Open Collections

UBC Undergraduate Research

The effects of plastic debris and toxins on Black-­footed and Laysan albatross in the North Pacific Mang, Shari 2012

You don't seem to have a PDF reader installed, try download the pdf

Item Metadata

Download

Media
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
Mang_S_The_Effects_ENVR_200.pdf [ 575.55kB ]
[if-you-see-this-DO-NOT-CLICK]
Metadata
JSON: 1.0074563.json
JSON-LD: 1.0074563+ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): 1.0074563.xml
RDF/JSON: 1.0074563+rdf.json
Turtle: 1.0074563+rdf-turtle.txt
N-Triples: 1.0074563+rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: 1.0074563 +original-record.json
Full Text
1.0074563.txt
Citation
1.0074563.ris

Full Text

The	
  Effects	
  of	
  Plastic	
  Debris	
  and	
  Toxins	
  on	
  Black-­‐footed	
  and	
  Laysan	
  Albatross	
   in	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic. ABSTRACT 	
    Plastic	
  and	
  toxins	
  have	
  a	
  negative	
  impact	
  on	
  the	
  health	
  and	
  reproductive	
  success	
  of	
    Black-­‐footed	
  and	
  Laysan	
  albatross	
  birds	
  breeding	
  on	
  islands	
  in	
  the	
  Hawaiian	
  Island	
  chain.	
   These	
  islands	
  lie	
  within	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Gyre,	
  which,	
  due	
  to	
  its	
  circulation	
  patterns,	
   accumulates	
  massive	
  amounts	
  of	
  plastic.	
  Since	
  plastics	
  are	
  permeable,	
  lipophilic	
  structures,	
   they	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  absorb	
  and	
  accumulate	
  pollutants	
  with	
  ease.	
  Albatross	
  are	
  exposed	
  to	
  these	
   toxins	
  either	
  through	
  direct	
  consumption	
  of	
  contaminated	
  plastic	
  or	
  via	
  bioaccumulation.	
   Ingestion	
  of	
  this	
  pollution	
  can	
  negatively	
  impact	
  feeding	
  habits,	
  <itness,	
  fat	
  deposition,	
  and	
   embryo	
  and	
  chick	
  development.	
  Varying	
  affects	
  from	
  both	
  plastic	
  and	
  toxins	
  have	
  been	
   found	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  foraging	
  ranges,	
  feeding	
  habits,	
  and	
  trophic	
  levels	
  of	
  the	
  seabirds.	
  	
   Although	
  plastic	
  and	
  toxin	
  accumulation	
  within	
  both	
  Black-­‐footed	
  and	
  Laysan	
  albatrosses	
   has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  negatively	
  impact	
  their	
  health	
  and	
  <itness,	
  the	
  mortality	
  rates	
  and	
   impact	
  on	
  population	
  success	
  is	
  still	
  unclear.	
  	
   PLASTIC 	
    Plastic	
  constitutes	
  the	
  majority	
  of	
  marine	
  debris	
  worldwide,	
  making	
  up	
  60-­‐80%	
  of	
    the	
  total	
  by	
  mass	
  (Derriak,	
  2002;	
  Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Titmus	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  2011).	
  Many	
  of	
  the	
   products	
  we	
  produce	
  are	
  made	
  from	
  plastic,	
  especially	
  single	
  use	
  items,	
  which	
  generate	
  a	
   large	
  amount	
  of	
  waste.	
  There’s	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  plastic,	
  but	
  the	
  basis	
  of	
  them	
  all	
  is	
  synthetic	
   organic	
  polymers	
  derived	
  from	
  petroleum,	
  which	
  make	
  plastic	
  lightweight,	
  cheap,	
  and	
  long	
   lasting	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Derriak,	
  2002).	
  Polyethylene	
  (PE)	
  and	
  polypropylene	
  (PP)	
  based	
   plastic	
  are	
  two	
  common	
  types	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
  environment,	
  both	
  of	
  which	
  are	
  highly	
    resistant	
  to	
  aging	
  and	
  degradation	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
  Titmus	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  2011)	
  and	
  both	
   have	
  a	
  density	
  less	
  than	
  seawater	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  	
  Plastics	
  are	
  divided	
  into	
  pre-­‐ production	
  plastics	
  (virgin	
  pellets)	
  and	
  post-­‐consumer	
  plastics. 	
    The	
  polymers	
  of	
  plastic	
  become	
  embrittled	
  due	
  to	
  photodegradation	
  and	
  oxidation,	
    and	
  about	
  2-­‐3	
  years	
  after	
  entering	
  the	
  sea	
  the	
  pieces	
  begin	
  to	
  break	
  into	
  smaller	
  fragments	
   (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Titmus	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  2011).	
  The	
  lifespan	
  of	
  plastic	
  in	
  the	
  ocean	
  is	
   highly	
  variable	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  type	
  and	
  qualities	
  of	
  the	
  plastic.	
  Estimates	
  have	
  been	
   made	
  that	
  <ishing	
  nets	
  submerged	
  in	
  the	
  ocean	
  may	
  persist	
  for	
  50	
  years	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
   1987),	
  while	
  a	
  plastic	
  bottle	
  is	
  estimated	
  to	
  take	
  450	
  years	
  to	
  completely	
  break	
  down	
  (Rios	
   et	
  al.,	
  2007).	
  The	
  process	
  is	
  much	
  slower	
  in	
  ocean	
  environments	
  than	
  on	
  land	
  due	
  to	
  cooler	
   temperatures	
  and	
  reduced	
  UV	
  exposure	
  (Ryan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
   	
