UBC Undergraduate Research

The evolution of aerial imaging Lee, Jordan Apr 20, 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Lee_Jordan_FRST_497_2015.pdf [ 453.49kB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0075601.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0075601-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0075601-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0075601-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0075601-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0075601-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0075601-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0075601-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0075601.ris

Full Text

	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   1	  	  	  The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	   Jordan	  Lee	  	  The	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia	  	  FRST	  497	  	  	  April	  20,	  2015	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   2	  	  	  	  Abstract	  .......................................................................................................................	  4	  	  	  Introduction:	  ................................................................................................................	  4	  	  	  How	  the	  Forestry	  Sector	  Uses	  Imaging	  .........................................................................	  7	  	  	  How	  Digital	  and	  Analog	  Imaging	  Differ	  .......................................................................	  10	  	  	  The	  Future	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  in	  the	  Forestry	  Sector	  ....................................................	  13	  	  	  Conclusion	  .................................................................................................................	  16	  	  	  References:	  ................................................................................................................	  18	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   3	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   4	  Abstract	  	  	   The	  advent	  of	  photography	  has	  altered	  how	  many	  people	  around	  the	  world	  complete	  a	  task	  or	  frame	  their	  memories.	  The	  ability	  to	  frame	  an	  image	  and	  preserve	  it	  to	  be	  analyzed	  in	  another	  time	  has	  evolved	  over	  the	  years	  and	  the	  forestry	  sector	  itself	  has	  see	  the	  wide	  spectrum	  of	  technology	  flow	  through	  it.	  Aerial	  film	  photography	  was	  the	  paramount	  and	  technological	  marvel	  that	  allowed	  foresters	  to	  view	  a	  landscape	  from	  a	  vantage	  point	  that	  gave	  a	  plethora	  of	  information	  that	  could	  be	  used	  to	  make	  appropriate	  management	  plans.	  However,	  as	  time	  elapsed,	  digital	  imaging	  with	  the	  use	  of	  digital	  sensors	  allowed	  images	  to	  be	  stored	  on	  hard	  disk	  drives	  to	  be	  viewed	  electronically	  rather	  than	  having	  to	  be	  developed	  and	  processed.	  This	  rapidly	  sped	  up	  turn	  over	  time	  and	  coincidently	  allowed	  researchers	  to	  save	  time	  and	  money	  capturing	  the	  same	  images	  from	  film.	  The	  timing	  however	  was	  overlapped	  and	  it	  took	  much	  advancement	  in	  digital	  imaging	  to	  produce	  the	  same	  results	  as	  film	  photography	  with	  regards	  to	  resolution	  and	  sharpness.	  The	  introduction	  of	  LIDAR	  opens	  up	  a	  whole	  new	  complimentary	  perspective	  on	  aerial	  imaging	  due	  to	  its	  ability	  to	  scan	  the	  landscape	  with	  speed	  while	  outputting	  quantitative	  data.	  LIDAR	  works	  congruently	  with	  aerial	  photography	  and	  this	  ability	  to	  hybridize	  maps	  using	  LIDAR	  data	  gives	  a	  new	  dimension	  to	  how	  they	  can	  be	  viewed	  graphically.	  	  Introduction:	  	   Photography	  has	  shaped	  how	  we	  perceive	  the	  forestry	  sector	  as	  a	  whole.	  It	  has	  allowed	  us	  to	  research	  and	  document	  changes	  from	  an	  aerial	  perspective	  that	  otherwise	  would	  be	  impossible	  to	  survey	  from	  traditional	  ground	  methods.	  The	  advent	  of	  aerial	  imaging	  is	  a	  revolutionary	  surveying	  method	  as	  it	  encompasses	  a	  field	  of	  view	  that	  aids	  in	  the	  changes	  of	  landscape,	  pest	  management,	  hydrological	  shifts,	  and	  road	  or	  transportation	  layout.	  The	  ability	  to	  see	  a	  landscape	  from	  a	  “birds	  eye	  view”	  can	  prove	  to	  be	  invaluable	  when	  researching	  a	  landscape.	  Aerial	  photography	  has	  gone	  through	  many	  shifts	  with	  regards	  to	  technology	  in	  the	  past	  fifty	  years.	  The	  use	  of	  film	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   5	  photography	  pioneered	  how	  images	  were	  archived	  and	  reviewed	  when	  cameras	  were	  used	  to	  capture	  stands	  from	  mountaintops	  and	  subsequently	  airplanes	  shortly	  after.	  