Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

Reclaiming Haida Gwaii : the Haida’s road to co-management MacKay, Calum Apr 30, 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-MacKay_Calum_FRST_ 497_2015.pdf [ 226.47kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0075604.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0075604-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0075604-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0075604-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0075604-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0075604-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0075604-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0075604-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0075604.ris

Full Text

	  	   	  G r a d u a t i n g 	   E s s a y 	   2 0 1 5 	  Reclaiming	  Haida	  Gwaii:	  The	  Haida’s	  Road	  to	  Co-­‐Management	  Calum	  MacKay	  This	  paper	  aims	  to	  explain	  how	  the	  Haida	  came	  to	  be	  stewards	  of	  Haida	  Gwaii	  after	  a	  century	  of	  oppression.	  When	  the	  British	  began	  to	  colonize	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  they	  removed	  the	  Haida	  people	  from	  all	  decision-­‐making	  processes	  on	  their	  land	  base.	  They	  over-­‐harvested	  the	  archipelago	  from	  the	  early	  1900’s	  until	  the	  early	  2000’s	  with	  very	  little	  oversight	  by	  any	  regulatory	  institution.	  This	  practice	  decimated	  the	  landscape	  that	  was	  once	  full	  of	  biodiversity,	  all	  while	  preventing	  the	  Haida	  people	  from	  practicing	  traditional	  activities	  on	  their	  land.	  The	  conflict	  became	  more	  intense	  in	  the	  1980’s	  when	  environmentalists	  began	  supporting	  the	  Haida	  in	  reclaiming	  their	  land,	  and	  peaked	  when	  blockades	  were	  formed	  that	  prevented	  the	  large	  forest	  companies	  from	  accessing	  timber.	  This	  conflict	  led	  to	  the	  Canadian	  Supreme	  Court	  deciding	  that	  the	  government	  had	  not	  accommodated	  First	  Nations	  interests	  to	  the	  extent	  they	  deserved,	  and	  stated	  that	  the	  Haida	  must	  be	  involved	  in	  all	  decisions	  made	  on	  their	  land.	  The	  decision	  led	  to	  a	  co-­‐management	  council	  that	  now	  oversees	  forestry	  activity	  on	  the	  island	  and	  is	  made	  up	  of	  both	  Haida	  and	  government	  leaders.	  Spring	  	   15	  08	  Fall	  	   2	  Table	  of	  Contents	  Key	  Words	  ..............................................................................................................................................	  2	  Abbreviations	  ........................................................................................................................................	  2	  Introduction	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  3	  Haida	  Gwaii	  ............................................................................................................................................	  3	  History	  of	  logging	  .................................................................................................................................	  4	  Confrontation	  with	  Haida	  ..................................................................................................................	  5	  A	  Time	  of	  Change:	  Bringing	  Power	  to	  the	  Haida	  ........................................................................	  8	  New	  AAC	  ................................................................................................................................................	  12	  New	  Players	  ..........................................................................................................................................	  13	  Conclusion:	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  15	  References:	  ...........................................................................................................................................	  16	  	  Key	  Words	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  First	  Nations,	  Forestry,	  AAC,	  Supreme	  Court	  of	  Canada,	  EBM	  Abbreviations	  AAC:	  Allowable	  Annual	  Cut	  EBM:	  Ecosystem	  Based	  Management	  HGMC:	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Management	  Council	  SLUA:	  Strategic	  Land	  Use	  Agreement	  TFL:	  Tree	  Farm	  License	  FRPA:	  Forest	  Range	  and	  Practices	  Act	  	  	   3	  Introduction	  In	  2004,	  logging	  in	  Haida	  Gwaii	  changed	  forever.	  	  After	  a	  long	  history	  of	  conflict	  between	  environmentalists,	  First	  Nations	  and	  industry,	  the	  Supreme	  Court	  of	  Canada	  decided	  that	  the	  government	  did	  not	  adequately	  accommodate	  First	  Nations	  interests	  in	  their	  attempt	  to	  transfer	  the	  rights	  of	  TFL	  39	  from	  Weyerhaeuser	  in	  the	  early	  2000’s.	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  	  These	  conflicts	  led	  to	  an	  unprecedented	  joint	  decision-­‐making	  council	  formed	  by	  the	  Haida	  people	  and	  the	  Canadian	  government	  (Kunst’aa	  Guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol,	  2009).	  