    The	
  term	
  ‘biodegradable’	
  plastics	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  bit	
  of	
  a	
  misnomer.	
  Plastics	
  are	
  made	
  with	
    only	
  a	
  portion	
  of	
  biodegradable	
  materials,	
  such	
  as	
  starch,	
  which,	
  after	
  broken	
  down,	
  leaves	
   the	
  microscopic	
  plastic	
  fragments	
  that	
  constituted	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  structure	
  (Ryan	
  et	
  al.,	
   2009). 	
    The	
  main	
  sources	
  of	
  plastic	
  debris	
  are	
  garbage	
  dumped	
  from	
  ships	
  at	
  sea	
  and	
  land-­‐  based	
  sources,	
  which	
  are	
  usually	
  carried	
  out	
  by	
  rivers	
  and	
  storm-­‐water	
  [Figure	
  1]	
  (Ryan	
  et	
   al.,	
  2009).	
  Densely	
  populated	
  and	
  industrial	
  areas	
  contribute	
  a	
  large	
  amount	
  of	
  land-­‐based	
   litter	
  which	
  enters	
  via	
  rivers	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  The	
  actual	
  amount	
  entering	
  the	
  marine	
   environment	
  has	
  been	
  dif<icult	
  to	
  quantify,	
  since	
  it’s	
  often	
  not	
  <lowing	
  out	
  at	
  a	
  constant	
  rate.	
   Litter	
  will	
  build	
  up	
  between	
  rain	
  events,	
  and	
  then	
  if	
  the	
  water	
  <low	
  becomes	
  large	
  enough,	
   all	
  is	
  <lushed	
  at	
  once	
  (Ryan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  Merchant	
  ships	
  and	
  <ishing	
  boats	
  dump	
  large	
    amounts	
  of	
  plastic	
  into	
  the	
  oceans	
  every	
  year	
  including	
  items	
  such	
  as	
  ropes	
  and	
  <ishing	
  nets	
   (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  	
    Figure	
  1.	
  Diagram	
  showing	
  the	
  main	
  sources	
  and	
  movement	
  of	
  plastics	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
  environment.	
  Sinks	
  occur	
  (1)	
   on	
  beaches,	
  (2)	
  in	
  coastal	
  waters	
  and	
  their	
  sediments	
  and	
  (3)	
  in	
  the	
  open	
  ocean.	
  Curved	
  arrows	
  indicated	
  wind-­‐ blown	
  litter,	
  grey	
  arrows	
  water-­‐borne	
  litter,	
  stripped	
  arrows	
  vertical	
  movement	
  through	
  the	
  water	
  column,	
  and	
   black	
  arrows	
  ingestion	
  by	
  marine	
  organisms.	
  From	
  Ryan	
  et	
  al.	
  (2009).  	
    The	
  proportion	
  of	
  plastic	
  in	
  litter	
  increases	
  the	
  further	
  it	
  gets	
  from	
  the	
  source,	
  due	
  to	
    its	
  buoyancy	
  and	
  longevity	
  which	
  makes	
  it	
  more	
  easily	
  transported	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  more	
   dense	
  waste	
  such	
  as	
  glass	
  or	
  metal	
  (Ryan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009;	
  Titmus	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  2011).	
  Plastic	
   debris	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  increasing	
  in	
  abundance	
  even	
  though	
  some	
  countries	
  have	
  instated	
   regulations	
  regarding	
  dumping	
  plastic.	
  In	
  2008,	
  245	
  million	
  tons	
  of	
  plastic	
  was	
  produced	
   worldwide,	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  1.5	
  million	
  tons	
  that	
  was	
  produced	
  in	
  1950	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   More	
  plastic	
  produced,	
  means	
  more	
  opportunity	
  for	
  waste	
  accumulation	
  at	
  sea. 	
    In	
  an	
  attempt	
  to	
  control	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  being	
  dumped	
  in	
  oceans,	
  MARPOL	
    Annex	
  V	
  was	
  put	
  into	
  effect	
  in	
  1988	
  (Ryan	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  It	
  is	
  an	
  international	
  protocol	
  that	
   restricts	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  garbage	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  discharged	
  at	
  sea,	
  and	
  bans	
  at	
  sea	
  disposal	
  of	
   plastic	
  and	
  synthetics	
  such	
  as	
  <ishing	
  nets	
  and	
  ropes	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  Even	
  though	
  MARPOL	
    was	
  rati<ied	
  by	
  79	
  countries,	
  the	
  legislation	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  ignored.	
  Almost	
  10	
  years	
  after	
  it	
   was	
  implemented,	
  it	
  was	
  estimated	
  that	
  6.5	
  million	
  tons	
  per	
  year	
  of	
  plastic	
  were	
  still	
  being	
   dumped	
  by	
  ships	
  at	
  sea	
  (Derriak,	
  2002). TOXINS 	
    There	
  are	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  persistent	
  organic	
  compounds	
  (POPs)	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
    environment	
  two	
  of	
  which	
  are	
  polychlorinated	
  biphenyl’s	
  (PCBs),	
  found	
  in	
  storage	
   materials	
  and	
  electronics,	
  and	
  DDT,	
  an	
  organo-­‐chlorine	
  pesticide	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al,	
  2007).	
  Both	
  of	
   these	
  POPs	
  were	
  banned	
  in	
  Canada	
  and	
  the	
  US	
  in	
  the	
  1970s	
  (Finkelstein	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
   	
    POPs	
  are	
  considered	
  by	
  Rios	
  et	
  al.	
  (2007)	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  most	
  persistent	
  organic	
    compound	
  that	
  humans	
  have	
  introduced	
  to	
  the	
  environment.	
  They	
  are	
  very	
  chemically	
   stable	
  and	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  bioaccumulate	
  in	
  the	
  food	
  chain.	
  They	
  have	
  varying	
  contamination	
   concentrations	
  throughout	
  the	
  oceans,	
  which	
  produces	
  signi<icant	
  variation	
  in	
  the	
  amount	
   of	
  contamination	
  to	
  which	
  marine	
  life	
  is	
  exposed	
  (Finkelstein	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  POPs	
  are	
  known	
   mutagens,	
  carcinogens,	
  and	
  endocrine	
  disruptors	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007)	
  and	
  PCB	
  has	
  been	
   found	
  to	
  lead	
  to	
  reproductive	
  disorders	
  or	
  death	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  	
   	