Gaspar	  Tournachon	  took	  the	  first	  aerial	  photograph	  in	  1858	  in	  a	  hot-­‐air	  balloon	  over	  France	  (Professional	  Aerial	  Photographers	  Association,	  2015).	  	  This	  in	  turn,	  sparked	  a	  shift	  into	  how	  efficient	  and	  reliable	  aerial	  photography	  was	  as	  the	  imaging	  was	  first-­‐hand	  and	  instantaneous,	  pending	  development.	  Prior	  to	  the	  invention	  of	  photographing	  while	  during	  flight,	  tasks	  were	  conducted	  by	  drawing	  sketches	  while	  flying	  or	  ballooning	  (Professional	  Aerial	  Photographers	  Association,	  2015).	  This	  of	  course	  posed	  an	  issue	  with	  accuracy	  and	  feasibility.	  An	  unstable	  flight	  increased	  the	  possibility	  of	  error	  due	  to	  the	  shifting	  of	  the	  recording	  medium	  and	  subsequent	  light	  reaching	  the	  film	  causing	  a	  blurry	  image.	  It	  was	  not	  until	  1909,	  when	  the	  Wright	  brothers	  took	  the	  first	  aerial	  photograph	  from	  an	  airplane	  itself.	  This	  was	  crucial	  during	  World	  War	  I	  as	  it	  gave	  the	  added	  benefit	  of	  reconnaissance	  over	  the	  opposing	  forces	  base	  and	  footholds.	  (Professional	  Aerial	  Photographers	  Association,	  2015).	  The	  obstruction	  still	  existed	  however	  of	  achieving	  consistent	  results	  that	  was	  replicable	  and	  accurate.	  Shutter	  systems	  were	  not	  as	  advanced	  as	  they	  are	  today	  and	  this	  caused	  images	  to	  be	  blurry	  as	  the	  exposure	  times	  were	  too	  long.	   	  	  Film	  was	  a	  revolutionary	  tool	  used	  and	  vital	  for	  aerial	  imaging,	  the	  resolution	  and	  sharpness	  was	  paramount	  for	  it's	  time	  and	  specific	  film	  types	  were	  invented	  solely	  for	  aerial	  photography.	  As	  technology	  evolved,	  the	  digital	  realm	  began	  to	  take	  over	  the	  market	  share	  of	  film	  and	  soon	  enough	  the	  race	  for	  megapixels	  began.	  Digital	  had	  several	  advantages	  over	  film.	  The	  ease	  of	  use	  and	  ability	  to	  view	  images	  instantly	  greatly	  increased	  the	  efficiency.	  Any	  saved	  time	  while	  using	  aircraft	  meant	  money	  saved	  in	  the	  long	  run	  and	  digital	  aided	  with	  this.	  The	  digital	  files	  allowed	  images	  to	  be	  reproduced	  quickly	  but	  the	  sensors	  used	  did	  not	  match	  the	  quality	  in	  resolution	  and	  latitude.	  Film	  was	  slowly	  phased	  out	  during	  this	  transitional	  period	  where	  digital	  reigned	  supreme	  in	  many	  commercial	  scenarios.	  It	  was	  not	  until	  manufacturers	  such	  as	  Canon	  and	  Nikon	  released	  their	  "Full	  Frame"	  digital	  SLR	  offerings	  in	  the	  early	  to	  middle	  2000’s	  that	  the	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   6	  megapixel	  count	  could	  rival	  and	  surpass	  film.	  Film	  and	  digital	  photography	  has	  allowed	  the	  forest	  industry	  to	  see	  stereographic	  images,	  these	  images	  can	  be	  viewed	  with	  special	  glasses	  that	  give	  the	  perspective	  of	  3D	  images.	  This	  becomes	  incredibly	  useful	  when	  comparing	  heights,	  and	  distinguishing	  different	  tree	  species	  in	  a	  stand.	  The	  advancements	  in	  technology	  has	  now	  led	  us	  to	  develop	  LIDAR	  systems,	  models	  created	  by	  measuring	  the	  amount	  of	  light	  reflected	  after	  it	  has	  been	  scanned	  and	  reflected	  by	  a	  laser.	  Similar	  to	  how	  an	  electron	  microscope	  operates,	  this	  new	  technology	  gives	  incredible	  amounts	  of	  detail	  and	  precision.	  The	  imaging	  sector	  has	  vastly	  increased	  the	  amount	  of	  useable	  tooling	  that	  the	  forestry	  sector	  uses	  to	  the	  fullest	  extent.	  By	  applying	  technology	  from	  the	  past	  and	  the	  future	  we've	  centered	  ourselves	  in	  a	  place	  in	  time	  where	  satellite	  imaging	  and	  LIDAR	  systems	  can	  be	  used	  to	  measure	  foliage	  and	  heights	  with	  great	  speed	  and	  precision	  to	  help	  create	  management	  plans	  that	  are	  efficient.	  	  The	  Rise	  of	  Film	  Film	  was	  invented	  in	  the	  late	  19th	  century	  as	  a	  means	  to	  share	  images	  or	  moving	  images	  to	  the	  masses.	  Film	  in	  this	  early	  age	  proved	  to	  be	  very	  insensitive	  to	  light,	  which	  caused	  it	  to	  react	  slowly	  (History	  of	  Kodak,	  2015).	  Low	  sensitivity	  film	  made	  shooting	  in	  dark	  scenes	  impossible	  and	  the	  mechanism	  which	  controls	  the	  amount	  of	  light	  being	  let	  on	  the	  film,	  called	  the	  shutter,	  had	  to	  be	  kept	  open	  for	  extended	  periods	  at	  a	  time	  just	  to	  frame	  a	  properly	  exposed	  image.	  