The	  agreement	  was	  counted	  as	  a	  victory	  not	  only	  for	  the	  Haida	  but	  also	  for	  all	  First	  Nations’	  bands	  fighting	  to	  get	  their	  voices	  heard	  across	  British	  Columbia.	  After	  years	  of	  dispute,	  the	  Haida	  had	  finally	  succeeded	  in	  acquiring	  the	  right	  to	  make	  decisions	  on	  their	  land	  base,	  one	  of	  the	  last	  forest	  regions	  representative	  of	  the	  coastal	  temperate	  rainforest	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  This	  paper	  gives	  a	  context	  of	  the	  history	  of	  logging	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  examining	  the	  events	  that	  led	  to	  the	  conflict	  between	  the	  Haida	  and	  government.	  	  In	  addition,	  it	  describes	  the	  policy	  changes	  to	  land	  management	  that	  have	  occurred	  since	  the	  Haida	  have	  returned	  as	  stewards	  of	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  It	  concludes	  with	  an	  explanation	  of	  the	  role	  of	  the	  new	  licensees	  who	  are	  responsible	  for	  managing	  the	  area	  under	  the	  guidance	  of	  Haida	  and	  government.	  	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  previously	  known	  as	  the	  Queen	  Charlotte	  Islands,	  is	  a	  cluster	  of	  islands	  located	  off	  the	  west	  coast	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  south	  of	  Alaska.	  The	  words	  “Haida	  Gwaii”	  mean	  “Islands	  of	  the	  Haida	  people”.	  (Takeda,	  2015)	  The	  two	  most	  populated	  islands	  of	  the	  archipelago	  are	  Graham	  Island	  and	  Moresby	  Island,	  with	  another	  150	  smaller	  islands	  	   4	  surrounding	  them	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Haida	  Gwaii	  is	  rich	  in	  cultural	  history.	  	  For	  thousands	  of	  years	  the	  Haida	  lived	  off	  the	  ocean	  and	  land	  developing	  close	  cultural	  ties	  with	  nature,	  especially	  bears,	  salmon	  and	  many	  tree	  species,	  particularly	  cedar.	  (Our	  Islands,	  2013)	  The	  Haida’s	  reign	  on	  the	  islands	  was	  undisturbed	  until	  the	  era	  of	  colonization	  when	  Haida	  Gwaii	  was	  visited	  by	  famous	  explorers	  such	  as	  the	  Juan	  Perez	  (Canadian	  Wildlife	  Service,	  2002).	  Haida	  Gwaii	  didn’t	  attract	  a	  lot	  of	  international	  interest	  until	  its	  sea	  otter	  population	  was	  recognized.	  In	  the	  early	  1800’s	  demand	  in	  China	  and	  other	  Asian	  regions	  for	  sea	  otter	  pelts	  was	  high,	  and	  brought	  hunters	  wealth	  (White,	  2006).	  The	  pelts	  were	  used	  for	  clothing,	  specifically	  coats	  and	  vests	  (White,	  2006).	  European	  merchants	  began	  trading	  with	  the	  Haida	  for	  their	  coveted	  sea	  otter	  pelts	  (White,	  2006).	  Sea	  otter	  hunting	  became	  so	  intense	  that	  the	  population	  become	  extinct	  before	  the	  end	  of	  the	  century,	  souring	  relations	  between	  the	  Haida	  and	  merchants,	  resulting	  in	  the	  Haida	  becoming	  hostile,	  taking	  ships	  captive,	  and	  even	  sinking	  boats	  and	  killing	  their	  crew	  (Keller,	  2014).	  	  The	  relationship	  between	  the	  Haida	  and	  the	  Europeans	  led	  to	  more	  problems,	  as	  disease	  brought	  over	  by	  European	  traders	  decimated	  the	  local	  Haida	  tribes,	  as	  well	  as	  many	  others	  in	  the	  province	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Smallpox	  reduced	  the	  Haida	  population	  from	  over	  10	  000	  to	  600	  by	  the	  late	  1800’s	  (Lee,	  2012).	  This	  left	  the	  Haida	  nation	  weak,	  and	  resulted	  in	  Britain	  claiming	  sovereignty	  over	  the	  islands	  without	  consulting	  the	  Haida	  people	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  History	  of	  logging	  Logging	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  has	  been	  occurring	  for	  as	  long	  as	  the	  Haida	  have	  populated	  the	  archipelago.	  They	  have	  used	  trees	  for	  many	  traditional	  purposes,	  from	  creating	  longhouses,	  to	  building	  totem	  poles	  and	  large	  war	  canoes	  that	  could	  accompany	  up	  to	  30	  people	  (White,	  	   5	  2006).	  This	  process	  was	  slow,	  as	  they	  did	  not	  have	  any	  sort	  of	  mechanized	  system.	  Trees	  had	  to	  be	  felled	  using	  axes,	  then	  cut	  into	  smaller	  sections	  and	  pulled	  through	  the	  forest.	  It	  was	  therefore	  a	  much	  lower	  rate	  of	  harvest	  and	  more	  sustainable,	  mimicking	  natural	  small-­‐scale	  disturbances.	  This	  resulted	  in	  the	  age	  class	  of	  the	  forest	  remaining	  natural	  throughout	  the	  Haida’s	  reign	  on	  the	  islands	  (.	  	  The	  arrival	  of	  Europeans	  in	  the	  late	  1800’s	  and	  early	  1900’s	  brought	  industrial	  forestry	  to	  the	  islands,	  and	  with	  it,	  better	  technology.	  Logging	  was	  still	  laborious,	  with	  Europeans	  having	  to	  hand	  fall	  trees,	  but	  steam	  driven	  machinery,	  “Steam	  Donkeys”,	  were	  used	  to	  haul	  fallen	  trees	  out	  of	  the	  forest	  to	  the	  ocean	  where	  they	  were	  collected.	  