
  The	
  Case	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
   Government	
  and	
  the	
  2000	
  Elections,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
   Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  262.	
   51  	
    62	
    	
   	
   discontent	
  alone	
  was	
  not	
  enough	
  to	
  topple	
  the	
  regime,	
  the	
  movement	
  signalled	
  the	
  beginning	
  of	
  the	
   end	
  for	
  Fujimori.52	
   	
    In	
  September	
  2000,	
  just	
  months	
  after	
  Fujimori’s	
  victory	
  in	
  the	
  2000	
  elections,	
  a	
  videotape	
    documenting	
  Montesinos’	
  $15,000	
  bribe	
  to	
  an	
  opposition	
  congressman,	
  Alberto	
  Kouri,	
  in	
  exchange	
  for	
   his	
  allegiance	
  to	
  Perú	
  2000	
  was	
  leaked	
  to	
  the	
  press	
  and	
  aired	
  on	
  national	
  television.	
  Within	
  48	
  hours	
  of	
   the	
  airing	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  “Vladivideo”	
  Fujimori	
  ceded	
  the	
  presidency,	
  promising	
  new	
  elections	
  in	
  which	
  he	
   would	
  not	
  run,	
  fired	
  Montesinos	
  (something	
  his	
  daughter	
  Keiko	
  had	
  been	
  pushing	
  him	
  to	
  do)	
  and	
   declared	
  he	
  would	
  dismantle	
  the	
  SIN.	
  The	
  video’s	
  release	
  proved	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  tip	
  of	
  the	
  iceberg	
  that	
  would	
   bring	
  the	
  regime	
  to	
  its	
  knees	
  as	
  similar	
  videos	
  aired	
  on	
  national	
  television	
  for	
  months	
  exposing	
  the	
   incredible	
  depth	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  clientelism	
  that	
  sustained	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidency.	
  Scholars	
  have	
  noted	
   that	
  the	
  video	
  effectively	
  ended	
  Fujimori’s	
  presidency	
  because	
  it	
  drove	
  a	
  wedge	
  between	
  the	
  president	
   and	
  his	
  top	
  advisor,	
  Montesinos,	
  which	
  could	
  not	
  easily	
  be	
  remedied.	
  Compounding	
  this	
  painful	
  break	
   was	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  Fujimori	
  could	
  no	
  longer	
  sustain	
  the	
  close	
  relationship	
  with	
  Peru’s	
  Armed	
  Forces	
   without	
  Montesino’s	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  legal	
  system	
  and	
  personal	
  willingness	
  to	
  use	
  corruption	
  to	
   maintain	
  the	
  necessary	
  relationships	
  with	
  the	
  military’s	
  top	
  advisors.	
  Furthermore,	
  the	
  video	
   precipitated	
  Fujimori’s	
  loss	
  of	
  control	
  in	
  congress	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  essential	
  for	
  a	
  2000-­‐2005	
  presidential	
   term.	
  As	
  the	
  regime	
  crumbled	
  around	
  him,	
  Fujimori	
  boarded	
  a	
  plane	
  to	
  Japan	
  in	
  November	
  of	
  2000	
   under	
  the	
  pretext	
  that	
  he	
  was	
  conducting	
  official	
  business	
  in	
  Asia.53	
  Fujimori	
  faxed	
  his	
  resignation	
  into	
   congress	
  from	
  Japan	
  on	
  the	
  21st	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  month,	
  where	
  it	
  was	
  rejected	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  instead	
  removed	
   as	
  president,	
  citing	
  “moral	
  incapacity”	
  as	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  his	
  dismissal.	
  Montesinos	
  had	
  already	
  fled	
  the	
   country	
  after	
  the	
  release	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  Vladivideo	
  at	
  the	
  urging	
  of	
  Fujimori.	
  He	
  was	
  arrested	
  in	
  Venezuela	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   52  	
  Carrión,	
  146-­‐147.	
   	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron,	
  “Endogenous	
  Regime	
  Breakdown:	
  The	
  Vladivideo	
  and	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Fujimori,”	
  in	
  The	
   Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  277-­‐283.	
   53  	
    63	
    	
   	
   in	
  June	
  2001	
  and	
  extradited	
  to	
  Peru	
  to	
  face	
  numerous	
  criminal	
  charges,	
  pleading	
  guilty	
  to	
  those	
  that	
  had	
   been	
  caught	
  on	
  tape.	
  Both	
  Fujimori,	
  from	
  his	
  home	
  in	
  Japan,	
  and	
  Montesinos,	
  from	
  jail	
  in	
  Lima,	
   implicated	
  each	
  other	
  for	
  self-­‐serving	
  purposes.	
  In	
  the	
  end	
  it	
  was	
  clear	
  to	
  the	
  majority	
  that	
  one	
  could	
   not	
  have	
  existed	
  without	
  the	
  other.54	
   Fujimori’s	
  legacy	
  persists	
  despite	
  the	
  obvious	
  shortcomings	
  of	
  his	
  regime,	
  as	
  demonstrated	
  by	
   his	
  daughter’s	
  close	
  run	
  in	
  the	
  2011	
  presidential	
  elections.	
  The	
  restoration	
  of	
  stability	
  and	
  growth	
  of	
  the	
   Peruvian	
  economy	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  more	
  than	
  a	
  decade	
  of	
  internal	
  conflict	
  signal	
  the	
  largest	
   successes	
  of	
  the	
  regime.	
  However,	
  these	
  successes	
  were	
  somewhat	
  eclipsed	
  in	
  2000	
  by	
  the	
  corruption	
   scandal	
  and	
  subsequent	
  trials	
  for	
  human	
  rights	
  violations	
  under	
  the	
  regime.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  more	
  nuanced	
   aspects	
  of	
  the	
  regime	
  that	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  bear	
  most	
  heavily	
  on	
  Fujimori’s	
  continuing	
  legacy	
  namely	
  his	
   manipulation	
  of	
  public	
  opinion,	
  maintenance	
  of	
  a	
  strong	
  electoral	
  support	
  base	
  among	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
   classes	
  and	
  the	
  regime’s	
  appeals	
  to	
  women.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   54  	
  Conaghan,	
  “The	
  Immoral	
  Economy	
  of	
  Fujimorismo,”	
  241-­‐245.	
    	
    64	
    	
   	
   	
   Chapter	
  Four:	
   The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy	
  in	
  the	
  Twenty-­‐First	
  Century 	
   Valentín	
  Paniagua	
  led	
  the	
  provisional	
  government	
  after	
  Fujimori’s	
  removal	
  from	
  office	
  on	
   November	
  22nd,	
  2000	
  until	
  elections	
  were	
  held	
  in	
  2001.	
  A	
  constitutionalist	
  from	
  the	
  centrist	
  party	
   Popular	
  Action,	
  Paniagua	
  led	
  a	
  wide-­‐ranging	
  group	
  of	
  technocrats	
  that	
  represented	
  the	
  left	
  to	
  the	
  right	
   of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  spectrum	
  during	
  Peru’s	
  transition	
  period.	
  Despite	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  mass	
   mobilization	
  and	
  non-­‐political	
  organization	
  in	
  bringing	
  down	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government,	
  the	
  transition	
   period	
  under	
  Paniagua	
  was	
  controlled	
  by	
  the	
  political	
  establishment	
  and	
  “…crafted	
  to	
  exclude	
  the	
   popular	
  movement.”	
  In	
  order	
  to	
  address	
  growing	
  demands	
  for	
  governmental	
  reform,	
  especially	
  in	
   regards	
  to	
  replacing	
  Fujimori’s	
  chosen	
  regional	
  representatives	
  with	
  popularly	
  elected	
  ones,	
  the	
   Paniagua	
  government	
  went	
  some	
  way	
  in	
  reforming	
  the	
  centralized	
  and	
  institutionally	
  weak	
  government	
   left	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  wake.	
  The	
  provisional	
  government	
  faced	
  many	
  obstacles	
  in	
  congress,	
  owing	
  to	
  the	
   number	
  of	
  seats	
  filled	
  by	
  Fujimori	
  supporters	
  after	
  the	
  president’s	
  removal	
  and	
  the	
  demands	
  made	
  by	
   the	
  official	
  opposition	
  who	
  recognized	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  engage	
  in	
  open	
  and	
  democratic	
  politics	
  for	
  the	
   first	
  time	
  in	
  over	
  a	
  decade.	
  	
  The	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  administration	
  created	
  an	
  opportunity	
  for	
  the	
   redefinition	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  democracy.	
  The	
  forces	
  that	
  had	
  worked	
  together	
  to	
  oust	
  Fujimori	
  now	
  faced	
  a	
   new	
  challenge,	
  one	
  that	
  rested	
  on	
  two	
  divergent	
  ideas	
  of	
  democracy.	
  In	
  a	
  generalized	
  sense,	
  the	
  popular	
   movement’s	
  aims	
  for	
  democracy	
  fell	
  in	
  line	
  with	
  traditional	
  socialist-­‐leftist	
  aspirations	
  more	
  tied	
  to	
  ideas	
   of	
  equity	
  and	
  a	
  critique	
  of	
  neoliberal	
  orthodoxy.	
  The	
  political	
  elite,	
  who	
  were	
  at	
  the	
  helm	
  of	
  transition,	
   still	
  put	
  their	
  faith	
  in	
  the	
  Washington	
  Consensus	
  and	
  saw	
  the	
  return	
  to	
  democracy	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  the	
   political	
  establishment	
  and	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  abandonment	
  of	
  free	
  market	
  policies.	
  The	
  political	
  elite	
  that	
    	