Kodak	  made	  using	  film	  a	  much	  easier	  process,	  from	  purchasing	  ready	  to	  use	  film	  down	  to	  the	  processing	  (History	  of	  Kodak,	  2015).	  During	  Kodak's	  lifetime,	  journalists	  and	  hobbyists	  have	  shot	  its	  film	  stocks	  all	  over	  the	  world.	  As	  the	  digital	  age	  began	  to	  take	  over	  the	  market	  share,	  Kodak	  was	  forced	  to	  fall	  into	  a	  massive	  downturn	  and	  was	  not	  able	  to	  cope	  with	  the	  drastic	  loss	  in	  sales	  as	  the	  years	  passed.	  Their	  attempts	  to	  mitigate	  damage	  by	  adopting	  digital	  technology	  was	  insufficient	  as	  their	  products	  never	  stood	  up	  to	  the	  major	  players	  at	  the	  time.	  Photo	  labs	  around	  the	  world	  slowly	  had	  to	  discontinue	  development	  service,	  as	  the	  cost	  of	  chemicals	  and	  paper	  was	  not	  recuperating	  the	  amount	  of	  sales.	  The	  industry	  has	  turned	  into	  a	  very	  niche	  market	  as	  digital	  can	  sometimes	  still	  surpass	  film	  in	  terms	  of	  resolution	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   7	  but	  enthusiasts	  and	  professionals	  alike	  still	  abide	  by	  film	  as	  the	  only	  method	  of	  archival	  imaging.	  Brands	  such	  as	  Fujifilm	  and	  Ilford	  still	  create	  film	  emulsions	  and	  the	  chemical	  development	  liquids	  as	  well	  but	  the	  majority	  of	  their	  products	  are	  tailored	  towards	  the	  hobby	  and	  commercial	  business	  sector.	  	  How	  the	  Forestry	  Sector	  Uses	  Imaging	  	  	  	   “The	  use	  of	  aerial	  photography	  to	  assess	  and	  map	  landscape	  change	  is	  a	  crucial	  element	  of	  ecosystem	  management.	  Aerial	  photographs	  are	  ideal	  for	  mapping	  small	  ecosystems	  and	  fine-­‐scale	  landscape	  features,	  such	  as	  riparian	  areas	  or	  individual	  trees”	  (Fensham	  &	  Fairfax	  2002,	  Tuominen	  &	  Pekkarinen	  2005).	  Aerial	  photography	  is	  recorded	  as	  being	  dated	  back	  as	  far	  as	  the	  1930’s	  and	  this	  allows	  it	  to	  be	  “longest-­‐available”	  complete	  record	  of	  landscape	  change	  in	  areas	  that	  have	  been	  documented	  (Morgan,	  Gergel,	  &	  Coops,	  2010).	  This	  allows	  for	  data	  to	  be	  cross	  referenced	  and	  gives	  insight	  to	  a	  comparison	  of	  previous	  ecological	  change	  which	  can	  prove	  to	  be	  invaluable	  with	  regards	  to	  managing	  an	  area.	  "Aerial	  photographs	  have	  been	  used	  for	  many	  years	  to	  identify	  and	  map	  vegetation,	  to	  measure	  their	  area	  and	  to	  characterize	  form,	  size	  and	  condition	  of	  plants	  and	  communities.	  Four	  types	  of	  film	  are	  commonly	  used:	  black	  and	  white	  panchromatic,	  black	  and	  white	  infra-­‐red,	  color,	  and	  color	  infra-­‐red"	  (Hoffer,	  1984,	  p.	  132).	  Film	  in	  the	  forestry	  sector	  was	  a	  very	  niche	  segment	  in	  many	  manufacturers	  sales.	  "Conventional	  aerial	  photographs	  continue	  to	  be	  the	  major	  source	  of	  remote	  sensing	  data	  used	  in	  natural	  resource	  assessments	  despite	  the	  many	  developments	  in	  digital	  remote	  sensing"	  (Fent,	  Hall,	  &	  Nesby,	  1995).	  Kodak	  created	  a	  film	  emulsion	  named	  Aerochrome	  that	  was	  specific	  for	  land	  surveying	  but	  also	  had	  uses	  in	  the	  Vietnam	  war	  as	  well.	  Since	  the	  IR	  light	  reflecting	  off	  foliage	  would	  turn	  a	  red	  or	  purple	  hue,	  camouflage	  used	  by	  the	  opposing	  forces	  would	  be	  rendered	  a	  dark	  shade	  of	  black	  therefore	  revealing	  enemy	  bases	  and	  camps.	  This	  allowed	  researchers	  to	  quickly	  spot	  areas	  that	  were	  differentiated	  from	  the	  rest	  such	  as	  water	  streams,	  species,	  and	  even	  man-­‐made	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   8	  buildings.	  However,	  IR	  film	  also	  made	  finding	  disturbances	  due	  to	  the	  fact	  that	  it	  was	  much	  easier	  to	  spot	  pest,	  weather,	  and	  disease	  centers.	  Black	  and	  white	  films	  in	  the	  past	  were	  also	  created	  with	  infrared	  emulsions	  but	  spotting	  species	  and	  disturbances	  was	  much	  more	  difficult	  due	  to	  the	  fact	  that	  photographers	  had	  to	  wait	  for	  trees	  to	  defoliate	  or	  discolor	  in	  the	  fall.	  	  	   Normal	  black	  and	  white	  (BW)	  panchromatic	  films	  were	  used	  extensively	  and	  were	  very	  common.	  BW	  films	  hold	  the	  best	  resolution	  and	  with	  this	  "high	  resolution	  makes	  it	  particularly	  useful	  for	  such	  measurements	  as	  heights	  of	  trees	  or	  diameters	  of	  crowns."	  (Hoffer,	  1984,	  p.	  132).	  Higher	  resolution	  allows	  us	  to	  see	  sharper	  shadows	  or	  distinguishing	  light	  characteristics	  to	  better	  allow	  us	  to	  compare	  nearby	  stands.	  