    POPs	
  are	
  lipophilic,	
  and	
  when	
  they	
  are	
  in	
  ocean	
  surface	
  waters,	
  they	
  get	
  absorbed	
    into	
  lipophilic,	
  permeable	
  particulate	
  materials,	
  such	
  as	
  plastic	
  debris	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007;	
   Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Normally	
  POPs	
  found	
  in	
  the	
  water	
  column	
  are	
  absorbed	
  by	
  sediments,	
   which	
  then	
  settle	
  on	
  the	
  sea	
  <loor.	
  Plastic	
  behaves	
  like	
  sediments	
  in	
  that	
  they	
  absorb	
  the	
   hydrophobic	
  POPs	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  but	
  rather	
  than	
  sinking	
  they	
  remain	
  in	
  the	
  surface	
   waters,	
  becoming	
  a	
  <loating	
  accumulation	
  of	
  toxins,	
  within	
  reach	
  of	
  marine	
  life	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
   2010).	
  The	
  concentration	
  of	
  pollutants	
  in	
  plastic	
  steadily	
  increases	
  with	
  exposure	
  time	
   (McDermid	
  &	
  McMuller,	
  2004).	
  The	
  combination	
  of	
  plastic	
  absorbing	
  contaminants	
  and	
    remaining	
  accessible	
  for	
  consumption	
  in	
  the	
  surface	
  waters	
  poses	
  a	
  real	
  threat	
  to	
  the	
  health	
   of	
  marine	
  species	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010). OCEANS 	
    The	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Ocean	
  is	
  a	
  complex	
  circulation	
  system,	
  but	
  it’s	
  primarily	
  made	
  up	
    of	
  a	
  rotating	
  gyre	
  system	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  It	
  can	
  be	
  divided	
  into	
  the	
  Subpolar	
  Gyre	
   (SPG)	
  and	
  Subtropical	
  Gyre	
  (STG),	
  which	
  are	
  separated	
  by	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Transition	
  Zone	
   (NPTZ).	
  The	
  NPTZ	
  is	
  bordered	
  by	
  two	
  frontal	
  systems,	
  the	
  Subarctic	
  Frontal	
  Zone	
  (SRFZ)	
   and	
  the	
  Subtropical	
  Frontal	
  Zone	
  (STFZ).	
  The	
  Subtropical	
  Convergence	
  Zone	
  (STCZ)	
  forms	
   at	
  the	
  southern	
  edge	
  of	
  the	
  transition	
  zone	
  [Figure	
  2]	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  This	
  paper	
  will	
   focus	
  mainly	
  on	
  debris	
  in	
  the	
  Subtropical	
  Gyre	
  and	
  the	
  Subtropical	
  Convergence	
  Zone,	
   which	
  is	
  where	
  the	
  island	
  of	
  Midway	
  and	
  the	
  Hawaiian	
  Island	
  chain	
  are	
  located.	
  Studies	
   have	
  found	
  this	
  region	
  to	
  be	
  important	
  regarding	
  the	
  concentration	
  and	
  transportation	
  of	
   marine	
  debris	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
   Figure	
  2.	
  Schematic	
  representing	
  the	
  major	
  ocean	
  currents	
  and	
  zones	
  of	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic.	
  The	
  orange	
  lines	
   represent	
  frontal	
  zones.	
  The	
  shaded	
  green	
  areas	
  are	
  locations	
  where	
  high	
  debris	
  accumulation	
  occurs.	
  WPG	
  -­‐	
   Western	
  Garbage	
  Patch.	
  EPG	
  -­‐	
  Eastern	
  Garbage	
  Patch.	
  From	
  Howell	
  et	
  al.	
  (2012).  	
    Plastic	
  debris	
  is	
  now	
  ubiquitous	
  throughout	
  the	
  world’s	
  ocean,	
  although	
  the	
    distribution	
  is	
  patchy	
  due	
  to	
  differences	
  in	
  current	
  patterns,	
  wind,	
  and	
  differences	
  in	
   geographic	
  input	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Within	
  the	
  NPG	
  scientists	
  have	
  found	
  the	
  ratio	
  by	
   mass	
  of	
  plastic	
  to	
  plankton	
  to	
  be	
  6:1	
  (McDermid	
  &	
  McMullen,	
  2004).	
  The	
  highest	
  densities	
   of	
  plastic	
  in	
  the	
  NPG	
  occur	
  between	
  20º-­‐40º	
  N	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009),	
  with	
  Midway	
  Atoll	
   situated	
  at	
  28º12’	
  N	
  (Guruge	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  Modeling	
  studies	
  have	
  found	
  that	
  plastic	
  debris	
   can	
  remain	
  within	
  the	
  NPG	
  for	
  more	
  than	
  12	
  years	
  (Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
   	
    The	
  majority	
  of	
  studies	
  done	
  on	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  in	
  oceans	
  have	
  involved	
    evaluating	
  the	
  surface	
  waters.	
  However,	
  in	
  the	
  open	
  ocean,	
  denser	
  plastics	
  will	
  sink	
  to	
  the	
   denser,	
  colder	
  midwater	
  layer,	
  where	
  they	
  will	
  <loat	
  neutrally	
  buoyant	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
   1987).	
  This	
  means	
  there	
  is	
  likely	
  a	
  large	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  being	
  unaccounted	
  for,	
  and	
  the	
   amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  in	
  the	
  ocean	
  has	
  been	
  greatly	
  underestimated	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987). 	
    The	
  circulation	
  of	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Ocean	
  is	
  highly	
  variable	
  over	
  spatial	
  and	
    temporal	
  scales.	
  The	
  Subtropical	
  Frontal	
  Zone	
  (STFZ)	
  is	
  a	
  permanent	
  region	
  of	
  the	
  North	
   Paci<ic,	
  which	
  shifts	
  latitudinally	
  with	
  the	
  seasons	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al,	
  2012)	
  due	
  to	
  changes	
  in	
   wind,	
  weather	
  conditions,	
  water	
  temperature	
  and	
  salinity	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  The	
  air	
  and	
   water	
  currents	
  directing	
  horizontal	
  convergence	
  in	
  this	
  zone	
  are	
  also	
  what	
  cause	
  buoyant	
   organic	
  and	
  inorganic	
  materials,	
  whether	
  passive	
  or	
  active,	
  to	
  aggregate	
  there	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al.,	
   2012).	
   	