    65	
    	
   	
   emerged	
  from	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  decade	
  still	
  contained	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  actors,	
  such	
  as	
  the	
   American	
  Popular	
  Revolutionary	
  Alliance,	
  the	
  Christian	
  People’s	
  Party,	
  the	
  United	
  Left	
  and	
  the	
  Alliance	
   Popular	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  newer	
  parties	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  rightist	
  Union	
  for	
  Peru	
  (UPP,	
  Union	
  Para	
  Perú)	
  and	
   members	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Confederation	
  of	
  Industrialists	
  and	
  Entrepreneurs.	
  It	
  was	
  this	
  grouping	
  of	
  the	
   political	
  elite	
  that	
  led	
  the	
  transition	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  the	
  Organization	
  of	
  American	
  States.	
  The	
  General	
   Labour	
  Confederation,	
  regional	
  movements,	
  peasant	
  federations,	
  university	
  students,	
  women’s	
   organizations	
  and	
  professional	
  associations	
  were	
  given	
  marginal	
  shares	
  in	
  the	
  process	
  or	
  excluded	
  all	
   together	
  from	
  the	
  top-­‐down	
  transition	
  period	
  under	
  Paniagua.1	
   The	
  2001	
  elections	
  saw	
  the	
  return	
  of	
  established	
  political	
  leaders	
  such	
  as	
  Alan	
  García	
  Perez	
   under	
  the	
  APRA,	
  Flores	
  Lourdes	
  Nano	
  under	
  the	
  PPC	
  and	
  Diez	
  Conseco	
  under	
  the	
  IU	
  all	
  of	
  whom	
   collectively	
  secured	
  more	
  than	
  50	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  and	
  a	
  substantial	
  holding	
  in	
   congress	
  for	
  the	
  APRA	
  and	
  AP.	
  Scholarly	
  documents	
  argue	
  that	
  the	
  resurgence	
  of	
  these	
  leaders	
  did	
  not	
   equate	
  the	
  resurgence	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  parties	
  under	
  which	
  they	
  ran,	
  instead	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  decade	
   changed	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  in	
  that	
  these	
  traditional	
  parties	
  did	
  not	
  seek	
  to	
  re-­‐institutionalize	
   themselves	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  2001	
  elections	
  but	
  instead	
  party	
  leaders	
  employed	
  personalistic	
  campaigns	
   often	
  exposing	
  the	
  party	
  to	
  broad	
  changes	
  in	
  identity	
  and	
  leadership	
  to	
  suit	
  electoral	
  needs.	
  In	
  2009	
   Political	
  Scientist	
  Omar	
  Sanchez	
  argued	
  that	
  “[t]he	
  lesson	
  political	
  entrepreneurs	
  drew	
  in	
  the	
  1990s	
  was	
   that	
  the	
  building	
  of	
  bona	
  fide	
  parties	
  with	
  an	
  organizational	
  base	
  was	
  dispensable	
  in	
  the	
  quest	
  for	
   influence	
  and	
  power.”2	
   Alejandro	
  Toledo	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  effectively	
  mobilize	
  anti-­‐Fujimori	
  sentiment	
  to	
  his	
  advantage	
  in	
  the	
   lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  2001	
  presidential	
  elections.	
  Toledo	
  was	
  a	
  free-­‐market	
  proponent	
  who	
  studied	
  economics	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   1  	
  Deborah	
  Poole	
  and	
  Gerardo	
  Rénique,	
  “Popular	
  Movements,	
  the	
  Legacy	
  of	
  the	
  Left,	
  and	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
  Fujimori,”	
   Socialism	
  and	
  Democracy	
  14,	
  no.	
  2	
  (2000):	
  60-­‐64,	
  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08854300008428264	
  (accessed	
   December	
  11,	
  2012).	
   2 Omar	
  Sanchez,	
  “Party	
  Non-­‐Systems:	
  A	
  Conceptual	
  Innovation,”	
  Party	
  Politics	
  15,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2009):	
  513-­‐514,	
   http://ppq.sagepub.com/content/15/4/487	
  (accessed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
    	
    66	
    	
   	
   at	
  Stanford	
  University	
  and	
  had	
  worked	
  for	
  the	
  World	
  Bank.3	
  Toledo	
  ran	
  under	
  the	
  newly	
  formed	
  Peru	
   Possible	
  (PP	
  or	
  Perú	
  Posible)	
  and	
  capitalized	
  on	
  his	
  indigenous	
  background	
  while	
  fashioning	
  a	
  campaign	
   platform	
  that	
  focused	
  on	
  the	
  reduction	
  of	
  poverty,	
  unemployment	
  and	
  underemployment	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  an	
   increase	
  in	
  health	
  and	
  education	
  expenditure.	
  Toledo	
  beat	
  out	
  runner-­‐up	
  García	
  in	
  June	
  2001,	
  becoming	
   Peru’s	
  first	
  self-­‐identifying	
  indigenous	
  president	
  since	
  1931.4	
   Alejandro	
  Toledo	
  in	
  Office,	
  2001-­‐2006	
   	
    The	
  2001	
  elections	
  and	
  Toledo’s	
  time	
  in	
  office	
  saw	
  the	
  reestablishment	
  of	
  democracy	
  and	
    multiparty	
  politics	
  in	
  Peru	
  but	
  not	
  the	
  resurrection	
  of	
  the	
  pre-­‐1980	
  party	
  system.5	
  In	
  2011	
  Political	
   Scientist	
  Martin	
  Tanaka	
  noted	
  that	
  party	
  weakness	
  in	
  Peru	
  is	
  evident	
  “…in	
  their	
  ever-­‐diminishing	
   presence	
  in	
  regional	
  and	
  local	
  politics…,	
  in	
  their	
  lack	
  of	
  discipline	
  and	
  fragmentation	
  in	
  the	
  National	
   Congress,	
  and	
  in	
  extreme	
  electoral	
  volatility.”6	
  The	
  Toledo	
  government	
  saw	
  a	
  period	
  of	
  macroeconomic	
   growth	
  unmatched	
  in	
  Peru’s	
  history	
  although	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
  such	
  growth	
  were	
  only	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  top	
  30	
   percent	
  of	
  the	
  economic	
  strata.	
  Unemployment	
  and	
  low	
  wages	
  continued	
  to	
  plague	
  Peru’s	
  poorest	
   sectors	
  leading	
  to	
  widespread	
  discontent.	
  Presidential	
  approval	
  ratings	
  for	
  Toledo	
  during	
  his	
  time	
  in	
   office	
  hovered	
  just	
  above	
  single	
  digits.7	
  Toledo	
  did	
  not	
  move	
  fast	
  enough	
  to	
  root	
  out	
  corruption	
  or	
   renovate	
  the	
  judicial	
  system	
  and	
  increasingly	
  came	
  under	
  attack	
  for	
  not	
  taking	
  the	
  necessary	
  initiative	
  to	
   prosecute	
  those	
  guilty	
  of	
  committing	
  human	
  rights	
  violations	
  that	
  occurred	
  during	
  the	
  internal	
  war	
  in	
   the	
  1980s	
  and	
  1990s.8	
  In	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  address	
  the	
  demands	
  for	
  redress	
  of	
  human	
  rights	
  violations,	
  in	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   3  	
  Poole	
  and	
  Rénique,	
  63.	
   	
  Eduardo	
  Silva,	
  Challenging	
  Neoliberalism	
  in	
  Latin	
  America	
  (New	
  York:	
  Cambridge	
  University	
  Press,	
  2009),	
  246.	
   5 	
  Sanchez,	
  513.	
   6 	
  Martin	
  Tanaka,	
  “A	
  Vote	
  for	
  Moderate	
  Change,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  22,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  77,	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v022/22.4.tanaka.pdf	
  (accessed	
   January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   7 	
  Cynthia	
  McClintock,	
  “An	
  Unlikely	
  Comeback	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  17,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2006):	
  97,	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v017/17.4mcclintock.pdf	
  (accessed	
   January	
  20,	
  2013).	
  	
   8 	
  Silva,	
  246.	
   4  	
    67	
    	
   	
   2001	
  the	
  Toledo	
  administration	
  supported	
  the	
  establishment	
  of	
  the	
  Commission	
  for	
  Truth	
  and	
   Reconciliation.9	
  The	
  commission	
  presented	
  their	
  final	
  report	
  in	
  2003	
  and	
  found	
  that	
  69,280	
  people	
  died	
   during	
  the	
  internal	
  conflict,	
  making	
  it	
  the	
  bloodiest	
  period	
  in	
  the	
  republic’s	
  history.	
  The	
  controversial	
   report	
  also	
  found	
  that	
  the	
  peasant	
  population	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  at	
  risk.	
  The	
  report	
  placed	
  the	
  blame	
  for	
  54	
   percent	
  of	
  the	
  deaths	
  on	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path,	
  1.5	
  percent	
  on	
  the	
  Tupac	
  Amaru	
  Revolutionary	
  Movement	
   and	
  the	
  remaining	
  44.5	
  percent	
  on	
  the	
  police	
  and	
  Peruvian	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  and,	
  to	
  a	
  lesser	
  extent,	
  self-­‐ defence	
  committees	
  established	
  in	
  the	
  emergency	
  zones.10	
   Beginning	
  in	
  2002,	
  anti-­‐neoliberal	
  and	
  anti-­‐Toledo	
  protests	
  erupted	
  throughout	
  Peru	
  although	
   the	
  movement	
  failed	
  to	
  gain	
  national	
  cohesion.	
  These	
  waves	
  of	
  popular	
  mobilization	
  went	
  some	
  way	
  in	
   further	
  opening	
  the	
  stage	
  for	
  anti-­‐system	
  candidates	
  who	
  could	
  offer	
  economic	
  alternatives	
  to	
  Peru’s	
   poor	
  masses	
  in	
  the	
  2006	
  elections.11	
  Beyond	
  his	
  economic	
  policy,	
  Toledo	
  was	
  further	
  criticized	
  for	
  his	
   opulent	
  lifestyle,	
  a	
  critique	
  that	
  was	
  compounded	
  by	
  his	
  indigenous	
  identity	
  and	
  what	
  Peruvians	
   perceived	
  as	
  acceptable	
  indigenous	
  behavior.	
  Furthermore,	
  Toledo	
  was	
  judged	
  in	
  comparison	
  to	
   Fujimori’s	
  carefully	
  constructed	
  man	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  image	
  that	
  had	
  been	
  bolstered	
  by	
  incessant	
  tours	
  of	
   the	
  countryside	
  and	
  the	
  inauguration	
  of	
  strategic	
  public	
  works	
  throughout	
  his	
  time	
  in	
  office.	
  Despite	
  the	
   fact	
  that	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  had	
  been	
  witness	
  to	
  the	
  syphoning	
  off	
  of	
  1.8	
  billion	
  dollars	
  of	
  state	
   money,	
  government	
  corruption	
  was	
  perceived	
  as	
  increasing	
  under	
  Toledo’s	
  leadership.	
  Public	
  opinion	
   polls	
  in	
  2005	
  also	
  showed	
  the	
  electorate’s	
  increasing	
  dissatisfaction	
  with	
  “the	
  way	
  democracy	
  works	
  in	
   Peru.”12	
  Going	
  into	
  the	
  2006	
  elections	
  it	
  seemed	
  clear	
  to	
  scholars	
  that	
  Peruvians	
  would	
  continue	
  to	
  look	
   outside	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  spectrum	
  to	
  find	
  viable	
  leadership.13	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   9  	
  McClintock,	
  97.	
  	