As	  time	  went	  on,	  technology	  evolved	  to	  the	  point	  where	  logging	  became	  far	  more	  efficient,	  and	  in	  the	  late	  70’s	  and	  80’s	  more	  wood	  was	  being	  taken	  out	  of	  the	  coast	  of	  BC	  than	  ever	  (Gowgaia	  Institute,	  2007).	  Confrontation	  with	  Haida	  Whilst	  the	  British	  began	  the	  colonization	  of	  the	  Haida	  islands,	  the	  local	  tribes	  resisted	  the	  imposed	  colonialism.	  Refusing	  to	  be	  conquered,	  the	  Haida	  fought	  back	  against	  British	  gold	  miners	  who	  were	  given	  land	  by	  the	  government	  in	  the	  Chilcotin	  and	  Frasier	  Canyon	  Wars	  in	  the	  late	  1800’s	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  They	  also	  fought	  back	  peacefully	  by	  petitioning	  King	  Edward	  VII	  to	  improve	  substandard	  living	  conditions	  brought	  on	  by	  the	  Indian	  Act	  in	  the	  late	  1800’s	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  Indian	  Act	  was	  put	  in	  place	  by	  Canada’s	  first	  Prime	  Minister,	  Sir	  John	  A	  Macdonald,	  who	  stated	  that,	  "The	  great	  aim	  of	  our	  legislation	  has	  been	  to	  do	  away	  with	  the	  tribal	  system	  and	  assimilate	  the	  Indian	  people	  in	  all	  respects	  with	  the	  other	  inhabitants	  of	  the	  Dominion	  as	  speedily	  as	  they	  are	  fit	  to	  change”	  (Hanson,	  2009).	  	   6	  The	  act	  banned	  traditional	  Indian	  gatherings,	  prevented	  Indians	  from	  holding	  land	  and	  owning	  a	  business	  and	  forced	  their	  children	  to	  attend	  Christian	  schools	  away	  from	  their	  parents	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  Haida	  pursued	  legal	  action	  against	  the	  government	  for	  years	  but	  the	  department	  of	  Indian	  Affairs	  would	  not	  grant	  First	  Nations	  their	  rights	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Tribes	  across	  British	  Columbia	  were	  becoming	  frustrated	  and	  formed	  the	  Allied	  Tribes	  of	  British	  Columbia	  in	  1916,	  in	  an	  attempt	  to	  strengthen	  their	  case	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  In	  1927,	  after	  years	  of	  lobbying	  and	  protesting	  The	  Special	  Committee	  of	  the	  House	  of	  Commons	  agreed	  to	  oversee	  the	  case	  for	  recognition	  of	  Aboriginal	  title	  in	  Haida	  Gwaii	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  This	  resulted	  in	  not	  only	  a	  rejection	  of	  the	  case	  but	  an	  amendment	  to	  the	  Indian	  Act	  that	  prohibited	  First	  Nations	  from	  hiring	  lawyers	  in	  order	  to	  prevent	  further	  dispute	  over	  land	  claims	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Over	  the	  next	  25	  years,	  little	  could	  be	  done	  in	  the	  progression	  towards	  First	  Nations	  rights.	  It	  took	  WWII	  ending	  and	  a	  paradigm	  shift	  in	  attitudes	  towards	  First	  Nations	  in	  the	  early	  1950’s	  to	  lead	  to	  the	  repeal	  of	  the	  amendment	  that	  prevented	  First	  Nations	  from	  disputing	  land	  claims	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  This	  coincided	  with	  the	  start	  of	  the	  environmental	  movement	  in	  North	  America,	  bringing	  renewed	  energy	  to	  the	  conflict	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  During	  this	  period	  in	  time,	  the	  large	  forestry	  corporations	  such	  as	  Rayonier	  were	  logging	  at	  huge	  scales	  on	  the	  island,	  displacing	  local	  Haida	  people	  and	  their	  businesses	  such	  as	  fishing	  and	  boat	  building.	  (Takeda,	  2015)	  The	  Haida	  were	  frustrated	  with	  their	  lack	  of	  decision-­‐making	  power	  on	  their	  own	  land.	  Consequently,	  when	  logging	  began	  to	  intensify	  on	  Moresby	  Island	  and	  Burnaby	  Island,	  the	  Islands	  Protection	  Committee	  was	  formed.	  The	  committee	  was	  made	  up	  of	  Haida	  and	  non-­‐Haida	  islanders,	  and	  was	  the	  first	  of	  its	  kind	  in	  the	  battle	  for	  the	  	   7	  Haida	  islands	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  	  The	  Islands	  Protection	  Committee	  lobbied	  against	  the	  government	  for	  more	  environmental	  protection,	  and	  the	  creation	  of	  a	  wilderness	  area.	  	  The	  government	  refused,	  stating	  they	  were	  still	  planning	  on	  logging	  Lyell	  Island	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Unfazed,	  the	  committee	  continued	  lobbying	  for	  increased	  protection	  and	  criticized	  licensees	  for	  their	  poor	  management	  strategies.	  This	  began	  to	  raise	  public	  awareness	  of	  environmental	  degradation	  in	  the	  region	  and	  in	  response	  the	  government	  created	  the	  Public	  Advisory	  Committee	  in	  1977	  to	  oversee	  logging	  operations	  on	  the	  islands	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  Public	  Advisory	  Committee	  concluded	  that	  Lyell	  Island	  was	  being	  over	  harvested	  by	  30%,	  primarily	  by	  Rayonier	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  Ministry	  of	  Forests	  ignored	  these	  results	  and	  planned	  to	  renew	  Rayonier’s	  tree	  farm	  license	  two	  years	  later.	  