    The	
  region	
  around	
  the	
  Northwestern	
  Hawaiian	
  Islands	
  and	
  Midway	
  are	
  impacted	
  by	
    the	
  seasonal	
  change	
  in	
  latitude	
  of	
  the	
  STCZ	
  and	
  NPTZ.	
  As	
  the	
  zones	
  move	
  closer	
  to	
  the	
   island	
  in	
  winter	
  and	
  early	
  spring,	
  the	
  islands	
  are	
  bombarded	
  with	
  biological	
  material	
  and	
   marine	
  debris,	
  due	
  to	
  increased	
  retention	
  at	
  the	
  surface	
  (Howell	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  The	
  egg	
    laying	
  and	
  early	
  chick	
  rearing	
  months	
  of	
  both	
  Black-­‐footed	
  and	
  Laysan	
  albatrosses	
  on	
  these	
   islands	
  are	
  from	
  November	
  to	
  February	
  (Kappes	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010),	
  which	
  puts	
  them	
  in	
  close	
   proximity	
  to	
  a	
  large	
  aggregation	
  of	
  marine	
  debris.	
  As	
  the	
  NPTZ	
  moves	
  further	
  south	
  in	
  early	
   spring	
  and	
  summer,	
  marine	
  debris	
  is	
  reported	
  at	
  its	
  highest	
  concentration	
  around	
  the	
   Hawaiian	
  island	
  chain	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  This	
  corresponds	
  to	
  the	
  late	
  stage	
  of	
  chick	
   rearing	
  with	
  birds	
  starting	
  to	
  disperse	
  across	
  the	
  Paci<ic	
  around	
  June	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
   2009).	
   	
    A	
  study	
  by	
  McDermid	
  &	
  McMullen	
  (2004)	
  examined	
  plastic	
  debris	
  on	
  9	
  beaches	
    throughout	
  the	
  Hawaiian	
  Archipelago	
  and	
  found	
  that	
  Midway	
  Atoll,	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  remote	
   beaches	
  at	
  the	
  Western	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  island	
  chain,	
  had	
  the	
  highest	
  quantity	
  of	
  plastic	
  as	
  seen	
  in	
   Table	
  1.	
  Of	
  the	
  total	
  debris	
  collected,	
  72%	
  by	
  weight	
  was	
  plastic	
  particles,	
  totaling	
  19,100	
   pieces	
  from	
  the	
  9	
  beaches	
  (McDermid	
  &	
  McMullen,	
  2004).	
  43%	
  of	
  the	
  plastic	
  pieces	
   collected	
  were	
  1-­‐2.8mm	
  in	
  size,	
  which	
  is	
  small	
  enough	
  to	
  be	
  ingested	
  by	
  planktivores	
  as	
   well	
  as	
  surface	
  feeding	
  birds	
  such	
  as	
  albatross	
  (McDermid	
  &	
  McMullen,	
  2004).	
  This	
  study	
   points	
  out	
  how,	
  regardless	
  of	
  proximity	
  to	
  dumping	
  zones,	
  or	
  how	
  dense	
  the	
  human	
   population	
  is	
  in	
  the	
  area,	
  plastic	
  debris	
  is	
  likely	
  to	
  affect	
  all	
  beaches	
  in	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
   (McDermid	
  &	
  McMullen,	
  2004).	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  important	
  to	
  note,	
  that	
  pre-­‐production	
  pellets	
  are	
   known	
  to	
  be	
  found	
  in	
  high	
  densities	
  on	
  beaches	
  near	
  industry,	
  but	
  in	
  McDermid	
  and	
   McMullen’s	
  study,	
  they	
  were	
  abundant	
  on	
  even	
  these	
  remote	
  beaches	
  far	
  from	
  cities	
  and	
   industry.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
    Table	
  1.	
  Total	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  collected	
  from	
  each	
  beach	
  sorted	
  by	
  type.	
  From	
  McDermis	
  &	
  McMullen	
  (2004).  PLASTIC,	
  TOXINS,	
  AND	
  ALBATROSSES 	
    The	
  main	
  threats	
  to	
  marine	
  life	
  from	
  plastic	
  are	
  ingestion	
  and	
  assimilation	
  of	
    persistent	
  organic	
  pollutants	
  (Derriak,	
  2002;	
  Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Seabirds	
  are	
  highly	
   susceptible	
  to	
  plastic	
  ingestion	
  due	
  to	
  their	
  expansive	
  foraging	
  ranges,	
  and	
  high	
  trophic	
   level	
  (Titmus	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  2011;	
  Blight	
  &	
  Burger,	
  1997).	
  Plastic	
  can	
  be	
  ingested	
  directly,	
  or	
   acquired	
  via	
  bioaccumulation	
  through	
  secondary	
  ingestion	
  of	
  their	
  prey	
  (Titmus	
  &	
   Hyrenbach,	
  2011).	
  Seabirds	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  assimilate	
  the	
  chemicals	
  from	
  plastic	
  in	
  their	
   stomachs,	
  which	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  harmful	
  accumulation	
  in	
  tissues	
  such	
  as	
  the	
  liver	
  and	
   subcutaneous	
  fat	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
   	
    44%	
  of	
  all	
  seabird	
  species	
  have	
  been	
  con<irmed	
  to	
  ingest	
  plastic	
  (Titmus	
  &	
    Hyrenbach,	
  2011;	
  Rios	
  et	
  al.,	
  2007),	
  however	
  Procellariiformes,	
  the	
  order	
  of	
  surface	
  feeding	
   seabirds	
  including	
  Black-­‐footed	
  albatrosses	
  (BFA)	
  and	
  Laysan	
  albatrosses	
  (LA),	
  tend	
  to	
   accumulate	
  more	
  plastic	
  than	
  other	
  seabirds	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  This	
  is	
  in<luenced	
  by	
    migratory	
  patterns,	
  and	
  where	
  their	
  feeding	
  and	
  breeding	
  grounds	
  are	
  located	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
   al.,	
  1987).	
  	