   Comisión	
  de	
  la	
  Verdad	
  y	
  Reconcilliación,	
  Truth	
  and	
  Reconciliation	
  Commission	
  Final	
  Report,	
   http://www.cverdad.org.pe/ingles/ifinal/conclusiones.php#up	
  (accessed	
  December	
  10,	
  2012).	
   11 	
  Silva,	
  247.	
   12	
  McClintock,	
  99.	
   13 	
  Ibid.	
  	
   10  	
    68	
    	
   	
   	
    Fujimori	
  travelled	
  from	
  Japan	
  to	
  Chile	
  in	
  November	
  2005,	
  where	
  he	
  was	
  immediately	
  arrested	
    by	
  Chilean	
  authorities.	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  government	
  responded	
  by	
  immediately	
  filing	
  for	
  Fujimori’s	
   extradition	
  to	
  face	
  21	
  criminal	
  charges	
  in	
  Peru.14	
  In	
  Peru,	
  as	
  the	
  elections	
  neared,	
  the	
  pro-­‐Fujimori	
  party,	
   Alliance	
  for	
  the	
  Future	
  (AF,	
  Alianza	
  por	
  el	
  Futuro)	
  sought	
  “…	
  to	
  obtain	
  a	
  bloc	
  of	
  congressional	
  seats	
  in	
   order	
  to	
  pursue	
  favorable	
  judicial	
  treatment	
  for	
  Fujimori.”15	
  Despite	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  a	
  large	
  majority	
  of	
   Peruvians	
  believed	
  Fujimori	
  should	
  face	
  persecution,	
  20	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  electorate	
  still	
  supported	
  a	
   political	
  comeback	
  for	
  the	
  authoritarian	
  president	
  and	
  rallied	
  behind	
  the	
  party	
  when	
  he	
  announced	
  his	
   presidential	
  bid	
  in	
  October,	
  despite	
  a	
  congressional	
  ban	
  on	
  his	
  accession	
  of	
  public	
  office	
  from	
  2001	
  to	
   2011.	
  The	
  AF	
  was	
  led	
  by	
  Martha	
  Chávez	
  and	
  at	
  the	
  head	
  of	
  the	
  congressional	
  roster	
  sat	
  the	
  ex-­‐first	
  lady	
   and	
  Fujimori’s	
  daughter	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori.16	
   The	
  2006	
  Elections	
   	
    Anti-­‐Toledo	
  and	
  anti-­‐neoliberal	
  sentiment	
  was	
  the	
  springboard	
  for	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  Ollanta	
  Humala’s	
    candidacy	
  in	
  the	
  lead	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  2006	
  elections.	
  Humala	
  was	
  a	
  political	
  outsider,	
  ex-­‐army	
  officer	
  and	
   fierce	
  nationalist	
  and	
  his	
  party,	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Nationalist	
  Party	
  (PNP,	
  or	
  Partido	
  Nacionalista	
  Peruano),	
   with	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  the	
  Union	
  for	
  Peru	
  electoral	
  movement,	
  gained	
  momentum	
  in	
  the	
  months	
  leading	
   up	
  to	
  the	
  2006	
  congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  campaigns.	
  He	
  presented	
  another	
  challenge	
  to	
  the	
   resurrection	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  party	
  system	
  leading	
  a	
  personalistic	
  and	
  populist	
  campaign.	
  The	
  PNP	
   platform	
  found	
  strength	
  in	
  promises	
  to	
  break	
  with	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  oligarchy,	
  repudiate	
  the	
  Trade	
   Promotion	
  Act,	
  reduce	
  coca	
  eradication	
  agreements	
  with	
  the	
  U.S.	
  and	
  restore	
  connections	
  with	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   14  	
  Jo-­‐Marie	
  Burt,	
  “Guilty	
  as	
  Charged:	
  The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Former	
  President	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  for	
  Human	
  Rights	
  Violations,”	
   The	
  International	
  Journal	
  of	
  Transitional	
  Justice	
  3	
  (2009):	
  395.	
  http://ijtj.oxfordjournals.org/	
  (accessed	
  January	
  25,	
   2013).	
  	
   15	
  McClintock,	
  99.	
   16 	
  Ibid.	
  	
    	
    69	
    	
   	
   Venezuela’s	
  Hugo	
  Chávez.	
  Not	
  surprisingly,	
  Humala	
  found	
  the	
  bulk	
  of	
  his	
  support	
  in	
  the	
  poorest	
  sectors	
   of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate.17	
   By	
  October	
  2005,	
  opinion	
  poll	
  data	
  and	
  media	
  coverage	
  had	
  narrowed	
  the	
  race	
  down	
  from	
  23	
   presidential	
  candidates	
  to	
  3,	
  although	
  40	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  remained	
  undecided.	
  Two	
  of	
  the	
   three	
  candidates	
  ran	
  with	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  established	
  political	
  parties,	
  García	
  with	
  the	
  APRA	
  and	
  Lourdes	
   Flores	
  Nano	
  who	
  ran	
  under	
  the	
  National	
  Unity	
  (UN,	
  or	
  Unidad	
  Nacional)	
  that	
  was	
  closely	
  related	
  to	
  the	
   PPC.	
  Humala,	
  the	
  third	
  contender,	
  ran	
  with	
  his	
  own	
  electoral	
  movement,	
  the	
  PNP.	
  Up	
  until	
  March	
  2006,	
   it	
  seemed	
  clear	
  that	
  Humala	
  and	
  Flores	
  would	
  vie	
  for	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
  while	
  García	
   lagged	
  behind	
  substantially.	
  However	
  from	
  March	
  until	
  the	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  in	
  April,	
  García	
   impressively	
  maneuvered	
  himself	
  to	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  the	
  ideological	
  spectrum	
  while	
  portraying	
  both	
   Humala	
  and	
  Flores	
  as	
  extremes.	
  On	
  the	
  campaign	
  trail,	
  García	
  connected	
  Humala	
  to	
  “irresponsible	
   change”	
  and	
  Flores	
  to	
  “continuity”	
  as	
  her	
  ties	
  to	
  the	
  political	
  elites	
  and	
  business	
  sectors	
  created	
  her	
   image	
  as	
  the	
  candidate	
  of	
  the	
  rich.	
  While	
  the	
  election	
  race	
  waged	
  on,	
  with	
  all	
  sides	
  coming	
  under	
  attack,	
   García	
  effectively	
  presented	
  himself	
  as	
  a	
  moderate.	
  His	
  disastrous	
  political	
  history	
  was	
  downplayed,	
  and	
   his	
  campaign	
  focused	
  on	
  his	
  moderating	
  approach,	
  for	
  example,	
  as	
  scholars	
  have	
  pointed	
  out,	
  “…his	
   proposal	
  for	
  la	
  sierra	
  exportadora	
  (the	
  exporting	
  highlands)	
  integrated	
  the	
  left’s	
  concern	
  with	
  the	
  poor	
   and	
  the	
  ‘reconstructed’	
  view	
  that	
  the	
  way	
  out	
  of	
  poverty	
  was	
  through	
  the	
  global	
  free	
  market.”	
   Furthermore,	
  García	
  promised	
  infrastructure	
  development,	
  measures	
  to	
  increase	
  agricultural	
  product	
   exportation,	
  labour	
  reforms,	
  and	
  the	
  negotiation	
  with	
  foreign	
  companies	
  to	
  increase	
  state	
  revenue	
  all	
  of	
   which	
  seemed	
  a	
  middle-­‐ground	
  when	
  compared	
  with	
  Flores’	
  complacency	
  with	
  big	
  business	
  and	
   Humala’s	
  nationalistic	
  edge.	
  Humala	
  was	
  attacked	
  on	
  a	
  personal	
  level,	
  first	
  because	
  of	
  his	
  dubious	
   ethnicity,	
  having	
  claimed	
  to	
  be	
  indigenous	
  despite	
  his	
  upper-­‐class	
  upbringing	
  in	
  Lima.	
  He	
  was	
  also	
  the	
   subject	
  of	
  accusations	
  related	
  to	
  his	
  time	
  in	
  the	
  Armed	
  Forces	
  and	
  his	
  involvement	
  with	
  extrajudicial	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   17  	
  Silva,	
  247.	
    	
    70	
    	
   	
   killings	
  in	
  the	
  Huallaga	
  Valley	
  in	
  1992	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  his	
  party’s	
  connections	
  to	
  other	
  players	
  involved	
  in	
   human	
  rights	
  abuses	
  and	
  corruption	
  under	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government.	
  In	
  2000,	
  Humala	
  led	
  a	
  military	
   uprising	
  against	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  that	
  turned	
  out	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  means	
  of	
  distraction	
  that	
  had	
  allowed	
   Montesinos	
  to	
  flee	
  the	
  country.	
  Humala’s	
  family	
  was	
  also	
  drawn	
  into	
  the	
  media	
  after	
  a	
  2005	
  attack	
  on	
  a	
   police	
  station	
  led	
  by	
  Humala’s	
  brother,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  unfortunate	
  remarks	
  made	
  by	
  both	
  his	
  father	
   (pertaining	
  to	
  amnesty	
  for	
  Shining	
  Path	
  leader	
  Guzmán)	
  and	
  homophobic	
  remarks	
  made	
  by	
  his	
   mother.18	
  The	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  elections	
  in	
  April	
  2006,	
  clearly	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  García’s	
  posturing	
  was	
   working	
  when	
  the	
  APRA	
  came	
  in	
  a	
  close	
  second	
  behind	
  the	
  PNP	
  with	
  24.3	
  and	
  30.6	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote	
   respectively.19	
   The	
  first	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  in	
  April	
  also	
  signalled	
  a	
  victory	
  of	
  sorts	
  for	
  the	
  Alliance	
  for	
  the	
  Future	
   and	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori.	
  The	
  party	
  won	
  7.4	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote	
  for	
  the	
  party’s	
  presidential	
  candidate	
   Martha	
  Chávez,	
  coming	
  in	
  fourth	
  overall.	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  won	
  three	
  times	
  the	
  preferential	
  votes	
  for	
  her	
   congressional	
  bid	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  candidate	
  after	
  receiving	
  positive	
  media	
  coverage	
  and	
  campaigning	
   with	
  her	
  American	
  husband.20	
   The	
  second	
  round	
  of	
  voting	
  saw	
  Humala	
  and	
  García	
  face	
  off,	
  with	
  García	
  capturing	
  the	
   presidency	
  by	
  only	
  5	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  vote.21	
  Both	
  candidates	
  tried	
  to	
  retreat	
  from	
  their	
  perceived	
   corners	
  with	
  García	
  attempting	
  to	
  win	
  over	
  the	
  votes	
  lost	
  to	
  Flores	
  and	
  Chávez	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  round,	
  while	
   Humala	
  backed	
  down	
  from	
  his	
  proposals	
  to	
  nationalize	
  Peru’s	
  natural	
  resources	
  and	
  other	
  staunchly	
   leftist	
  initiatives.	
  Montesinos	
  also	
  intervened	
  in	
  the	
  campaign	
  on	
  May	
  19,	
  2006	
  just	
  days	
  before	
  the	
  only	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   18  	
  McClintock,	
  100-­‐104,	
  	
   	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales,	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  2006	
  Nacional	
  Primera	
  Vuelta	
  (Presidente),	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/resultados2006/1ravuelta/index.onpe	
  (accessed	
  January	
   25,	
  2013).	
  	
