Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

The effect of freight trains on air pollution in the British Columbia Lower Mainland Giacchetto, Maruska; Jiang, Vivian (XiuXiu); McDougall, Kelsey; Phaisaltantiwongs, Mina Apr 30, 2015

Your browser doesn't seem to have a PDF viewer, please download the PDF to view this item.

Item Metadata

Download

Media
52966-Giacchetto_M_et_al_Air_ENVR_400_2015.pdf [ 1.82MB ]
Metadata
JSON: 52966-1.0074573.json
JSON-LD: 52966-1.0074573-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 52966-1.0074573-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: 52966-1.0074573-rdf.json
Turtle: 52966-1.0074573-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 52966-1.0074573-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 52966-1.0074573-source.json
Full Text
52966-1.0074573-fulltext.txt
Citation
52966-1.0074573.ris

Full Text

 1 	   	    Abstract	  	  On	  August	  21st	  2014,	  Port	  Metro	  Vancouver	  approved	  an	  increase	  of	  US	  thermal	  coal	  train	  traffic	  along	  the	  BNSF	  rail	  line	  enroute	  to	  Fraser	  Surrey	  Docks.	  As	  a	  result	  of	  the	  anticipated	  increase	  in	  U.S.	  thermal	  coal	  trains,	  health	  concerns	  have	  been	  expressed	  by	  our	  community	  partner,	  Communities	  and	  Coal,	  a	  group	  of	  citizens	  in	  the	  communities	  surrounding	  the	  BNSF	  rail	  line	  (Delta,	  White	  Rock,	  Crescent	  Beach	  and	  Surrey).	  Air	  quality	  data	  obtained	  from	  Kevin	  Akaoka,	  a	  UBC	  graduate	  student,	  was	  collected.	  Data	  was	  collected	  by	  measuring	  particulate	  matter	  concentrations	  at	  two	  different	  sites	  (John	  Oliver	  Park	  and	  White	  Rock)	  using	  a	  GRIMM	  Model	  1.108	  Aerosol	  Spectrometer.	  The	  results	  show	  that	  trains	  are	  not	  the	  major	  source	  of	  particulate	  matter	  in	  these	  regions,	  in	  comparison	  to	  all	  sources.	  	  	  The	  Effect	  of	  Freight	  Trains	  on	  Air	  Pollution	  in	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Lower	  Mainland	  April	  30,	  2015	  	  	   Maruska	  Giacchetto	  Vivian	  (XiuXiu)	  Jiang	  Kelsey	  McDougall	  Mina	  Phaisaltantiwongs	  	  Course:	  ENVR	  400	  Instructor:	  Tara	  Ivanochko	  	  	  	   2 Table	  of	  Contents	  Abstract	  .........................................................................................................................................................................	  1	  Table	  of	  Contents	  ......................................................................................................................................................	  2	  Author	  Biographies	  ..................................................................................................................................................	  3	  Introduction	  ................................................................................................................................................................	  4	  Methods	  ........................................................................................................................................................................	  4	  Background	  Information	  .......................................................................................................................................	  5	  Results	  ...........................................................................................................................................................................	  5	  Discussion	  .................................................................................................................................................................	  