   	
    Ryan	
  et	
  al.	
  (2009)	
  found	
  that	
  seabirds	
  tend	
  to	
  be	
  selective	
  in	
  the	
  types	
  of	
  plastic	
  they	
    ingest,	
  choosing	
  pieces	
  based	
  on	
  colours	
  and	
  shapes	
  which	
  they	
  mistake	
  for	
  prey.	
  Light	
   brown	
  plastic	
  particles	
  have	
  been	
  found	
  to	
  resemble	
  pelagic	
  <ish	
  eggs,	
  which	
  are	
  a	
  source	
  of	
   food	
  for	
  albatrosses	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Although	
  BFA	
  and	
  LA	
  are	
  top	
  predators	
  and	
   surface	
  feeders,	
  they	
  tend	
  to	
  seek	
  out	
  different	
  prey	
  and	
  both,	
  especially	
  BFA,	
  are	
  known	
  to	
   be	
  scavengers	
  of	
  trash	
  from	
  ships	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  LA	
  primarily	
  eat	
  Ommastrephis	
   squid	
  while	
  BFA	
  largely	
  consume	
  <lying	
  <ish	
  eggs	
  (Kappes	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  This	
  places	
  BFA	
   higher	
  in	
  the	
  food	
  web,	
  so	
  they	
  may	
  experience	
  higher	
  bioaccumulation	
  of	
  both	
  plastic	
  and	
   toxins,	
  neither	
  of	
  which	
  they	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  degrade	
  (Guruge	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001). 	
    The	
  at	
  sea	
  foraging	
  habitat	
  of	
  Laysan	
  and	
  Black-­‐footed	
  albatrosses	
  is	
  segregated,	
    with	
  LA	
  foraging	
  more	
  northwesterly	
  and	
  BFA	
  northeasterly	
  primarily	
  due	
  to	
  differences	
  in	
   prey	
  type	
  (Kappes	
  et	
  al.,	
  2010).	
  Similar	
  patterns	
  of	
  segregation	
  are	
  seen	
  during	
  egg	
   incubation,	
  chick	
  rearing,	
  and	
  non-­‐breeding	
  periods,	
  with	
  Laysan	
  albatross	
  traveling	
  farther	
   and	
  for	
  longer	
  periods	
  than	
  Black-­‐footed	
  albatross,	
  overall.	
  In	
  Kappes	
  et	
  al.	
  (2010)	
  study,	
   only	
  47.6%	
  of	
  their	
  foraging	
  ranges	
  overlapped,	
  with	
  both	
  foraging	
  extensively	
  in	
  the	
  North	
   Paci<ic	
  Transition	
  Zone	
  (NPTZ)	
  during	
  the	
  breeding	
  season,	
  but	
  LA	
  were	
  also	
  foraging	
   further	
  north	
  than	
  BFA,	
  utilizing	
  the	
  Subarctic	
  Frontal	
  Zone	
  (SAFZ)	
  [Figure	
  3].	
  These	
   differences	
  in	
  foraging	
  ranges	
  and	
  prey	
  are	
  directly	
  correlated	
  to	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
   ingested,	
  which	
  related	
  to	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  toxins	
  assimilated	
  from	
  the	
  plastic	
  (Derriak,	
   2002).  Figure	
  3.	
  Foraging	
  trips	
  of	
  37	
  Laysan	
  and	
  36	
  Black-­‐footed	
  albatrosses	
  breeding	
  on	
  Tern	
  Island,	
  during	
  the	
   incubation	
  period	
  from	
  mid-­‐December	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  January	
  in	
  the	
  years	
  2002-­‐2003	
  to	
  2005-­‐2006.	
    	
    A	
  study	
  by	
  Finkelstein	
  found	
  that	
  Black-­‐footed	
  albatross	
  have	
  370-­‐460%	
  higher	
    organochlorine	
  (i.e.	
  PCB	
  and	
  DDT)	
  concentrations	
  than	
  Laysan	
  Albatross.	
  Both	
  species	
  now	
   have	
  130-­‐360%	
  higher	
  concentrations	
  of	
  PCB	
  and	
  DDE	
  than	
  a	
  decade	
  ago	
  as	
  can	
  be	
  seen	
  in	
   Table	
  2	
  (Finkelstein	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).	
  The	
  North	
  American	
  coast,	
  where	
  BFA	
  frequent,	
  has	
  a	
   history	
  of	
  high	
  contaminant	
  discharge	
  from	
  industry	
  and	
  agriculture,	
  and	
  the	
  geographic	
   separation	
  of	
  their	
  foraging	
  ranges	
  would	
  explain	
  the	
  higher	
  concentration	
  of	
  contaminants	
   in	
  BFA	
  as	
  compared	
  to	
  LA	
  (Finkelstein	
  et	
  al.,	
  2006).  Table	
  2.	
  Temporal	
  trends	
  in	
  Black-­‐footed	
  (BFAL)	
  and	
  Laysan	
  (LAAL)	
  Albatrosses.	
  The	
  1992	
  and	
  1993	
  data	
   are	
  from	
  Auman	
  et	
  al.	
  (1997).	
  From	
  Finkelstein	
  et	
  al.	
  (2006).  	
    By	
  examining	
  the	
  stomach	
  contents	
  of	
  albatross	
  chicks,	
  scientists	
  have	
  been	
  able	
  to	
    con<irm	
  that	
  parents	
  are	
  regurgitating	
  plastic	
  to	
  their	
  young	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Derriak	
   2002).	
  Although	
  the	
  land	
  around	
  the	
  birds’	
  nests	
  is	
  often	
  littered	
  with	
  plastic,	
  young	
  chicks	
   rarely	
  eat	
  scraps	
  off	
  the	
  ground	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Laysan	
  albatross	
  chicks,	
  aren’t	
  able	
   to	
  regurgitate	
  plastic	
  their	
  parents	
  accidentally	
  feed	
  to	
  them,	
  and	
  only	
  pieces	
  of	
  plastic	
   <0.1g	
  can	
  pass	
  through	
  the	
  gizzard	
  opening	
  in	
  albatrosses	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  This	
   causes	
  it	
  to	
  accumulates	
  in	
  their	
  stomachs	
  (Derriak,	
  2002)	
  putting	
  them	
  at	
  risk	
  for	
   dehydration	
  or	
  starvation	
  (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997) 	
    Foraging	
  patterns	
  appear	
  to	
  differ	
  in	
  birds	
  of	
  the	
  same	
  species	
  living	
  in	
  different	
    colonies.	
  This	
  in	
  turn	
  impacts	
  their	
  exposure	
  and	
  ingestion	
  of	
  plastic	
  debris	
  and	
  POPs.	
  A	
   study	
  by	
  Young	
  et	
  al.	
  (2009)	
  examined	
  Laysan	
  albatross	
  colonies	
  on	
  different	
  islands	
  in	
  the	
   Hawaiian	
  Island	
  chain,	
  Oahu	
  and	
  Kure,	
  which	
  are	
  2150	
  km	
  apart.	
  During	
  the	
  breeding	
   season	
  both	
  LA	
  colonies	
  foraged	
  close	
  to	
  their	
  respective	
  nesting	
  islands.	
  As	
  they	
  moved	
   into	
  the	
  late	
  chick	
  rearing	
  stage,	
  they	
  both	
  began	
  expanding	
  their	
  range	
  northward	
  (Young	
   et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  Albatrosses	
  on	
  Oahu	
  foraged	
  mainly	
  in	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Transition	
  Zone,	
  and	
    most	
  did	
  not	
  reach	
  the	
  Eastern	
  Garbage	
  Patch.	
  Kure’s	
  albatross	
  foraged	
  more	
  north/ northwest	
  of	
  the	
  island,	
  frequently	
  foraging	
  in	
  the	
  Western	
  Garbage	
  Patch	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
   2009).	
   	