   20 McClintock,	
  104.	
   21 	
  Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales,	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  2006	
  Nacional	
  Segunda	
  Vuelta	
  (Presidente),	
   http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/resultados2006/2davuelta/index.onpe	
  (accessed	
   January	
  25,	
  2013).	
   19  	
    71	
    	
   	
   presidential	
  debate	
  of	
  the	
  campaign.	
  The	
  media	
  got	
  a	
  hold	
  of	
  an	
  audio-­‐tape	
  smuggled	
  out	
  of	
   Montesinos’	
  jail	
  cell	
  that	
  affirmed	
  the	
  media’s	
  accusations	
  that	
  the	
  2000	
  uprising	
  led	
  by	
  Humala	
  had	
   indeed	
  been	
  a	
  ploy	
  aimed	
  at	
  securing	
  Montesinos’	
  escape	
  from	
  Peru.	
  The	
  tape	
  also	
  confirmed	
  that	
   Humala	
  had	
  been	
  involved	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  2000	
  election	
  fraud.	
  This	
  further	
  tarnished	
  Humala’s	
  image	
   connecting	
  his	
  name	
  to	
  the	
  dark	
  underbelly	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  administration	
  without	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  benefits	
  of	
   establishing	
  a	
  connection	
  to	
  Fujimori’s	
  positive	
  legacy.	
  Ultimately,	
  García	
  won	
  a	
  clear	
  victory	
  in	
  the	
   coastal	
  regions	
  while	
  Humala’s	
  support	
  lay	
  in	
  the	
  poor	
  interior.22	
   Fujimori	
  on	
  Trial	
   In	
  September	
  2007,	
  the	
  Chilean	
  Supreme	
  Court’s	
  ruling	
  called	
  for	
  the	
  extradition	
  of	
  Fujimori	
  to	
   Peru	
  to	
  face	
  charges	
  of	
  “…corruption,	
  usurpation	
  of	
  authority	
  and	
  human	
  rights	
  violations.”23	
  The	
   charges	
  brought	
  against	
  him	
  were	
  grouped	
  into	
  categories	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  tried	
  accordingly.	
  In	
  December	
   2007	
  at	
  Fujimori’s	
  summary	
  trial,	
  he	
  was	
  found	
  guilty	
  of	
  usurpation	
  of	
  authority	
  related	
  to	
  a	
  raid	
  on	
  the	
   house	
  of	
  Montesinos’	
  wife.	
  	
  The	
  first	
  public	
  trial	
  was	
  the	
  human	
  rights	
  cases	
  pertaining	
  to	
  the	
  Barrios	
   Altos	
  and	
  Cantuta	
  massacres	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  kidnapping	
  of	
  a	
  journalist	
  and	
  a	
  businessman	
  after	
  the	
  1992	
   coup.	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  found	
  guilty	
  on	
  all	
  charges	
  of	
  aggravated	
  homicide,	
  assault	
  and	
  kidnapping	
  and	
  was	
   sentenced	
  to	
  25	
  years	
  behind	
  bars	
  on	
  April	
  7,	
  2009.	
  On	
  June	
  20,	
  2009,	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  also	
  found	
  guilty	
  of	
   the	
  illegal	
  transfer	
  of	
  $15	
  million	
  dollars	
  of	
  state	
  money	
  to	
  Montesinos	
  upon	
  his	
  departure	
  from	
  the	
   country	
  in	
  2000	
  earning	
  him	
  reparation	
  payments	
  of	
  $1	
  million	
  dollars	
  and	
  7.5	
  years	
  in	
  prison.	
  The	
  final	
   public	
  trial	
  began	
  on	
  September	
  28,	
  2009	
  in	
  which	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  tried	
  and	
  convicted	
  on	
  three	
  charges	
   related	
  to	
  wiretapping	
  opposition	
  leaders,	
  bribing	
  congress	
  members	
  and	
  purchasing	
  a	
  television	
   channel	
  with	
  government	
  money,	
  earning	
  him	
  an	
  additional	
  six	
  year	
  sentence.24	
  	
  A	
  public	
  opinion	
  poll	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   22  	
  McClintock,	
  104-­‐106.	
  	
    23	
  Burt,	
  396.	
   24  	
  Ibid.	
    	
    72	
    	
   	
   conducted	
  in	
  March	
  of	
  2009	
  revealed	
  that	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  those	
  polled	
  supported	
  a	
  prison	
  sentence	
  for	
   Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  believed	
  he	
  was	
  responsible	
  for	
  the	
  Barrios	
  Altos	
  and	
  Cantuta	
  massacres.25	
   García	
  in	
  Office,	
  2006-­‐2011	
   In	
  office,	
  García	
  formed	
  alliances	
  in	
  congress	
  with	
  the	
  center-­‐left	
  and	
  center-­‐right	
  to	
  offset	
  the	
   APRA’s	
  minority.	
  In	
  2006	
  García’s	
  five	
  year	
  plan	
  was	
  passed	
  through	
  congress	
  that	
  aimed	
  to	
  reduce	
   poverty,	
  increase	
  expenditure	
  on	
  education,	
  health,	
  job	
  creation,	
  rural	
  infrastructure	
  and	
  support	
  for	
   export-­‐focused	
  agricultural	
  production	
  in	
  the	
  interior.26	
  García	
  continued	
  to	
  maintain	
  ties	
  to	
  Washington	
   and	
  “…significantly	
  expanded	
  trade	
  and	
  investment	
  relations	
  with	
  the	
  United	
  States,	
  with	
  a	
  free	
  trade	
   agreement	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  countries	
  [that	
  came]	
  into	
  effect	
  in	
  February	
  2009.”	
  Further	
  anti-­‐neoliberal	
   protests,	
  led	
  by	
  indigenous-­‐peasant	
  organizations,	
  regional	
  movements	
  and	
  labour	
  unions	
  erupted	
  again	
   in	
  the	
  last	
  years	
  of	
  García’s	
  second	
  administration	
  and	
  were	
  met	
  with	
  increasingly	
  harsh	
  measures.	
  It	
   was	
  in	
  this	
  climate	
  of	
  increasing	
  popular	
  mobilization	
  and	
  clashes	
  between	
  demonstrators	
  and	
  the	
  police	
   and	
  military	
  that	
  the	
  2011	
  congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  election	
  campaigns	
  heated	
  up.27	
   The	
  2011	
  Elections	
   The	
  Peruvian	
  party	
  system	
  remained	
  in	
  tatters	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  2011	
  election	
  campaign;	
  all	
  five	
   contenders	
  presented	
  themselves	
  as	
  political	
  outsiders.	
  	
  One	
  respected	
  polling	
  agency	
  reported	
  more	
   than	
  80	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  electorate	
  maintained	
  no	
  traditional-­‐party	
  allegiance.	
  Humala	
  ran	
  with	
  his	
   electoral	
  coalition	
  Win	
  Peru	
  (GP,	
  or	
  Gana	
  Perú);	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  ran	
  under	
  the	
  electoral	
  movement	
  Force	
   2011	
  (Fuerza	
  2011);	
  Toledo	
  ran	
  again	
  with	
  Peru	
  Possible;	
  Luis	
  Castañeda	
  ran	
  with	
  the	
  National	
  Solidarity	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   25  	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “El	
  Avance	
  de	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori,”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  9,	
  no.	
  110	
  (2009):	
  2,	
   www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Opinion_Data_Marzo_2009.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
  	
   26 	
  Silva,	
  248.	
   27 	
  Neil	
  Burron,	
  “Ollanta	
  Humala	
  and	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Conjecture:	
  Democratic	
  Expansion	
  or	
  ‘Inclusive’	
  Neoliberal	
   Redux?”	
  Latin	
  American	
  Perspectives	
  39	
  (2012):	
  135-­‐136,	
  http://lap.sagepub.com/content/39/1/133	
  (accessed	
   January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
    	
    73	
    	
   	
   Alliance	
  (ASN,	
  or	
  Alianza	
  Solidaridad	
  Nacional)	
  and	
  Pedro	
  Pablo	
  Kuczynski	
  ran	
  as	
  an	
  independent.	
   Scholars	
  have	
  also	
  noted	
  that	
  a	
  decisive	
  factor	
  in	
  the	
  election	
  results	
  was	
  the	
  splitting	
  of	
  the	
  center-­‐right	
   between	
  three	
  candidates,	
  Toledo,	
  Castañeda	
  and	
  Kuczynski.	
  In	
  the	
  end	
  this	
  division	
  went	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  in	
   locking	
  all	
  three	
  candidates	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  second	
  round	
  run-­‐off.	
  	
  Thus	
  Humala	
  and	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori,	
  who	
  ran	
   simply	
  as	
  “Keiko,”	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  command	
  their	
  respective	
  minority	
  support	
  to	
  secure	
  their	
  places	
  in	
  the	
   run-­‐off	
  in	
  June.	
  	