11	  Future	  Implications	  ...........................................................................................................................................................	  11	  Limitations	  ................................................................................................................................................................	  12	  Conclusion	  and	  Future	  Recommendations	  .................................................................................................	  12	  Acknowledgments	  .................................................................................................................................................	  13	  Bibliography	  .............................................................................................................................................................	  14	  Appendix:	  Air	  Pollution	  Data	  Analysis	  Methods	  ......................................................................................	  16	  	  	   	   3 Author	  Biographies	  	  Maruska	  Giacchetto	  Maruska,	  an	  effective	  communicator	  and	  listener,	  brought	  fieldwork	  experience	  to	  the	  team.	  She	  acquired	  this	  from	  coursework	  as	  well	  as	  her	  NSERC	  experience	  working	  on	  a	  Greenhouse	  Gas	  analysis	  project,	  involving	  water	  sample	  collection.	  She	  is	  excellent	  with	  time-­‐management,	  is	  goal-­‐oriented,	  and	  has	  experience	  with	  several	  computer	  programs	  such	  as	  Excel,	  R,	  and	  GIS.	  	  Vivian	  (XiuXiu)	  Jiang	  Vivian	  brought	  critical	  thinking	  and	  research	  skills	  to	  the	  project.	  Her	  experience	  doing	  a	  co-­‐op	  in	  China	  working	  with	  environmental	  impact	  assessments,	  has	  given	  her	  a	  great	  deal	  of	  knowledge	  on	  air	  pollution	  (with	  a	  focus	  on	  total	  volatile	  organic	  compounds	  -­‐	  TVOCs),	  chemical	  industrial	  production,	  real	  estate	  development,	  agricultural	  reclamation,	  and	  municipal	  infrastructure	  projects.	  Vivian’s	  wide	  range	  of	  knowledge	  is	  also	  supplemented	  by	  the	  following	  skills:	  basic	  graphic	  design,	  research,	  and	  basic	  MATLAB	  and	  Excel	  skills.	  	  	  Kelsey	  McDougall	  Kelsey	  is	  a	  goal-­‐oriented,	  organized,	  and	  responsible	  individual	  with	  an	  interest	  in	  how	  environmental	  factors	  affect	  human	  health.	  She	  brought	  her	  knowledge	  of	  atmospheric	  science,	  meteorology,	  and	  social	  based	  geography	  to	  this	  project,	  as	  well	  as	  her	  experience	  with	  fieldwork.	  	  Mina	  Phaisaltantiwongs	  Mina	  brought	  a	  positive	  attitude	  and	  strong	  work	  ethic,	  as	  well	  as	  knowledge	  from	  various	  coursework	  such	  as	  air	  pollution	  meteorology	  and	  atmospheric	  science	  to	  the	  project.	  In	  addition,	  she	  was	  capable	  of	  analyzing	  and	  visually	  representing	  environmental	  data	  and	  brought	  experience	  in	  project	  management	  and	  project	  presentation	  to	  the	  team.	  	   	   4 Introduction	  	   Port	  Metro	  Vancouver	  in	  2014	  approved	  the	  development	  of	  a	  Direct	  Transfer	  Coal	  Facility	  at	  Fraser	  Surrey	  Docks	  to	  handle	  up	  to	  four	  million	  metric	  tonnes	  of	  coal,	  implying	  an	  anticipated	  increase	  in	  freight	  train	  traffic	  along	  the	  Burlington	  Northern	  Santa	  Fe	  (BNSF)	  rail	  line	  (Port	  Metro	  Vancouver,	  2014).	  The	  project	  was	  approved	  despite	  over	  1,700	  people	  signing	  a	  petition	  against	  the	  expansion	  of	  US	  Thermal	  coal	  traffic	  (Port	  Metro	  Vancouver,	  2014).	  	  	  