    Chick	
  boluses	
  examined	
  from	
  both	
  islands	
  contained	
  plastic,	
  however	
  chicks	
  on	
  Kure	
    Atoll	
  were	
  fed	
  ten	
  times	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  plastic	
  as	
  those	
  on	
  Oahu	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  Every	
   bolus	
  from	
  Kure	
  contained	
  <ishing	
  line	
  or	
  tools,	
  whereas	
  only	
  a	
  couple	
  from	
  Oahu	
  had	
   <ishing	
  paraphernalia,	
  even	
  though	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  high	
  amount	
  of	
  recreational	
  <ishing	
  right	
  next	
   to	
  the	
  Oahu	
  colony	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
  	
  	
   	
    Similar	
  to	
  how	
  levels	
  of	
  plastic	
  ingestion	
  vary	
  between	
  regions,	
  POP	
  concentrations	
    vary	
  between	
  species	
  in	
  the	
  Northern	
  and	
  Southern	
  ocean.	
  The	
  concentration	
  of	
  PCBs	
  in	
  the	
   subcutaneous	
  fat	
  of	
  BFA	
  in	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  was	
  92	
  µg/g,	
  while	
  White-­‐capped	
  albatrosses	
   living	
  in	
  the	
  Southern	
  ocean	
  had	
  concentrations	
  of	
  	
  1.4	
  µg/g	
  (Guruge	
  et	
  al.,	
  2001).	
  BFA	
  had	
   the	
  highest	
  concentration	
  out	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  8	
  species	
  examined	
  from	
  the	
  North	
  and	
  South	
   Paci<ic,	
  illustrating	
  the	
  signi<icance	
  of	
  foraging	
  range	
  and	
  prey	
  type	
  on	
  toxin	
  accumulation	
   (Guruge,	
  et	
  al.	
  2001).	
   	
    Comparing	
  studies	
  on	
  Laysan	
  chicks,	
  shows	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  ingested	
  plastic	
  over	
  the	
    decades.	
  In	
  1966,	
  a	
  study	
  on	
  Hawaii	
  found	
  74%	
  of	
  91	
  chicks	
  examined	
  contained	
  plastic	
   (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  A	
  1989	
  study	
  found	
  plastic	
  in	
  90%	
  of	
  the	
  chicks	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  In	
   1995,	
  Auman’s	
  study	
  found	
  97.6%	
  of	
  the	
  251	
  chicks	
  examined	
  contained	
  plastic.	
  This	
   increase	
  in	
  plastic	
  ingestion	
  from	
  the	
  1960s,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  high	
  proportion	
  of	
  consumer	
  to	
   pre-­‐production	
  plastic	
  being	
  ingested,	
  corresponds	
  to	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  plastic	
  production	
  and	
   thus	
  plastic	
  debris	
  concentrations	
  in	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Blight	
  &	
  Burger,	
   1997).	
    IMPACT	
   	
    Ingested	
  plastic	
  is	
  not	
  broken	
  down	
  in	
  the	
  intestinal	
  tract	
  of	
  albatrosses,	
  which	
    results	
  in	
  accumulation	
  in	
  the	
  proventriculi	
  and	
  gizzards	
  (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  This	
  can	
  lead	
   to	
  diminished	
  feeding	
  stimulus,	
  reduced	
  food	
  intake,	
  lower	
  steroid	
  hormone	
  levels,	
   blockage	
  of	
  gastric	
  enzyme	
  secretion,	
  obstruction	
  of	
  the	
  gut,	
  starvation,	
  dehydration,	
   decreased	
  fat	
  deposition,	
  delayed	
  ovulation,	
  reproductive	
  failure,	
  and	
  increased	
  POP	
   assimilation	
  (Derriak,	
  2002;	
  Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997;	
  Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  McDermid	
  &	
   McMullen,	
  2004).	
   	
    The	
  albatross’	
  brain	
  requires	
  stimuli	
  to	
  regulate	
  its	
  food	
  intake.	
  Appetite	
  stimulation	
    occurs	
  via	
  contraction	
  of	
  the	
  stomach,	
  low	
  temperatures,	
  and	
  sight	
  of	
  food.	
  Inhibition	
  of	
  the	
   appetite	
  results	
  from	
  dehydration,	
  and	
  distention	
  of	
  the	
  proventriculus,	
  gizzard,	
  and	
   intestines	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987;	
  Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  Therefore,	
  large	
  amounts	
  of	
  plastic	
   accumulated	
  within	
  the	
  GI	
  of	
  the	
  bird	
  can	
  suppress	
  feeding	
  by	
  keeping	
  the	
  stomach	
   distended	
  and	
  preventing	
  stomach	
  contraction	
  -­‐	
  this	
  would	
  signal	
  the	
  brain	
  that	
  the	
  bird	
  is	
   satis<ied	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
  Albatross	
  chicks	
  already	
  have	
  a	
  high	
  incidence	
  of	
  death	
   due	
  to	
  dehydration,	
  so	
  the	
  additional	
  displacement	
  of	
  food	
  by	
  plastic	
  may	
  accelerate	
  the	
   process	
  of	
  dehydration	
  and	
  starvation,	
  especially	
  in	
  those	
  birds	
  that	
  are	
  already	
  in	
  poor	
   health	
  (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997). 	
    Albatrosses	
  have	
  relatively	
  small	
  gizzards	
  and	
  can	
  suffer	
  serious	
  internal	
  injuries	
    and	
  possible	
  death	
  if	
  intestinal	
  blockages	
  become	
  signi<icant	
  (Derriak,	
  2002;	
  Azzarello	
  et	
   al.,	
  1987).	
  Studies	
  have	
  found	
  dead	
  birds	
  with	
  solid	
  pieces	
  of	
  plastic	
  completely	
  blocking	
   the	
  opening	
  between	
  the	
  oesphagus	
  and	
  proventriculus.	
  Blockages	
  such	
  as	
  this	
  can	
  impede	
   movement	
  of	
  food	
  to	
  the	
  intestine	
  (Azzarello	
  et	
  al.,	
  1987).	
    	