BW	  IR	  films	  only	  see	  light	  emitted	  between	  0.7	  to	  0.9µm	  where	  as	  normal	  BW	  range	  is	  between	  0.4	  to	  0.7	  µm.	  Because	  conifers	  and	  deciduous	  trees	  reflect	  different	  wavelengths	  of	  light,	  with	  BW	  IR	  film	  it	  becomes	  obvious	  to	  spot	  the	  different	  types	  of	  trees	  in	  a	  stand.	  (Hoffer,	  1984,	  p.	  133).	  	   	  	   Color	  films	  open	  up	  a	  different	  realm	  of	  photography,	  it	  does	  not	  hold	  the	  highest	  resolution	  but	  makes	  up	  for	  that	  regard	  in	  the	  multiple	  differentiation	  in	  colors	  reproduced	  on	  the	  negative.	  Instead	  of	  viewing	  images	  on	  a	  grey	  scale,	  we	  can	  now	  view	  images	  in	  the	  entire	  visible	  light	  spectrum.	  Because	  of	  this,	  color	  film	  is	  very	  useful	  in	  determining	  specific	  species	  of	  vegetation.	  (Hoffer,	  1984).	  Color	  film	  can	  either	  be	  in	  slide	  (positives)	  or	  print	  (negatives).	  The	  films	  emulsion	  is	  sensitive	  to	  red,	  green,	  and	  blue	  waves	  and	  are	  captured	  as	  the	  light	  passes	  through	  the	  acetate	  (Hoffer,	  1984).	  	  	   The	  figure	  below	  highlights	  some	  of	  the	  issues	  that	  are	  evident	  when	  taking	  aerial	  photographs.	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   9	  	   	  	   Figure	  1:	  Types	  of	  error	  involved	  with	  taking	  aerial	  photographs	  (Aerial	  Photography:	  A	  Rapidly	  Evolving	  Tool	  for	  Ecological	  Management,	  Bioscience	  2010)	  	   	  Lens	  distortion	  is	  a	  source	  of	  systematic	  error	  that	  affects	  all	  photos	  being	  taken.	  Either	  due	  to	  faulty	  equipment	  or	  sub-­‐par	  optics,	  images	  tend	  to	  be	  skewed	  and	  not	  truly	  representative	  of	  their	  actual	  scale	  or	  size	  (Morgan	  et	  al.,	  2010).	  Random	  errors	  that	  occur	  typically	  involve	  the	  camera	  being	  skewed	  off	  axis	  to	  its	  intended	  target	  from	  aircraft	  flight	  stability	  issues.	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   10	  How	  Digital	  and	  Analog	  Imaging	  Differ	  	  The	  technology	  remains	  the	  same	  for	  both	  methods	  of	  photography.	  In	  fact,	  they	  share	  a	  majority	  of	  the	  parts.	  The	  basic	  premise	  of	  a	  camera,	  be	  it	  digital	  or	  analog,	  relies	  on	  a	  lens,	  shutter,	  aperture,	  body,	  and	  recording	  medium.	  The	  lens	  poses	  to	  frame	  the	  image	  and	  do	  so	  while	  maintaining	  the	  highest	  resolution	  possible.	  The	  focal	  length	  of	  the	  lens	  determines	  the	  scale	  to	  which	  the	  image	  is	  recorded.	  A	  shutter	  governs	  the	  amount	  of	  time	  that	  the	  lens	  lets	  in	  to	  expose	  the	  recording	  medium,	  and	  the	  aperture	  controls	  the	  amount	  of	  light	  that	  is	  being	  emitted	  from	  the	  lens.	  The	  recording	  medium	  in	  this	  case	  can	  be	  either	  a	  plane	  of	  film	  that	  is	  picked	  up,	  exposed,	  and	  stored.	  Or	  a	  digital	  sensor	  that	  analyzes	  the	  light,	  records	  which	  red,	  green,	  blue	  sources	  are	  being	  emitted	  (Morgan	  et	  al.,	  2010)	  and	  stores	  this	  information	  on	  a	  hard	  disk	  drive	  in	  a	  series	  of	  zeroes	  and	  ones.	  It	  is	  generally	  regarded	  in	  the	  photography	  hobby	  that	  film	  has	  a	  very	  high	  range	  of	  exposure	  latitude,	  that	  is	  the	  range	  the	  film	  can	  actually	  be	  exposed	  to	  can	  be	  very	  low	  or	  very	  high	  and	  still	  retain	  some	  of	  the	  detail	  before	  becoming	  unrecognizable.	  Digital	  on	  the	  other-­‐hand	  has	  a	  narrow	  range	  and	  requires	  exposure	  to	  be	  very	  precise	  in	  order	  to	  not	  jeopardize	  the	  image.	  Modern	  day	  digital	  cameras	  however	  have	  solved	  this	  bias	  and	  have	  remarkable	  latitude	  ranges.	  The	  only	  difference	  between	  the	  two	  mediums	  is	  how	  the	  light	  is	  recorded	  at	  the	  final	  point.	  When	  digital	  began	  to	  emerge	  in	  the	  aerial	  imaging	  sector,	  it	  became	  vastly	  apparent	  that	  "digital	  form	  bypasses	  the	  added	  expense	  and	  time	  associated	  with	  photographic	  film,	  film	  development,	  and	  scanning.	  Second,	  the	  ability	  to	  preview	  digital	  images	  in	  the	  field	  would	  help	  establish	  the	  optimal	  exposure	  settings	  for	  a	  given	  stand	  and	  sky	  conditions.	  Third,	  image	  processing	  and	  data	  extraction	  could	  occur	  directly	  in	  the	  field,	  this	  creating	  a	  more	  streamlined	  process"	  (Frazer,	  Fournier,	  Trofymow,	  &	  Hall,	  2001).	  Shooting	  in	  digital	  allowed	  proofing	  to	  be	  done	  in	  the	  field	  itself,	  shooting	  film	  would	  sometimes	  delay	  the	  task	  if	  the	  film	  was	  loaded	  improperly	  or	  an	  operator	  error	  mistook	  the	  readings	  from	  the	  light	  meter	  incorrectly.	  