Consequently,	  a	  group	  of	  citizens	  in	  the	  communities	  surrounding	  the	  BNSF	  railway	  has	  expressed	  concerns	  over	  health,	  property	  damage	  and	  environment	  effects	  that	  could	  be	  caused	  by	  an	  increase	  in	  air,	  noise,	  and	  water	  pollution.	  These	  citizens	  formed	  a	  group	  called	  Communities	  and	  Coal	  and	  approached	  UBC	  Environmental	  Science	  400	  students	  for	  an	  assessment	  on	  current	  air	  pollution	  from	  train	  traffic	  in	  the	  affected	  communities:	  White	  Rock	  and	  Delta.	  This	  research	  project	  will	  aid	  our	  community	  partner	  by	  analyzing	  previously	  gathered	  air	  pollution	  data	  to	  be	  used	  for	  future	  comparisons	  after	  the	  construction	  of	  a	  Direct	  Transfer	  Coal	  Facility.	  	   The	  impacts	  of	  trains	  travelling	  through	  residential	  areas	  can	  have	  significant	  health	  impacts	  on	  the	  surrounding	  communities	  (Jansen	  et	  al.	  2005)	  and	  thus,	  is	  a	  main	  focus	  of	  our	  project	  for	  our	  community	  partner.	  Air	  pollution	  such	  as	  emitted	  particulate	  matter	  (PM)	  from	  trains	  can	  pose	  a	  health	  risk	  by	  leading	  to	  cardiopulmonary	  and	  respiratory	  diseases	  (Jaffe	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  PM	  is	  not	  only	  emitted	  by	  engine	  exhaust,	  but	  also	  by	  uncovered	  loads	  of	  coal	  (Jaffe	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  Due	  to	  an	  increase	  in	  global	  demand	  for	  coal	  as	  a	  fuel	  source,	  and	  consequently	  an	  increase	  in	  the	  number	  of	  coal	  shipments	  via	  train	  and	  rail	  shipping	  distances,	  cumulative	  fugitive	  coal	  dust	  emissions	  to	  surrounding	  communities	  has	  increased	  (Lazo	  and	  McClain,	  1996).	  	   This	  project	  aims	  to	  specifically	  investigate	  current	  air	  pollution	  in	  two	  lower	  BC	  mainland	  communities	  (Delta	  and	  White	  Rock)	  from	  train	  traffic	  along	  the	  BNSF	  railway	  in	  the	  anticipation	  of	  increased	  train	  traffic	  by:	  1)	  Investigating	  air	  quality	  data	  (particulate	  matter	  concentrations)	  gathered	  by	  Akaoka	  (2015)	  at	  these	  locations,	  and	  2)	  Identifying	  areas	  of	  future	  research	  and	  freight	  train	  particulate	  matter	  signatures	  to	  pay	  attention	  to	  in	  anticipation	  of	  the	  increase	  of	  coal	  train	  traffic.	  	  Methods	  	   The	  air	  quality	  data	  provided	  by	  Akaoka	  (2015)	  was	  analyzed	  to	  investigate	  the	  exposure	  of	  particulate	  matter	  from	  freight	  and	  passenger	  trains	  along	  these	  railways	  to	  the	  surrounding	  communities.	  The	  particulate	  matter	  concentrations	  were	  obtained	  using	   5 a	  GRIMM	  Model	  1.108	  Aerosol	  Spectrometer,	  which	  is	  an	  optical	  particle	  counter	  that	  separates	  the	  particulate	  matter	  into	  sixteen	  different	  size	  categories	  at	  six-­‐second	  intervals.	  The	  passage	  of	  the	  trains	  was	  determined	  by	  using	  a	  Samson	  GoMic	  Portable	  USB	  Microphone	  to	  match	  the	  audio	  results	  of	  trains	  passing	  with	  the	  data	  collected	  from	  the	  particulate	  counter.	  Shorter	  duration	  trains	  are	  assumed	  to	  be	  passenger	  trains,	  while	  longer	  trains	  are	  assumed	  to	  be	  freight	  trains,	  as	  identified	  by	  Akaoka	  (2015).	  The	  two	  sites	  examined	  in	  Akaoka’s	  study	  (2015)	  are	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  and	  a	  residence	  in	  White	  Rock,	  BC.	  The	  dates	  used	  for	  this	  study	  include	  one	  weekday	  and	  one	  weekend	  day	  at	  each	  site	  (September	  13th	  and	  16th,	  2014	  at	  John	  Oliver,	  and	  October	  4th	  and	  10th,	  2014	  at	  White	  Rock).	  