    Plastic	
  ingestion	
  also	
  appears	
  to	
  cause	
  large	
  amount	
  of	
  stress	
  to	
  individuals,	
  which	
    affects	
  their	
  overall	
  health	
  and	
  <itness	
  (Auman	
  et	
  al.,	
  1997).	
  Research	
  has	
  concluded	
  that	
   seabirds	
  carrying	
  large	
  loads	
  of	
  plastic	
  have	
  lower	
  food	
  consumption,	
  which	
  limits	
  the	
  fat	
   deposits	
  they	
  can	
  lay	
  down	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  Reduction	
  in	
  deposits	
  can	
  have	
  detrimental	
   effects	
  on	
  albatross’	
  migratory	
  abilities,	
  and	
  their	
  reproductive	
  success	
  once	
  they	
  reach	
   breeding	
  grounds	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  Again,	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  harm	
  varies	
  among	
  species,	
  but	
   Procellariiformes	
  are	
  more	
  vulnerable,	
  because	
  they	
  lack	
  the	
  ability	
  to	
  regurgitate	
  ingested	
   plastic	
  (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  It’s	
  been	
  found	
  that	
  Laysan	
  albatross	
  on	
  Midway	
  Atoll	
  contain	
  a	
   wider	
  variety,	
  greater	
  incidence,	
  and	
  larger	
  volume	
  of	
  plastic	
  than	
  other	
  seabirds	
  (Auman	
  et	
   al.,	
  1997).	
   	
    POPs	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  be	
  assimilated	
  and	
  absorbed	
  into	
  different	
  tissues	
  of	
  the	
  albatrosses	
    (Derriak,	
  2002).	
  The	
  toxic	
  effect	
  of	
  POPs	
  becomes	
  evident	
  during	
  high	
  energy	
  activities,	
   such	
  as	
  breeding	
  and	
  migration.	
  PCB	
  and	
  DDT	
  are	
  lipid	
  pollutants,	
  so	
  when	
  lipids	
  become	
   mobilized	
  during	
  high	
  energy	
  activity,	
  the	
  toxins	
  become	
  redistributed	
  throughout	
  tissues	
   due	
  to	
  subcutaneous	
  fat	
  reserves	
  being	
  metabolized	
  (Colabuono	
  et	
  al.,	
  2012).	
  The	
  toxins	
   then	
  move	
  through	
  the	
  bloodstream,	
  causing	
  increases	
  in	
  concentration	
  in	
  other	
  organs,	
   such	
  as	
  the	
  liver.	
  It’s	
  shown	
  that	
  birds	
  in	
  poor	
  body	
  condition	
  will	
  have	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  these	
   compounds	
  in	
  the	
  liver	
  and	
  muscle	
  tissue	
  due	
  to	
  depleting	
  fat	
  reserves	
  (Colabuono	
  et	
  al.,	
   2012).	
   	
    POPs	
  can	
  have	
  adverse	
  effects	
  that	
  result	
  in	
  malformations	
  of	
  fetuses,	
  embryo	
    mortality,	
  chick	
  edema,	
  and	
  egg	
  shell	
  thinning,	
  which	
  causes	
  hatchling	
  failure.	
  In	
  the	
  study	
   by	
  Guruge	
  et	
  al.	
  (2001),	
  the	
  subcutaneous	
  fat	
  of	
  female	
  BFAs	
  had	
  a	
  range	
  of	
  13-­‐73	
  µg/g	
  and	
   LA	
  ranged	
  from	
  3.3	
  to	
  7.8	
  µg/g	
  .	
  Previous	
  studies	
  have	
  shown	
  that	
  as	
  little	
  as	
  4	
  µg/g	
  of	
  DDE	
    in	
  eggs	
  can	
  cause	
  greater	
  than	
  5%	
  shell	
  thinning.	
  According	
  to	
  Guruge	
  et	
  al.	
  (2001),	
  the	
   concentrations	
  of	
  contaminants	
  are	
  high	
  enough	
  to	
  threaten	
  population	
  levels	
  of	
   albatrosses. 	
    Even	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  evidence	
  of	
  the	
  negative	
  impact	
  plastic	
  ingestion	
  can	
  have,	
  it	
  is	
    dif<icult	
  for	
  researchers	
  to	
  prove	
  that	
  plastic	
  is	
  the	
  cause	
  of	
  death	
  or	
  ill	
  health	
  in	
  the	
   albatrosses	
  studied.	
  As	
  a	
  result,	
  it’s	
  still	
  unclear	
  what	
  the	
  levels	
  of	
  mortality	
  are	
  due	
  to	
   plastic	
  and	
  POP	
  consumption	
  (Young	
  et	
  al.,	
  2009).	
   CONCLUSION 	
    Although	
  the	
  research	
  cannot	
  say	
  conclusively	
  whether	
  plastic	
  and	
  toxins	
  are	
    contributing	
  to	
  death	
  or	
  declining	
  populations,	
  it’s	
  clear	
  that	
  the	
  pollutants	
  are	
  reducing	
  the	
   overall	
  health	
  and	
  <itness	
  of	
  Black-­‐footed	
  and	
  Laysan	
  albatrosses.	
  There	
  are	
  clear	
  trends	
   that	
  plastic	
  consumption	
  is	
  increasing	
  in	
  both	
  species.	
  The	
  impact	
  however	
  varies	
  with	
  the	
   rate	
  of	
  consumption,	
  which	
  depends	
  on	
  the	
  island	
  used	
  for	
  breeding,	
  where	
  the	
  birds	
   forage,	
  and	
  the	
  type	
  of	
  prey	
  consumed.	
  Due	
  to	
  the	
  movement	
  of	
  the	
  North	
  Paci<ic	
  Gyre,	
  the	
   regions	
  most	
  negatively	
  impacted	
  are	
  not	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  sources	
  of	
  pollution.	
  	