  Fujimori	
  capitalized	
  on	
  her	
  father’s	
  maintenance	
  of	
  20	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  electorate,	
  mostly	
   among	
  the	
  poorest	
  sectors,	
  voters	
  who	
  still	
  rallied	
  behind	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  who	
  had	
  ended	
  hyperinflation,	
   brought	
  down	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  and	
  supported	
  wide-­‐spread	
  social	
  assistance	
  programs.28	
  In	
  1999,	
  one	
   year	
  before	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  was	
  removed	
  from	
  office,	
  nearly	
  40	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  population	
  was	
   receiving	
  some	
  form	
  of	
  social	
  aid	
  from	
  his	
  administration.29	
  Fujimori’s	
  campaign	
  platform	
  promised	
  an	
   increase	
  in	
  public	
  spending	
  on	
  social	
  assistance	
  programs	
  that	
  received	
  73%	
  of	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  those	
   polled	
  by	
  the	
  national	
  polling	
  agency	
  in	
  2011.30	
  Up	
  until	
  April	
  2011,	
  Keiko	
  was	
  consistently	
  ahead	
  of	
   Humala	
  in	
  polling	
  results.31	
  	
  After	
  April	
  the	
  race	
  significantly	
  narrowed	
  while	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  women	
   continued	
  to	
  support	
  Keiko.32	
   Humala	
  built	
  his	
  campaign	
  on	
  wide-­‐spread	
  economic	
  discontent	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  “anti-­‐Lima	
   sentiment”	
  coming	
  from	
  the	
  highlands,	
  and	
  gained	
  momentum	
  as	
  the	
  only	
  viable	
  candidate	
  on	
  the	
  left	
   of	
  the	
  political	
  spectrum.	
  Both	
  Keiko	
  and	
  Humala	
  offered	
  “more	
  state.”	
  Keiko	
  stressed	
  her	
  father’s	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   28  	
  Steven	
  Levitsky,	
  “A	
  Surprising	
  Left	
  Turn,”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  22,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  86-­‐87,	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v022/22.4.levitsky.pdf	
  (accessed	
   January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   29 	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  “Conclusion:	
  The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Fall	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,”	
  in	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  ed.	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión	
  (University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006),	
  309.	
  	
   30 	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Continúa	
  el	
  Empate,”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  141	
  (2011):	
  4,	
   www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Continua-­‐el-­‐Empate.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   31 	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “La	
  Incertidumbre	
  Continúa,”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  143	
  (2011):	
  2,	
   www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/La-­‐Incertidumbre-­‐Continua.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   32 	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Ligero	
  Avance	
  de	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori,”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  142	
  (2011):	
   2,	
  www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Ligero-­‐Avance-­‐de-­‐Keiko-­‐Fujimori.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
   2013).	
    	
    74	
    	
   	
   model	
  of	
  social	
  assistance	
  and	
  his	
  legacy	
  of	
  extending	
  the	
  state’s	
  presence	
  into	
  the	
  interior.	
  Meanwhile,	
   Humala	
  espoused	
  a	
  more	
  socialist	
  inspired	
  model	
  that	
  looked	
  to	
  redistributive	
  measures,	
  at	
  least	
  in	
  a	
   rhetorical	
  sense.33	
   In	
  the	
  second	
  round,	
  it	
  seemed	
  clear	
  that	
  Keiko	
  would	
  win	
  as	
  it	
  was	
  the	
  coastal	
  middle-­‐class	
  who	
   would	
  tip	
  the	
  vote,	
  presumably	
  in	
  favor	
  of	
  the	
  free	
  market	
  orientated	
  policies	
  of	
  Keiko.34	
  The	
  national	
   polling	
  agency	
  conducted	
  a	
  poll	
  in	
  May	
  of	
  2011	
  that	
  demonstrated	
  that	
  Keiko	
  was	
  perceived	
  as	
  more	
   likely	
  to	
  respect	
  the	
  institution	
  of	
  democracy	
  than	
  Humala.35	
  51	
  percent	
  of	
  those	
  polled	
  in	
  May	
  believed	
   that	
  a	
  theoretical	
  Keiko	
  government	
  would	
  be	
  more	
  democratic	
  than	
  her	
  father’s	
  regime.36	
  The	
  media	
   engaged	
  in	
  ostracizing	
  Humala	
  and	
  clearly	
  supported	
  a	
  victory	
  for	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori.	
  At	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  both	
   candidates	
  attempted	
  to	
  gather	
  votes	
  wherever	
  they	
  could.	
  Political	
  Scientist	
  Steven	
  Levitsky	
  has	
  noted	
   that	
  in	
  the	
  end	
  “…Humala	
  moderated	
  his	
  appeal	
  more	
  successfully	
  than	
  did	
  Fujimori.”37	
  Humala	
  was	
   able	
  to	
  reduce	
  economic	
  fears	
  as	
  he	
  retreated	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  center,	
  abandoning	
  his	
  espoused	
  connection	
   with	
  Chávez	
  in	
  Venezuela	
  for	
  a	
  more	
  conducive	
  relationship	
  with	
  Brazil’s	
  Luiz	
  Inácio	
  Lula	
  da	
  Silva.	
   Humala	
  retreated	
  from	
  proposals	
  for	
  constitutional	
  reform	
  and	
  radical	
  economic	
  change	
  in	
  exchange	
  for	
   increased	
  “social	
  inclusion.”	
  Most	
  importantly	
  Humala	
  realigned	
  his	
  party	
  with	
  centrist	
  economic	
   thinkers	
  and	
  the	
  liberal	
  political	
  and	
  intellectual	
  establishment	
  gaining	
  more	
  legitimacy	
  in	
  the	
  eyes	
  of	
   the	
  middle-­‐class.	
  Essentially,	
  Humala	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  transform	
  his	
  seemingly	
  radical	
  leftist	
  electoral	
   movement	
  into	
  a	
  broad-­‐based	
  anti-­‐Fujimorista	
  campaign	
  that	
  quickly	
  gained	
  momentum.	
  Keiko,	
  on	
  the	
   other	
  hand,	
  was	
  greatly	
  aided	
  by	
  her	
  father’s	
  legacy	
  but	
  in	
  the	
  final	
  moments	
  of	
  the	
  campaign	
  also	
   slightly	
  hindered	
  by	
  it	
  when	
  anti-­‐Fujimori	
  rhetoric	
  increased.	
  A	
  poll	
  conducted	
  in	
  May	
  of	
  2011	
   demonstrated	
  that	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  still	
  commanded	
  attention	
  on	
  the	
  political	
  scene	
  when	
  30	
  percent	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   33	
  Levitsky,	
  84-­‐90.	
   34  	
  Ibid,	
  91.	
   	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Continúa	
  el	
  Empate,”	
  4.	
   36 	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Avaza	
  Keiko,”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  140	
  (2011):	
  3,	
  www.ipsos-­‐ apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/avaza-­‐keiko.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   37	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Aveza	
  Keiko,”	
  3.	
   35  	
    75	
    	
   	
   of	
  respondents	
  named	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  as	
  the	
  most	
  effective	
  in	
  50	
  years.38	
  This	
  numerical	
   evidence	
  of	
  continued	
  support	
  for	
  Fujimori’s	
  government	
  was	
  effectively	
  employed	
  during	
  Keiko’s	
   campaign	
  tours,	
  enabling	
  Keiko	
  to	
  present	
  herself	
  as	
  a	
  continuation	
  of	
  her	
  father’s	
  legacy.39	
  In	
  the	
  end,	
   Humala	
  won	
  the	
  run-­‐off	
  with	
  51.5	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  vote	
  on	
  June	
  5,	
  2011	
  beating	
  out	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  by	
  an	
   incredibly	
  slim	
  margin.40	
   The	
  presidential	
  electoral	
  movements	
  of	
  the	
  2000s	
  clearly	
  demonstrate	
  the	
  lasting	
  impact	
  of	
  the	
   political	
  system’s	
  demise	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  1980s	
  and	
  its	
  further	
  degradation	
  that	
  occurred	
  under	
  the	
   Fujimori	
  government.	
  Despite	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori’s	
  loss	
  in	
  the	
  2011	
  elections,	
  her	
  near	
  victory	
  signals	
  the	
   profound	
  impact	
  of	
  her	
  father’s	
  legacy	
  on	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  psyche,	
  one	
  that	
  nearly	
  eclipsed	
  the	
  widely	
   perceived	
  moral	
  ineptitude	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  administration.	
    	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   	
   38  	
  Ipsos	
  APOYO,	
  “Aveza	
  Keiko,”	
  3.	
   	
  Perucom	
  Perú,	
  “Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  Responde	
  a	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa,”	
  Surco,	
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-­‐ RCUpylLhSw	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
  	
   40 	
  Levitsky,	
  84-­‐91.	
   39  	
    76	
    	
   	
   	
   Conclusion	
   	
   Peru’s	
  political	
  history	
  from	
  the	
  early	
  twentieth	
  century	
  until	
  1980	
  has	
  taken	
  a	
  unique	
  course.	
  It	
   was	
  not	
  until	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  1960s	
  that	
  Peru	
  experienced	
  any	
  substantial	
  change	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  land	
   reform,	
  wider	
  political	
  inclusion	
  or	
  the	
  loosening	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  oligarchy.	
  These	
  reforms	
  occurred	
   under	
  a	
  military	
  government	
  that	
  ruled	
  until	
  1980,	
  leaving	
  a	
  peculiar	
  legacy	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  politics	
  that	
  was	
   centered	
  on	
  the	
  failures	
  of	
  the	
  transition	
  to	
  civilian	
  rule	
  that	
  occurred	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  military	
  regime	
   and	
  a	
  growing	
  mistrust	
  for	
  effectual	
  constitutional	
  reform.	
  	
  The	
  1980s	
  saw	
  the	
  establishment	
  of	
  two	
   civilian	
  governments	
  that	
  were	
  unable	
  to	
  effectively	
  deal	
  with	
  a	
  rising	
  economic,	
  social	
  and	
  political	
   crisis.	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  decade,	
  the	
  country	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  edge	
  of	
  collapse	
  owing	
  to	
  a	
  rampant	
  economic	
   crisis	
  and	
  rising	
  violence	
  propagated	
  by	
  the	
  Shining	
  Path	
  guerilla	
  group	
  and	
  counter-­‐insurgency	
  efforts.	
   By	
  1990	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate	
  was	
  concerned	
  with	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  elites’	
  ability	
   to	
  govern	
  in	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  such	
  a	
  crisis	
  and	
  gripped	
  by	
  a	
  profound	
  distrust	
  in	
  the	
  political	
  system.	
  	