With	  digital,	  errors	  could	  be	  spotted	  quickly	  and	  be	  mitigated.	  No	  longer	  did	  companies	  require	  sending	  film	  to	  cities	  if	  the	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   11	  area	  was	  in	  a	  remote	  location	  including	  the	  downtime	  required	  to	  process	  and	  scan	  the	  negatives.	  In	  2001,	  a	  study	  was	  undertaken	  to	  analyze	  the	  differences	  in	  using	  hemispherical	  (fisheye)	  technology	  to	  compare	  the	  differences	  between	  the	  Nikon	  F	  35mm	  Single	  Lens	  Reflex	  (SLR)	  with	  an	  8mm	  fisheye	  lens	  and	  the	  consumer	  grade	  Nikon	  Coolpix	  950.	  Around	  this	  time	  frame,	  the	  digital	  cameras	  were	  beginning	  to	  take	  over	  the	  consumer	  grade	  camera	  segment.	  	  The	  study	  was	  tailored	  towards	  noting	  if	  the	  digital	  sensor	  would	  be	  able	  to	  out	  resolve	  and	  edge	  the	  film	  camera	  with	  its	  limitations	  of	  production	  speed.	  "The	  most	  striking	  visual	  difference	  between	  the	  digital	  and	  film	  canopy	  photographs	  was	  that	  the	  sharpness	  of	  the	  digital	  images	  were	  generally	  poor	  compared	  to	  the	  film	  camera.	  Consequently,	  the	  digital	  photos	  appeared	  blurred,	  and	  many	  of	  the	  fine	  structural	  details	  of	  the	  canopy	  were	  poorly	  defined."	  (Frazer	  et	  al.,	  2001).	  The	  study	  noted	  that	  the	  digital	  images	  were	  suspect	  to	  heavy	  sharpness	  loss	  around	  the	  peripheral	  of	  the	  image	  and	  around	  the	  high	  contrast	  images	  outside	  the	  centre	  bound	  made	  it	  difficult	  to	  gauge	  what	  was	  being	  photographed.	  Chromatic	  aberrations	  were	  clearly	  evident	  that	  caused	  halo-­‐ing	  around	  features	  with	  high	  contrast,	  this	  caused	  abnormal	  blue	  and	  red	  artifacts	  around	  the	  fringes	  of	  contrasting	  parts	  such	  as	  tree	  canopies	  and	  gaps.	  	   	  In	  more	  current	  years	  however,	  the	  transition	  to	  digital	  as	  a	  medium	  has	  become	  the	  only	  method	  of	  aerial	  photography.	  Film	  such	  as	  Kodak's	  Aerochrome	  have	  now	  been	  fully	  discontinued	  and	  the	  only	  remaining	  stock	  is	  typically	  sold	  on	  online	  bidding	  sites.	  Panchromatic	  films	  still	  exist	  today,	  mostly	  made	  by	  Ilford	  and	  Kodak	  but	  the	  IR	  versions	  prove	  to	  be	  difficult	  to	  find.	  Stabilization	  both	  in	  camera	  and	  in	  lens	  has	  greatly	  mitigated	  the	  issue	  of	  blurry	  photographs	  taken	  by	  a	  rough	  exposure.	  The	  sensor	  technology	  in	  digital	  cameras	  today	  is	  much	  more	  advanced	  than	  they	  were	  fifteen	  years	  ago.	  Their	  ability	  to	  have	  high	  megapixel	  counts	  and	  immense	  dynamic	  range	  rival	  film's	  latitude	  but	  do	  so	  with	  incredible	  power	  and	  contrasting	  power.	  Modern	  aged	  lenses	  try	  greatly	  to	  remove	  the	  chromatic	  aberrations	  that	  were	  evident	  on	  older	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   12	  lenses.	  Kodak	  has	  also	  developed	  modern	  aged	  digital	  high	  resolution	  sensors	  alongside	  Nikon	  to	  create	  what	  is	  called	  the	  "Nikon	  N90"	  which	  utilizes	  Kodak's	  DCS460CIR	  sensor.	  (Quackenbush,	  Hopkins,	  &	  Kinn,	  2000).This	  sensor	  mimics	  the	  advantages	  that	  Aerochrome	  gave	  and	  allows	  high	  resolution	  color	  infra-­‐red	  photos	  to	  be	  taken	  digitally.	  "High	  spatial	  resolution	  digital	  aerial	  imagery	  provides	  significant	  advantages	  over	  traditional	  image	  sources.	  However,	  using	  high	  resolution	  imagery	  also	  creates	  many	  challenges"	  (Quackenbush	  et	  al.,	  2000).	  The	  use	  of	  these	  high	  resolution	  images	  makes	  it	  easier	  to	  interpret	  specific	  land	  features	  such	  as	  concrete	  or	  fauna.	  The	  following	  table	  highlights	  the	  benefits	  and	  negatives	  of	  shooting	  on	  either	  medium	  each	  having	  a	  specific	  nature	  that	  may	  or	  may	  be	  suitable	  for	  a	  specific	  task	  undertaken.	  	  	  	   	  Figure	  2:	  Comparisons	  of	  the	  advantages	  and	  disadvantages	  of	  film	  and	  digital	  photography	  (Aerial	  Photography:	  A	  Rapidly	  Evolving	  Tool	  for	  Ecological	  Management.	  Bioscience,	  2010)	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   13	  	   	   	  The	  Future	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  in	  the	  Forestry	  Sector	  	   	  	   In	  more	  current	  years,	  aerial	  imaging	  is	  mostly	  either	  done	  with	  digital	  cameras	  on	  smaller	  projects	  or	  the	  use	  of	  new	  technology	  in	  LIDAR	  (Light	  Detection	  and	  Range).	  