The	  Island	  Protections	  Committee	  filed	  a	  petition,	  encouraging	  the	  Ministry	  of	  Forestry	  to	  conduct	  a	  full	  public	  enquiry	  before	  renewing	  the	  license	  to	  TFL	  24	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  government	  rejected	  the	  petition	  as	  the	  renewal	  had	  not	  occurred	  yet	  but	  stated	  that	  petitioners	  should	  be	  consulted	  before	  the	  renewal	  occurred.	  The	  consultation	  was	  successful	  but	  the	  government	  didn’t	  accept	  any	  of	  the	  changes	  that	  the	  Island	  Protection	  Committee	  proposed	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  	  Logging	  continued	  on	  Lyell	  Island	  and	  as	  a	  last	  ditch	  effort	  to	  save	  their	  land,	  the	  Island	  Protection	  Committee	  organized	  a	  blockade	  at	  Sedgwick	  Bay	  and	  Windy	  Bay	  on	  Lyell	  Island	  in	  1985	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Western	  Forest	  Products,	  who	  had	  recently	  bought	  the	  license	  from	  Rayonier,	  was	  granted	  an	  injunction	  from	  the	  government,	  which	  led	  to	  the	  arrests	  of	  many	  Haida	  elders	  participating	  in	  the	  blockade	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  arrests	  were	  broadcast	  across	  the	  country,	  and	  raised	  support	  for	  the	  Haida	  among	  the	  Canadian	  public	  	   8	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  This	  pressured	  the	  government	  into	  creating	  The	  South	  Moresby	  National	  Park	  Reserve,	  located	  on	  the	  southern	  part	  of	  Moresby	  Island	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  park	  pleased	  the	  Haida	  but	  they	  still	  wanted	  their	  rights	  acknowledged	  by	  the	  government,	  which	  it	  continued	  to	  refuse.	  Negotiations	  went	  on	  for	  5	  years	  before	  the	  Gwaii	  Haanas	  Agreement	  was	  signed	  between	  the	  Council	  of	  the	  Haida	  Nation	  and	  the	  government	  in	  1993	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  The	  Agreement	  stated	  that	  the	  newly	  named	  Gwaii	  Haanas	  National	  Park	  Reserve	  and	  Haida	  Heritage	  Site	  were	  to	  be	  co-­‐managed	  with	  priority	  given	  to	  Aboriginal	  rights,	  allowing	  the	  Haida	  to	  hunt	  and	  fish	  in	  the	  park	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  	  In	  1995	  TFL	  39	  was	  replaced	  without	  consulting	  the	  Haida,	  even	  though	  the	  court	  encouraged	  the	  Crown	  to	  do	  so	  after	  the	  Haida	  initiated	  litigation	  regarding	  its	  replacement	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  This	  happened	  again	  in	  2000	  after	  MacMillan	  Bloedel	  sold	  the	  rights	  to	  TFL	  39	  to	  Weyerhaeuser.	  The	  Haida	  took	  their	  argument	  to	  the	  BC	  Supreme	  Court	  claiming	  that	  they	  should	  have	  been	  consulted	  and	  accommodated.	  They	  went	  so	  far	  as	  to	  strengthen	  their	  case	  by	  providing	  evidence	  that	  asserted	  their	  title	  on	  the	  islands	  for	  the	  last	  200	  years,	  showing	  that	  they	  had	  to	  be	  consulted	  and	  accommodated	  according	  to	  law	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  The	  case	  would	  take	  4	  years	  to	  resolve.	  	  A	  Time	  of	  Change:	  Bringing	  Power	  to	  the	  Haida	  	  In	  2004,	  The	  Supreme	  Court	  of	  Canada	  found	  that	  the	  government	  did	  not	  adequately	  accommodate	  First	  Nations	  interests	  in	  its	  attempt	  to	  transfer	  the	  rights	  of	  TFL	  39	  from	  	   9	  Weyerhaeuser	  in	  the	  early	  2000’s	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  This	  was	  a	  landmark	  case	  as	  it	  determined	  that	  First	  Nations	  must	  be	  consulted	  even	  when	  title	  has	  not	  been	  granted.	  	  The	  source	  of	  this	  decision	  arises	  from	  a	  necessary	  part	  of	  the,"	  	  “honorable	  reconciliation	  process"	  demanded	  by	  section	  35	  of	  the	  Constitution	  Act,	  1982.	  The	  Crown	  must	  act	  honorably,	  and	  so	  cannot	  simply	  use	  resources	  "as	  it	  chooses,"	  or	  "run	  roughshod	  over	  Aboriginal	  interests."”	  (Constitution	  Act	  1982	  as	  cited	  by	  Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  The	  court	  goes	  on	  to	  further	  strengthen	  its	  argument	  by	  using	  the	  constitution	  to	  prove	  that	  because	  Europeans	  never	  conquered	  the	  Haida	  nation,	  the	  Crown	  has	  a	  duty	  to	  consult	  and	  accommodate	  First	  Nations	  interests.	  This	  also	  comes	  from	  section	  35	  of	  the	  constitution.	  	  