   	
    This	
  distrust	
  in	
  the	
  traditional	
  political	
  system	
  led	
  to	
  a	
  breakdown	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  party	
  system	
    during	
  the	
  1990	
  congressional	
  and	
  presidential	
  elections	
  and	
  was	
  an	
  underlying	
  factor	
  that	
  allowed	
  for	
   two	
  political	
  outsiders,	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa,	
  to	
  vie	
  for	
  the	
  presidency.	
  Fujimori	
  was	
   able	
  to	
  manipulate	
  the	
  party	
  system	
  breakdown,	
  his	
  outsider	
  status	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  his	
  ethnic	
  minority	
  status	
   and	
  man	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  image	
  to	
  win	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
  June	
  of	
  1990.	
  	
   	
    During	
  Fujimori’s	
  ten	
  years	
  in	
  office	
  he	
  restored	
  macroeconomic	
  stability	
  to	
  the	
  country	
  and	
    ended	
  the	
  internal	
  war.	
  Fujimori’s	
  authoritarian	
  regime	
  however,	
  was	
  sustained	
  by	
  corruption,	
   clientelism	
  and	
  coercion.	
  When	
  in	
  2000,	
  amidst	
  a	
  re-­‐election	
  scandal,	
  the	
  depth	
  of	
  this	
  corruption	
  came	
   to	
  light	
  with	
  the	
  release	
  of	
  the	
  Vladivideos	
  it	
  seemed	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  had	
  been	
  completely	
    	
    77	
    	
   	
   discredited.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  regime’s	
  successes	
  in	
  restoring	
  economic	
  stability	
  and	
  ending	
  the	
  internal	
  war,	
  as	
   well	
  as	
  Fujimori’s	
  careful	
  manipulation	
  of	
  public	
  opinion,	
  his	
  regime’s	
  appeals	
  to	
  women	
  and	
  his	
   strategic	
  use	
  of	
  social	
  assistance	
  programs	
  during	
  his	
  presidency	
  that	
  allowed	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  to	
   outlive	
  the	
  administration’s	
  rapid	
  fall	
  from	
  grace.	
  	
   	
    The	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century	
  has	
  seen	
  a	
  resurgence	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  under	
  Alberto’s	
  daughter	
    and	
  ex-­‐first	
  lady	
  Keiko	
  Sofía	
  Fujimori.	
  	
  Keiko	
  ran	
  for	
  congress	
  in	
  2006,	
  securing	
  more	
  preferential	
  votes	
   than	
  any	
  other	
  candidate	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  history	
  and	
  was	
  narrowly	
  defeated	
  by	
  Ollanta	
  Humala	
  in	
  the	
  2011	
   presidential	
  elections.	
  	
  Related	
  to	
  the	
  persistent	
  ability	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  to	
  command	
  attention	
  on	
   the	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  scene,	
  is	
  a	
  sustained	
  degradation	
  of	
  the	
  traditional	
  party	
  system	
  that	
  collapsed	
  at	
   the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  1980s.	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  government	
  under	
  Alberto	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  capitalize	
  on	
  the	
  breakdown	
   of	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  in	
  1990	
  and	
  actively	
  took	
  measures	
  to	
  further	
  reduce	
  the	
  political	
  system’s	
   institutional	
  capacity.	
   This	
  thesis	
  has	
  shown	
  that	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  name	
  still	
  commanded	
  attention	
  on	
  the	
  Peruvian	
   political	
  scene	
  in	
  2011	
  despite	
  the	
  administration’s	
  meteoric	
  fall	
  in	
  2000	
  as	
  the	
  depth	
  of	
  governmental	
   corruption	
  was	
  realized	
  and	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori’s	
  subsequent	
  trial	
  and	
  conviction	
  on	
  numerous	
  charges	
  of	
   corruption	
  and	
  human	
  rights	
  violations.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century	
  has	
  seen	
  a	
  resurgence	
  of	
  the	
   Fujimori	
  name	
  it	
  is	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  social,	
  political	
  and	
  cultural	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  that	
  have	
   allowed	
  for	
  such	
  a	
  continuation	
  of	
  public	
  support	
  for	
  the	
  family	
  require	
  a	
  new	
  historical	
  assessment.	
  This	
   project	
  has	
  built	
  upon	
  academic	
  study	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  history	
  in	
  the	
  twentieth	
  century	
  via	
  the	
   intersection	
  of	
  opinion	
  polls	
  and	
  intellectual	
  interpretation	
  to	
  bring	
  the	
  discussion	
  into	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
   century	
  to	
  include	
  the	
  continuation	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  that	
  has	
  previously	
  been	
  treated	
  as	
  moribund	
   with	
  the	
  regime’s	
  end	
  in	
  2000.	
  Whether	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  factor	
  in	
  Peruvian	
    	
    78	
    	
   	
   politics	
  remains	
  to	
  be	
  seen,	
  this	
  project	
  only	
  suggests	
  a	
  new	
  direction	
  of	
  study	
  for	
  historians	
  engaged	
  in	
   contemporary	
  Peruvian	
  history.	
   The	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  establishment	
  has	
  seen	
  the	
  resurgence	
  of	
  multiple	
  politicians	
  who	
  have	
   returned	
  to	
  domestic	
  prominence	
  despite	
  previously	
  failed	
  political	
  careers.	
  	
  One	
  such	
  political	
  force	
  is	
   Alan	
  García	
  Perez	
  who	
  left	
  the	
  presidential	
  office	
  in	
  1990	
  amidst	
  a	
  widespread	
  economic,	
  social	
  and	
   political	
  crisis	
  that	
  had	
  completely	
  discredited	
  his	
  administration	
  only	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  presidency	
  in	
   2006	
  with	
  massive	
  public	
  support.	
  If	
  this	
  trend	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  seen	
  as	
  an	
  aspect	
  of	
  Peruvian	
  politics	
  it	
  is	
  equally	
   likely	
  that	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  could	
  experience	
  a	
  similar	
  resurgence	
  of	
  popularity	
  whether	
  that	
  occurs	
  with	
   the	
  help	
  of	
  his	
  daughter	
  or	
  on	
  his	
  own	
  accord.	
  	
   The	
  continuation	
  of	
  support	
  for	
  Fujimori	
  in	
  a	
  general	
  sense	
  signals	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate’s	
   ability	
  to	
  negotiate	
  and	
  weigh	
  successes	
  against	
  failures	
  to	
  make	
  political	
  decisions	
  based	
  less	
  on	
  a	
  belief	
   in	
  the	
  political	
  system	
  and	
  more	
  on	
  an	
  inherent	
  distrust	
  for	
  the	
  system	
  that	
  is	
  seen	
  as	
  necessarily	
   corrupt.	
  The	
  peculiar	
  legacy	
  of	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  has	
  fed	
  and	
  fed	
  off	
  of	
  this	
  breakdown	
  of	
  trust	
  in	
  the	
   political	
  system	
  that	
  began	
  in	
  the	
  1980s.	
  It	
  becomes	
  clear	
  then,	
  that	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  relevant	
  for	
  scholars	
  to	
   begin	
  to	
  study	
  the	
  nuances	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  place	
  these	
  recent	
  developments	
  within	
  a	
   larger	
  historical	
  context	
  that	
  aims	
  to	
  better	
  understand	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  political	
  system	
  and	
  its	
  historical	
   trajectory.	
  Related	
  to	
  this,	
  scholars	
  could	
  spend	
  much	
  time	
  studying	
  the	
  developments	
  in	
  the	
  Peruvian	
   political	
  psyche	
  that	
  have	
  allowed	
  for	
  such	
  a	
  cynical	
  view	
  of	
  the	
  political	
  establishment	
  to	
  root	
  itself	
  in	
   Peruvian	
  politics.	
   The	
  study	
  of	
  contemporary	
  history	
  is	
  constrained	
  by	
  limitations	
  such	
  as	
  access	
  to	
  unreleased	
   sources	
  and	
  questions	
  of	
  temporal	
  distance,	
  issues	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  taken	
  into	
  account	
  in	
  the	
  preparation	
   and	
  presentation	
  of	
  this	
  thesis.	
  However	
  these	
  limitations	
  by	
  no	
  means	
  negate	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
   contemporary	
  history.	
  In	
  the	
  case	
  of	
  this	
  thesis,	
  it	
  is	
  the	
  recent	
  past	
  which	
  calls	
  into	
  question	
  the	
    	
    79	
    	
   	
   limitations	
  of	
  more	
  distanced	
  interpretations	
  of	
  the	
  meanings	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  political	
  legacy	
  for	
  the	
   Peruvian	
  public.	
  Contemporary	
  history	
  is	
  an	
  integral	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  historical	
  profession	
  and	
  such	
  recent	
   historical	
  interpretations	
  of	
  events	
  provide	
  an	
  important	
  jumping	
  off	
  point	
  for	
  future	
  scholars.	
  It	
  is	
   necessary	
  to	
  situate	
  the	
  recent	
  past	
  in	
  a	
  larger	
  historical	
  context	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  move	
  forward	
  in	
  the	
  study	
   of	
  history.	
   This	
  thesis	
  has	
  attempted	
  to	
  shift	
  the	
  scholarly	
  focus	
  from	
  one	
  that	
  treated	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  legacy	
   as	
  moribund	
  in	
  2000	
  to	
  one	
  that	
  attempts	
  to	
  understand	
  the	
  underlying	
  factors	
  that	
  have	
  allowed	
  this	
   legacy	
  to	
  persist	
  in	
  the	
  twenty-­‐first	
  century	
  despite	
  the	
  regime’s	
  corrupt	
  nature	
  and	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori’s	
   imprisonment	
  on	
  grave	
  charges	
  of	
  corruption	
  and	
  human	
  rights	
  violations.	
  The	
  fact	
  that	
  the	
  Fujimori	
   name	
  commanded	
  significant	
  support	
  within	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  electorate,	
  as	
  seen	
  in	
  Keiko’s	
  near	
   presidential	
  victory	
  in	
  2011,	
  demands	
  a	
  reassessment	
  of	
  this	
  legacy	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  situate	
  Peru’s	
  recent	
  past	
   in	
  a	
  wider	
  historical	
  context.	
    	
    80	
    	
   	
   Bibliography	
   Ash,	
  Timothy	
  Garton.	
  History	
  of	
  the	
  Present:	
  Essays,	
  Sketches,	
  and	
  Dispatches	
  from	
  Europe	
  in	
  the	
  1990s.	
   New	
  York;	
  Random	
  House,	
  1999.	
   	