LIDAR	  is	  unique	  because	  it	  emits	  laser	  from	  an	  aerial	  source	  to	  which	  the	  time	  is	  recorded	  from	  the	  point	  of	  emission	  to	  receiving.	  This	  allows	  the	  computer	  to	  record	  the	  distances	  on	  a	  plot,	  which	  can	  then	  be	  analyzed	  to	  give	  a	  three-­‐dimension	  representation	  of	  the	  area	  just	  observed.	  LIDAR	  gives	  an	  extremely	  detailed	  point	  of	  view	  of	  the	  land	  base,	  which	  can	  aid	  in	  canopy	  closure,	  height,	  species	  and	  therefore	  biodiversity.	  	  LIDAR	  is	  certainly	  becoming	  one	  of	  the	  more	  up	  and	  coming	  terms	  when	  discussing	  remote	  sensing.	  Its	  ability	  to	  record	  so	  many	  data	  points	  in	  such	  a	  quick	  period	  of	  time	  makes	  it	  efficient	  at	  recording	  spatial	  data	  across	  a	  wide	  platform.	  “Understanding	  canopy	  structure	  is	  critical	  to	  provide	  insights	  into	  functional	  characteristics	  and	  processes	  of	  tree	  growth,	  and	  can	  reveal	  important	  information	  on	  the	  forests’	  response	  to	  disturbance	  at	  the	  individual	  tree,	  stand,	  community,	  and	  ecosystem	  level”	  (Parker	  et	  al.	  2004;	  Rhoads	  et	  al.	  2004).	  It	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  LIDAR	  in	  itself	  is	  complimentary	  to	  aerial	  imaging	  as	  a	  whole.	  It	  offers	  a	  completely	  different	  perspective	  and	  data	  set	  that	  supplements	  what	  aerial	  photography	  can	  offer.	  The	  costs	  carried	  with	  LIDAR	  imaging	  can	  vary	  depending	  on	  the	  amount	  of	  land	  being	  surveyed.	  LIDAR	  can	  also	  be	  fused	  with	  multispectral	  data	  fusion	  to	  give	  an	  even	  better	  representation	  of	  the	  stand.	  "LIDAR	  characteristics,	  such	  as	  high	  sampling	  intensity,	  extensive	  areal	  coverage,	  ability	  to	  penetrate	  beneath	  the	  top	  layer	  of	  the	  canopy,	  precise	  geo-­‐location,	  and	  accurate	  ranging	  measurements,	  make	  airborne	  laser	  systems	  useful	  for	  directly	  assessing	  vegetation	  characteristics."	  (Popescu	  &	  Wynne,	  2004).	  It	  was	  noted	  in	  some	  publications	  however	  that	  due	  to	  the	  laser	  being	  narrowly	  beamed,	  it	  caused	  issues	  with	  being	  able	  to	  detect	  the	  very	  top	  of	  some	  trees.	  This	  caused	  an	  underestimation	  of	  the	  tree	  heights	  being	  recorded.	  Because	  of	  the	  narrow	  beams,	  it	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   14	  becomes	  increasingly	  important	  to	  ensure	  that	  enough	  passes	  are	  flown	  over	  the	  area	  to	  gain	  a	  proper	  representation	  of	  the	  land	  base.	  (Dubaya	  &	  Drake,	  2000).	  	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  3:	  An	  illustration	  showing	  the	  potential	  pitfall	  of	  LIDAR	  sampling.	  (The	  Use	  of	  Airborne	  LiDAR	  and	  Aerial	  Photography	  in	  the	  Estimation	  of	  Individual	  Tree	  Heights	  in	  Forestry.	  Computers	  &	  Geosciences,	  2005)	  	   LIDAR	  does	  suffer	  from	  other	  issues	  as	  well.	  Poor	  weather	  and	  cloud	  conditions	  could	  alter	  the	  laser	  transmission	  causing	  improper	  readings	  (Dubaya	  &	  Drake,	  2000).	  The	  sheer	  absolute	  speed	  of	  being	  able	  to	  account	  for	  vertical	  height	  data	  is	  invaluable	  in	  the	  forestry	  sector	  and	  to	  better	  optimize	  this	  system,	  one	  should	  look	  into	  improving	  the	  pitfalls	  of	  LIDAR.	  LIDAR,	  teamed	  up	  with	  GPS	  acts	  as	  a	  hybrid	  aerial	  photography	  source	  that	  can	  be	  very	  detailed.	  It	  allows	  land	  owners	  to	  gain	  data	  that	  may	  or	  may	  not	  be	  other	  attainable	  due	  to	  the	  conditions	  on	  the	  ground.	  Forestry	  applications	  typically	  have	  2	  types	  of	  LIDAR,	  discrete	  and	  full	  waveform	  LIDAR.	  Discrete	  LIDAR	  records	  a	  few	  recorded	  returns	  per	  pulse	  where	  as	  full	  waveform	  LIDAR	  system	  records	  the	  energy	  returned	  in	  a	  group	  or	  series	  of	  the	  same	  time	  interval	  (Lim,	  Treitz,	  Wulder,	  St-­‐Onge,	  &	  Flood,	  2003).	  LIDAR	  has	  made	  some	  very	  large	  evolutionary	  changes	  over	  the	  past	  few	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   15	  years.	  Changes	  with	  pulse	  repetition	  rates,	  larger	  data	  storage,	  advanced	  positioning	  systems,	  greater	  altitude	  flights	  that	  will	  allow	  a	  wider	  footprint	  to	  observe	  and	  record	  therefore	  reducing	  the	  amount	  of	  flight	  paths	  taken.	  (Lim,	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  	  	   LIDAR	  works	  effectively	  due	  to	  its	  ability	  to	  give	  numerical	  data	  to	  the	  points	  being	  recorded.	  With	  traditional	  photography	  we	  have	  only	  have	  a	  comparison	  between	  what	  is	  tall	  or	  short	  with	  compared	  to	  another	  object.	  