The	  collected	  particulate	  matter	  data	  was	  then	  analyzed	  for	  concentration	  range	  frequencies	  at	  three	  different	  size	  classes:	  PM3,	  PM10,	  and	  PM20	  (see	  Appendix).	  	  Background	  Information:	  Air	  	   The	  three	  different	  size	  classes	  highlighted	  in	  this	  paper	  are	  PM3,	  PM10	  and	  PM20	  and	  refer	  to	  airborne	  particles	  that	  have	  a	  respective	  diameter	  of	  3,	  10	  and	  20	  microns	  or	  less.	  Exposure	  to	  fine	  particulate	  matters	  such	  as	  PM2.5	  and	  PM10	  have	  been	  linked	  to	  respiratory	  diseases	  and	  premature	  mortality	  (Suzuki	  and	  Taylor,	  2003).	  While	  typically	  PM2.5	  is	  used	  to	  indicate	  smaller	  size	  classes,	  this	  project	  instead	  uses	  PM3	  due	  to	  instrument	  limitations	  as	  it	  could	  only	  measure	  particulate	  matter	  to	  the	  nearest	  whole	  number.	  The	  Corporation	  of	  Delta	  (2014)	  found	  that	  coal	  particles	  are	  typically	  larger	  than	  10	  µm	  in	  diameter;	  therefore	  this	  project	  uses	  PM20	  to	  investigate	  fugitive	  coal	  particles.	  	  	  	  Results	  	   The	  results	  in	  Figure	  1	  and	  2	  illustrate	  the	  particulate	  matter	  concentration	  frequencies	  as	  a	  percent	  of	  a	  total	  day	  (24-­‐hour	  period)	  at	  three	  different	  diameter	  size	  classes	  (A	  -­‐	  PM3,	  B	  -­‐	  PM10,	  and	  C	  -­‐	  PM20)	  for	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  and	  White	  Rock,	  respectively.	  The	  frequency	  is	  higher	  for	  PM3	  in	  the	  lower	  concentration	  ranges	  ([PM]<10,	  and	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  10≤[PM]<20	  µg/m3)	  and	  the	  frequency	  of	  PM10	  and	  PM20	  is	  highest	  below	  30	  µg/m3	  at	  John	  Oliver	  Park.	  At	  the	  White	  Rock	  site	  the	  frequency	  is	  highest	  for	  all	  size	  classes	  in	  the	  lower	  concentration	  ranges	  ([PM]<10,	  and	  10	  ≤	  [PM]<20	  µg/m3).	  	   	   6 	  	  	  	  Figure	  1:	  Percentage	  of	  total	  time	  in	  one	  minute	  intervals	  in	  which	  either	  freight	  trains,	  passenger	  trains	  or	  no	  trains	  are	  passing	  by	  for	  different	  PM	  concentration	  ranges	  at	  three	  different	  size	  classes	  (A	  –	  PM3,	  B	  –	  PM10,	  C	  –	  PM20)	  at	  John	  Oliver	  Park.	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  sees	  no	  passing	  passenger	  trains.	   	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  A)	  PM3	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  B)	  PM10	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  C)	  PM20	  	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	   7 	  	  	  	  	  Figure	  2:	  Percentage	  of	  total	  time	  in	  one	  minute	  intervals	  in	  which	  either	  freight	  trains,	  passenger	  trains	  or	  no	  trains	  are	  passing	  by	  for	  different	  PM	  concentration	  ranges	  at	  three	  different	  size	  classes	  (A	  –	  PM3,	  B	  –	  PM10,	  C	  –	  PM20)	  at	  White	  Rock.	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  A)	  PM3	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  B)	  PM10	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	  0	  10	  20	  30	  40	  50	  60	  70	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  of	  Total	  Time	  (24	  Hours)	  Concentration	  (µg/m3	  )	  C)	  PM20	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	   8 The	  results	  in	  Figure	  3	  and	  4	  show	  that	  there	  are	  50	  1-­‐minute	  interval	  observations	  of	  PM10	  where	  concentrations	  exceed	  50	  µm/m3	  including	  14%	  of	  these	  are	  due	  to	  the	  passage	  of	  a	  train	  from	  all	  the	  data	  examined.	  