   Balbi,	
  Carmen	
  Rosa.	
  “Politics	
  and	
  Trade	
  Unions	
  in	
  Peru.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
   Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  134-­‐151.	
  University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
  	
   	
   Boesten,	
  Jelke.	
  “Choice	
  or	
  Poverty	
  Alleviation?	
  Population	
  Politics	
  under	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori.”	
  European	
   Review	
  of	
  American	
  and	
  Caribbean	
  Studies	
  82	
  (2007):	
  3-­‐20.	
  http://jstor.org/	
  (accessed	
  January	
   10,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Burron,	
  Neil.	
  “Ollanta	
  Humala	
  and	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Conjecture:	
  Democratic	
  Expansion	
  or	
  ‘Inclusive	
   Neoliberal	
  Redux?”	
  Latin	
  American	
  Perspectives	
  39	
  (2012):	
  133-­‐139.	
   http://lap/sagepub.com/content/39/1/133	
  (accessed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Burt,	
  Jo-­‐Marie.	
  “Guilty	
  as	
  Charged:	
  The	
  Trial	
  of	
  Former	
  President	
  Alberto	
  Fujimori	
  for	
  Human	
  Rights	
   Violations.”	
  The	
  International	
  Journal	
  of	
  Transitional	
  Justice	
  2	
  (2009):	
  384-­‐405.	
   http:ijtj.oxfordjournals.org/	
  (accessed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Cameron,	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Democracy	
  and	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru:	
  Political	
  Coalitions	
  and	
  Social	
  Change.	
   New	
  York:	
  St.	
  Martin’s	
  Press,	
  1994.	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Endogenous	
  Regime	
  Breakdown:	
  The	
  Vladivideo	
  and	
  Fall	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru.”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
   The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  268-­‐293.	
  University	
   Park,	
  PA:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Political	
  and	
  Economic	
  Origins	
  of	
  Regime	
  Change	
  in	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Eighteenth	
  Brumaire	
  of	
  Alberto	
   Fujimori.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
   Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  37-­‐69.	
  University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
   Press,	
  1997.	
  	
   	
   Carrión,	
  Julio	
  F.	
  “Conclusion:	
  The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Fall	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
   Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  102-­‐125.	
   Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Public	
  Opinion,	
  Market	
  Reforms	
  and	
  Democracy	
  in	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
   of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  126-­‐149.	
  Pennsylvania:	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   Catterall,	
  Peter.	
  “What	
  (If	
  Anything)	
  is	
  Distinctive	
  about	
  Contemporary	
  History?”	
  Journal	
  of	
   Contemporary	
  History	
  32,	
  no.	
  1	
  (1997):	
  441-­‐452.	
  http://jch.sagepub.com/content/32/4	
   /441.citation	
  (accessed	
  February	
  25,	
  2013).	
   	
   Comisión	
  de	
  la	
  Verdad	
  y	
  Reconcilliacón,	
  Truth	
  and	
  Reconciliation	
  Commission	
  Final	
  Report.	
   	
   http//www.cverdad.org.pe/ingles/ifinal/conclusiones.php#up	
  (accessed	
  December	
  10,	
  2012).	
  	
    	
    81	
    	
   	
   	
   Conoghan,	
  Catherine	
  M.	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  Deception	
  in	
  the	
  Public	
  Sphere.	
  Pittsburg,	
  PA:	
  University	
  of	
   Pittsburgh	
  Press,	
  2005).	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “The	
  Immoral	
  Economy	
  of	
  Fujimorismo”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
   Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  102-­‐125.	
  Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
   University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   Crabtree,	
  John.	
  “Neopopulism	
  and	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Phenomenon.”	
  In	
  Fujimori’s	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Political	
  Economy,	
   edited	
  by	
  John	
  Crabtree	
  and	
  Jim	
  Thomas,	
  13-­‐36.	
  London:	
  Institute	
  of	
  Latin	
  American	
  Studies,	
   1998.	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Peru	
  Under	
  Garcia:	
  An	
  Opportunity	
  Lost.	
  Basingstoke,	
  Hampshire:	
  Macmillan,	
  1992.	
  	
   	
   Degregori,	
  Carlos	
  Iván.	
  “After	
  the	
  fall	
  of	
  Abimael	
  Guzmán:	
  The	
  Limits	
  of	
  Sendero	
  Luminoso.”	
  In	
  The	
   Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
   Mauceri,	
  179-­‐191.	
  University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
  	
   	
   De	
  La	
  Cadena,	
  Marisol.	
  “From	
  Race	
  to	
  Class:	
  Insurgent	
  Intellectuals	
  de	
  Provincia	
  in	
  Peru	
  1910-­‐1970.”	
  In	
   Shining	
  and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
  in	
  Peru	
  1980-­‐1995,	
  edited	
  by	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern,	
  22-­‐59.	
   Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  1998.	
   	
   Drayton,	
  Richard.	
  “Where	
  Does	
  the	
  World	
  Historian	
  Write	
  From?	
  Objectivity,	
  Moral	
  Conscience	
  and	
  the	
   Past	
  and	
  Present	
  of	
  Imperialism”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Contemporary	
  History	
  46,	
  no.3	
  (2011):	
  671-­‐685.	
   http://jch.sagepub.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/content/46/3/671.full.pdf+html	
  (accessed	
   February	
  10,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Durand,	
  Fransisco.	
  “The	
  Growth	
  and	
  Limitations	
  of	
  the	
  Peruvian	
  Right.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
   Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  152-­‐175.	
  University	
   Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
   	
   Fujimori,	
  Alberto.	
  “A	
  Momentous	
  Decision.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  2cnd	
  ed,	
   edited	
  by	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
  Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk,	
  460-­‐467.	
  Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
   Press,	
  2005.	
   	
   Gamero,	
  Julio.	
  “Estabilización:	
  ¿Gradualismo	
  o	
  Shock?”	
  Quehacer	
  DESCO	
  63	
  (March-­‐April	
  1990):	
  9-­‐15.	
   	
   	
   Gorriti,	
  Gustavo.	
  The	
  Shining	
  Path:	
  A	
  History	
  of	
  the	
  Millenarian	
  War	
  in	
  Peru.	
  North	
  Carolina:	
  University	
  of	
   North	
  Carolina	
  Press,	
  1999.	
   	
   Graham,	
  Carol.	
  Peru’s	
  Apra:	
  Parties,	
  Politics,	
  and	
  the	
  Elusive	
  Quest	
  for	
  Democracy.	
  Boulder,	
  CO:	
  Lynne	
   Rienner	
  Publishers,	
  1992.	
   	
   Guzmán,	
  Abimael.	
  “We	
  Are	
  the	
  Initiators.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  2cnd	
  ed,	
  edited	
   by	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
  Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk,	
  325-­‐330.	
  Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
   2005.	
   	
   Hollander,	
  Jaap	
  Den.	
  “Contemporary	
  History	
  and	
  the	
  Art	
  of	
  Self-­‐Distancing.”	
  History	
  and	
  Theory	
  50,	
  no.	
  1	
    	
    82	
    	
   	
   (2011):	
  51-­‐67.	
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/doi/10.1111/j.1468-­‐ 2303.2011.00603.x/pdf	
  (accessed	
  February	
  10,	
  2013).	
   	
   Hunefeldt,	
  Christine.	
  “The	
  Rural	
  Landscape	
  and	
  Changing	
  Political	
  Awareness:	
  Enterprises,	
  Agrarian	
   Producers	
  and	
  Peasant	
  Communities,	
  1969-­‐1994.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
   Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  107-­‐133.	
  University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
  	
   	
   Ipsos	
  APOYO.	
  “Avaza	
  Keiko.”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  140	
  (2011):	
  1-­‐4.	
  www.i	
   psos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/avaza-­‐keiko.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Continúa	
  el	
  Empate.”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  141	
  (2011):	
  1-­‐5.	
  www.ipso	
   s-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Continua-­‐el-­‐Empate.pdf	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “El	
  Avance	
  de	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori.”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  9,	
  no.	
  110	
  (2009):	
  1-­‐6.	
  	
   www.ipsosapoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Opinion_Data_Marzo_2009.pdf	
  (accessed	
   March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “La	
  Incertidumbre	
  Continúa.”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  143	
  (2011):	
  1-­‐4.	
  	
   www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/La-­‐Incertidumbre-­‐Continua.pdf	
  (accessed	
   March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Ligero	
  Avance	
  de	
  Keiko	
  Fujimori.”	
  Resumen	
  de	
  Encuestras	
  a	
  la	
  Opinión	
  Pública	
  11,	
  no.	
  142	
  (2011):	
  1-­‐ 4.	
  	
  www.ipsos-­‐apoyo.pe/sites/default/files/opinion_data/Ligero-­‐Avance-­‐de-­‐Keiko-­‐Fujimori.pdf	
   (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   Levitsky,	
  Steven.	
  “A	
  Surprising	
  Left	
  Turn.”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  22,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  84-­‐94.	
  http://muse.jhu.	
   edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v022/22.4.levitcky.pdf	
  (accessed	
   January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Levitt,	
  Barry	
  S.	
  Power	
  in	
  the	
  Balance:	
  President’s,	
  Parties	
  and	
  Legislatures	
  in	
  Peru	
  and	
  Beyond.	
  Notre	
   Dame,	
  IA:	
  University	
  of	
  Notre	
  Dame	
  Press,	
  2012.	
  	
   	
   Little,	
  Daniel.	
  “History	
  of	
  the	
  Present.”	
  Understanding	
  Society:	
  Innovative	
  Thinking	
  about	
  Social	
  Agency	
   and	
  Structure	
  in	
  the	
  Global	
  World.	
  http://understandingsociety.blogspot.ca/2009/08/history-­‐of-­‐ present.html	
  (accessed	
  February	
  10,	
  2013).	
   	
   Manzetti,	
  Luigi.	
  Privatization	
  South	
  American	
  Style.	
  New	
  York:	
  Oxford	
  University	
  Press,	
  1999.	
  	
   	
   Mauceri,	
  Philip.	
  “An	
  Authoritarian	
  Presidency:	
  How	
  and	
  Why	
  Did	
  Presidential	
  Power	
  Run	
  Amok	
  in	
   Fujimori’s	
  Peru?”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
   by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  39-­‐60.	
  Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “The	
  Transition	
  to	
  ‘Democracy’	
  and	
  the	
  Failures	
  of	
  Institution	
  Building.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
   Polity,	
  Society,	
  Economy,	
  edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  13-­‐36.	
   Pennsylvania,	
  PA:	
  The	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
   	
   McClintock,	
  Cynthia.	
  “An	
  Unlikely	
  Comeback	
  in	
  Peru.”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  17,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  95-­‐109.	
    	