Another	  important	  part	  of	  the	  Haida	  case	  was	  that	  the	  court	  determined	  that	  the	  level	  of	  accommodation	  by	  the	  government	  should	  be	  dependent	  on	  the	  strength	  of	  the	  claim	  and	  the	  potential	  impact	  it	  will	  have	  on	  First	  Nations	  interests	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  The	  case	  is	  clear,	  however,	  that	  Aboriginal	  people	  do	  not	  have	  a	  veto	  prior	  to	  final	  proof	  of	  Aboriginal	  Title	  or	  Rights.	  	  The	  court	  stated,	  “Accommodation	  involves	  balancing	  interests.	  The	  government	  is	  subject	  to	  a	  standard	  of	  reasonableness	  in	  this	  balancing	  exercise.”	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  This	  means	  that	  if	  the	  government	  decides	  that	  the	  proposed	  project	  provides	  greater	  rewards	  for	  Canadians	  then	  it	  will	  go	  head	  with	  it	  even	  though	  it	  comes	  at	  the	  expense	  of	  First	  Nations	  interests.	  The	  enormous	  pressure	  created	  by	  the	  blockades	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  and	  mounting	  support	  for	  the	  Haida	  among	  Canadians	  forced	  the	  Canadian	  government	  to	  take	  the	  Haida’s	  needs	  seriously.	  The	  government	  determined	  that	  in	  the	  case	  of	  the	  Haida,	  due	  to	  the	  strength	  of	  their	  claim,	  and	  the	  potential	  impact	  of	  not	  accommodating	  them,	  that	  they	  should	  be	  	   10	  accommodated.	  In	  order	  to	  better	  accommodate	  the	  Haida’s	  interests,	  the	  Haida	  Gwaii	  SLUA	  was	  created	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  It	  was	  developed	  by	  the	  government	  and	  the	  Haida	  people	  to	  generate	  better	  communication	  in	  terms	  of	  creating	  management	  objectives	  and	  land	  use	  zones	  that	  were	  more	  appropriate	  for	  the	  complexities	  of	  managing	  forests	  that	  have	  so	  many	  different	  values	  and	  uses	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  	  The	  SLUA	  had	  two	  objectives.	  	  The	  first	  was	  to	  address	  the	  Haida’s	  land-­‐use	  planning	  process	  recommendations	  promoting	  a	  government-­‐to-­‐government	  relationship	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  This	  was	  important	  for	  the	  Haida,	  as	  their	  previous	  conservation	  objectives	  had	  not	  been	  accommodated	  due	  to	  their	  lack	  of	  political	  power.	  The	  Canadian	  court	  system	  re-­‐distributed	  this	  power	  in	  the	  favor	  of	  the	  Haida,	  allowing	  them	  to	  play	  a	  much	  larger	  role	  in	  the	  decision-­‐making	  process,	  as	  seen	  in	  the	  Canada	  court	  rulings	  on	  the	  matter	  (Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia,	  2004).	  	  The	  second	  objective	  was	  to	  confirm	  strategic	  land-­‐use	  zones	  and	  provide	  a	  framework	  for	  EBM.	  EBM	  is	  defined	  in	  the	  SLUA	  as	  “an	  adaptive,	  systematic	  approach	  to	  managing	  human	  activities,	  that	  seeks	  to	  ensure	  the	  co-­‐existence	  of	  healthy,	  fully	  functioning	  ecosystems	  and	  human	  communities.”	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  While	  this	  definition	  does	  not	  provide	  clarity	  on	  the	  implementation	  of	  EBM,	  it	  defines	  a	  balance	  between	  ecosystems	  and	  human	  communities.	  	  In	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  the	  community	  is	  closely	  tied	  to	  the	  environment,	  especially	  to	  species	  such	  as	  cedar.	  	  Implementing	  EBM	  provides	  a	  platform	  for	  better	  management	  of	  these	  resources.	  This	  is	  demonstrated	  in	  SLUA’s	  management	  objectives,	  which	  have	  criteria	  that	  compensate	  for	  the	  lack	  of	  clarity	  defining	  EBM.	  The	  SLUA	  uses	  objectives,	  indicators	  and	  targets	  to	  establish	  clear	  standard	  on	  how	  to	  manage	  certain	  aspects	  of	  Haida	  Gwaii	  that	  the	  Haida	  people	  and	  the	  government	  deem	  important.	  An	  example	  of	  this	  can	  be	  seen	  with	  	   11	  the	  objective	  “to	  maintain	  the	  natural	  ecological	  function	  of	  high	  value	  fish	  habitat”.	  To	  achieve	  this	  objective	  the	  land	  manager	  must	  have	  a	  measure	  of	  0%	  damage	  with	  the	  indicator	  being	  the	  “percent	  reduction	  in	  the	  natural	  amount	  of	  old	  riparian	  forest	  within	  2.0	  tree	  lengths	  of	  streams,	  lakes,	  wetlands	  and	  estuaries	  classified	  as	  high	  value	  fish	  habitat”	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  By	  having	  defined	  objectives	  and	  targets	  the	  SLUA	  improves	  upon	  traditional	  methods	  by	  allowing	  the	  government	  and	  Haida	  to	  explicitly	  evaluate	  their	  management	  using	  the	  indicators	  provided	  in	  the	  framework	  of	  the	  agreement.	  This	  creates	  accountability	  on	  the	  part	  of	  those	  managing	  the	  forests.	  Important	  management	  objectives	  include	  the	  preservation	  of	  monumental	  cedar	  as	  well	  as	  many	  cedar	  species	  such	  as	  western	  red	  cedar	  and	  yellow	  cedar	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  Other	  objectives	  consist	  of	  terrestrial	  and	  aquatic	  habitat	  protection	  and	  the	  protection	  of	  biodiversity	  on	  the	  islands.	  (SLUA,	  2007).	  These	  are	  important	  steps	  forward	  in	  accommodating	  the	  Haida’s	  management	  objectives.	  	  In	  the	  past,	  management	  objectives	  have	  not	  been	  as	  stringent,	  as	  is	  clear	  in	  the	  comparison	  of	  fish	  habitat	  management.	  FRPA	  states:	  “An	  authorized	  person	  who	  carries	  out	  a	  primary	  forest	  activity	  must	  conduct	  the	  primary	  forest	  activity	  at	  a	  time	  and	  in	  a	  manner	  that	  is	  unlikely	  to	  harm	  fish	  or	  destroy,	  damage	  or	  harmfully	  alter	  fish	  habitat.”	  (FRPA,	  2002)	  This	  is	  a	  stark	  comparison	  of	  the	  SLUA’s	  previous	  mention	  of	  fish	  habitat	  as	  the	  SLUA	  states	  that	  there	  must	  be	  protected	  areas	  instead	  of	  saying	  that	  fish	  must	  try	  be	  protected.	  This	  is	  just	  one	  example	  of	  a	  change	  from	  results-­‐based	  management	  to	  practice-­‐based	  management	  taking	  place	  on	  the	  island.	  	  After	  the	  SLUA	  was	  created	  in	  2007,	  the	  government	  continued	  towards	  reconciliation	  with	  	   12	  the	  Kunst’aa	  guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol.	  This	  translates	  into	  “the	  beginning”.	  It	  has	  many	  objectives,	  but	  its	  most	  important	  was	  the	  creation	  of	  the	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Management	  Council	  (HGMC).	  Its	  focus	  on	  joint	  decision-­‐making	  is	  evident	  with	  the	  council	  consisting	  of	  two	  people	  from	  the	  Haida	  tribe	  and	  two	  government	  employees.	  The	  council	  is	  overseen	  by	  a	  chairperson	  who	  is	  approved	  by	  both	  parties.	  If	  the	  two	  parties	  cannot	  come	  to	  a	  consensus	  on	  a	  given	  decision,	  it	  is	  the	  chairperson’s	  responsibility	  to	  make	  a	  decision	  (Ministry	  of	  Aboriginal	  Relations	  and	  Reconciliation,	  2009).	  The	  main	  purpose	  of	  the	  HGMC	  is	  to	  oversee	  the	  implementation	  of	  the	  SLUA	  and	  its	  objectives.	  Other	  purposes	  include:	  determining	  the	  AAC	  for	  the	  Haida	  management	  area	  (not	  including	  federal	  reserves,	  municipalities	  and	  fee	  simple	  lands),	  approving	  management	  plans	  and	  developing	  policies	  and	  standards	  for	  identifying	  conservation	  and	  heritage	  sites	  (Kunst’aa	  Guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol,	  2009).	  The	  decisions	  that	  the	  HGMC	  make	  on	  resource	  use	  will	  be	  passed	  along	  to	  a	  “solutions	  table”,	  with	  members	  of	  the	  government	  and	  the	  Haida	  nation	  (Kunst’aa	  Guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol,	  2009).	  The	  solutions	  table	  is	  responsible	  for	  working	  with	  stakeholders	  to	  implement	  and	  support	  the	  HGMC’s	  decisions	  in	  an	  operational	  environment	  (Ministry	  of	  Aboriginal	  Relations	  and	  Reconciliation,	  2009).	  This	  joint	  decision-­‐making	  process	  creates	  a	  more	  efficient	  environment	  to	  create	  policy	  and	  implement	  the	  SLUA.	  	  New	  AAC	  In	  2012	  the	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Management	  Council	  (HGMC)	  determined	  the	  Annual	  Allowable	  Cut	  (AAC)	  to	  be	  929	  000	  cubic	  meters	  for	  all	  commercial	  harvesting	  in	  the	  Haida	  management	  area	  (Ministry	  of	  Forests,	  Lands	  and	  Natural	  Resource	  Operations,	  2012).	  This	  was	  the	  first	  time	  that	  anyone	  other	  than	  the	  province’s	  chief	  forester	  had	  made	  the	  	   13	  decision,	  and	  a	  lot	  of	  preparation	  went	  into	  making	  the	  final	  determination.	  A	  timber	  supply	  review	  was	  conducted	  prior	  to	  the	  determination,	  which	  encompassed	  the	  entire	  Haida	  Gwaii	  area.	  The	  Joint	  Haida-­‐BC	  Technical	  Working	  Group	  (JTWG)	  then	  did	  a	  timber	  supply	  analysis.	  The	  working	  group	  was	  made	  up	  of	  members	  from	  the	  Council	  of	  Haida	  Nation	  as	  well	  as	  the	  BC	  Ministry	  of	  Forests,	  Lands	  and	  Natural	  Resources	  Operations	  (MFLNRO).	  In	  this	  analysis,	  a	  “base	  case”	  was	  established:	  “an	  initial	  harvest	  level	  of	  895,266	  cubic	  meters	  per	  year	  is	  possible	  and	  can	  be	  maintained	  for	  80	  years	  before	  rising	  to	  a	  long-­‐term	  sustainable	  level	  of	  923,558	  cubic	  meters	  per	  year”	  (Timber	  Supply	  Review,	  2012).	  The	  purpose	  of	  the	  review	  was	  to	  minimize	  timber	  shortages	  in	  the	  future	  and	  keep	  a	  steady	  supply	  of	  wood	  to	  feed	  mills.	  	  The	  recommendation	  was	  used	  to	  provide	  an	  idea	  of	  the	  amount	  that	  can	  be	  harvested	  to	  maximize	  long	  term	  sustainable	  yield,	  not	  as	  a	  recommendation	  of	  the	  AAC.	  	  