The	  50	  observations	  of	  concentration	  above	  50	  µm/m3	  should	  be	  taken	  into	  consideration	  for	  further	  investigation	  because	  the	  B.C.	  Ambient	  Air	  Quality	  Objectives	  (BC	  Air	  Quality,	  1995)	  for	  PM10	  (24-­‐hour	  average)	  is	  50	  µm/m3	  (based	  off	  of	  standard	  conditions	  of	  25°C	  and	  1	  atm).	  	  	  Regarding	  PM20,	  Figures	  3	  and	  4	  illustrate	  that	  there	  were	  580	  observations	  with	  concentrations	  above	  20	  µm/m3,	  9.8%	  of	  these	  observations	  are	  due	  to	  freight	  trains.	  Currently	  there	  are	  no	  regulations	  for	  PM20	  in	  British	  Columbia,	  however	  large	  particles	  are	  aesthetically	  undesirable	  due	  to	  accumulation	  on	  surfaces.	  	  	   	   9 	  	  	  	  Figure	  3:	  The	  percentage	  of	  time	  contribution	  of	  PM	  concentration	  ranges	  due	  to	  freight	  trains,	  passenger	  trains	  or	  times	  with	  no	  train	  traffic	  passing	  by	  for	  three	  different	  size	  classes	  (A	  –	  PM3,	  B	  –	  PM10,	  C	  –	  PM20)	  at	  John	  Oliver	  Park.	  Note	  that	  in	  the	  higher	  concentration	  ranges	  there	  is	  a	  large	  contribution	  due	  to	  freight	  trains.	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  A)	  PM3	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  B)	  PM10	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  C)	  PM20	  	  -­‐	  John	  Oliver	  Park	   10 	  	  	  	  Figure	  4:	  The	  percentage	  of	  time	  contribution	  of	  PM	  concentration	  ranges	  due	  to	  freight	  trains,	  passenger	  trains	  or	  times	  with	  no	  train	  traffic	  passing	  by	  for	  three	  different	  size	  classes	  (A	  –	  PM3,	  B	  –	  PM10,	  C	  –	  PM20)	  at	  White	  Rock.	  Note	  that	  in	  the	  middle	  concentration	  ranges	  there	  is	  a	  large	  contribution	  due	  to	  freight	  trains.	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  A)	  PM3	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  B)	  PM10	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	  0%	  10%	  20%	  30%	  40%	  50%	  60%	  70%	  80%	  90%	  100%	  [PM]	  <	  10	   10	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  20	   20	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  30	   30	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  40	   40	  ≤	  [PM]	  <	  50	   [PM]	  ≥	  50	  Percentage	  Contribution	  to	  Concentration	  Range	  Concentration	  (µm/m3	  )	  C)	  PM20	  -­‐	  White	  Rock	   11 Discussion	   Our	  results	  show	  that	  for	  all	  concentration	  levels,	  the	  release	  of	  particulate	  matter	  (PM3,	  PM10,	  PM20)	  from	  trains	  is	  not	  the	  primary	  source	  in	  the	  two	  areas	  studied.	  This	  means	  that	  PM	  in	  these	  areas	  primarily	  occurs	  from	  other	  sources,	  which	  could	  include:	  road	  traffic,	  fossil	  fuel	  combustion,	  sea	  spray,	  forest	  fires,	  wind	  blown	  soil,	  erosion	  process	  (Suzuki	  and	  Taylor,	  2003).	  It	  should	  be	  noted	  that	  at	  the	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  site	  the	  presence	  of	  two	  nearby	  highways	  are	  likely	  large	  contributors	  of	  particulate	  matter,	  thus	  accounting	  for	  a	  higher	  proportion	  of	  each	  particulate	  matter	  concentration	  range	  when	  comparing	  to	  train	  traffic.	  At	  the	  White	  Rock	  site,	  the	  presence	  of	  residential	  roads,	  and	  the	  ocean	  via	  sea	  spray	  would	  be	  contributors	  for	  particulate	  matter.	  	  	  