  The	
  issue	
  of	
   plastic	
  waste	
  and	
  organic	
  pollutants	
  is	
  therefore	
  not	
  a	
  local	
  problem,	
  but	
  a	
  global	
  one,	
  and	
   needs	
  to	
  be	
  addressed	
  to	
  prevent	
  further	
  increases	
  in	
  accumulation	
  rates	
  of	
  both	
  plastic	
   and	
  toxins.  Reference Auman,	
  H.	
  J.,	
  Ludwig,	
  J.	
  P.,	
  Giesy,	
  J.	
  P.,	
  Colborn,	
  T.	
  (1997).	
  Plastic	
  ingestion	
  by	
  Laysan	
   Albatross	
  chicks	
  on	
  Sand	
  Island,	
  Midway	
  Atoll,	
  in	
  1994	
  and	
  1995.	
  Albatross	
  Biology	
   and	
  Conservation,	
  pp.	
  239-­‐44. Blight,	
  L.	
  K.,	
  &	
  Burger,	
  A.	
  E.	
  (1997).	
  Occurrence	
  of	
  plastic	
  particles	
  in	
  seabirds	
  from	
  the	
   eastern	
  north	
  paci<ic.	
  Marine	
  Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
  34(5),	
  323-­‐323. Derraik,	
  J.	
  G.	
  B.,	
  (2002).	
  The	
  pollution	
  of	
  the	
  marine	
  environment	
  by	
  plastic	
  debris:	
  A	
   review.	
  Marine	
  Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
  44(9),	
  842-­‐852. Finkelstein,	
  M.,	
  Keitt,	
  B.,	
  Croll,	
  D.,	
  Tershy,	
  B.,	
  Jarman,	
  W.,	
  Rodriguez-­‐Pastor,	
  S.,	
  et	
  al.	
  (2006).	
   Albatross	
  species	
  demonstrate	
  regional	
  differences	
  in	
  north	
  paci<ic	
  marine	
   contamination.	
  Ecological	
  Applications,	
  16(2),	
  678-­‐686. Guruge,	
  K.	
  S.,	
  Watanabe,	
  M.,	
  Tanaka,	
  H.,	
  &	
  Tanabe,	
  S.	
  (2001).	
  Accumulation	
  status	
  of	
   persistent	
  organochlorines	
  in	
  albatrosses	
  from	
  the	
  north	
  paci<ic	
  and	
  the	
  southern	
   ocean.	
  Environmental	
  Pollution,	
  114(3),	
  389-­‐398. Howell,	
  E.	
  A.,	
  Bograd,	
  S.	
  J.,	
  Morishige,	
  C.,	
  Seki,	
  M.	
  P.,	
  &	
  Polovina,	
  J.	
  J.	
  (2012).	
  On	
  north	
  paci<ic	
   circulation	
  and	
  associated	
  marine	
  debris	
  concentration.	
  Marine	
  Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
   65(1–3),	
  16-­‐22. Kappes,	
  M.	
  A.,	
  Shaffer,	
  S.	
  A.,	
  Tremblay,	
  Y.,	
  Foley,	
  D.	
  G.,	
  Palacios,	
  D.	
  M.,	
  Robinson,	
  P.	
  W.,	
  et	
  al.	
   (2010).	
  Hawaiian	
  albatrosses	
  track	
  interannual	
  variability	
  of	
  marine	
  habitats	
  in	
  the	
   north	
  paci<ic	
  RID	
  D-­‐5015-­‐2009	
  RID	
  B-­‐9180-­‐2008.	
  Progress	
  in	
  Oceanography,	
  86(1-­‐2),	
   246-­‐260.  McDermid,	
  K.	
  J.,	
  &	
  McMullen,	
  T.	
  L.	
  (2004).	
  Quantitative	
  analysis	
  of	
  small-­‐plastic	
  debris	
  on	
   beaches	
  in	
  the	
  hawaiian	
  archipelago.	
  Marine	
  Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
  48(7-­‐8),	
  790-­‐794. Rios,	
  L.	
  M.,	
  Jones,	
  P.,	
  Moore,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Narayan,	
  U.	
  V.	
  (2010).	
  Quantitation	
  of	
  persistent	
  organic	
   pollutants	
  adsorbed	
  on	
  plastic	
  debris	
  from	
  the	
  northern	
  paci<ic	
  gyre's	
  "eastern	
   garbage	
  patch".	
  Journal	
  of	
  Environmental	
  Monitoring,	
  12(12),	
  2226-­‐2236. Rios,	
  L.	
  M.,	
  Moore,	
  C.,	
  &	
  Jones,	
  P.	
  R.	
  (2007).	
  Persistent	
  organic	
  pollutants	
  carried	
  by	
  synthetic	
   polymers	
  in	
  the	
  ocean	
  environment.	
  Marine	
  Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
  54(8),	
  1230-­‐1237. Ryan,	
  P.	
  G.,	
  Moore,	
  C.	
  J.,	
  van	
  Franeker,	
  J.	
  A.,	
  &	
  Moloney,	
  C.	
  L.	
  (2009).	
  Monitoring	
  the	
   abundance	
  of	
  plastic	
  debris	
  in	
  the	
  marine	
  environment	
  RID	
  B-­‐4363-­‐2009.	
   Philosophical	
  Transactions	
  of	
  the	
  Royal	
  Society	
  B-­Biological	
  Sciences,	
  364(1526),	
   1999-­‐2012. Titmus,	
  A.	
  J.,	
  &	
  Hyrenbach,	
  K.	
  D.	
  (2011).	
  Habitat	
  associations	
  of	
  <loating	
  debris	
  and	
  marine	
   birds	
  in	
  the	
  north	
  east	
  paci<ic	
  ocean	
  at	
  coarse	
  and	
  meso	
  spatial	
  scales.	
  Marine	
   Pollution	
  Bulletin,	
  62(11),	
  2496-­‐2506.	
    	
    Young,	
  L.	
  C.,	
  Vanderlip,	
  C.,	
  Duffy,	
  D.	
  C.,	
  Afanasyev,	
  V.,	
  &	
  Shaffer,	
  S.	
  A.	
  (2009).	
  Bringing	
  home	
   the	
  trash:	
  Do	
  colony-­‐based	
  differences	
  in	
  foraging	
  distribution	
  lead	
  to	
  increased	
   plastic	
  ingestion	
  in	
  laysan	
  albatrosses?	
  RID	
  D-­‐5015-­‐2009.	
  Plos	
  One,	
  4(10),	
  e7623.  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

    

Usage Statistics

Country Views Downloads
China 1 0
United States 1 0
City Views Downloads
Shenzhen 1 0
Ashburn 1 0

{[{ mDataHeader[type] }]} {[{ month[type] }]} {[{ tData[type] }]}
Download Stats

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/dsp.52966.1-0074563/manifest

Comment

Related Items