But	  with	  LIDAR	  we	  are	  able	  to	  achieve	  quantifiable	  data	  between	  trees	  or	  stands	  that	  are	  differentiated	  (Lovell,	  Jupp,	  Culvenor,	  &	  Coops,	  2003).	  With	  this	  being	  said,	  with	  photography	  on	  the	  ground	  measuring	  forest	  cover,	  a	  typical	  hemispherical	  type	  lens	  recording	  an	  image	  will	  tend	  to	  distort	  and	  bend	  trees	  to	  get	  them	  in	  the	  frame	  therefore	  potentially	  allowing	  a	  false	  representation	  of	  the	  tree	  cover	  due	  to	  the	  silhouette	  being	  compared.	  However,	  with	  LIDAR,	  forest	  cover	  is	  more	  appropriately	  represented	  because	  it	  only	  sees	  straight	  down	  vertically.	  Therefore	  removing	  the	  ability	  to	  confuse	  the	  trunk	  as	  a	  form	  of	  vegetative	  cover	  (Lovell	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  	  It	  is	  interesting	  to	  note	  that	  when	  the	  correlation	  between	  tree	  height	  and	  merchantable	  volume	  was	  calculated,	  LIDAR	  became	  increasingly	  important	  to	  be	  used	  as	  a	  method	  of	  calculating	  stand	  value	  with	  very	  high	  speed.	  This	  serves	  as	  a	  very	  good	  method	  of	  estimating	  the	  rough	  land	  value	  of	  a	  given	  area	  based	  on	  timber	  sales	  alone.	  Studies	  have	  also	  shown	  that	  if	  we	  could	  extrapolate	  the	  data	  from	  the	  intensity	  of	  the	  lasers	  on	  the	  904nm	  wavelength,	  one	  could	  theoretically	  join	  this	  data	  with	  the	  vertical	  heights	  to	  calculate	  the	  specific	  species	  being	  studied	  as	  well.	  In	  other	  words,	  using	  laser	  intensity	  as	  a	  means	  to	  classify	  certain	  ground	  covers	  alongside	  measuring	  stand	  height	  could	  very	  well	  be	  seen	  in	  the	  horizon	  (Lim,	  et	  al.,	  2003).	  With	  that	  technology,	  the	  merger	  of	  other	  technology	  perhaps	  even	  past	  technology	  with	  LIDAR	  is	  possible	  given	  its	  digital	  ability	  to	  be	  correlated	  with	  other	  data	  sets	  to	  make	  a	  hybrid	  data	  set.	  	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   16	  	   	  	  Conclusion	  	  	   Aerial	  imaging	  has	  come	  a	  long	  way	  with	  regards	  to	  technology.	  We've	  seen	  the	  practical	  uses	  from	  film	  flourish	  and	  subsequently	  falter.	  Not	  due	  to	  it	  becoming	  irrelevant	  but	  because	  the	  ease	  of	  digital	  photography	  finally	  surpassed	  it's	  own	  pitfalls	  and	  slowly	  begin	  emerging	  as	  the	  new	  leader.	  Films	  ability	  to	  hold	  detail	  down	  to	  the	  finest	  grain	  and	  ability	  to	  give	  us	  sharp	  infra-­‐red	  images	  that	  aided	  greatly	  in	  spectroscopic	  analysis.	  The	  ability	  to	  blow	  up	  negatives	  with	  an	  enlarger	  while	  maintaining	  picture	  quality	  was	  monumental	  with	  the	  creation	  of	  maps	  covering	  large	  areas.	  The	  advent	  of	  digital	  photography	  took	  many	  years	  to	  penetrate	  the	  photography	  segment	  and	  even	  then,	  professional	  grade	  digital	  cameras	  taking	  RAW	  images	  could	  not	  compare	  with	  regards	  to	  resolution.	  The	  overall	  post	  processing	  however	  was	  greatly	  reduced	  therefore	  saving	  money	  in	  the	  long	  term.	  Digital	  was	  here	  to	  stay	  and	  the	  sensors	  were	  becoming	  so	  much	  more	  advanced	  that	  the	  resolution	  was	  beginning	  to	  make	  the	  gap	  in	  quality	  between	  analog	  and	  digital	  non-­‐existent.	  The	  forestry	  sector	  benefitted	  greatly	  by	  the	  addition	  of	  technology	  that	  the	  imaging	  sector	  was	  debuting	  in	  terms	  of	  new	  equipment	  and	  technological	  advances.	  Researchers	  and	  landowners	  could	  not	  view	  their	  entire	  landscapes	  on	  their	  desks	  and	  make	  crucial	  decisions	  on	  land	  management	  plans	  from	  images	  that	  were	  taken	  last	  week.	  Disturbances	  could	  now	  be	  mitigated	  quickly	  and	  efficiently	  due	  to	  the	  fact	  that	  the	  information	  was	  accurate,	  and	  quantifiable.	  Viewing	  the	  landscape	  from	  a	  birds	  eye	  view	  now	  meant	  relating	  to	  the	  information	  much	  easier.	  Species	  composition,	  stand	  height,	  hydrological	  activity,	  and	  overall	  stand	  health	  could	  now	  be	  easily	  viewed.	  The	  introduction	  of	  LIDAR	  in	  the	  forestry	  sector	  now	  meant	  faster	  data	  acquisition	  and	  the	  ability	  to	  accurately	  estimate	  the	  stand	  value	  due	  to	  LIDAR	  being	  able	  to	  account	  for	  volume	  from	  the	  height	  and	  species	  of	  the	  tree.	  Technology	  is	  always	  advancing	  and	  LIDAR	  is	  no	  exception,	  hopes	  of	  having	  more	  accurate	  measurement	  and	  ability	  to	  make	  less	  flight	  paths	  will	  increase	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   17	  the	  efficiency	  of	  the	  task.	  