While	  this	  paper	  only	  presents	  information	  on	  particulate	  matter	  time	  intervals	  in	  which	  trains	  are	  passing	  by,	  it	  is	  important	  to	  note	  that	  other	  studies	  have	  been	  completed	  in	  nearby	  areas	  that	  could	  not	  be	  confirmed	  in	  our	  study	  due	  to	  limitations.	  For	  example,	  Jaffe	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  also	  studied	  the	  BNSF	  railway,	  however	  focused	  on	  air	  pollution	  in	  Washington	  State.	  The	  study	  found	  that	  not	  only	  does	  the	  fraction	  of	  larger	  sized	  particulate	  matter	  increase	  after	  the	  passage	  of	  coal	  trains	  when	  compared	  to	  other	  train	  types,	  but	  also	  that	  PM2.5	  concentrations	  will	  exceed	  US	  National	  Standards	  if	  train	  traffic	  increases	  by	  50%	  (Jaffe	  et	  al.,	  2014).	  The	  Corporation	  of	  Delta	  (2014)	  confirmed	  the	  results	  that	  Jaffe	  et	  al.	  (2014)	  found,	  which	  are	  that	  coal	  particles	  are	  found	  in	  larger	  PM	  size	  classes.	  They	  also	  found	  that	  dustfall	  in	  John	  Oliver	  Park	  exceeds	  the	  BC	  Air	  Quality	  guidelines	  for	  the	  month	  of	  April,	  90%	  of	  which	  was	  found	  to	  be	  due	  to	  coal	  dust	  (Corporation	  of	  Delta,	  2014).	  	  	  Future	  Implications	  	   While	  our	  data	  cannot	  be	  directly	  compared	  to	  the	  Canada	  Wide	  Standards	  (CWS),	  as	  they	  are	  calculated	  on	  24	  hour	  running	  average	  over	  a	  period	  of	  3	  consecutive	  years,	  the	  observations	  of	  concentrations	  above	  30	  µm/m3	  of	  PM3	  should	  not	  be	  neglected	  and	  should	  continue	  to	  be	  monitored	  as	  the	  CWS	  for	  PM2.5	  is	  27	  µm/m3	  (Environment	  Canada,	  2013).	  With	  an	  increase	  in	  the	  number	  of	  trains,	  it	  is	  likely	  to	  observe	  more	  time	  intervals	  with	  concentrations	  around	  the	  CWS	  level	  due	  to	  the	  unique	  signature	  (i.e.	  increase	  in	  the	  proportion	  of	  particle	  concentrations	  from	  trains	  out	  of	  the	  total	  time)	  seen	  in	  Figures	  3	  and	  4	  in	  the	  higher	  concentration	  ranges	  for	  both	  sites	  (i.e.	  greater	  than	  20	  µm/m3).	  These	  observations	  could	  contribute	  to	  the	  long-­‐run	  increase	  in	  ambient	  concentrations.	  	  	  	  	   12 Limitations	  	   This	  project	  has	  three	  main	  limitations.	  Firstly,	  the	  method	  used	  to	  identify	  trains	  (passenger	  or	  freight)	  was	  done	  by	  the	  use	  of	  an	  audio	  device,	  however,	  this	  made	  correctly	  identifying	  the	  train	  type	  impossible.	  Assumptions	  on	  duration	  had	  to	  be	  made,	  but	  this	  may	  have	  resulted	  in	  errors	  in	  the	  differentiation	  of	  train	  time.	  Secondly,	  the	  median	  time	  duration	  values	  used	  for	  the	  concentration	  frequencies	  were	  based	  off	  of	  data	  gathered	  in	  a	  complementary	  study	  on	  noise	  pollution	  in	  these	  communities	  (see	  Appendix).	  These	  time	  durations	  were	  used	  to	  allow	  for	  differences	  in	  travel	  speed,	  time	  errors	  (between	  microphone	  and	  computer)	  and	  wind	  effects.	  However,	  it	  must	  be	  noted	  that	  the	  wind	  effect	  would	  not	  be	  fully	  taken	  into	  account.	  Lastly,	  this	  study	  was	  limited	  by	  lack	  of	  wind	  data.	  Particulate	  matter	  concentration	  is	  strongly	  influenced	  by	  wind	  speed	  and	  direction.	  As	  the	  Lower	  Mainland	  is	  near	  to	  the	  Pacific	  Ocean,	  the	  area	  is	  affected	  by	  diurnal	  changes	  in	  the	  land	  and	  sea	  breezes.	  