These	  results,	  as	  well	  as	  others,	  were	  summarized	  in	  a	  public	  discussion	  paper	  that	  had	  a	  45-­‐day	  review	  period	  allowing	  members	  of	  the	  public	  to	  provide	  input	  on	  the	  decision	  and	  how	  it	  would	  affect	  them.	  	  The	  AAC	  rational	  provides	  a	  lot	  of	  insight	  into	  the	  decision-­‐making	  process	  behind	  the	  determination.	  Management	  on	  the	  island	  has	  changed	  greatly	  with	  the	  decision	  to	  allow	  the	  HGMC	  to	  oversee	  land	  management	  on	  the	  islands.	  	  Nowhere	  is	  this	  more	  evident	  than	  in	  the	  significant	  fall	  of	  47.8%	  of	  the	  AAC.	  (Ministry	  of	  Forests,	  Lands	  and	  Natural	  Resource	  Operations,	  2012).	  Much	  of	  this	  change	  has	  come	  from	  the	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Land	  Use	  Objectives	  Order,	  which	  defines	  how	  forestry	  is	  to	  be	  practiced	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  	  New	  Players	  Another	  momentous	  change	  due	  to	  the	  Haida’s	  empowerment	  was	  the	  introduction	  of	  Taan	  	   14	  Forest,	  a	  Haida	  owned	  forestry	  company	  that	  is	  a	  subsidiary	  of	  the	  Haida	  Enterprise	  Corporation	  (Haico).	  Haico	  is	  a	  corporation	  that	  develops	  resources	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  with	  the	  intention	  of	  providing	  jobs	  for	  the	  Haida	  people.	  (Hamilton,	  2012)	  The	  word	  “taan”	  translates	  to	  “bear”	  in	  Haida,	  and	  is	  significant	  as	  the	  Haida	  people	  have	  a	  close	  spiritual	  relationship	  with	  bears.	  The	  name	  is	  a	  metaphor	  for	  the	  goals	  of	  the	  company,	  which	  are,	  “to	  maximize	  the	  benefits	  from	  the	  forest	  resource	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  and	  for	  the	  Haida	  Nation.	  Specifically,	  manage	  for	  long	  term	  sustainability,	  increase	  the	  number	  of	  local	  logging	  and	  manufacturing	  jobs	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii,	  extract	  the	  best	  value	  possible	  from	  the	  areas	  harvested,	  and	  manage	  the	  business	  prudently	  and	  effectively”(Taan	  Forest,	  2012).	  Taan	  manages	  TFL	  60,	  formerly	  TFL	  39,	  which	  was	  owned	  by	  Western	  Forest	  Products.	  It	  was	  purchased	  from	  Western	  Forest	  Products	  for	  $10,000,000,	  using	  funds	  given	  to	  the	  Haida	  nation	  as	  a	  result	  of	  the	  Kunst’aa	  guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol	  (Hamilton,	  2012).	  TFL	  60	  is	  121	  787	  ha	  with	  a	  timber	  harvesting	  land	  base	  of	  52,218	  ha.	  It	  is	  mainly	  situated	  on	  Graham	  Island	  with	  minor	  sections	  located	  on	  Louise	  Island	  and	  Moresby	  Island.	  AAC	  for	  TFL	  60	  is	  340	  000	  cubic	  meters,	  of	  which	  the	  contribution	  of	  red	  and	  yellow	  cedar	  should	  not	  exceed	  on	  average,	  about	  133,000	  cubic	  meters.	  The	  main	  communities	  associated	  and	  contained	  within	  the	  TFL	  are	  Skidegate,	  Port	  Clements,	  Sandspit,	  Masset	  and	  Queen	  Charlotte	  City.	  	  The	  transfer	  of	  TFL	  60	  to	  Taan	  Forest	  Products	  stands	  to	  benefit	  the	  Haida	  people.	  In	  the	  past,	  companies	  who	  held	  the	  land,	  like	  Western	  Forest	  Products	  and	  Weyerhaeuser,	  were	  large	  companies,	  and	  therefore	  their	  work	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  was	  a	  small	  part	  of	  their	  business.	  They	  hired	  workers	  from	  all	  over	  British	  Columbia,	  resulting	  in	  workers	  being	  imported	  from	  other	  regions	  of	  the	  province.	  Raw	  logs,	  on	  the	  other	  hand,	  were	  being	  	   15	  exported	  from	  the	  islands,	  as	  many	  large	  companies	  were	  tied	  to	  mills	  in	  the	  Greater	  Vancouver	  area	  as	  well	  as	  southern	  Vancouver	  Island.	  In	  2006,	  over	  95%	  of	  timber	  harvested	  on	  the	  island	  was	  produced	  off-­‐island	  (HGMC,	  2013)	  The	  export	  of	  jobs	  created	  a	  major	  strain	  on	  relations	  between	  the	  Haida	  and	  the	  major	  licensees,	  as	  they	  were	  not	  only	  logging	  on	  their	  traditional	  land,	  but	  they	  were	  not	  providing	  ample	  opportunity	  for	  employment	  of	  the	  Haida	  people.	  	  The	  evidence	  can	  be	  seen	  in	  the	  21%	  decline	  in	  working	  age	  adults	  between	  1996	  and	  2011	  (HGMC,	  2013).	  Many	  left	  the	  island	  to	  find	  better	  employment	  opportunities,	  creating	  a	  positive	  feedback	  loop	  with	  fewer	  working	  families,	  and	  therefore	  fewer	  children.	  Social	  services	  and	  schooling	  were	  reduced,	  making	  it	  harder	  to	  attract	  people	  to	  stay	  there,	  resulting	  in	  more	  families	  leaving	  (Haida	  Gwaii	  Management	  Council,	  2013).	  Taan	  aims	  to	  end	  this	  trend	  through	  providing	  meaningful	  employment	  opportunities	  to	  the	  Haida	  people	  (Taan	  Forest,	  2012).	  