Aerial	  imaging	  and	  remote	  sensing	  are	  monumental	  and	  ever	  evolving	  with	  regards	  to	  the	  forestry	  sector	  it	  is	  without	  a	  doubt	  a	  necessity	  to	  be	  used	  with	  the	  changing	  landscape	  around	  us.	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	   	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   18	  References:	  	  	  Dubayah,	  R.	  O.,	  &	  Drake,	  J.	  B.	  (2000).	  Lidar	  remote	  sensing	  for	  forestry.	  Journal	  of	  Forestry,	  98(6),	  44-­‐46.	  	  Eastman,	  George.	  (Accessed	  on	  April	  20,	  2015).	  History	  of	  Kodak.	  Retrieved	  from	  URL:	  http://www.kodak.com/ek/US/en/George_Eastman.htm	  	  Fent,	  L.,	  Hall,	  R.	  J.,	  &	  Nesby,	  R.	  K.	  (1995).	  Aerial	  films	  for	  forest	  inventory:	  optimizing	  film	  	  Fensham,	  R.	  J.,	  &	  Fairfax,	  R.	  J.	  (2002).	  Aerial	  photography	  for	  assessing	  vegetation	  change:	  a	  review	  of	  applications	  and	  the	  relevance	  of	  findings	  for	  Australian	  vegetation	  history.	  Australian	  Journal	  of	  Botany,	  50(4),	  415-­‐429.	  	  Frazer,	  G.	  W.,	  Fournier,	  R.	  A.,	  Trofymow,	  J.	  A.,	  &	  Hall,	  R.	  J.	  (2001).	  A	  comparison	  of	  digital	  and	  film	  fisheye	  photography	  for	  analysis	  of	  forest	  canopy	  structure	  and	  gap	  light	  transmission.	  Agricultural	  and	  forest	  meteorology,109(4),	  249-­‐263.	  	  Hall,	  R.	  J.	  (2003).	  The	  roles	  of	  aerial	  photographs	  in	  forestry	  remote	  sensing	  image	  analysis.	  In	  Remote	  sensing	  of	  forest	  environments	  (pp.	  47-­‐75).	  Springer	  US.	  	  Hoffer,	  R.	  M.	  (1984).	  Remote	  sensing	  to	  measure	  the	  distribution	  and	  structure	  of	  vegetation.	  The	  role	  of	  terrestrial	  vegetation	  in	  the	  global	  carbon	  cycle:	  measurement	  by	  remote	  sensing.	  John	  Wiley	  and	  Sons.	  	  Lim,	  K.,	  Treitz,	  P.,	  Wulder,	  M.,	  St-­‐Onge,	  B.,	  &	  Flood,	  M.	  (2003).	  LiDAR	  remote	  sensing	  of	  forest	  structure.	  Progress	  in	  physical	  geography,	  27(1),	  88-­‐106.	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   19	  Lovell,	  J.	  L.,	  Jupp,	  D.	  L.,	  Culvenor,	  D.	  S.,	  &	  Coops,	  N.	  C.	  (2003).	  Using	  airborne	  and	  ground-­‐based	  ranging	  lidar	  to	  measure	  canopy	  structure	  in	  Australian	  forests.	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Remote	  Sensing,	  29(5),	  607-­‐622.	  	  Morgan,	  J.	  L.,	  Gergel,	  S.	  E.,	  &	  Coops,	  N.	  C.	  (2010).	  Aerial	  photography:	  a	  rapidly	  evolving	  tool	  for	  ecological	  management.	  BioScience,	  60(1),	  47-­‐59.	  	  Reeves,	  R.	  G.	  (ed)	  (1975)	  Manual	  of	  Remote	  Sensing.	  American	  Society	  of	  Photogrammetry,	  Falls	  Church,	  Virginia.	  2144	  pp	  	   International,	  PAPA.	  (Accessed	  on	  April	  19,	  2015).	  History	  of	  Aerial	  Photography.	  Retrieved	  from	  URL:	  http://professionalaerialphotographers.com/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=808138&module_id=158950	  	  	   Parker,	  G.	  G.,	  Harmon,	  M.	  E.,	  Lefsky,	  M.	  A.,	  Chen,	  J.,	  Van	  Pelt,	  R.,	  Weis,	  S.	  B.,	  ...	  &	  Frankling,	  J.	  F.	  (2004).	  Three-­‐dimensional	  structure	  of	  an	  old-­‐growth	  Pseudotsuga-­‐Tsuga	  canopy	  and	  its	  implications	  for	  radiation	  balance,	  microclimate,	  and	  gas	  exchange.	  Ecosystems,	  7(5),	  440-­‐453.	  	  Popescu,	  S.	  C.,	  &	  Wynne,	  R.	  H.	  (2004).	  Seeing	  the	  Trees	  in	  the	  Forest.Photogrammetric	  Engineering	  &	  Remote	  Sensing,	  70(5),	  589-­‐604.	  	  Quackenbush,	  L.	  J.,	  Hopkins,	  P.	  F.,	  &	  Kinn,	  G.	  J.	  (2000).	  Developing	  forestry	  products	  from	  high	  resolution	  digital	  aerial	  imagery.	  Photogrammetric	  Engineering	  and	  Remote	  Sensing,	  66(11),	  1337-­‐1348.	  	  	   	   The	  Evolution	  of	  Aerial	  Imaging	  	  	   20	  	   Rhoads,	  A.	  G.,	  Hamburg,	  S.	  P.,	  Fahey,	  T.	  J.,	  Siccama,	  T.	  G.,	  &	  Kobe,	  R.	  (2004).	  Comparing	  direct	  and	  indirect	  methods	  of	  assessing	  canopy	  structure	  in	  a	  northern	  hardwood	  forest.	  Canadian	  Journal	  of	  Forest	  Research,	  34(3),	  584-­‐591.	  	  Suárez,	  J.	  C.,	  Ontiveros,	  C.,	  Smith,	  S.,	  &	  Snape,	  S.	  (2005).	  Use	  of	  airborne	  LiDAR	  and	  aerial	  photography	  in	  the	  estimation	  of	  individual	  tree	  heights	  in	  forestry.	  Computers	  &	  Geosciences,	  31(2),	  253-­‐262.	  	  Tuominen,	  S.,	  &	  Pekkarinen,	  A.	  (2004).	  Local	  radiometric	  correction	  of	  digital	  aerial	  photographs	  for	  multi	  source	  forest	  inventory.	  Remote	  Sensing	  of	  Environment,	  89(1),	  72-­‐82.	  	  	  	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0075601/manifest

Comment

Related Items