This	  project	  could	  have	  been	  made	  better	  by	  taking	  into	  account	  the	  wind	  direction	  and	  speed,	  thus	  improving	  the	  accuracy	  of	  the	  actual	  frequency	  of	  concentrations	  due	  to	  the	  passage	  of	  trains.	  	  	  Conclusion	  and	  Future	  Recommendations	  	   At	  current,	  air	  pollution	  from	  trains	  is	  not	  of	  immediate	  concern	  as	  it	  was	  shown	  that	  the	  proportion	  of	  PM	  emitted	  from	  trains	  was	  small	  compared	  to	  emissions	  from	  other	  sources.	  However,	  given	  an	  increase	  of	  U.S.	  thermal	  coal	  train	  traffic,	  it	  is	  likely	  that	  the	  proportion	  of	  PM	  emitted	  from	  trains	  will	  increase	  especially	  for	  coarse	  PM	  (greater	  than	  PM20).	  	   We	  suggest	  that	  future	  research	  include	  a	  longer	  time	  span	  of	  observation	  on	  air	  pollution	  in	  the	  BC	  Lower	  Mainland	  in	  order	  to	  ensure	  statistical	  significance.	  We	  highly	  recommend	  further	  monitoring	  on	  the	  coal	  train	  traffic	  through	  the	  affected	  communities	  as	  the	  Direct	  Transfer	  Coal	  Station	  will	  be	  built	  at	  Fraser	  Surrey	  Docks.	  	   Also,	  as	  the	  particle	  counter	  used	  can	  not	  pick	  up	  the	  ultrafine	  particle	  sizes	  released	  by	  diesel	  engines,	  this	  class	  of	  size	  particles	  should	  be	  investigated	  in	  future	  research	  as	  engine	  exhaust	  can	  have	  large	  effects	  on	  human	  health	  (e.g.	  lung	  and	  heart	  diseases,	  cancer,	  or	  airway	  inflammation	  -­‐	  WHO,	  2012;	  Jansen	  et	  al.,	  2005).	  	   	   13 Acknowledgments	  	  	   We	  would	  like	  to	  thank	  our	  professors	  and	  advisors,	  Tara	  Ivanochko	  and	  Sara	  Harris,	  for	  their	  expertise.	  Also	  to	  Kevin	  Akaoka	  for	  the	  use	  of	  his	  Master’s	  Thesis	  data	  and	  advice.	  To	  Ian	  McKendry	  for	  his	  input	  into	  the	  analysis	  of	  our	  data.	  Last,	  but	  not	  least,	  to	  our	  community	  partner	  Stephanie	  Smith	  for	  her	  passion	  about	  the	  project,	  and	  to	  her	  volunteer	  for	  allowing	  set	  up	  of	  equipment	  on	  their	  property.	   	   14 Bibliography	  	  Akaoka,	  K.	  (2015).	  Investigating	  particulate	  emissions	  of	  coal	  carrying	  trains	  in	  the	  Lower	  	  Mainland,	  BC	  (Unpublished	  master’s	  dissertation).	  University	  of	  British	  Columbia,	  Vancouver,	  BC.	  	  BC	  Air	  Quality	  (1995).	  Air	  quality	  objective	  for	  PM10.	  Retrieved	  from	  	  http://www.bcairquality.ca/reports/aqopm.html	  	  	  	  Corporation	  of	  Delta	  (2014).	  Coal	  Dustfall	  Monitoring	  Update.	  Meeting	  of	  the	  Corporation	  of	  	  Delta	  Council.	  Retrieved	  from	  https://delta.civicweb.net/document/108635/F13%20Coal%20Dustfall%20Monitoring%20Update.pdf?handle=728DDA07A8EC4382A8873739BE21653C	  	  	  Environment	  Canada	  (2013).	  Canadian	  ambient	  air	  quality	  standards.	  Retrieved	  from	  	  http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=56D4043B-­‐1&news=A4B2C28A-­‐2DFB-­‐4BF4-­‐8777-­‐ADF29B4360BD	  	  	  Giacchetto,	  M.,	  Jiang,	  V.X.,	  McDougall,	  K.,	  and	  Phaisaltantiwongs,	  M.	  (2015).	  The	  effect	  of	  	  freight	  trains	  on	  noise	  pollution	  in	  the	  British	  Columbia	  Lower	  Mainland.	  	  	  Jaffe,	  D.A.,	  Hof,	  G.,	  Ayres,	  B.,	  Malashanka,	  S.,	  Putz,	  J.	  &	  Pierce,	  J.R.	  (2014).	  Diesel	  particulate	  matter	  emission	  factors	  and	  air	  quality	  implications	  from	  in-­‐service	  rail	  in	  Washington	  State,	  USA.	  Atmospheric	  Pollution	  Research,	  5,	  344-­‐351.	  	  Jansen,	  K.L.,	  Larson,	  T.V.,	  Koenig,	  J.Q.,	  Mar,	  T.F.,	  Fields,	  C.,	  Stewart,	  J.,	  &	  Lippmann,	  M.	  (2005).	  Associations	  between	  health	  effects	  and	  particulate	  matter	  and	  black	  carbon	  in	  subjects	  with	  respiratory	  disease.	  Environmental	  Health	  Perspectives,	  113(12),	  1741-­‐1746.	  	  Lazo,	  J.K.,	  &	  McClain,	  K.T.	  (1996).	  Community	  perceptions,	  environmental	  impacts	  and	  energy	  policy:	  Rail	  shipment	  of	  coal.	  Energy	  Policy,	  24(6),	  531-­‐540.	  	  Port	  Metro	  Vancouver	  (2014).	  Fraser	  Surrey	  Docks,	  Direct	  Transfer	  Coal	  Facility	  Project.	  Vancouver,	  BC.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en/projects/OngoingProjects/Tenant-­‐Led-­‐Projects/FraserSurreyDocks.aspx	  	  	  	  	   15 Suzuki,	  N.	  M.,	  and	  Taylor,	  B.	  (2003).	  Particulate	  matter	  in	  British	  Columbia:	  A	  report	  on	  	  PM10	  and	  PM2.5	  mass	  concentrations	  up	  to	  2000.	  Victoria,	  B.C:	  Ministry	  of	  Water,	  Land	  and	  Air	  Protection.	  	  World	  Health	  Organization	  (WHO)	  (2012).	  IARC:	  Diesel	  engine	  exhaust	  carcinogenic.	  Bulletin	  of	  the	  World	  Health	  Organization,	  90(7),	  480.	  Retrieved	  from	  http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA302595301&v=2.1&u=ubcolumbia&it=r&p=HRCA&sw=w&asid=e622dd4b1609cda9c4d4015eaa68eb47	  	  	  	   	   16 Appendix:	  Air	  Pollution	  Data	  Analysis	  Methods	  	  The	  particulate	  matter	  raw	  data	  was	  originally	  in	  6	  second	  increments,	  however	  for	  simplicity	  as	  well	  as	  to	  remove	  any	  small	  sensitivities	  to	  changes	  the	  data	  was	  averaged	  over	  1	  minute	  increments.	  This	  data	  then	  was	  calculated	  into	  PM3,	  PM10	  and	  PM20	  to	  show	  the	  different	  diameter	  size	  class	  distributions	  over	  two	  24-­‐hour	  periods	  at	  two	  different	  sites.	  Percentage	  of	  total	  time	  (24	  hours)	  allocated	  to	  each	  concentration	  of	  each	  size	  class	  were	  then	  distributed	  into	  different	  concentration	  bins;	  including	  less	  than	  10	  µm/m3,	  between	  10	  µm/m3	  and	  20	  µm/m3,	  between	  20	  µm/m3	  and	  30	  µm/m3,	  between	  30	  µm/m3	  and	  40	  µm/m3,	  between	  40	  µm/m3	  and	  50	  µm/m3,	  and	  greater	  than	  50	  µm/m3.	  This	  percentage	  of	  total	  time	  was	  then	  calculated	  for	  the	  duration	  of	  time	  when	  trains	  were	  passing	  by	  (see	  Figure	  A-­‐1).	  The	  John	  Oliver	  site	  had	  only	  freight	  trains	  passing	  by	  and	  the	  median	  duration	  observed	  during	  the	  noise	  section	  of	  this	  study	  of	  7.87	  minutes	  (rounded	  up	  to	  8	  min,	  due	  to	  the	  interval	  sizes)	  was	  used.	  The	  White	  Rock	  site	  had	  both	  freight	  trains	  and	  passenger	  trains	  passing	  by,	  the	  same	  freight	  train	  duration	  was	  used,	  however	  for	  the	  passenger	  trains	  the	  duration	  of	  3.9	  minutes	  (rounded	  to	  4	  minutes)	  was	  used.	  This	  was	  done	  to	  understand	  the	  distribution	  particulate	  matter	  concentrations	  for	  the	  different	  size	  classes	  both	  for	  the	  overall	  day,	  as	  well	  as	  when	  trains	  were	  passing	  by.	  	  Train	  Duration	  	  Figure	  A-­‐1:	  Box	  plot	  for	  the	  train	  duration	  (minutes)	  for	  passenger	  and	  freight	  trains.	  The	  mean	  duration	  value	  for	  passenger	  trains	  was	  3.9	  minutes	  and	  7.9	  minutes	  for	  freight	  trains.	  The	  red	  x	  signifies	  an	  outlier.	  (Giacchetto,	  Jiang,	  McDougall,	  and	  Phaisaltantiwongs,	  2015).	  	  0	  5	  10	  15	  20	  25	  Passenger	   Freight	  Time	  (minutes)	  Train	  Type	  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0074573/manifest

Comment

Related Items