Unlike	  larger	  companies,	  it	  is	  not	  tied	  to	  any	  larger	  mills,	  and	  due	  to	  the	  fact	  that	  it	  controls	  almost	  half	  of	  the	  AAC	  on	  the	  island	  (Ministry	  of	  Forests,	  Lands	  and	  Natural	  Resource	  Operations,	  2012),	  it	  is	  in	  a	  position	  to	  have	  a	  significant	  impact	  on	  the	  future	  of	  logging	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  	   	  Conclusion:	  The	  road	  to	  co-­‐management	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii	  has	  been	  long	  and	  filled	  with	  conflict.	  The	  Haida	  have	  had	  to	  deal	  with	  many	  setbacks,	  from	  the	  restrictions	  of	  the	  Indian	  Act,	  to	  the	  arrests	  of	  over	  100	  band	  members	  in	  the	  blockades	  on	  Lyell	  Island	  (Takeda,	  2015).	  Through	  the	  entire	  process,	  the	  Haida	  have	  shown	  that	  they	  will	  do	  whatever	  it	  takes	  to	  achieve	  not	  only	  what	  they	  feel	  they	  deserve,	  but	  also	  what	  they	  feel	  they	  are	  responsible	  to	  	   16	  do	  as	  stewards	  of	  the	  Haida	  islands	  for	  thousands	  of	  years.	  Though	  it	  has	  not	  come	  easy,	  they	  have	  been	  able	  to	  realize	  their	  goal	  of	  having	  their	  voice	  heard.	  	  With	  the	  introduction	  of	  HGMC,	  they	  have	  been	  able	  to	  reduce	  the	  AAC	  and	  make	  meaningful	  decisions	  on	  their	  land	  base;	  something	  their	  community	  has	  fought	  to	  do	  for	  over	  a	  century.	  References:	  	  Canadian	  Wildlife	  Service.	  (2002).	  Lessons	  from	  the	  Islands.	  Environment	  Canada,	  Ottawa.	  	  Forest	  and	  Range	  Practices	  Act	  (2002,	  c-­‐C69).	  Retrieved	  from	  BC	  Laws	  website:	  http://www.bclaws.ca/Recon/document/ID/freeside/00_02069_01	  	  Gowgaia	  Institute.	  (2007).	  Forest	  Economy	  Trends	  and	  Economic	  Conditions	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  British	  Columbia,	  Queen	  Charlotte	  Islands.  Haida	  Gwaii	  Management	  Council.	  (2013).	  A	  Discussion	  Paper.	  British	  Columbia:	  Haida	  Gwaii	  	  Haida	  Gwaii	  Strategic	  Land	  Use	  Agreement,	  2007,	  Council	  of	  the	  Haida	  Nation	  –	  Government	  of	  British	  Columbia.	  	  	  Haida	  Nation	  v.	  British	  Columbia	  (Minister	  of	  Forests),	  SCC	  73	  (2004).	  	  	   17	  Hamilton,	  G.	  (2012,	  February	  17).	  Taan	  Forest	  rising	  as	  the	  new	  face	  of	  logging	  industry	  on	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  The	  Vancouver	  Sun.	  Retrieved	  January	  23,	  2015,	  from	  http://www.vancouversun.com/business/Taan	  Forest	  rising	  face	  logging	  industry	  Haida	  Gwaii/6171572/story.html	  	  Hanson,	  E.	  (2009).	  The	  Indian	  Act.	  Indigenous	  Foundations.	  Retrieved	  Jan	  1,	  2015	  from	  http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/government-­‐policy/the-­‐indian-­‐act.html	  	  Hume,	  M.	  (2014,	  October	  29).	  Underwater	  discovery	  near	  Haida	  Gwaii	  could	  rewrite	  human	  history.	  Retrieved	  January	  31,	  2015,	  from	  	  	  Joint	  Technical	  Working	  Group.	  (2012).	  Timber	  Supply	  Analysis	  Report.	  Retrieved	  November	  20,	  2014	  from:	  https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hts/tsa/tsa25/	  	  	  Keller,	  J.	  (2014,	  June	  30).	  Underwater	  researchers	  explore	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  Retrieved	  December	  29,	  2015,	  from	  http://metronews.ca/news/victoria/1082553/underwater-­‐researchers-­‐explore-­‐haida-­‐gwaii/	  	  Kunst’aa	  Guu	  –	  Kunst’aayah	  Reconciliation	  Protocol,	  Haida	  Nation	  –	  British	  Columbia,	  2009.	  	  Lee,	  L.	  	  2015.	  People,	  Land	  &	  Sea:	  Environmental	  Governance	  On	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  Simon	  Fraser	  University.	  Burnaby,	  BC.	  	  	   18	  Ministry	  of	  Aboriginal	  Relations	  and	  Reconciliation.	  (2009).	  B.C.	  and	  Haida	  Achieve	  Historic	  Reconciliation	  Protocol	  [Press	  release].	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2009-­‐2013/2009PREM0079-­‐000754.htm	  	  Ministry	  of	  Forests,	  Lands	  and	  Natural	  Resource	  Operations.	  (2012)	  Rationale	  for	  Allowable	  Annual	  Cut	  (AAC)	  Determinations	  for	  Tree	  Farm	  License	  58,	  Tree	  Farm	  License	  60,	  and	  Timber	  Supply	  Area	  25.	  Victoria,	  BC.	  	  Our	  Islands.	  (2013).	  Retrieved	  March	  31,	  2015,	  from	  http://www.gohaidagwaii.ca/our-­‐islands/natural_history	  	  Taan	  Forest.	  (2012).	  Corporate	  Sustainability	  Statement	  [Press	  release]	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.taanforest.com/index.php?page=protecting-­‐our-­‐land	  	  Takeda,	  L.	  (2015).	  War	  in	  the	  Woods:	  1974-­‐2001.	  In	  Islands'	  spirit	  rising:	  Reclaiming	  the	  forests	  of	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  Vancouver,	  British	  Columbia:	  UBC	  Press.	  	  White,	  F.	  (2006).	  Was	  New	  Spain	  Really	  First?:	  Rereading	  Juan	  Perez's	  1774	  Expedition	  to	  Haida	  Gwaii.	  The	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Native	  Studies	  26	  (1):	  1-­‐24.	  	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0075604/manifest

Comment

Related Items