    83	
    	
   	
   http://muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracy/v017/	
   17.4mcclintock.pdf	
  (accessed	
  January	
  20,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Electoral	
  Authoritarian	
  versus	
  Partially	
  Democratic	
  Regimes:	
  The	
  Case	
  of	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Government	
   and	
  the	
  2000	
  Elections.”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
   edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  242-­‐268.	
  Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   Moyano,	
  Maria	
  E.	
  “There	
  Have	
  Been	
  Threats.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peru	
  Reader:	
  History,	
  Culture,	
  Politics,	
  2cnd	
  ed,	
   edited	
  by	
  Orin	
  Starn,	
  Carlos	
  Iván	
  Degregori	
  and	
  Robin	
  Kirk,	
  387-­‐392.	
  Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
   Press,	
  2005.	
   	
   Oficina	
  Nacional	
  de	
  Procesos	
  Electorales.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1990	
  Primera	
  Vuelta.	
  http://www.web.on	
   pe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RESUMEN/GENERALES/2.pdf	
  (accessed	
  November	
  04,	
   2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1990	
  2da	
  Vuelta.	
  http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecciones/RES	
   UMEN/GENERALES/2.pdf	
  (accessed	
  November	
  04,	
  2012).	
  	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1995	
  Nacional	
  (Congreso).	
  http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elecc	
   iones/RESUMEN/CONGRESO/5.pdf	
  (accessed	
  January	
  04,	
  2013.	
  	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  1995	
  Nacional	
  (Presidente).	
  http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/modElecciones/elec	
   ciones/RESUMEN/GENERALES/10.pdf	
  (accessed	
  January	
  04,	
  2013).	
  	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  2006	
  Nacional	
  Primera	
  Vuelta	
  (Presidente).	
  http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/mod	
   Elecciones/resultados2006.1ravuelta.inde	
  x.onpe	
  (accesed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
  	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  Elecciones	
  Generales	
  2006	
  Nacional	
  Segunda	
  Vuelta	
  (Presidente).	
  http://www.web.onpe.gob.pe/mo	
   dElecciones/resultados2006.2davuelta.inde	
  x.onpe	
  (accesed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
  	
   	
   Oliart,	
  Patricia.	
  “Alberto	
  Fujimori:	
  ‘The	
  Man	
  Peru	
  Needed?’”	
  In	
  Shining	
  and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
   in	
  Peru	
  1980-­‐1995,	
  edited	
  by	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern,	
  411-­‐424.	
  Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  1998.	
   	
   Otis,	
  John.	
  “Peru:	
  The	
  Return	
  of	
  Fujimori.”	
  Globalpost,	
  March	
  19,	
  2011.	
  http://globalpost.come/dispatch	
   /news/regions/americas/110307/alberto-­‐fujimori-­‐keiko-­‐peru-­‐election	
  (accessed	
  January	
  10,	
   2013).	
  	
   	
   Perucom	
  Perú.	
  “Keiko	
  Fujimori	
  Responde	
  a	
  Mario	
  Vargas	
  Llosa.”	
  Surco.	
  http://www.youtube.com/watch	
   ?v=-­‐RCUpylLhSw	
  (accessed	
  March	
  5,	
  2013).	
   	
   Palmer,	
  David	
  Scott.	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Authoritarian	
  Tradition.	
  Michigan:	
  Praeger	
  Publishers,	
  1980.	
  	
   	
   Palmowski,	
  Jan.	
  “Speaking	
  Truth	
  to	
  Power:	
  Contemporary	
  History	
  in	
  the	
  Twenty-­‐First	
  Century.”	
  Journal	
   of	
  Contemporary	
  History	
  46,	
  no.	
  3	
  (2011):	
  485-­‐50.	
  http://jch.sagepub.com/conte	
   nt/46/485.citation	
  (accessed	
  February	
  25,	
  2013).	
   	
   Poole,	
  Deborah	
  and	
  Gerardo	
  Rénique.	
  “Popular	
  Movements,	
  the	
  Legacy	
  of	
  the	
  Left	
  and	
  the	
  Fall	
  of	
   Fujimori.”	
  Socialism	
  and	
  Democracy	
  14,	
  no.	
  2	
  (2000):	
  53-­‐74.	
  http://dx.doi.org/10.108	
    	
    84	
    	
   	
   0/08854300008428264	
  (accessed	
  December	
  11,	
  2012).	
  	
   	
   Roberts,	
  Kenneth	
  M.	
  “Do	
  Parties	
  Matter?	
  Lessons	
  from	
  the	
  Fujimori	
  Experience.”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
   The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  81-­‐101.	
  Pennsylvania:	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   Roncagliolo,	
  Rafael.	
  “Elecciones	
  en	
  Lima:	
  Cifras	
  Testarudas.”	
  Quehacer	
  DESCO	
  62	
  (December-­‐January	
   1990):	
  12-­‐20.	
   	
   Roth,	
  Michael	
  S.	
  “Foucault’s	
  ‘History	
  of	
  the	
  Present’”	
  History	
  and	
  Theory	
  20,	
  no1	
  (1981):	
  32-­‐46.	
   http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/stable/pdfplus/2504643.pdf?acceptTC=true	
   (accessed	
  February	
  10,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Rousseau,	
  Stephanie.	
  Women’s	
  Citizenship	
  in	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Paradoxes	
  of	
  Neopopulism	
  in	
  Latin	
  America.	
  New	
   York:	
  Palgrave	
  Macmillon,	
  2009.	
   	
   Rudolph,	
  James	
  D.	
  Peru:	
  The	
  Evolution	
  of	
  a	
  Crisis.	
  New	
  York:	
  Praeger,	
  1992.	
   	
   Sagasti,	
  Francisco	
  and	
  Maz	
  Hernández,	
  “The	
  Crisis	
  of	
  Governance.”	
  In	
  Peru	
  in	
  Crisis:	
  Dictatorship	
  or	
   Democracy?,	
  edited	
  by	
  Joseph	
  S.	
  Tulchin	
  and	
  Gary	
  Bland,	
  23-­‐34.	
  Boulder,	
  CO:	
  Lynne	
  Reinner	
   Publishers,	
  1994	
   	
   Sanchez,	
  Omar.	
  “Party	
  Non-­‐Systems:	
  A	
  Conceptual	
  Innovation.”	
  Party	
  Politics	
  15,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2009):	
  487-­‐520.	
   http://ppq.sagepub.com/content/15/4/487	
  (accessed	
  January	
  25,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Schmidt,	
  Gregory	
  D.	
  “All	
  the	
  President’s	
  Women:	
  Fujimori	
  and	
  Gender	
  Equality	
  in	
  Peruvian	
  Politics.”	
  In	
   The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
   150-­‐177.	
  Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “Fujimori’s	
  1990	
  Upset	
  Victory	
  in	
  Peru:	
  Electoral	
  Rules,	
  Contingencies	
  and	
  Adaptive	
  Stratagies.”	
   Comparative	
  Politics	
  28,	
  no.	
  3	
  (April,	
  1996):	
  321-­‐354.	
  http://www.jstor.org/	
  (accessed	
   September	
  15,	
  2012).	
  	
   	
   Silva,	
  Eduardo.	
  Challenging	
  Neoliberalism	
  in	
  Latin	
  America.	
  New	
  York:	
  Cambridge	
  University	
  Press,	
  2009.	
  	
   	
   Stern,	
  Steve	
  J.	
  “Introduction	
  to	
  Part	
  One.”	
  In	
  Shining	
  and	
  Other	
  Paths:	
  War	
  and	
  Society	
  in	
  Peru	
  1980-­‐ 1995,	
  edited	
  by	
  Steve	
  J.	
  Stern,	
  13-­‐21.	
  Durham:	
  Duke	
  University	
  Press,	
  1998.	
   	
   Tanaka,	
  Martin.	
  “A	
  Vote	
  for	
  Moderate	
  Change.”	
  Journal	
  of	
  Democracy	
  22,	
  no.	
  4	
  (2011):	
  75-­‐83	
  http://	
   muse.jhu.edu.ezproxy.library.ubc.ca/journals/journal_of_democracya/v022/22.4.tanaka.pdf	
   (accessed	
  January	
  20,	
  2013).	
  	
   	
   Tosh,	
  John.	
  The	
  Pursuit	
  of	
  History:	
  Aims,	
  Methods	
  and	
  New	
  Directions	
  in	
  the	
  Study	
  of	
  Modern	
  History.	
   Harlow:	
  Pearson	
  Education	
  Limited,	
  2010.	
  	
   	
   Watters,	
  Raymond	
  Frederick.	
  Poverty	
  and	
  Peasantry	
  in	
  Peru’s	
  Southern	
  Andes,	
  1963-­‐90.	
  Pittsburgh,	
  Pa:	
   University	
  of	
  Pittsburgh	
  Press,	
  1994.	
  	
   	
    	
    85	
    	
   	
   Weyland,	
  Kurt.	
  “The	
  Rise	
  and	
  Decline	
  of	
  Fujimori’s	
  Neo-­‐populist	
  Leadership.”	
  In	
  The	
  Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
   Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  13-­‐38.	
  Pennsylvania:	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
  	
   	
   Wise,	
  Carol.	
  “Against	
  the	
  Odds:	
  The	
  Paradoxes	
  of	
  Peru’s	
  Economic	
  Recovery	
  in	
  the	
  1990’s.”	
  In	
  The	
   Fujimori	
  Legacy:	
  The	
  Rise	
  of	
  Electoral	
  Authoritarianism	
  in	
  Peru,	
  edited	
  by	
  Julio	
  F.	
  Carrión,	
  201-­‐ 226.	
  Pennsylvania:	
  Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  2006.	
   	
   -­‐-­‐-­‐.	
  “State	
  Policy	
  and	
  Social	
  Conflict	
  in	
  Peru.”	
  In	
  The	
  Peruvian	
  Labyrinth:	
  Polity,	
  Society	
  and	
  Economy,	
   edited	
  by	
  Maxwell	
  A.	
  Cameron	
  and	
  Philip	
  Mauceri,	
  70-­‐103.	
  University	
  Park,	
  PA:	
  The	
   Pennsylvania	
  State	
  University	
  Press,	
  1997.	
  	
   	
    	
    86	
    

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0076021/manifest

Comment

Related Items